Podcasts about Nobel Peace Prize

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One of five Nobel Prizes established by Alfred Nobel

  • 1,508PODCASTS
  • 2,168EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
Nobel Peace Prize

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Best podcasts about Nobel Peace Prize

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Latest podcast episodes about Nobel Peace Prize

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST: 11.29.21 - "Let's Talk About Racism" Guide

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 38:47


Hour 2 -  Nick Reed talks about a variety of topics in the news, including: Nick shares an opinion piece about Critical Race Theory (CRT) in Springfield Public Schools. A Canadian school board withdrew support for an event featuring Yazidi activist, former ISIS sex slave, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad out of concern it could foster “Islamophobia” and “offend” Muslim students. The Salvation Army recently defended an internal racism guide that discouraged "colorblindness" and encouraged staff members to "apologize for being white" after the guide faced backlash. Sarah went to post the "Let's Talk About Racism" guide that The Salvation Army was promoting. They've removed it. Matthew McConaughey announced Sunday that he has decided against a run for Texas governor amid speculation that the actor might enter the race.

Africa Daily
Why is Abiy Ahmed heading ‘to the front'?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 14:40


A little over two years since winning the Nobel Peace Prize, Abiy Ahmed is leading a country at war. Rebels from the northern Tigray region have taken increasing territory over the past few months. Thousands have died and more than two million have been pushed from their homes. The international community is showing increasing concern about the situation. Many countries have told their citizens to leave. So, how did it all come to this? #AfricaDaily Host: Alan Kasujja (@kasujja) Reporter: Beverly Ochieng (@beverlyochieng)

The Way Out Is In
Building and Sustaining the Beloved Community (Episode #15)

The Way Out Is In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 81:42


Welcome to episode fifteen of The Way Out Is In: The Zen Art of Living, a podcast series mirroring Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh's deep teachings of Buddhist philosophy: a simple yet profound methodology for dealing with our suffering, and for creating more happiness and joy in our lives. In this episode, the presenters, Zen Buddhist monk Brother Phap Huu and lay Buddhist practitioner and journalist Jo Confino, talk about the art of community living, and take a closer look at the Plum Village community's four decades of existence.The conversation touches upon key friendships – like that between Martin Luther King Jr. and Thich Nhat Hanh; ‘the beloved community'; collective energy; the spirit of togetherness; sustaining a community; deep listening; the importance of the sangha (a community of practitioners) for individuals' practice of mindfulness. And: can two people form a community? As abbot of Upper Hamlet and former attendant to Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, Brother Phap Huu shares inspiring inside stories from the Plum Village community, including unexpected turns of events; the impact on the community of practitioners of Thay's withdrawal from public life; the secrets to a resilient and harmonious community; sharing opinions versus voting. What is it like to lead a community as a young abbot or abbess? And can you guess Thay's true ‘masterpiece'? Jo muses on the importance of vulnerability and of a conscious community; dharma sharing; and how sanghas he joined in different countries impacted his own practice. The episode ends with a short meditation on community and friendship, guided by Brother Phap Huu. Co-produced by the Plum Village App:https://plumvillage.app/ And Global Optimism:https://globaloptimism.com/ With support from the Thich Nhat Hanh Foundation:https://thichnhathanhfoundation.org/ List of resources Loving Speech & Deep Listeninghttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDJBKEOe7Pg Bhikkhu/bhikshuhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhikkhu Bodhisattvahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodhisattva International Sangha Directoryhttps://plumvillage.org/about/international-sangha-directory/ Martin Luther King Jr.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King_Jr. Dharma sharinghttps://plumvillage.org/extended-mindfulness-practises/ Vesak Dayhttps://plumvillage.org/articles/vesak-day-2021/Dharma Talks: ‘Beloved Community'https://plumvillage.org/library/dharma-talks/beloved-community/ Brothers in the Beloved Community https://www.parallax.org/product/brothers-in-the-beloved-community/ Letter from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1967https://plumvillage.org/letter-from-dr-martin-luther-king-jr-nominating-thich-nhat-hanh-for-the-nobel-peace-prize-in-1967/ “Man is not our enemy”https://plumvillage.org/articles/blog/poems-of-thay/alone-again-song-recommendation-thays-poetry/ Quotes“Community living is complex, difficult, and needs a lot of openness, deep listening, and negotiation.” “In the Buddhist language, there’s a teaching on letting go. So we have to really learn to let go of our own ideas of what happiness is, what success is, and to see that our individual happiness is not an individual matter, but that happiness is actually a collective matter. Like, when I’m happy, I think you’ll be happy. And when you suffer, I will also suffer. Maybe not directly, but I can feel it from you. I can also find a way to support you, though. And so, community living is a practice in itself.” “Our spirit is that everyone shares their opinion and we sit in a circle. So whenever we share an opinion, it’s not about ‘me'; we’re sharing it for the collective community.” “When Thay says, ‘We don’t need one Buddha, we need many Buddhas’, that is the heart of what is now known as distributed leadership. The world is very complex, so you cannot have one leader who knows everything. What you need to do is give people in each area the responsibility and the accountability that goes with it, rather than having one person at the top of the pyramid. And Plum Village has been doing that for 40 years now.” “Thay said, ‘We’re all allowed to suffer. Suffering is a noble truth that is taught in Buddhism, it’s a gem that the Buddha gave to us to have insight. But our responsibility is also to practice with our suffering.' So, I can suffer, but I’m not just going to go and vent everywhere about it and complain; that’s not the spirit. We all suffer, we all have difficulties, but our practice is to acknowledge it, take care of it, embrace it, and find ways to transform it. And that is very key in our community.” “We often complain that if we’re to avoid climate change or to deal with social injustice, we are reliant on our leaders to change everything. Yes, of course we need leaders to change things, of course we need policy, of course we need people to change – but, actually, we need to change too. And if everyone takes responsibility for their own contribution, then the world will start to change.” “Everyone, especially men, we hear a problem and want to solve it. But often people don’t need it to be solved. They need it to be shared, and so it is called dharma sharing for that very reason.” “In a group setting, each person who shares will at some point share an aspect of themselves – because the whole purpose of Thay’s teaching is about interbeing, that I’m not by myself alone. If you’re suffering but I’m quite happy, it doesn’t mean I have to take on your suffering. But it does mean that, at some level, I recognize your suffering and feel for you in the same way as if I was experiencing it myself.” “When we want to walk the path that offers us strength, compassion, love, understanding, it’s much easier to do so with friends around you that support it. We call that conditions. And that’s why we say that in spirituality it is so important to have friends. It’s like eating rice with soup. Sometimes the rice can be so dry – but soup helps you swallow. So sometimes friendships are like that sweet, gentle support, that soup that helps you slide through the difficulties more easily.”

The View From The Lane - A show about Tottenham
62 attempts, no goals - why can't Spurs score from corners?

The View From The Lane - A show about Tottenham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 42:30


The Athletic's Charlie Eccleshare and James Maw join Danny Kelly to preview Tottenham's visit to Burnley on Sunday, in a weekend that could see Spurs go above Arsenal in the table They discuss how news of Cristian Romero's injury potentially being more serious than first thought will affect the team, plus Charlie has sat down and watched all of Spurs' 62 unsuccessful corners this season in an attempt to work out what's going wrong. There's also the small matter of the club announcing an £80m pre-tax loss and debts rising to £706m, but it's not all bad news as the results also report continued strong investment in the ever-improving women's team. All this plus Danny's bid for a Nobel Peace Prize, memories of Poch's meltdown at Turf Moor, and spurious talk of Alessandro Del Piero's penchant for wearing women's boots.

Luxury Listing Specialist - Dominate High End Listings In Any Market

Nobel Peace Prize winner Daniel Kahneman once said, “People would rather do business with someone they like and trust rather than someone they don't, even if the likable person is offering a lower-quality product at a higher price.” This is true of a lot of different areas, and real estate is no exception. That's why agents need to go out of their way to make themselves likable - being likable is just as, if not more, important than having a top-quality product to offer. To come off as likable to your clients, do your research before your meeting and always think about what you're going to say next. Be approachable and authentic; people can spot fakers from a mile away, and it can be off-putting. The goal isn't to be a perfect agent - no one is - so admit when you're wrong, and always strive to do better.

Axios Today
Escalating war in Ethiopia

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 11:11


Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed - a Nobel Peace Prize winning politician - has said he'll lead troops who are fighting rebels in the Tigray region of the country in what he's calling "the final fight" to save Ethopia. Meanwhile, the Biden administration is warning of a potential humanitarian crisis there that could destabilize the entire region. Plus, the rise of vegan Thanksgiving. And, the story of the first Thanksgiving - 1200 miles south of Plymouth, Massachusetts. Guests: Axios' Zach Basu, Ben Montgomery and Russell Contreras. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Julia Redpath, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Alex Sugiura, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, David Toledo and Jayk Cherry. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Finding Founders
Bullying in Africa, The Nobel Peace Prize, & Turning down $400k: Founder Wisdom #060 - Christina Catalano

Finding Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 20:08


Christina Catalano is a noted human rights leader and founder of RISE. Although it started small, the RISE Anti-Bullying Initiative has grown to become one of the largest anti-bullying initiatives in the world. And Christina's influence doesn't stop there, in fact, she was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2020. But before the awards and accolades, her experience with bullying was personal. Growing up on the Jersey Shore, school was a place she felt isolated and attacked. https://www.theriseinitiative.org/ Subscribe to our Newsletter! https://findingfounders.co/subscribe Website: findingfounders.co Follow Sam: https://www.instagram.com/samueldonner/ Follow Finding Founders IG: https://www.instagram.com/findingfounderspodcast/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/finding-founders/support

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Performance Anxiety: Sarah McQuaid

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 77:45


I would like to welcome singer/songwriter Sarah McQuaid to the show. Sarah has been singing since joining a children's choir and was touring before hitting double digits. Even in school she looked at singing like it was her vocation. That shouldn't be surprising once you discover that both her parents were artists and one of her relatives was a founder of the ACLU and won a Nobel Peace Prize. She discusses her love of traditional music and how that led to her accidentally writing a book. She also describes the similarities between writing a song and having children, even if that song is sung in hillbilly gaelic. She has a new live album out, The St. Buryan Sessions. It's just her in a church and it sounds so lush. Pick it up wherever you get music. There is also a limited vinyl release so grab that while you can! Follow her on IG @sarahmcquaidmusic, check out her site sarahmcquaid.com. Follow us @PerformanceAnx on the socials. You can help support the show at either ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety or performanceanx.threadless.com. And now please enjoy my wonderful chat with Sarah McQuaid on Performance Anxiety, part of the Pantheon Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The CJN Daily
Ethiopia is spiralling into civil war—and Israel has a chance to help

The CJN Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


After years of relative stability and the election of a prime minister who won a Nobel Peace Prize in 2019, Ethiopia has been mired in domestic warfare since November 2020. Sparked by postponed elections and the COVID-19 pandemic, the war sees the Ethiopian government facing off against rural militias, separatist groups and a paramilitary organization slowly advancing across the entire country. This leaves the nation's remaining Jews trapped and scared. So advocates are looking to Israel for help evacuating the country's Jewish populace, echoing Operation Moses from the 1980s and Operation Solomon from 1991, which brought thousands of Ethiopian Jews to the Holy Land. One of those advocates is Yaffa Tegegne. The Montreal-based lawyer is the daughter of Baruch Tegegne, the famous activist who spearheaded the campaign to save Ethiopia's Jews. Tegegne joins to discuss her parents' legacy, the people he saved and what Canadians need to know about the Ethiopian Jews trapped in the current conflict. What we talked about: Visit Tegegne's website at yaffategegne.com, and read her short biography of her father at yaffategegne.com/baruch-tegegne Listen to The CJN Daily episode, "At 13, he got an Apple Watch. At 14, he built a daily prayer app for it" at thecjn.ca/kid-genius. Credits The CJN Daily is written and hosted by Ellin Bessner (@ebessner on Twitter). Victoria Redden is the producer. Michael Fraiman is the executive producer. Our theme music is by Dov Beck-Levine. Our title sponsor is Metropia. We're a member of The CJN Podcast Network; find more great Jewish podcasts at thecjn.ca.

Oprah’s SuperSoul Conversations
Dr. Mukwege: The Power of Women

Oprah’s SuperSoul Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 64:41


Oprah talks to Nobel Peace Prize winner and author of The Power of Women, Dr. Denis Mukwege. Dr. Mukwege has dedicated his life to caring for the survivors of rape and sexual violence in his home country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Dr. Mukwege has operated on more than 60,000 women who have suffered unthinkable atrocities to their bodies. He has also survived several assassination attempts. Dr. Mukwege says he has a responsibility to saving these women both physically and emotionally, as well as educating men and making sure the world knows that sexual violence is still happening to women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and around the world.

Day 6 from CBC Radio
Episode 572: Climate risks to your home; Astroworld fallout; crisis in Ethiopia; Tick, Tick ... Boom! and more

Day 6 from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 53:54


Assessing the risk climate change poses to your home; making sense of the tragedy at Travis Scott's Astroworld; how racism gets reflected in roads, bridges and urban design; how Ethiopia's prime minister went from winning the Nobel Peace Prize to being snared in a civil war; Victoria Leacock Hoffman, the friend and colleague who produced the original production of Jonathan Larson's Tick, Tick ... Boom!; and more.

Sense-making in a Changing World
Localisation and The Global Economy: Helena Norberg-Hodge with Morag Gamble Part 1 of 4

Sense-making in a Changing World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 61:43


Welcome to the first of this special series on Sense-Making in a Changing World podcast. I am talking over a series of four conversations with internationally claimed localisation activist Helena Norberg-Hodge. Helena is the founder and Director of Local Futures, an international nonprofit organisation dedicated to renewing ecological and social wellbeing by strengthening communities and local economies worldwide. Helena's first book Ancient Futures has been translated into 40 languages and sold over 1 million copies. She's been the subject of hundreds of articles and written many books, including her latest book, Local is Our Future: Steps to an Economics of Happiness, which accompanies her award-winning documentary, also called the Economics of Happiness. Helena's work spans almost five decades and she collaborates with leading ecological thinkers. She's been the recipient of a Right Livelihood Award, also known as the alternative Nobel Peace Prize and also the Goi Peace Prize. I first met Helena back in 1992 at Schumacher College, and was absolutely inspired by the work that she was doing and subsequently volunteered with her in Ladakh (Little Tibet). This is the first of our series of conversations about localisation:the global economythe food systemcommunitybig picture activismSo grab your notebook, listen in with friends, follow up by watching Helena's films and delving into her  localisation action guide. Before we begin, I'd like to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which I'm meeting with you today and pay respects to their elders past, present and emerging I'm here on the unceded lands of the Gubbi Gubbi people and on the banks of the Moocaboola [Mary] River. Thank you so much for being here as part of this series of conversations with Helena Norberg-Hodge.Morag GamblePermaculture Education Institute

Quantum Conversations: With Karen Curry Parker
The Implicit Bias in the Cosmos - with Dr. Ervin László

Quantum Conversations: With Karen Curry Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 30:17


We are living in a paradox.  We are the manifestation of consciousness - pieces of the cosmos - encased within bodies, ruled by a mind that creates the illusion that we are separate from the cosmos - individual events that will never be repeated again in the history of all that is.  It's easy for us to think we are a dominion unto ourselves.  And yet, this paradox invites us to explore that if we are  holographic pieces of the cosmos, then the rules of the cosmos must apply to the unique and personal manifestation of the story that is our unique life - a theme we're exploring with many Quantum Revolutionaries this season. Today we are speaking with Dr. Ervin Laszlo, a philosopher and systems scientist who has published more than 101 books and over 400 articles and research papers. The subject of the one-hour PBS special, Life of a Modern-Day Genius, Dr. Laszlo is also the founder and president of the international think tank The Club of Budapest and of the prestigious Laszlo Institute of New Paradigm Research. The recipient of various honors and awards, including Honorary PhDs from the United States, Canada, Finland, and Hungary, Dr. Laszlo always received the Goi Award, the Japan Peace Prize, in 2001, the Assisi Mandir of Peace Prize in 2006, and was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 and 2005. Get Dr. Laszlo's book now at https://www.amazon.com/Wisdom-Principles-Handbook-Timeless-Truths/dp/1250797217 or at your favorite bookseller.  Visit Dr. Laszlo's website at https://thelaszloinstitute.com/ or at  https://ervinlaszlobooks.com/ We can't wait to see you next time for some more powerful insights into our ever-changing world with Karen Curry Parker and her guest, Dr. Peta Stapleton.

Newshour
South Africa's ex-president De Klerk dies at 85

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:21


De Klerk shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela for helping to negotiate an end to apartheid. But his legacy divides opinion in South Africa. Also on the programme: Rare face-to-face talks between British and Iranian officials in London on reviving a deal curbing Tehran's nuclear activities; and Brian Eno on making the music industry more sustainable. (Pic: FW de Klerk addresses the Trinity College Law Society Credit: NurPhoto/ Getty

Catalyze
The role U.S. universities play in driving nuclear weapons research and development, with Seth Shelden '98 of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Catalyze

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 20:45


Seth Shelden '98 is the United Nations liaison for the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN). The coalition was awarded the Nobel Peace Price in 2017 for its work to bring about the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW). The TPNW outlaws the use, testing, development, production, possession, and transfer of nuclear weapons, and it outlines how countries can destroy their own stockpiles. It also stipulates victim assistance, environmental remediation, and other humanitarian efforts as part of each participating country's obligations.Seth is also a partner in the law firm of Farkas & Neurman, an adjunct professor at the City University of New York School of Law, and vice president of Ground UP Productions. The alumnus received his bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a major in international studies (with concentrations in economics and peace, war, and defense). He earned his J.D. from University of California, Berkeley, School of Law in 2002.Seth offers insights on Biden's projected nuclear arms policy, how U.S. universities serve as research and development pipelines, and what anyone can do to divest from companies involved in building and maintaining nuclear weapons. ICAN reports, resources, and other references mentioned in the episode:Complicit: 2020 global nuclear weapons spendingSchools of Mass Destruction: American Universities in the U.S. Nuclear Weapons ComplexTake the University Pledge Don't Bank on the Bomb projectCities Appeal (#ICANSAVEMYCITY) The Doomsday Clock Follow ICAN on Twitter,  Facebook, and Instagram. You can follow Seth on Twitter.Episode CreditsThe intro music for this episode is by Scott Hallyburton '22, guitarist of the band South of the Soul. The outro song, “On the Island,” is by the artist Godmode. 

The New Yorker: Politics and More
The Nobel Prize Winner Maria Ressa on the Turmoil at Facebook

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 13:30


The roughly ten thousand company documents that make up the Facebook Papers show a company in turmoil—and one that prioritizes its economic interests over known harms to public interest. Among other things, they catalogue the company's persistent failure to control disinformation and hate speech. David Remnick spoke with Maria Ressa, an investigative journalist, in the Philippines, who runs the news organization Rappler. She has been the target of hate campaigns by supporters of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, and in October Ressa (along with the Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov) received the Nobel Peace Prize for working to protect freedom of expression. Ressa is also a co-founder of what's called the Real Facebook Oversight Board, a group of expert observers and critics who are not affiliated with Facebook's own quasi-independent Oversight Board.  She doesn't see easy tweaks to ameliorate the damage; the fundamental approach of steering content to users to maximize engagement, she feels, is inherently destructive. “We've adapted this hook, line, and sinker: ‘personalization is better,' ” Ressa points out. “It does make the company more money, but is that the right thing? Personalization also tears apart a shared reality.”

Shaping Opinion
Encore: George Marshall Reshaped the World After WWII

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 62:14


Author and historian Rachel Yarnell Thompson joins Tim to talk about the man with a plan, George Marshall, whose “Marshall Plan” reshaped Europe and the world after World War Two. After playing important military roles in winning both World War One and World War Two, he was tapped for what would become his most well-recognized legacy, the rebuilding of the free world. Rachel is the author of: Marshall—A Statesman Shaped in the Crucible of War. This Encore Episode was first released on November 11, 2019. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_-_George_Marshall.mp3 George C. Marshall was named the Army chief of staff in Washington on the day that Nazi tanks rolled through Poland on their way to near complete domination of Eastern and Western Europe. He was the first five-star general in American history. From that day forward, he transformed the American military into a level of power never before seen. He oversaw the country's and the allies' military strategy that led to unconditional victories in Europe and in the Pacific. In addition to Europe and the Pacific, he oversaw military operations in China and the Mediterranean. He had the respect of world leaders that included President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, and of course throughout all of the armed forces. He was credited with finding the generals who would win the war, including generals Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and George Patton. He was one of the architects of the D-Day invasion and was set to command the invasion of Normandy, when FDR decided to keep General Marshall in Washington. FDR said to his general, “I didn't feel that I could sleep at ease if you were out of Washington.” George Marshall's accomplishments are many. Once the war ended, he retired from the military, and in one day was called upon by President Harry Truman to address China's civil war as the president's special envoy. President Truman tapped Marshall to serve as his Secretary of State, dealing with the Berlin Blockade, and then to develop and implement the European Recovery Program, better known as the Marshall Plan. Along the way, George Marshall would become president of the American Red Cross, and President Truman's Secretary of Defense during the Korean War. He earned the Nobel Peace Prize. George Marshall was a study in contrasts. He was the commander of the most powerful military the world, yet he was seen as a man of quiet, even humble confidence in his own ideas. He operated in a highly political environment with the world's leading politicians, yet he refused to become political. Often, when he was asked of his own party affiliation, he said he was an Episcopalian. In the process, he won the respect, admiration and the trust of both Democrat and Republican leaders. Our Gratitude Our thanks to Rachel Yarnell Thompson and the George C. Marshall International Center for providing their time and resources in support of production of this episode, including photo depictions. Links The George C. Marshall International Center The George C. Marshall Foundation George C. Marshall's Nobel Prize Biography, The Nobel Prize Committee George C. Marshall, History.com The Marshall Plan, Secretary of State Office of the Historian The Marshall Plan, National Archives About this Episode's Guest Rachel Yarnell Thompson Rachel Yarnell Thompson is The George C. Marshall International Center's Special Projects Director. The Center is located near the Marshall House, known locally as Dodona Manor, the general's former residence in Leesburg, Virginia. She is also the author of the book, Marshall—A Statesman Shaped in the Crucible of War.

Bitch Talk
Flash Back Friday - Filipino Style

Bitch Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 66:24


Welcome to Flash Back Friday! With 600+ episodes, we're excited to revisit some of our favorites with our new listeners (and maybe new to our regular listeners).To cap off Filipino American History Month (October), we're flashing back to some of our favorite interviews with Filipino artists from the past year! We were blown away by not only the amount of Filipino stories, but also the diversity of stories that we've covered in just the past 12 months. We laugh at the quirkiness of the short film Learning Tagalog with Kayla (with writer/director/star Kayla Galang), we discuss the power of Filipino cuisine in the superhero film Lumpia With a Vengeance (with writer/director Patricio Ginelsa and stars April Absynth and Katrina Dimaranan), some tears are shed while discussing death and family obligation in the narrative drama Islands (with writer/director Martin Edralin), and we celebrate A Thousand Cuts, a documentary on Filipino-American journalist and 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa (with director Ramona Diaz and Bay Area Hip-Hop activist Ruby Ibarra). Happy Filipino American History Month, we can't wait to see what kind of stories 2022 will bring!Due to time constraints, we couldn't include every Filipino artist interview in this episode, but if you're thirsty for more, check out our coverage of the film The Fabulous Filipino Brothers with  writer/director/star Dante Basco, and his sister, co-writer and star Arianna (Boss Bitch) Basco.You can follow director/writer/actor Kayla Galang on Instagram  and on her websiteYou can follow director Patricio Ginelsa on IG & FB & TwitterYou can follow actor April Absynth on IG & FB & TwitterYou can follow actor Katrina Dimaranan on IG & TwitterYou can follow Islands the film on TwitterYou can follow director Ramona Diaz on Twitter & IGYou can follow Hip-Hop activist Ruby Ibarra on Twitter & IG & FBYou can follow Filipino-American journalist and author Maria Ressa on Twitter & IGThanks for listening and for your support! We couldn't have reached 600 episodes without your help! --Be well, stay safe, Black Lives Matter, AAPI Lives Matter, and thank you for being vaxxed!--SUPPORT US HERE!Subscribe to our channel on YouTube for behind the scenes footage!Rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts!Visit our website! www.bitchtalkpodcast.comFollow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.Listen every other Thursday 9:30 - 10 am on BFF.FMPOWERED BY GO-TO Productions 

The New Yorker Radio Hour
The Nobel Prize Winner Maria Ressa on the Turmoil at Facebook

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:37


The roughly ten thousand company documents that make up the Facebook Papers show a company in turmoil—and one that prioritizes its economic interests over known harms to public interest. Among other things, they catalogue the company's persistent failure to control disinformation and hate speech. David Remnick spoke with Maria Ressa, an investigative journalist, in the Philippines, who runs the news organization Rappler. She has been the target of hate campaigns by supporters of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, and in October Ressa (along with the Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov) received the Nobel Peace Prize for working to protect freedom of expression. Ressa is also a co-founder of what's called the Real Facebook Oversight Board, a group of expert observers and critics who are not affiliated with Facebook's own quasi-independent Oversight Board.  She doesn't see easy tweaks to ameliorate the damage; the fundamental approach of steering content to users to maximize engagement, she feels, is inherently destructive. “We've adapted this hook, line, and sinker: ‘personalization is better,' ” Ressa points out. “It does make the company more money, but is that the right thing? Personalization also tears apart a shared reality.” Plus, a disinformation researcher says that, to understand dangerous conspiracy stories like QAnon, you have to look at the online horror genre known as creepypasta.

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
The role of the journalist in uncovering the secrets that affect us - Peran jurnalis dalam mengungkap rahasia yang berdampak terhadap kita

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 17:04


At a time when journalists face many challenges to investigate and reveal the truth the Nobel Peace Prize for 2021 was awarded to journalists Maria Ressa and Dimitry Muratov. And early in October investigative journalists leaked the Pandora Papers, revealing the dirty financial secrets of world leaders and others. At a time of social media misinformation effective investigative journalism is more important than ever. - Pada saat jurnalis menghadapi banyak tantangan untuk menyelidiki dan mengungkap kebenaran, Hadiah Nobel Perdamaian untuk tahun 2021 diberikan kepada jurnalis Maria Ressa dan Dimitry Muratov. Dan pada awal Oktober, jurnalis investigatif membocorkan Pandora Papers, mengungkap rahasia keuangan kotor para pemimpin dunia dan lainnya. Pada saat misinformasi media sosial marak, jurnalisme investigatif yang efektif menjadi lebih penting dari sebelumnya.

Looking Back On My Wonder Years: A Wonder Years Podcast
Small Wonder: S2E10: You Gotta Have Heart

Looking Back On My Wonder Years: A Wonder Years Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 68:44


Hey Everyone, Angela Bowen here, the host of She's A Small Wonder: A Small Wonder Podcast. Today, I covered S2E10: You Gotta Have Heart, which aired on November 15, 1986. In this episode The Brindles involve the Lawson's in their squabble. I knew last month when I read this short summary and seeing the Brindles names, I got the hair pulling out aggravated feeling that always comes when I cover an episode featuring the Brindles mainly Bonnie and this episode was no different. Granted it comes in halfway through the episode but the Wizard of Oz is what sets this whole episode off. When the Lawsons watch the Wizard of Oz and talk about how the Tin Man receives a heart and Vicky proceeds to ask what a heart is and what it means to have love in your heart and how you show you love someone. Joan describes love from a quote from the movie Love Story and the song Love Is A Many Splendored Thing and they also tell Vicky that a person shows love through giving. All terrible examples. Ted even toys with the idea of creating Vicky a heart not so much for her benefit, but more so the thought of winning the Nobel Peace Prize , granted for any of that to happen he would have to finally introduce Vicky to the world and the whole premise of this show seems to keep her identity and what she actually is on the DL. So Vicky gives Harriet her gawdy looking bracket as a form of the love she has in her heart. That's the message she gets, to love is to give people stuff. Harriet takes full advantage of this as she tells Vicki they're besties BFFs for life and proceed to outfit swap. The reveal is a bit unnerving at first, I mean Vicki looks great with her hair down and more natural looking (a preview of what's to come for Season 3 and Season 4 when they dress Vicki as a normal average kid)where Harriet just looks even more washed out in Vicki's red and white pinafore housemaid dress. It's the pale skin and red hair, Vicki's outfit does nothing for her. Bonnie bursts through the door of the Lawson home and says to Joan how our girls are besties and we should be too. She uses this tactic to move right into the Lawson's home after she says Brandon has become jealous of her (eye roll)because men are always checking her out everywhere she goes, so many F-Bombs dropped by me the moment Bonnie bursts in the door. No sooner do Ted and Joan convince Bonnie to leave and go back to Brandon than we get a repeat of the same scenario from Brandon suitcase in hand (massive eyeroll). If you took Bonnie and Brandon out of this episode, this would have been a good episode. It was entertaining regardless. Jamie also programs Vicki to give Harriet a taste of her own medicine by turning the tables on her and being a demanding super brat wanting all the stuff she gave Harriet back, but then it backfires on Jamie. Join me next month when I cover S2E12: Thanksgiving Story, which aired on November 29, (my Mom's Birthday) 1986. In this episode Jamie learns the value of family on Thanksgiving. Yes, I know I'm skipping over S1E11: The Shoplifter will be in December. It seemed only fitting that I cover the Thanksgiving Story for November. Have a great week everyone! See you in November!

Retail Politics Podcast
S02E3 Alex Mahadevan, Politics of the Nobel Peace Prize

Retail Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 27:10


Committee Backs Media Rebuking Oppressive World Leaders October 24, 17, 2021 – For only the third time in its 126-year history, the Norwegian Prize Committee gave the world's most coveted award to journalists, hailing their efforts to beat back the rise in rogue world leaders jailing, killing, and exiling the media. “Given that we're in the modern age, it's 2021, the fact that we're seeing a slide away from democratic behaviors from leaders around the world is pretty scary,” said Alex Mahadevan, program manager for Poynter Institute's Media Wise.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:47


"The war for our minds (con'd)." The colonization of independent media.    Patrick Lawrence THE SCRUM  Oct 21       21 OCTOBER—Watch and listen, O you with open eyes and ears. The national security state's long, very long campaign to control our press and broadcasters has taken a new turn of late. If independent media are what keep alive hope for a vigorous, authentic Fourth Estate, as argued severally in this space, independent media are now subject to an insidious, profoundly anti-democratic effort to undermine them. The Independent Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Frances Haugen, Maria Ressa: Let us consider this institution and these people. They are all frauds, if by fraudulent we mean they are not what and who they tell us they are and their claim to independence from power is bogus. The Deep State—and at this point it is mere pretense to object to this term—long ago made it a priority to turn the mainstream press and broadcasters to its purposes—to make a free press unfree. This has gone on since the earliest Cold War decades and is well and responsibly documented. (Alas, if more Americans read the many excellent books and exposés on this topic, assertions such as the one just made would not arrive as in the slightest outré.)    But several new realities are now very evident. Chief among them, the Deep State's colonization of corporate media is now more or less complete. CNN, filling its airtime with spooks, generals, and a variety of official and formerly official liars, can be counted a total takeover. The New York Times is prima facie government-supervised, as it confesses in its pages from time to time. The Washington Post, owned by a man with multimillion-dollar CIA contracts, has turned itself into a comic book. For reasons I will never entirely fathom, corporate media have not merely surrendered their legitimacy, such as it may have been: They have actively, enthusiastically abandoned what frayed claim they may have had to credibility. The national-security state incorporates mainstream media into its apparatus, and then people stop believing mainstream media: The thrill is gone, let's say.  In consequence of these two factors, independent media have begun to rise as … independent media. They accumulate audiences. A little at a time, they acquire the very habits of professionalism the mainstream press and broadcasters have let decay. Gradually, they assume the credibility the mainstream has lost. The media ecosystem—horrible phrase but there it is—begins to take on a new shape.  Certain phenomena engendered by independent media prove popular. There are whistleblowers. People inside Deep State institutions start to leak, and they turn to independent media, most famously WikiLeaks, to get information out. While the Deep State's clerks in mainstream media keep their heads down and their mouths shut as they cash their checks, independent media take principled stands in favor of free expression, and people admire these stands. They are, after all admirable. Those populating the national-security state's sprawling apparatus are not stupid. They can figure out the logical response to these developments as well as anyone else. The new imperative is now before us: It is to colonize independent media just as they had the mainstream in previous decades. There are some hopelessly clumsy cases. I urge all colleagues to stop bothering with The Young Turks in any capacity. Those running it, creatures of those who generously fund it, are simply infra-dig. As Matt Taibbi pointed out over the weekend in a piece wonderfully headed, “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Deep State,” they've now got some clod named Ben Carollo proclaiming the CIA as an accountable force for good, savior of democracy—this in a video appearing under the rubric “Rebel HQ.” As an East European émigré friend used to say, “Gimme break.” Democracy Now! is a subtler instance of colonization. The once-admirable Amy Goodman drank the Russiagate Kool-Aid, which I counted the first indication of covert intervention of one or another kind. Then she caved to the orthodoxy on the chemical-weapons scam during the Syrian crisis, and lately—you have to watch to believe—Goodman has begun broadcasting CNN “investigative” reports with unalloyed approval. The debate in this household is whether Ms. Goodman had a long lunch in Langley or her donors started threatening to delay their checks. I have no evidence of either but tend to the latter explanation. The three recent phenomena suggested at the top of this piece are indications of the Deep State's latest tactics in its assault on independent media and the culture that arises among them. It behooves us to understand this.  Two weeks ago, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published “The Pandora Papers,” a “leak” of 12 million electronic documents revealing the tax-fiddling, money-hiding doings of 300–odd political figures around the world. “The Pandora Papers” followed publication of “The Panama Papers” in 2016 and “The Paradise Papers” a year later. There are many useful revelations in these various releases, but we ought not be fooled as to the nature of the project. Where did the ICIJ get the documents in “The Pandora Papers,” and how?  Are they complete? Were names redacted out? They have been verified? Explaining provenance, authenticity, and so forth is essential to any investigative undertaking, but ICIJ has nothing to say on this point. Why, of all the people “The Pandora Papers” exposes, is there not one American on its list? As Moon of Alabama notes in an analysis of this release, it amounts to a list of “people the U.S. doesn't like.” The ICIJ vigorously insists on its independence. But on close inspection this turns out not to be so by any serious understanding of the term. Among its donors are the Ford Foundation, whose longtime ties to the CIA are well-documented, and the Open Societies Foundation, the (in)famous George Soros operation dedicated to cultivating coups in nations that fall outside the fence posts of neoliberalism.  The group was founded in 1997 as a project of the Center for Public Integrity, another institution dedicated to “inspiring change using investigative reporting,” as the center describes itself. Among its sponsors are Ford, once again, and the Democracy Fund, which was founded by Pierre Omidyar, bankroller of The Intercept (another compromised “independent” medium). Omidyar is, like Soros, a sponsor of subversion ops in other countries masquerading as “civil society” projects. ICIJ's other sponsors (and for that matter the Democracy Fund's) are comprised of the sorts of foundations that support NPR, PBS, and other such media. Let us be crystal clear on this point. Anyone who assumes media institutions taking money from such sponsors are authentically independent does not understand philanthropy as a well-established, highly effective conduit through which orthodoxies are enforced and public discourse circumscribed.  What are we looking at here? Not what we are supposed to think we are looking at, certainly. I will return to this question. There is the case of Maria Ressa, which I considered briefly in a previous commentary. Ressa is the supposedly courageous, speak-truth-to-power co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a Filipina journalist who co-founded The Rappler, a web publication in Manila. The Nobel committee cited Ressa for her “fight for freedom of expression.” Who is Maria Ressa, then, and what is The Rappler? I grow weary of writing this sentence: She and her publication are not what we are supposed to think they are. Ressa and The Rappler, each insisting on independence just as the ICIJ does, are straight-out lying on this point. The Rappler recently received a grant of $180,000 from the National Endowment for Democracy, a CIA front—this according to an NED financial report issued earlier this year. None other than Pierre Omidyar and a group called North Base Media own nonvoting shares in the publication. Among North Base's partners is the Media Development Investment Fund, which was founded by George Soros to do what George Soros likes to do in other countries. Does a picture begin to emerge? Read the names together and one will. You have to figure they all party together. Nobel in hand, Maria Ressa has already declared that Julian Assange is not a journalist and that independent media need new regulations, as in censorship. Henry Kissinger got a Nobel as a peacemaker: Ressa gets one as a defender of free expression. It's a fit. This brings us to the case of Frances Haugen, the former Facebook exec who recently appeared before Congress waving lots of documents she seems to have secreted (supposedly) out of Facebook's offices to argue for—what else at this point?—increased government regulation of social media, as in censorship. Frances Haugen, you see, is a courageous, speak-truth-to-power whistleblower. Never mind that her appearance on Capitol Hill was carefully choreographed by Democratic Party operatives whose party simply cannot wait to censor our First Amendment rights out of existence.  It is hard to say who is more courageous, I find—the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, or Frances Haugen. Where would we be without them? The culture of independent media as it has germinated and developed over the past decade or so gave us WikiLeaks, and its effectiveness cannot be overstated. It gave us all manner of gutsy journalists standing for the principles of a genuinely free press, and people listened. It gave us whistleblowers who are admired even as the Deep State condemns them.     And now the national-security state gives us none other than a secret-disclosing crew of mainstream hacks, a faux-independent journalist elevated to the highest honors, and a whistleblower who was handed her whistle and taught how to toot it—three crowd-pleasers, three simulacra. These are three frauds. They are to independent journalism what McDonald's is to food.  There is only one defense against this assault on truth and integrity, but it is a very good one. It is awareness. CNN, Democracy Now!, the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, Frances Haugen—none of these and many other media and people are properly labeled. But the labels can be written with modest efforts. Awareness and scrutiny, watching and listening, will prove enough.

The Dave Pamah Show
Working Together In Our Polarized World with Adam Kahane

The Dave Pamah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 44:17


In this episode I will speak to Adam Kahane who is a renowned facilitator and bestselling author whose work has been praised by Nobel Peace Prize–winners Nelson Mandela and Juan Manuel Santos. He urges that even lifelong opponents and groups of people across multiple organizations—including those who don't agree or like or even trust each other—can reach critical a-ha moments and move forward together. Learn more at:- https://reospartners.com/facilitating-breakthrough Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Tikvah Podcast
Elisha Wiesel on His Father's Jewish and Zionist Legacy

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 23:49


When Elie Wiesel was fifteen years old, the Nazis murdered his mother and sister and enslaved him and his father in Buchenwald. After the U.S. Army liberated the camp in April 1945, Wiesel went to France, where he studied the humanities and worked as a writer, and then to New York, where he became a professor and an activist for human rights. Wiesel, who died in July 2016, wrote some 60 books, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986, and was counselor to presidents, senators, kings, and prime ministers. Recently, he and his family were honored by the installation of a sculpture of his likeness in the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. The manner of this honoring introduces some particularly vexing Jewish questions, which his son Elisha discussed in a recent Washington Post op-ed. Elie Wiesel was a moral hero, and a particularly Jewish one. His family worried that his memorialization in a church would emphasize the universalist elements of his legacy, and discard particular Jewish elements of his moral persona—including his Jewish observance and his Zionist commitments. Elisha joins Mosaic's editor Jonathan Silver to think about these questions, his father's legacy, and more on this week's podcast. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

Economist Radio
The Economist Asks: Nobel peace prize winners 2021

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:28


This year's award celebrates two journalists working in countries where the screws are tightening on media freedom. Host Anne McElvoy asks Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Russia's Dmitry Muratov how they are defending the free press. The editor of Novaya Gazeta explains why he has dedicated his medal to murdered colleagues and the co-founder of Rappler shares how she fights back in the face of online trolling. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Economist Asks
The Economist Asks: Nobel peace prize winners 2021

The Economist Asks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:28


This year's award celebrates two journalists working in countries where the screws are tightening on media freedom. Host Anne McElvoy asks Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Russia's Dmitry Muratov how they are defending the free press. The editor of Novaya Gazeta explains why he has dedicated his medal to murdered colleagues and the co-founder of Rappler shares how she fights back in the face of online trolling. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sway
Can a Nobel Peace Prize Protect Maria Ressa From Rodrigo Duterte?

Sway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:05


Maria Ressa and Dmitri Muratov recently took home the Nobel Peace Prize, marking the first time working journalists have won the award since 1935. Ressa believes the Norwegian Nobel Committee's decision to recognize journalists this year sends a signal that, once again, “we are on the brink of the rise of fascism.” Through her digital media company Rappler, Ressa has been on the front lines of covering President Rodrigo Duterte's regime in the Philippines, exposing the leader's tactics of “violence and fear.” She also sounded the alarm on the role that social media platforms have played in the rise of leaders like Duterte and Donald Trump, saying that Facebook in particular “exploded an atom bomb” by amplifying misinformation and propaganda.Ressa's reporting has made her a target for lawsuits from the Duterte government and online harassment from his supporters: One study found almost 400,000 tweets targeting Ressa over a 13-month period. And she was convicted of cyber libel in 2020, which has made it difficult for her to leave the country.In this conversation, Kara Swisher asks Ressa to discuss the role of social media in the rise of polarization, and to consider if new revelations from the Facebook whistle-blower will be a game changer. And Ressa shares how her work — and the onslaught of lawsuits in response to it — have impacted her personal life and her family.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: The Sacred Art of Twerking

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 127:52


Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne discusses the death of former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, and the status of Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country." Then, we ask listeners if they would go back to the office if promised one month of remote work, after Amazon announced a similar plan for its corporate employees. Charlie Sennott talks about the United States' role in political and economic chaos in Haiti, following the kidnapping of 17 U.S. and Canadian missionaries. He also emphasizes the importance of journalism with the awarding of this year's Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Dmitri A. Muratov from Russia and Maria Ressa from the Philippines. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Renée Landers previews the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court term, including the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev death penalty case and debates over abortion. She also weighs in on term limits and whether or not she thinks Justice Stephen Breyer will retire before the end of Biden's term. Landers is a professor of law and faculty director of the health and biomedical law concentration at Suffolk University's School of Law. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on Dave Chapelle's Netflix special and Lizzo calling twerking sacred. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. We end the show by talking with listeners about how they respond to receiving care from private healthcare workers who remain unvaccinated.

ThePrint
ThePrintUninterrupted: How to stand up to a dictator? Nobel laureate-journalist Maria Ressa on facts, trust & social media

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 42:19


#NobelPeacePrizeWinner #MariaRessa In this edition of #ThePrintUninterrupted, Nobel Peace Prize winner journalist Maria Ressa tells ThePrint's Senior Consulting Editor Jyoti Malhotra how social media giants have aided and abetted the rise of populist leaders across the globe while creating fractured societies with manipulated realities based on twisted half-truths. The co-founder and CEO of Rappler, a news website based in the Philippines, also discussed how people speaking the truth to the power are being intimidated at various levels.

Velshi
Democracy Hanging in the Balance

Velshi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 86:37


Ali Velshi is joined by Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Rep. Stacey Plaskett, 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa, author Timothy Snyder, Rev. Dr. William Barber, executive director of the Feminist Majority Foundation Katherine Spillar, abortion rights advocate Dr. Willie Parker, Carol Leonnig from The Washington Post, The New York Times' Katie Benner, McKay Coppins from The Atlantic, and NBC's Scott Cohn.

Net Assessment
Richard Haass Is Unhappy

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:12


Chris, Melanie, and Zack return to discuss Richard Haass's critique of “Washington's new flawed foreign policy consensus.” The Council on Foreign Relations president laments the bipartisan turn away from the mostly internationalist spirit that has informed U.S. foreign policy since the end of the World War II. Is he right? Does such a consensus exist? And does that explain why successive U.S. presidents seem so skeptical of internationalism? The three also try to discern what Haass favors as an alternative, but conclude that dissatisfaction with the current direction of U.S. foreign policy doesn't easily translate into specific and implantable policies. Grievances for Katherine Tai for an underwhelming speech on U.S. trade policy, for Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley for holding up ambassadorial appointments, and to those who harassed Sen. Kyrsten Sinema — in the restroom! — for being … jerks. Attagirl to Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa who braved abuse and intimidation for uncovering corruption and misrule in the Philippines and elsewhere. Chris gives a shout out to Reps. Jim McGovern and Peter Meijer for introducing legislation to rein in executive power, and Melanie praises the developers at GlaxoSmithKline for their life-saving new malaria vaccine. She also gives a special shout out to her nephew Zack and his Utah state champion golf team at Long Peak High School. Links: Richard Haass, “The Age of America First: Washington's Flawed New Foreign Policy Consensus,” Foreign Affairs, November/December 2021, https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-09-29/biden-trump-age-america-first. Richard Haass, “What Mike Pompeo doesn't understand about China, Richard Nixon and U.S. foreign policy,” Washington Post, July 25, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/07/25/what-mike-pompeo-doesnt-understand-about-china-richard-nixon-us-foreign-policy/.   New American Engagement Initiative Annual Student Competition, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/scowcroft-center-for-strategy-and-security/new-american-engagement-initiative/naei-annual-student-competition/. New American Engagement Initiative Future Foreign Policy series with Rep. Joaquin Castro, Monday, Oct. 18 at 3:30 pm, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/future-foreign-policy-series-featuring-rep-joaquin-castro/. “America is shorthanded in foreign affairs. Thanks, Ted Cruz,” Washington Post, Oct. 10, 2021, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/10/10/america-is-shorthanded-foreign-affairs-thanks-ted-cruz/. Ankit Panda Twitter, https://twitter.com/nktpnd/status/1447366126447570946?s=12. Apoorva Mandavilli, "A 'Historic Event': First Malaria Vaccine Approved by WHO," New York Times, Oct. 6, 2021, https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/health/malaria-vaccine-who.html.  Connor O'Brien, “Lawmakers aim for blockbuster overhaul of war powers, arms sales,” POLITICO, Sept. 30, 2021, https://www.politico.com/news/2021/09/30/war-powers-act-bipartisan-overhaul-514794. Dina Smeltz, Ivo Daalder, Karl Friedhoff, Craig Kafura, and Emily Sullivan, "A Foreign Policy for the Middle Class--What Americans Think," Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Oct. 2021, https://www.thechicagocouncil.org/sites/default/files/2021-10/ccs2021_fpmc_0.pdf. Peggy Noonan, "Progressives Hold the Capital Captive," Wall Street Journal, Oct. 7, 2021, https://www.wsj.com/articles/biden-progressives-aoc-squad-sinema-reconciliation-infrastructure-lbj-approval-polling-11633643510.  Tyler Haslam, "High School Golf: Kihei Akina Leads Lone Peak Knights to 8th State Title in 9 Years," Deseret News, Oct. 5, 2021, https://www.deseret.com/2021/10/5/22708095/high-school-golf-kihei-akina-leads-lone-peak-knighs-to-8th-state-title-in-9-years-6a-uhsaa.   

Climate One
Zen and Coping with Climate

Climate One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:33


How do we manage our own anxiety around an uncertain climate future – let alone help our children work through their feelings and fears? In his latest book, Zen and the Art of Saving the Planet, internationally renowned Zen Master and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Thich Nhat Hahn argues that addressing the intersection of ecological destruction, rising inequality, racial injustice, and the lasting impacts of a devastating pandemic requires us to strengthen our clarity, compassion, and courage to act.  “The power of zen and the power of mindfulness is that it roots us in the present moment so we can be alert to what is going on, we can be responsive, we can be the master of our mind and awareness in any given situation,” including climate disruption, says Sister True Dedication, contributor and editor of Thich Nhat Hahn's book. Psychotherapist Leslie Davenport, author of All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal With Climate Change, provides thoughtful, practical exercises to help young readers process their feelings about climate change.  For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Sister True Dedication, Zen Buddhist nun, editor of Thich Nhat Hanh's book Zen and the Art of Saving The Planet  Leslie Davenport, author, Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change; All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal With Climate Change Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
CLIMATE ONE: Zen and Coping with Climate

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:33


How do we manage our own anxiety around an uncertain climate future – let alone help our children work through their feelings and fears? In his latest book, Zen and the Art of Saving the Planet, internationally renowned Zen Master and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Thich Nhat Hahn argues that addressing the intersection of ecological destruction, rising inequality, racial injustice, and the lasting impacts of a devastating pandemic requires us to strengthen our clarity, compassion, and courage to act.  “The power of zen and the power of mindfulness is that it roots us in the present moment so we can be alert to what is going on, we can be responsive, we can be the master of our mind and awareness in any given situation,” including climate disruption, says Sister True Dedication, contributor and editor of Thich Nhat Hahn's book. Psychotherapist Leslie Davenport, author of All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal With Climate Change, provides thoughtful, practical exercises to help young readers process their feelings about climate change.  For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Sister True Dedication, Zen Buddhist nun, editor of Thich Nhat Hanh's book Zen and the Art of Saving The Planet  Leslie Davenport, author, Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change; All the Feelings Under the Sun: How to Deal With Climate Change Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Everyday Ubuntu
Ep.22: Dawn Gifford Engle | Co-Founder, Activist and Filmmaker | Acts of Peace

Everyday Ubuntu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:18


Today's guest is Dawn Gifford Engle. Dawn is a filmmaker, an activist, and Co-Founder of The PeaceJam Foundation. She has been recognized for excellence in filmmaking, a well-decorated director, Dawn is the recipient of 12 Best Director awards. She wrote and directed the award-winning documentary films, Rigoberta Menchu: Daughter of the Maya, Desmond Tutu: Children of the Light, Adolfo Perez Esquivel: Rivers of Hope, Oscar Arias: Without a Shot Fired, Betty Williams: Contagious Courage, The Dalai Lama -- Scientist, and Shirin Ebadi: Until We Are Free. In addition, she co-authored the book, "PEACEJAM: A Billion Simple Acts of Peace", which was published by Penguin in 2008, and she has been nominated 17 times for the Nobel Peace Prize.The PeaceJam Foundation is creating the next generation of Nobel Peace Laureates, and in this episode, Dawn shares how the foundation came to be, the inspiring projects the youth have created, and what the most rewarding part of her work is. She also speaks about how she feels lucky to have reached her full potential, having started her career as an economist and has since added the titles - activist, author, filmmaker, mother and grandmother to her repertoire. She and Mungi discuss the Nobel laureates that have direct impacts on their lives and the promise of youth looking to bring about peace in our world.……..Visit mungingomane.coFollow Mungi on InstagramFollow The Brand is Female on Instagram

Online Marketing Strategies Podcast
#189: MLK - The Final 24 Hours

Online Marketing Strategies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 20:24


Martin Luther King Jr. became the predominant leader in the civil rights movement to end racial segregation and discrimination in America during the 1950s and 1960s, and was a leading spokesperson for nonviolent methods of achieving social change. His eloquence as a speaker and his personal charisma combined with a deeply rooted determination to establish equality among all races despite personal risk won him a worldwide following.  He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 and was selected by Time magazine as its Man of the Year. His “I Have a Dream” speech, which is now considered to be among the great speeches of American history, is frequently quoted. His success in galvanizing the drive for civil rights, however, made him the target of conservative segregationists who believed firmly in the superiority of the white race and feared social change.  He was arrested over 20 times and had his home was bombed. Ultimately, he was assassinated on April 4, 1968, on the balcony of a motel where he was staying in Memphis.  The "Remember This" Podcast is sponsored by Gift Shop For Guys. Looking for a cool gift for the man in your life? At Gift Shop For Guys we have spent countless hours sourcing and creating high-quality affordable items and accessories. Check out our huge selection of Cool T-Shirts and Fun-T-Shirts for your man. We carry a vast range of products that are ready to ship to you today. Free Shipping within the USA. E: support@giftshopforguys W: https://giftshopforguys.com We're a huge fan of connecting on social media. If you're on these social networks, let's follow each other: Instagram ▶️ https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuysInsta Facebook ▶️ https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuysFBook Podcast    ▶️ https://geni.us/RememberThisPodcast YouTube   ▶️ https://geni.us/RememberThisYouTube Gift Shop For Guys Suite 12, 5th Floor, Dymocks Building 428 George Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 ▶️ E: support@giftshopforguys.com ▶️ W: https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuys

The CyberWire
Espionage by password spraying, and espionage via peanut butter sandwich. Ransomware and DDoS warnings. Two journalists get the Nobel Peace Prize

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:59


Teheran is running password spraying attacks (especially on Thursdays and Sundays). More on the renewed popularity of DDoS attacks. NCSC warns British businesses against ransomware. Two journalists win the Nobel Peace Prize. Joe Carrigan shares his thoughts on GriftHorse. Our guest is Bindu Sundaresan from AT&T Cybersecurity football season and cyber risks. And watch out for small data cards in your peanut butter sandwiches, kids. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/196

Democracy Now! Video
Democracy Now! 2021-10-11 Monday

Democracy Now! Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:00


Indigenous author Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and The Red Nation organizer Jennifer Marley react to the first time the United States formally recognizes Indigenous Peoples' Day; Winona LaDuke on Indigenous-led activism against Line 3; Katrina vanden Heuvel reflects upon the significance of Nobel Peace Prize winner Dmitry Muratov. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-10-11 Monday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:00


Historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and The Red Nation organizer Jennifer Marley react to the first time the United States formally recognizes Indigenous Peoples' Day; Winona LaDuke on Indigenous-led activism against Line 3; Katrina vanden Heuvel reflects upon the significance of Nobel Peace Prize winner Dmitry Muratov. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

The Beat with Ari Melber
Trump's possible 2024 run rattles GOP

The Beat with Ari Melber

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 43:50


MSNBC's Dr. Jason Johnson fills in for MSNBC's Ari Melber to host "The Beat" on Friday, October 8, and reports on Trump's efforts to withhold documents from the January 6th Committee, economic inequality, the bombshell "Pandora Papers," racial justice, and the new Nobel Peace Prize winners. NYU law professor Melissa Murray and Democratic strategist Juanita Tolliver join.

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
October 8, 2021 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 52:50


Friday on the NewsHour, employment numbers in the United States fall short of expectations as workers continue to leave their jobs in the wake of the pandemic. Then, the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to news editors from Russia and the Philippines for their reporting in the face of political repression. And, David Brooks and Karen Tumulty consider the week in politics. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why the Nobel Peace Prize was won by 2 journalists, and what that means for press freedom

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 7:49


The Nobel Committee often likes to make a statement when it awards the Nobel Peace Prize every year, and 2021 is no different. Two journalists, one from the Philippines, the other from Russia, were recipients -- at a time when the free press is under global attack, and the truth is hard to find. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PRI's The World
Nobel Peace Prize shines a light on freedom of expression

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:56


For the first time since 1935, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists: Maria Ressa of the Philippines, and Russian independent journalist Dmitry Muratov. The award honors their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression against the growing threats against it. And it's election time in Iraq, where a high-stakes parliamentary vote will take place on Sunday. The election was called a year early in response to major protests in 2019. Plus, for nearly two centuries since Ludwig van Beethoven's death, his 10th Symphony sat unfinished and largely untouched. But with a little help from modern technology — that's about to change. 

Kottke Ride Home
Fri. 10/08 - Is The Nobel Prize Bad For Science?

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:33


The winners of the Nobel Peace Prize have been announced! As well as the winners in Chemistry and Literature. More on each winner, as well as a question about whether we really need the Nobel Prize. Plus, the remnants of the oldest Black church in the US have been uncovered in Colonial Williamsburg. And a Google AI has recreated famous works of art by Gustav Klimt that were lost in World War II.Sponsors:Novo, BankNovo.com/kottkeLinks:Maria Ressa is only the 18th woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in its 126-year history. (NY Times)The Nobel Peace Prize 2021 - Press release (Nobel Prize) Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win Nobel Peace Prize (Washington Post)Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to Scientists for Creating a Tool to Build Molecules (NY Times)Abdulrazak Gurnah wins the 2021 Nobel prize in literature (The Guardian)The flaws in the Nobel Prizes in medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics (Vox) Why COVID vaccines didn't win a science Nobel this year (Nature)Remnants of Black church uncovered in Colonial Williamsburg (AP)Colonial Williamsburg Project Unearths Foundation of First Baptist Church (NY Times)The Quest to Unearth One of America's Oldest Black Churches (Wired, 2020)Google used AI to recreate Gustav Klimt paintings burned by Nazis (Mashable)Klimt vs. Klimt (Google Arts & Culture)'The case remains open': FBI rebuts claim Zodiac Killer case is solved (NBC News)'Hot Garbage': Zodiac Expert Calls 'Bulls---' on Possible ID of Infamous Serial Killer (Rolling Stone)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Nobel Peace Prize Winners: Truth-Telling Journalists

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:35


On Friday, journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov were awarded the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize. Robert Mahoney, deputy executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, discusses the obstacles the journalists faced and this moment in journalism.  

Global News Podcast
Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win Nobel Peace Prize

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 30:41


The high profile Philippine and Russian journalists face threats and intimidation by doing their jobs. Also: suicide attack on Afghan mosque kills dozens of people, and moves in China to shut down the "dancing grannies".

Democracy Now! Video
Democracy Now! 2021-10-08 Friday

Democracy Now! Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:00


Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win the Nobel Peace Prize; Henrietta Lacks's family and lawyer on their lawsuit against biotech firm; historian Keisha Blain on her new book on the untold legacy of civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-10-08 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:00


Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win the Nobel Peace Prize; Henrietta Lacks's family and lawyer on their lawsuit against biotech firm; historian Keisha Blain on her new book on the untold legacy of civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Apple News Today
Journalists share Nobel Peace Prize for press-freedom fight

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 6:25


The Nobel Peace Prize went to journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov for their work fighting for press freedom under dangerous circumstances. BBC News has more. Divorced parents are going to court over whether their kids should be vaccinated against COVID. The Washington Post has the story. The Wall Street Journal explains how Trump’s trade war and the pandemic have driven cotton prices to sky-high levels.Bloomberg reports on how a cameo in a James Bond film can increase a car’s value by 1,000 percent.

WSJ What’s News
Ireland Paves the Way for a Global Tax Deal

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:54


A.M. Edition for Oct. 8. WSJ's Paul Hannon explains why the last major holdout has agreed to raise its corporate tax rate and what that means for a global deal. Tesla moves its headquarters from California to Texas. Plus, journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win this year's Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression. And agricultural economist Andrew Novakovic explains why retail cheese prices are on the rise. Peter Granitz hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices