Podcasts about Kabul

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  • 3,115PODCASTS
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  • Jun 23, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about Kabul

    Show all podcasts related to kabul

    Latest podcast episodes about Kabul

    RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
    The scene from Kabul as charities race to help earthquake victims

    RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 8:07


    People are digging through rubble with their bare hands in a desperate search for survivors, following the devastating earthquake which has killed at least 1,000 people in Khost, in the country's east. The disaster inflicts more misery on a country where millions are already experiencing hunger and poverty with the health system under enormous strain since the Taliban retook power.

    Das Interview von MDR AKTUELL
    Caritas: Aussichtslose Situation in Afghanistan

    Das Interview von MDR AKTUELL

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 5:37


    Nach dem Erdbeben in Afghanistan dauern die Rettungsarbeiten an. Doch die Region ist schwer zugänglich, das Land extrem arm. Der Leiter des Büros von Caritas International in Kabul, Stefan Recker, zur Lage vor Ort.

    RTÉ - Morning Ireland
    Quake further deepens devastation in Afghanistan

    RTÉ - Morning Ireland

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 7:41


    Shelley Thakral, World Food Programme spokesperson in Kabul, discusses the humanitarian situation in Afghanistan after a 6.1 magnitude earthquake.

    Brexitcast
    Earthquake in Afghanistan

    Brexitcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 33:09


    Adam is joined by Lyse Doucet and Sayed Rahman from the International Rescue Committee, who's in Kabul, after an earthquake killed at least 1,000 people and injured 1,500 in eastern Afghanistan. Also, the polio virus has been detected in London's sewers. Fergus explains all. Today's Newscast was made by Tim Walklate with Miranda Slade and Chris Flynn. The technical producer was Michael Regaard. The assistant editor was Alison Gee.

    World Business Report
    One thousand people killed in earthquake in Afghanistan

    World Business Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:11


    Today the Sri Lankan prime minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, said the country's economy has completely collapsed and needs international support. Addressing parliament, he said a donor conference would be convened to seek financial assistance from China, Japan and India. Dhananath Fernando is the Chief Operating Officer at the independent policy think tank the Advocata Institute in Colombo. He tells us what might have prompted the prime minister to conclude that an economic collapse had been reached. It's estimated that as many as one thousand people have died in an earthquake in Afghanistan and another 1500 people have been injured. The Taliban has called on aid agencies to help reach the worst-affected areas but so far few have been able to reach those in need. Head of delegation in Afghanistan for the International Committee of the Red Cross, Eloi Fillion joins us from Kabul. Prices in the UK are continuing to rise at their fastest rate for 40 years due to climbing food, energy and fuel costs. Russ Mould, investor director at AJ Bell, tells us how the markets have been reacting. In India financial content creators are seeing their popularity and their fortunes soar. Their fame coincides with the huge wave of retail investors coming into the equity markets. Our India Business Correspondent Nikhil Inamdar explains. After three long years many festivals are reopening their gates, and one of the world's most famous, Glastonbury, is starting this weekend in England. The BBC's Colin Paterson was there when Michael Eavis, the founder and organiser of the festival, welcomed people to the site once again. Director of MTN Bushfire festival, Jiggs Thorne, tells us how popular festivals are in Africa and the challenges faced. (Picture: Afghan people carry sacks of food grains distributed as an aid by the World Food Programme (WFP) in Kandahar on October 19, 2021. Picture Credit: JAVED TANVEER/AFP via Getty Images).

    Frisch an die Arbeit
    Wie kann man mit Kunst Klischees brechen, Moshtari Hilal?

    Frisch an die Arbeit

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 44:25


    "Vor 2001 hat sich niemand für Afghanistan interessiert, nach dem 11. September in dem Jahr aber war Afghanistan überall Thema, auch in der Schule, in der ersten Klasse, in der ich damals war", erzählt die Künstlerin Moshtari Hilal, die zu der Zeit in Deutschland lebte. "Ich musste mich damals schon mit dem Land auseinandersetzen, weil die anderen Kinder Maschinengewehrgeräusche gemacht, mir Terrorismus unterstellt oder gefragt haben, ob meine Familie Osama bin Laden kennt." Hilal, die 1993 in Kabul geboren wurde, kam als Asylbewerberin nach Deutschland und ging nach ihrem Abitur wieder für eine Zeit nach Afghanistan, auch um die Kunst- und Kulturszene ihres Geburtslandes kennenzulernen, wie sie im Podcast "Frisch an die Arbeit" erzählt. Obwohl sie sich eigentlich für Zeichnen und Kunst interessierte, begann sie zurück in Deutschland Islam- und Politikwissenschaften zu studieren. Mit der Zeit habe sie dann aber doch “mehr Zeit in die Kunst” als in ihr Studium gesteckt. Dass ihre Kunst so viel mit ihrer Biografie zu tun hat, sei inhaltlich ein Privileg, künstlerisch aber manchmal auch belastend. “Wenn ich diese sehr aufwendigen Schwarz-Weiß-Zeichnungen, die oft sehr detailliert und groß sind, verkaufe und dann quasi weggeben muss, fühlt sich das für mich an wie ein Verlust”, sagt Hilal. Über die Jahre habe sie sich ein eigenes Publikum erarbeitet. "Das macht mich auch in gewisser Weise unabhängig von den Strukturen in der Kunstindustrie, in der ich halt eben nicht klassisch ausgebildet wurde und in der ich auch nicht diese Netzwerke habe." Trotzdem, erzählt Hilal, habe sie den Wunsch, unabhängiger von Social-Media-Plattformen wie Instagram zu werden. “Manchmal wünsche ich mir, Instagram einfach zu löschen – und es wäre irrelevant für meine Arbeit und mein Vorankommen.”

    Beyazperde: Fragmanlar
    Mühr-ü Musallat - Perihan Fragman

    Beyazperde: Fragmanlar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


    Mühr-ü Musallat - Perihan, araştırma yapmak için ücra bir köye giden öğrencilerin yaşadıklarını konu ediyor. Üç sosyoloji öğrencisi, yıllar önce Perihan adında genç bir kızın ölümüyle sonuçlanan bir cin çıkarma ritüelini ararştırmak için ücra bir köye gider. Gençler, Hanife adında yanlış bilgiler veren bir kadının anlattıkları ve onlara yardım etmeyi Kabul eden tek kişi olan Hasan'ın rehberliğinde araştırma yapmaya başlar. Ancak çok geçmeden araştırmaları, tehlikeli, spiritüel ve kanlı bir hal alır. Grup, gün geçtikçe kendilerini korkunç bir kabusun içinde bulur.

    Beyond The Horizon
    More Details on The Terrorist Attack Against the Sikh Temple in Kabul (6/19/22)

    Beyond The Horizon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 15:09


    As the dust settles surrounding the attack against the Sikh's in Kabul, we are now getting more details. ISIS-K, as expected, have claimed responsibility for the attack and they promise that more are to come. As for the Taliban, their security forces say that they killed 7 people involved with the attack and are still pursuing others who might have taken part. (commercial at 7:58)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/islamic-state-says-attack-on-sikh-temple-is-revenge-for-prophet-insults/ar-AAYCSmN?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=55e4ef5d5e754a31979fc364ed87f515

    The Epstein Chronicles
    More Details on The Terrorist Attack Against the Sikh Temple in Kabul (6/19/22)

    The Epstein Chronicles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 15:09


    As the dust settles surrounding the attack against the Sikh's in Kabul, we are now getting more details. ISIS-K, as expected, have claimed responsibility for the attack and they promise that more are to come. As for the Taliban, their security forces say that they killed 7 people involved with the attack and are still pursuing others who might have taken part. (commercial at 7:58)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/islamic-state-says-attack-on-sikh-temple-is-revenge-for-prophet-insults/ar-AAYCSmN?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=55e4ef5d5e754a31979fc364ed87f515

    The Epstein Chronicles
    A Sikh Temple Is Attacked In Kabul As The Insurgency Roils (6/19/22)

    The Epstein Chronicles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 17:00


    The violence in Afghanistan continues to progress on almost a daily basis at this point. Recently, we've seen the violence of the extremists aimed at minority Muslim groups, but this time it was the Sikh community that was in the cross hairs. As tensions rise not only in Afghanistan but the region in general, these sorts of attacks are aimed at creating distrust and division and all signs point to them being successful thus far. (commercial at 10:32)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/blast-hits-sikh-temple-in-afghan-capital-kabul/ar-AAYBu5r?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=8a3ec09e570e49a2a1c61d8347e100bc

    Beyond The Horizon
    A Sikh Temple Is Attacked In Kabul As The Insurgency Roils (6/19/22)

    Beyond The Horizon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 17:00


    The violence in Afghanistan continues to progress on almost a daily basis at this point. Recently, we've seen the violence of the extremists aimed at minority Muslim groups, but this time it was the Sikh community that was in the cross hairs. As tensions rise not only in Afghanistan but the region in general, these sorts of attacks are aimed at creating distrust and division and all signs point to them being successful thus far. (commercial at 11:24)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/blast-hits-sikh-temple-in-afghan-capital-kabul/ar-AAYBu5r?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=8a3ec09e570e49a2a1c61d8347e100bc

    Anticipating The Unintended
    #173 Lathpath, Lathpath, Lathpath, Agnipath*

    Anticipating The Unintended

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 29:01


    India Policy Watch: The Road Of FireInsights on burning policy issues in India- RSJThe Union Defence Minister along with the chiefs of the three armed services on Tuesday announced the ‘Agnipath’ scheme for recruitment into the Indian military. You can read more about the scheme here. I have summarised the key features below:The soldiers under this scheme (referred to as ‘Agniveers’) will be enrolled for a duration of four years in a conscription or tour of duty (ToD) like model that’s prevalent in other countries. They will be paid between INR 30,000 - 40,000 per month during their tenure apart from risk or hardship allowance as applicable. 30 per cent of their salary will be deducted as a voluntary contribution into a corpus called ‘SevaNidhi’ with a matching contribution from the government. Roughly put, the soldiers will get this SevaNidhi package of about INR 11.7 Lacs plus the interest accumulated on this amount at the end of their four years of service. Few other post-retirement benefits are thrown in, including a life insurance cover and access to a bank loan of INR 18.2 Lacs against the SevaNidhi package.About 25 per cent of Agniveers will be absorbed into the regular cadre after four years. The rest will receive an Agniveer Skill certificate, the SevaNidhi corpus and some preferential treatment in getting into the Central Armed Police Force (CAPF) and maybe even state police forces. The Agniveers who leave at the end of four years, however, will not get the usual entitlements of gratuity and pension. This is huge. Over a period of couple of decades, this could mean only about 25 per cent of the forces will have the pension benefits that are available to all today. The enrollment under this scheme will be on an all-India and an all-class basis. This will be, by itself, a distinct rank in the armed forces with its own insignia. The likely implications of this are quite significant. The recruitment of soldiers today, especially in the army, is based on state-wise quotas and on the retirement of soldiers from various regiments that are class based. Class here should be read as an euphemism for caste or community. Drawing Agniveers on an all-class basis will mean withering away from the traditional structure of regiments. It could also mean a larger representation of states where unemployment rates are high because there might not be state-wise quotas anymore. This could further alter the composition mix of the armed forces.The government also positioned this as a move that will infuse youth and vitality (or ‘josh’ and ‘jazba’ as mentioned in various media reports) into the armed forces. The whole thing including the names Agnipath and Agniveer sounds like a campaign for an early 1990s Nana Patekar film. You could soon shoehorn Agni Pariksha (for the recruitment tests), Krantiveer (best Agniveer cadet), Yugpurush (lifetime achievement award for Agniveers), Angaar, Tiranga, Prahaar and so on. You get the picture. We are in this territory now. Anyway, the average age of the armed forces which is 32 now will come down by about five years. The younger workforce will be more technology-savvy that will be more attuned to the changing nature of modern warfare. Also, the 75 per cent of Agniveers who will go back into civil society will serve as a disciplined and nationalistic labour pool to draw from for organisations. There will be Agniveers in every village and taluk who will improve the moral fibre of our society. We will have no riots, no littering, no traffic violations and no crime. The retired Agniveers will change us. Because they will put the nation first. Always. Like Arnab. Well, that’s the official line anyway. BacklashUnfortunately, the response to the scheme hasn’t been what the government was expecting. There have been protests, arson and general lawlessness by unemployed youth that seems to be spreading across the country at the moment. A large section of retired armed forces officials too have questioned both the scale and speed of a change like this. The issues agitating them have some basis:There have been very few recruitment rallies during the two years of the pandemic. About 60,000 soldiers retire every year and this gap is filled up during the regular recruitment drives. It is safe to assume there's a 1.5 Lac gap that’s opened up since 2020. The expectation among aspirants was this will get filled up in the next year or so. That apart, there are those in the middle of their recruitment process who are unclear about their status now. Roughly put, there could be more than a crore of youngsters under the age of 21 who were waiting for these recruitment drives to restart. What they have now instead is about 46,000 open positions for the current year with a 25 per cent probability of a long-term career in armed services with full benefits. If you work the numbers, it also suggests a reduction in armed forces count by about 1.5 - 2 Lacs (about 10-15 per cent of the workforce) over the next four years. I’m not sure if that’s also a stated intent of this scheme but it will be a collateral result unless the Agniveer recruitment numbers are ramped up significantly in the following years.There is an inherent contradiction in acknowledging a modern military requires advanced warfare systems, technical know-how and expertise that takes years to build and having only 25 percent of personnel working on longer tenure commissions. Will the constant churn come in the way of managing these systems? Will there be institutionalised knowledge management that will be able to handle this scenario? Also, the eventual dismantling of the class-based system that this move seems to portend will need to be thought through. It is fundamental to how the army operates today.The other question is about the prospects of the 75 per cent who will be released every four years. This is a number that will keep rising over a period of time. All the romanticisation of the armed forces and its discipline aside, these will be youngsters without a college degree and with limited technical skills. How useful will they be to the wider world? Not much if you go by the current record of hiring of retired defence personnel. They will have to study further and acquire specific skills to be employable. To expect CAPF or the state police force to absorb them is a bit optimistic. Also, there are aspirants for those jobs too with their own patronage system who will scuttle these moves. Lastly, for all the josh and jazba that are likely to come free because of this move, it will be useful to understand the repercussions of having a workforce that knows only one in four among them will qualify for the longer commission. What behaviour will this engender in them? How objective will the criteria for selection be? And if the 75 per cent who are released struggle to get jobs and earn their livelihoods, the feedback loop to the future cohorts will be immediate. The situation will turn more fraught at the end of every four-year cycle. The comparison with other countries that have a ToD model is useful but it is important to appreciate we are a US$ 2000 per capita economy with over 40 per cent of the employable labour pool either without a job or underemployed. In other countries, those who want to continue to be in the armed forces almost self-select themselves. These arguments, for and against aside, this is a good example to understand the complexities of policymaking, especially in defence, in India. A Difficult ProblemLet’s begin with the single most important policy objective for armed forces now in India. This is quite stark and apparent - it needs to modernise its defence infrastructure and increase its capacity in areas of modern warfare like the air force and navy. Given the threat perception on its borders, this is an already delayed exercise. You can read a detailed ORF report on India’s platform modernisation deficit here for more. TL;DR: yes, we do have a modernisation challenge on hand. And it is quite bad.Now the key question is what’s coming in the way of modernisation? There are multiple answers to this but on the top of that list is a lack of funds. The defence budget has broadly remained around 2.2 per cent of the GDP over the last decade. India has struggled to contain its fiscal deficit and it has limited ability to allocate more to its defence budget. As we have written on umpteen occasions, the Indian state is spread wide and thin. It does way too many things badly. Therefore, it cannot find money to do things it must. More importantly, pension benefits (24 per cent) and wages (28 per cent) take up over half of its budget. These numbers, especially pension outlays, will continue to grow in the coming years as the full impact of OROP (one rank one pension) plays out. The OROP that came into effect in late 2015 is a known and acknowledged policy mistake that is quite simply unsustainable. But it is almost impossible to walk back on that now. So, the search for circumventing that burden is one of the factors that has led to this scheme. A bad policy decision has a long-term downstream impact and this is a classic case of that playing out. Even if the Agnipath scheme is implemented as it stands today, the easing up of the pension burden will take decades to play out. The need for modernisation of the armed forces is as of yesterday. But the government is hoping through a combination of a 10-15 per cent reduction in the strength of the military and a long-term solution to control the burgeoning pension bill would have given it some room to ramp up on modernisation without increasing defence outlay. There are various estimates of the net present value of the expenditure on a single soldier who joins the armed forces today. At fairly conservative estimates of discount rates, wages and future pension benefits, Pranay estimates this to be about INR 1 crore. In my view, that is the absolute floor for that value and it might be around INR 2 crores if one were to take a bit more realistic assumptions. So, a 1.5 - 2 Lac workforce reduction could mean a significant availability of funds to modernise the defence platforms over time.  Growth, Growth, GrowthThat’s likely the thinking that’s gone behind the scheme. Everything else including the messaging on josh and jazba or having retired Agniveers in every village is to make it palatable to the public. It is difficult to acknowledge openly to people that the economy cannot support the defence requirements of India when you have made nationalism and nation-first important planks of your political strategy. This communication plan could have worked except it had to contend with the other real problem of the Indian economy at the moment. Lack of jobs. For reasons that could take up another post, the Indian economy isn’t generating enough jobs for its large youthful population. Roughly, India needs to create between 15-20 million non-farm jobs every year to keep pace with those entering the labour force. The labour participation rate has remained in the 40-45 per cent range for a long time. New job creation data can be contentious but it is difficult to argue that India is creating anything more than 3-4 million jobs every year. The quality of many of these new jobs isn’t great. The merry-go-round of employees switching jobs and getting big hikes in the IT/ITES sector shouldn’t blind us to the reality in the broader economy. There aren’t enough jobs. The two prerequisites for job creation, an 8-9 per cent GDP growth and skew towards sectors like construction, infrastructure or labour-intensive exports aren’t being met. The reason the job crisis hasn’t snowballed into a larger political and social issue is the immense faith in the PM among the youth. There’s a strong belief among them that India is on its way to becoming a superpower. The regular dose of nationalism and jingoism that’s amplified by the media helps continue this narrative. A related issue here that accounts for the violent protests is the lure of government jobs. The public sector jobs at the junior levels have become more remunerative than similar roles in the private sector in the last decade. As much as people love quoting the salaries of the CMDs of PSU Banks or the senior IAS officers and comparing them to the compensation of private-sector CEOs, the reality is that at mid to junior levels the government jobs are better paying. You can dig deeper into the wage bills of listed PSUs and compare them with their private counterparts for evidence. The other supposed benefits of a government job like job security, work-life balance and a possibility of rent-seeking (though low in defence jobs) make the package very attractive. This has meant a dramatic reversion in trend of people hankering for public sector jobs that had waned in the first couple of decades of liberalisation. So, a reduction in the number of such jobs or cutting down their benefits as the Agnipath scheme is likely to be isn't going to be accepted despite the great popularity of the PM and the ruling party among this segment. Their expectation, in contrast, is for the number of government jobs to go up.Considering the constraints, it is difficult to see what else the government could have done here. The need to reduce wage and pension costs to fund modernisation is real. And given the fiscally conservative instinct of this government, it won’t deficit fund the modernisation programme. As is its wont, it has chosen to put a bold announcement with emphasis on other benefits while trying to solve its key problems under cover. There’s this myth that a big bang approach to reform is the only model that works in India. That’s wrong. A lot of what has looked like big reforms in India have actually had a long runway that’s often invisible to people. A more comprehensive reading of the history of ‘91 reforms makes this clear. So, the usual template has been followed so far: minimal consultation, no plans to test it out at a smaller scale and instant big bang implementation. The results are unsurprising. I am guessing we will see a similar script play out for the next few months. There will be rollbacks (a few have been already announced), some concessions that will tinker around years of service or percentage releases, and a few sops thrown in, to temper the anger. If I were to give more credit than is due to this government’s planning chops, I might even say it possibly did this on purpose. Release a more extreme form of scheme, brace for impact and then roll back to the position that you always wanted in the first place. It is one way to game public opinion to your favoured outcome. Of course, a more impactful solution to this is to acknowledge the mistake that OROP is and shift the pension of defence forces onto a voluntary, defined contribution scheme like the NPS which has been implemented since 2004 for all new recruits joining government services, except defence. That is the only sustainable solution to this problem. But dispassionate policy making in defence sector in India is difficult. All kinds of emotions about izzat, vardi, naam and nishaan get mixed up. Nana Patekar gets in the way of clear-headed thinking.  * (with apologies and acknowledgement to Harivansh Rai ‘Bachchan’)Addendum— Pranay KotasthaneFor a researcher working on the public finance of defence, the Agnipath scheme is an important milestone. Over the long term, it has the potential to substantially reduce the pension burden. And as RSJ writes, the scheme will have no impact on the allocations for modernisation in the short term. Nevertheless, this scheme is important for the single reason that just as today’s deficits are tomorrow’s taxes, today’s reforms become tomorrow’s savings. Many commentators suggest that India’s defence expenditure problem can be solved merely by increasing defence expenditure to 3 per cent of GDP, from the current allocation of 2.04 per cent. That’s hardly the case. Projecting current growth rates of defence spending components over the next ten years suggests that even if the government were to agree to a 3 per cent spending, pension spending will grow rapidly enough to allow only an incremental increase in the fiscal space for capital outlay.Keeping the public finance angle aside, I took away two lessons in politics.One, the political narrative that can be used to sell a policy solution sometimes matters more than the solution itself.In an article for the Times of India in March, I listed four alternatives before the government to manage personnel costs. The three solutions that were dropped tried to address the pension problem directly. It wasn’t possible to project these solutions as achieving any other objective. In contrast, the solution that was picked up, i.e. Agnipath, was the only one that allowed the government to skirt the fiscal motivations for this reform. The government went in with this stated objective: “attracting young talent from the society who are more in tune with contemporary technological trends and plough back skilled, disciplined and motivated manpower into the society.”  No mention of the fiscal angle. At all.This strategy itself had mixed results in the early days. Politically, it allowed the government to make statements such as these: “We never see the Armed Forces through the perspectives of savings. Whatever we need to spend, the government is willing to spend. Our aim is to defend the country’s borders. Whatever needs to be spent, will be spent.” — Mr Rajnath Singh, Union Defence MinisterHowever, not acknowledging the real reason why these reforms were mooted, created an impression that the government has needlessly and suddenly foisted another disruptive scheme on unsuspecting masses.Two, the government failed to align cognitive maps of important stakeholders, yet again. Pension reforms are wicked problems everywhere in the world because there are strong endowment effects of a large, organised collective at play. Some of you might recall that a couple of years ago, nearly 800,000 French people protested and disrupted key services across the country in opposition to the proposed pension reform. That reform merely aimed to consolidate 42 different pension schemes, with variations in retirement age and benefits, into a universal points-based system. Even so, the government had an excellent, indigenous pension reform example at hand. As we’ve written many times before, the civil services pension reform of 2004 was a rare example of introducing a scheme to reduce the pension burden without protests. Despite this example, the government chose to opt for an Agnipath scheme that made some applicants suddenly ineligible for selection. The resulting protests and violence eventually made the government relax the age criteria this time. The government mandarins would surely have anticipated these consequences. To smoothen the transition, the government could’ve done regular recruitment along with the Agnipath recruitment this year. Over the subsequent three-four years, it could have increased the intake for the latter and tapered down the intake in the regular induction in a phase-wise manner. But it chose a sledgehammer instead of a scalpel. Global Policy Watch: Social Media’s Rule of Three Global policy issues relevant to India— Pranay KotasthaneSocial media continues to confound us all. By now, we all have read a number of hypotheses on how social media rewards “evil”. In the initial days, social media’s tendency to push us into echo chambers was oft-cited as the mechanism that made people more extreme in their views. Then came the view that the evil lay in the “likes”, “retweets”, and “share” features, which promoted an asymmetric virality. Thereafter came the notion that it was the economic models that were to blame. Advertisement-led services and Big Tech monopolies were the real problems, we were told. And over the last four years or so, it’s the algorithms and recommendation engines of social media companies that have been the target. Despite these arguments, we still don’t have a conclusive answer. Several studies have refuted many of the assertions made above. And so, let’s take a step back from specific social media apps, and instead ask: what are the meta-mechanisms that make all forms of social media a powerful instrument? I can think of three interrelated mechanisms. All three mechanisms are connected to sociological and cognitive behaviours in the Information Age.One, Social Media expands our Reference NetworksReference Networks is a term used by psychologists to mean “people whose beliefs and behaviour matter for our behaviour”. A really small part of our behaviour is independent of others’ actions and beliefs. Most of our behaviour is interdependent, i.e. it depends on what people in our reference network say or do. For most of human history, geographic proximity largely determined our reference network. For instance, our on-road driving behaviour is shaped by people who are around us and whom we consider ‘like us’. TV, radio, books, and newspapers have played a major role in creating new horizontal comradeship (or what Benedict Anderson called ‘imagined communities’), but these media did not supplant the importance of geographically proximate reference networks. Social media, by contrast, expands our reference networks like never before. People across the world can now influence our perceptions instantly and repeatedly. And by this reference network expansion, I do not imply the ‘echo chambers’ trope. Courtesy of social media, our reference network in fact now includes many more people who think unlike us. Sociologist Zeynep Tufecki explains this mechanism using a beautiful metaphor:“While algorithms will often feed people some of what they already want to hear, research shows that we probably encounter a wider variety of opinions online than we do offline, or than we did before the advent of digital tools.Rather, the problem is that when we encounter opposing views in the age and context of social media, it’s not like reading them in a newspaper while sitting alone. It’s like hearing them from the opposing team while sitting with our fellow fans in a football stadium. Online, we’re connected with our communities, and we seek approval from our like-minded peers. We bond with our team by yelling at the fans of the other one. In sociology terms, we strengthen our feeling of “in-group” belonging by increasing our distance from and tension with the “out-group”—us versus them. Our cognitive universe isn’t an echo chamber, but our social one is. This is why the various projects for fact-checking claims in the news, while valuable, don’t convince people. Belonging is stronger than facts.” [MIT Technology Review, August 2018]Expressed another way, every issue becomes global by default because our reference networks are also global. Two, Social Media expands the Overton WindowRepeating what I had written about this particular mechanism in edition #130. The Overton Window framework suggests that for any political issue, there's a range of socially acceptable positions that's narrower than the range of all possible positions. These socially acceptable ideas are seen as being inside the Overton Window — they are mainstream and uncontroversial. On the other hand, policy positions outside it are viewed as shocking, upsetting, and electorally harmful. The key insight of this framework is that, with social pressure, the Overton Window can shift over time; today's radicals may become tomorrow's moderates. In the Information Age, something even more striking has happened. The Overton Window on practically every issue has been stretched such that nearly all possible positions on an issue have become socially acceptable. With that happening, the older institutions, which earlier exuded authority, are shredding legitimacy with every decision they make.With the old gatekeepers no longer wielding the same power as earlier, the range of opinions on any issue can be extremely broad. And combined with the fact that each of those views attracts a new reference network, the Overton Window of social acceptability gets stretched.Three, Disproportional Rewards for Extreme ContentMany analysts say that this mechanism is a result of skewed algorithms and the incentives arising out of an advertisement-based model. While that’s partly true, there’s a deeper reason: information overload. Persuasion is a key power in the information age. Persuading someone requires attracting someone’s attention. And since attention is a scarce commodity in a crowded information environment, the only way to attract it is to come up with something surprising and shocking. Consider this analogous example. If I were to write “Lng Yrs g, W Md Tryst WTh Dstny”, you would immediately identify that I’m talking about Nehru’s iconic 1947 speech, despite me dropping all vowels. From an information theory perspective, vowels carry “less” information content because they occur more frequently. In contrast, consonants contain “more” information because the probability of their occurrence is low.In a similar manner, a news feed post which reads “There was a bomb blast in Kabul”, carries less information, because this has quite unfortunately become a regular occurrence over the last few years. In contrast, a shocking opinion or news like “Russian information ops influenced the 2016 election results” surprises us, and hence carries more information. Over time, not only does the Overton Window expand, it becomes broader at the two poles. My proposition is that many real-life events attributed to social media (positive or negative) can be explained by a combination of these three mechanisms. Consider the work done by an online group DRASTIC (Decentralized Radical Autonomous Search Team Investigating COVID-19) in mid-2021. Their work alone changed the conversation on the Wuhan lab origin theory (RSJ wrote about it here). In this case, the expanded reference network allowed a band of interested folks to build on each other’s work. The Overton Window expansion meant that the group could put forward an idea that seemed preposterous at that time. And a skew towards surprises meant that their idea didn’t just die away in a closed in-group, but instead sailed across the globe.HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Article] Janan Ganesh has a cracking column in FT, which discusses a favourite topic of ours: economic growth. Sample these lines from the column: “The looming recession will be painful. But it will also drive a certain kind of post-materialist humbug from polite discourse. Growth will be harder to dismiss as a bean counter’s tawdry obsession when there is so little of the stuff to go round.”[Article] Zeynep Tufekci’s analysis of “how social media took us from Tahrir Square to Donald Trump”.[Post] Gurwinder from The Prism has this terrific insight: ideologies are memetic superbugs. His words: “The most successful ideology in the West today, wokeism, has succeeded because it’s perfectly configured, not to establish social justice, but to establish more copies of itself. It’s a memetic superbug evolved for contagion rather than truth or compassion, and if contaminating others requires it to delude the senses, twist the truth, and darken the heart, then so be it.”[Tweet] The always-insightful Bryan Caplan’s take on intersecting echo chambers lights a bulb. He says: “If you want to combat error, critique your in-group. You speak their language and they trust you, so you might persuade someone. If you want to raise your status, critique your out-group. They won't listen, but your in-group will love it.” The latter tendency dominates the former by a big margin, I guess. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

    Daily Dose
    Daily Dose Ep 1076: Govt's Agnipath outreach, Kashmir cop killed, Kabul blasts

    Daily Dose

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 9:14


    Veronica Joseph brings you the news from Bihar, Gujarat, Jammu and Kashmir, Assam, New Delhi, and Afghanistan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Newshour
    Sikh temple in Kabul attacked

    Newshour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 49:43


    The last Sikh temple in the Afghan capital Kabul has been attacked by militants using guns, grenades and a car bomb. Also in the programme: Ukraine's minister of culture wants Eurovision in Ukraine; and fifty years of Ziggy Stardust. (Picture: Armed Taliban stand guard near the scene of explosions and gunfight at a Sikh temple, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 18 June 2022. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 25 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Afghanistan Explosion rocks Sikh temple in Kabul Why Watergate still resonates 50 years later Migrants Some due for removal from the UK could be electronically tagged Hero at Alabama church shooting subdued gunman, police say death toll rises to 3 Free school lunch program coming to an end Eyewitness News WTVO WQRF Deputy 2 officers had chance to shoot Uvalde school gunman Trains set on fire in India protests US Capitol Police arrest Stephen Colbert staffers at House office building, charged with illegal entry Eurovision Ukraine deserves to host 2023 contest, says Boris Johnson Trump hits Pence over Jan. 6 role as possible GOP 2024 hopefuls gather Russia Ukraine live updates Russia looking to advance in Donetsk region, UK says Florida Allows Doctors to Order Vaccines for Very Young Children Russia Ukraine war live updates U.S. hopes arms surge will sap Putins will Lysychansk under heavy enemy fire Russias Putin condemns mad and thoughtless Western sanctions Remains of UK journalist Phillips identified in Brazil EU Opens Membership Path for Ukraine Marcelo Pecci Killers who shot Paraguayan prosecutor on honeymoon convicted Ginni Thomas says she cannot wait to meet with Jan. 6 committee to clear up misconceptions How Texans have coped without water in US heat wave From dry to deluge, how heavy snow, rain flooded Yellowstone

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Why Watergate still resonates 50 years later Remains of UK journalist Phillips identified in Brazil Free school lunch program coming to an end Eyewitness News WTVO WQRF Russia Ukraine war live updates U.S. hopes arms surge will sap Putins will Lysychansk under heavy enemy fire Migrants Some due for removal from the UK could be electronically tagged From dry to deluge, how heavy snow, rain flooded Yellowstone Florida Allows Doctors to Order Vaccines for Very Young Children Russia Ukraine live updates Russia looking to advance in Donetsk region, UK says Afghanistan Explosion rocks Sikh temple in Kabul Ginni Thomas says she cannot wait to meet with Jan. 6 committee to clear up misconceptions Marcelo Pecci Killers who shot Paraguayan prosecutor on honeymoon convicted Trump hits Pence over Jan. 6 role as possible GOP 2024 hopefuls gather US Capitol Police arrest Stephen Colbert staffers at House office building, charged with illegal entry Eurovision Ukraine deserves to host 2023 contest, says Boris Johnson Trains set on fire in India protests How Texans have coped without water in US heat wave EU Opens Membership Path for Ukraine Russias Putin condemns mad and thoughtless Western sanctions Hero at Alabama church shooting subdued gunman, police say death toll rises to 3 Deputy 2 officers had chance to shoot Uvalde school gunman

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Afghanistan Explosion rocks Sikh temple in Kabul How Texans have coped without water in US heat wave Deputy 2 officers had chance to shoot Uvalde school gunman US Capitol Police arrest Stephen Colbert staffers at House office building, charged with illegal entry Hero at Alabama church shooting subdued gunman, police say death toll rises to 3 Russia Ukraine live updates Russia looking to advance in Donetsk region, UK says Trump hits Pence over Jan. 6 role as possible GOP 2024 hopefuls gather Remains of UK journalist Phillips identified in Brazil Trains set on fire in India protests Florida Allows Doctors to Order Vaccines for Very Young Children Marcelo Pecci Killers who shot Paraguayan prosecutor on honeymoon convicted Eurovision Ukraine deserves to host 2023 contest, says Boris Johnson Migrants Some due for removal from the UK could be electronically tagged Russias Putin condemns mad and thoughtless Western sanctions EU Opens Membership Path for Ukraine Russia Ukraine war live updates U.S. hopes arms surge will sap Putins will Lysychansk under heavy enemy fire Free school lunch program coming to an end Eyewitness News WTVO WQRF From dry to deluge, how heavy snow, rain flooded Yellowstone Why Watergate still resonates 50 years later Ginni Thomas says she cannot wait to meet with Jan. 6 committee to clear up misconceptions

    Valigia Blu
    Il tradimento dell'Occidente, il futuro dell'Afghanistan

    Valigia Blu

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 60:45


    Il 15 agosto del 2021 i talebani entrano a Kabul, occupano la capitale, ottengono la fuga del presidente Ghani sostenuto dagli occidentali. Dal palazzo presidenziale annunciano che proclameranno l'Emirato Islamico di Afghanistan, usando lo stesso nome del Paese di prima dell'arrivo degli americani. I talebani sono tornati al potere dopo vent'anni di conflitto che gli Stati Uniti e gli occidentali non sono riusciti a vincere – nonostante abbiano investito miliardi di dollari e perso migliaia di uomini, che si sommano alle centinaia di migliaia di civili uccisi. Com'è stato possibile? Che cosa è successo nei mesi e negli anni che hanno preceduto la caduta di Kabul? Quanto hanno pesato gli errori del passato che a lungo l'Occidente non ha voluto vedere? Chi riempirà il vuoto politico-diplomatico che gli Stati Uniti si sono lasciati dietro? Chi sono i nuovi talebani e quanto possono dirsi nuovi? Su cosa poggia il loro consenso? Che ne sarà del faticoso percorso di emancipazione e conquista di diritti delle donne? Qual è il futuro dell'Afghanistan? Ne abbiamo parlato con due giornalisti italiani fra i massimi esperti di Afghanistan. Nico Primo, autore di diversi libri sull'Afghanistan, tra cui l'ultimo pubblicato ad aprile “Kabul, crocevia del mondo” edizioni People. Giornalista pluripremiato, inviato speciale del tg3. I suoi documentari sono stati premiati in Europa e nel mondo, compreso il suo corto Today I will live, sul conflitto afghano. Di recente ha prodotto il mediometraggio Un Ospedale in Guerra – Emergency in Afghanistan. Barbara Schiavulli, pluripremiata corrispondente di guerra e scrittrice, ha seguito i fronti caldi degli ultimi vent'anni, come Iraq e Afghanistan, Israele, Palestina, Pakistan, Yemen, Sudan. È cofondatrice e condirettrice di Radio Bullets. Tra i suoi ultimi libri Bulletproof diaries. Storie di una reporter di guerra e Quando muoio, lo dico a Dio. Storie di ordinario estremismo.

    The Ticket Podcast
    AIPS Gold Trophy - Best Audio, The Ticket

    The Ticket Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 58:40


    AIPS (International Sports Press Association) has awarded the gold trophy for best audio to an episode of The Ticket detailing a rescue mission for women athletes in Afghanistan after the fall of Kabul to the Taliban in August 2021.

    People are Revolting
    Madison, Kabul, BC, NH

    People are Revolting

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 11:21


    Madison, Kabul, BC, NH https://www.sentinelsource.com/news/local/as-at-monadnock-keene-high-students-protest-their-schools-response-to-bullying/article_66c14a46-d92b-5e09-bc60-8895a9fb5647.html https://www.straight.com/news/save-old-growth-dumps-manure-outside-premier-john-horgans-constituency-office https://gandhara.rferl.org/a/afghanistan-un-women-invisible/31869639.html https://www.channel3000.com/protesters-rally-for-high-wages-support-for-madison-teachers/ #peoplearerevolting twitter.com/peoplerevolting Peoplearerevolting.com movingtrainradio.com

    Wright on the Nail
    Deep Dive: Afghanistan 10 months after the 2021 Taliban Offensive

    Wright on the Nail

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 40:40


    In this week's ‘Deep Dive' episode, Chris is joined by Chris Kinder, chairman of Afghanaid, and Kitty Chevallier, programme development officer of Afghanaid.The conversation begins with guests discussing what has changed in Afghanistan since the 2021 Taliban offensive- some of the positive changes include an increase in security and a decrease in corruption. They chew over how the sanctions put in place by the Western world have caused the economy to shrink and show no sign of abating. Kitty shares her experience as a Western woman in Afghanistan's capital, Kabul, and expresses that she feels safer in the capital than she did before the Taliban takeover due to the increase in security.Guests debate if the Western world should start to recognise the Taliban as a government and stop their sanctions. They argue that there should be a level of engagement between the Taliban and the West to resume development aid but there are still changes to be made before the Taliban can have full recognition. Finally, they discuss what the West can do to help support people in Afghanistan over the long term.If you would like to get involved in Afghanaid's upcoming campaign, you can find out more on their website: www.afghanaid.org.uk/Event/by-her-side-exhibition. The launch event is free to attend and will be a celebration of the stories and strengths of the Afghan women they work with, including a series of portraits, taken by photographers Lynzy Billing and Kobra Akbari.Created & produced by Podcast Partners: www.podcastpartners.comSign up to receive updates by email when a new episode drops at: www.wrightonthenail.fm

    Marketplace All-in-One
    European leaders in Ukraine for talks with Zelenskyy

    Marketplace All-in-One

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 6:54


    France’s president, as well as leaders from Germany, Italy, and Romania, are in Kyiv to meet their Ukrainian counterpart. Volodymyr Zelenskyy is expected to push the EU leaders to speed up military aid. The plunge in Bitcoin’s value has so far done little to change monetary policy in El Salvador, where it’s accepted in everyday transactions. And as nearly half of Afghans go hungry, even scraps of stale bread are an important commodity to be bought and sold in Kabul markets.

    Marketplace Morning Report
    European leaders in Ukraine for talks with Zelenskyy

    Marketplace Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 6:54


    France’s president, as well as leaders from Germany, Italy, and Romania, are in Kyiv to meet their Ukrainian counterpart. Volodymyr Zelenskyy is expected to push the EU leaders to speed up military aid. The plunge in Bitcoin’s value has so far done little to change monetary policy in El Salvador, where it’s accepted in everyday transactions. And as nearly half of Afghans go hungry, even scraps of stale bread are an important commodity to be bought and sold in Kabul markets.

    Du lytter til Politiken
    16. juni: Først flygtede de fra Taleban, nu flygter de fra Danmark

    Du lytter til Politiken

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 26:00


    For nogle dage siden hørte Politikens journalist Jesper Thobo-Carlsen et rygte: Nogle af de afghanere, Danmark havde reddet ud af Kabul sidste år, ville ikke være her længere. Han fik fat i en af afghanerne, der kunne fortælle, at den var god nok. De synes, Danmark er et dejligt land, men mest for danskerne. Og nu vil USA give dem en fremtid, de ikke kan få i Danmark. Jesper Thobo-Carlsen fortæller, hvorfor de afghanere, der flygtede fra Taleban, nu forlader det land, som reddede dem.

    Listen First Montana
    Episode 27: Frank Garner

    Listen First Montana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 52:45


    LISTEN FIRST MONTANA Listen first. It is what all great leaders do. Episode 27: Frank Garner In this episode, Eric speaks with Frank Garner, 4th term State Representative of House District 7 and former Kalispell Police Chief.  Frank discusses his thoughts on the current state of policing, how he approached his leadership role as police chief, and how he used the lessons from Leadership Montana during a one year stint training police in Afghanistan in 2005.  Frank also reflects on state politics, leadership, and the future of Montana.  Frank is a graduate of the inaugural class of Leadership Montana in 2005 and is passionate about leaving the world in a better place than he found it – or as he says in this episode, planting trees that will provide shade for people he will never meet. Eric Halverson Host Eric, a graduate of Leadership Montana Class of 2016 and Masters Class 2019, leads this project with an unmatched curiosity and thirst for learning how each interviewee leans into leading. Eric magically brings to life the story underneath the words and weaves together a series that perfectly illustrates the meaning and value of listening deeply. Originally from Billings, Eric currently resides in Missoula where he serves as the Communications and Development Administrator for Partnership Health Center. Frank Garner Guest Frank Garner was raised in Kalispell, Montana, where he graduated from Flathead High School and Flathead Valley Community College. He became a member of the Kalispell Police Department in 1986, where he worked in the patrol division. Frank served in a number of roles throughout his career, including as a County Drug Team Agent, Shift Supervisor, Detective, SWAT Team Leader, and in 1997 he was promoted to Chief of Police. As Chief of Police, Frank initiated an aggressive community policing philosophy that led to a number of beneficial programs, including Kalispell's Meeting on Meth, the Major Case Unit, the School Resource Officer Program, and the Police Advisory Council. After nearly nine years as Chief, Frank retired and took a position as a Police Advisor in Afghanistan, where he served as a mentor to Afghan Police, a police trainer at the Jalalabad Regional Training Center, and later as the Professional Police Mentor Supervisor in the Afghan capital of Kabul. Frank went on to serve as the Chief of Security for the local hospital and then transitioned into private law enforcement and security consulting. Frank has a long record of public service that includes membership in the Evergreen Lions Club, The Kalispell Rotary Club, and Big Brothers and Sisters.   Frank is now in his fourth term as a Montana State Representative for House District 7 and currently serves as Chair of the Montana ARPA Health Commission as well as serving on the Health and Human Services interim budget committee.

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 25 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Gunman killed in Duncanville summer camp shootout identified Primary voters decide elections in Nevada, South Carolina, Maine, North Dakota LIVE UPDATES US aircrew cleared in review of deadly incident during flight from Kabul Biden to meet with Saudi crown prince despite pariah pledge Rwanda asylum flight cancelled after legal action Extreme weather is tormenting every U.S. region, and its far from over Donald Trump, eldest children to give sworn depositions in real estate investigation EU set to take legal action against UK over post Brexit deal changes Canada lifts jab mandate for domestic and overseas travel Dozens evacuated as unprecedented flooding forces Yellowstone National Park to close all entrances Pro Russian separatists tell Ukrainian fighters in Severodonetsk Surrender or die Happy the elephant is not a person, New York court rules Joe Biden to visit Middle East allies amid strains Southern Baptists Gather for Historic Convention Russia Ukraine war Some of UKs top journalists barred from Russia Whiskey Wars Denmark and Canada strike deal to end 50 year row over Arctic island BTS announce break to grow and pursue solo projects Bidens Never Been More Optimistic Despite Troubled US Economy Bloomberg Heat wave warnings in place across the US Sky News Australia Brittney Griner Russia extends WNBA stars detention again

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Brittney Griner Russia extends WNBA stars detention again Pro Russian separatists tell Ukrainian fighters in Severodonetsk Surrender or die Biden to meet with Saudi crown prince despite pariah pledge Happy the elephant is not a person, New York court rules Joe Biden to visit Middle East allies amid strains Primary voters decide elections in Nevada, South Carolina, Maine, North Dakota LIVE UPDATES EU set to take legal action against UK over post Brexit deal changes Gunman killed in Duncanville summer camp shootout identified Russia Ukraine war Some of UKs top journalists barred from Russia Bidens Never Been More Optimistic Despite Troubled US Economy Bloomberg Extreme weather is tormenting every U.S. region, and its far from over Rwanda asylum flight cancelled after legal action Canada lifts jab mandate for domestic and overseas travel Whiskey Wars Denmark and Canada strike deal to end 50 year row over Arctic island BTS announce break to grow and pursue solo projects Heat wave warnings in place across the US Sky News Australia Donald Trump, eldest children to give sworn depositions in real estate investigation US aircrew cleared in review of deadly incident during flight from Kabul Dozens evacuated as unprecedented flooding forces Yellowstone National Park to close all entrances Southern Baptists Gather for Historic Convention

    News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

    Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Happy the elephant is not a person, New York court rules Bidens Never Been More Optimistic Despite Troubled US Economy Bloomberg BTS announce break to grow and pursue solo projects Primary voters decide elections in Nevada, South Carolina, Maine, North Dakota LIVE UPDATES Gunman killed in Duncanville summer camp shootout identified Joe Biden to visit Middle East allies amid strains Pro Russian separatists tell Ukrainian fighters in Severodonetsk Surrender or die EU set to take legal action against UK over post Brexit deal changes Rwanda asylum flight cancelled after legal action Southern Baptists Gather for Historic Convention Canada lifts jab mandate for domestic and overseas travel Heat wave warnings in place across the US Sky News Australia Donald Trump, eldest children to give sworn depositions in real estate investigation Biden to meet with Saudi crown prince despite pariah pledge Extreme weather is tormenting every U.S. region, and its far from over Dozens evacuated as unprecedented flooding forces Yellowstone National Park to close all entrances Russia Ukraine war Some of UKs top journalists barred from Russia Whiskey Wars Denmark and Canada strike deal to end 50 year row over Arctic island Brittney Griner Russia extends WNBA stars detention again US aircrew cleared in review of deadly incident during flight from Kabul

    PRI's The World
    Ukrainian troops face shortages on the frontlines of eastern Donbas

    PRI's The World

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 47:29


    Ukrainian soldiers are having to make do with shortages of weapons and supplies on the frontlines in eastern Donbas, according to Ukrainian MP Mariana Bezugla, who is hunkered down there with the troops. Also, a fight between Turkish and Afghan teenagers has set off a series of attacks against migrant workers who pick up trash around Istanbul. As the country's economy worsens, tensions between Turks and refugees are getting worse. And in mid-August of last year, as the US was fully disengaging from Afghanistan, some Afghans clung to a C-17 military plane as it was taking off from Kabul airport and fell to their deaths. Multiple investigations had been launched to uncover exactly what happened. Plus, June 14 marks 40 since the war between the United Kingdom and Argentina over control of the Falkland Islands. We hear what the war and the islands mean to Argentinians today. The World relies on listener support to power our nonprofit newsroom. If you count on The World to bring you human-centered stories from across the globe, make your gift today to help us reach our goal of raising $25,000 before June 30. Learn more and donate here.

    Home Base Nation
    Codeword: Tom Brady - Afghan American Army Veteran Said Noor and his 20-year mission to save his family from the Taliban

    Home Base Nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 56:23


    In today's episode, Ron Hirschberg talks with Said Noor, a proud Afghan American Army Veteran who first served for over eight years as an interpreter for the U.S. Army troops stationed near his village, before he was able to move to the U.S. on a special visa. A few years later, Said became a U.S. citizen, joined the U.S. Army, and redeployed back to the same area he had lived with his mom and eight siblings amidst many years of Taliban brutality, this time as a soldier. Said and Ron talk about Said's incredible story of service and his mission to fight the Taliban, his early years in Afghanistan, his time with the Army, and how in August 2021 he succeeded in his 20-year mission to keep his family safe. After months of advocacy, and with the help of MA Congressman Seth Moulton and in a small way football player Tom Brady, he was able to get his family on one of the last evacuation planes leaving Afghanistan, and safely to the U.S. ###THE ANNUAL RUN TO HOME BASE IS 7-30-22 THIS YEAR! ALL FUNDRAISING GOES DIRECTLY TO THE CARE OF OUR VETERANS AND MILITARY FAMILIES, SO SIGN UP HERE: www.runtohomebase.org###If you are your loved one is experiencing any emotional, mental health struggles, you are not alone and please contact Home Base at (617) 724-5202, or visit www.homebase.org  Theme music for Home Base Nation: "Rolling the tree" by The Butler Frogs###Thank you Said Noor for your service, resilience and perseverance over 20 years to help your family and so many others with the common fight for humanity and peace.Said joined us virtually from Houston in March 2022, seven months since his family safely left Kabul alongside the US military, following the suicide bombing attack killing 13 US servicemembers and injuring 100s of Afghans. Said takes us back to the time he first learned about the 9/11 attacks in the US. He was 11 years old, living with his mom and 8 siblings, all witnessing the Taliban beating his mom regularly, robbing her for money that was sent from dad who had been working in the UAE. Said was fascinated with the US troops who soon became fixtures in the community, and although they appeared as if they were from another planet, they treated his family with immediate kindness – while the Taliban who spoke his same language were wreaking havoc all around him. For years Said and family would watch Stallone's Rambo movies which would become his early lessons in the English language, and in 2007, Said officially became a translator for the US troops at age 17. In 2014, Said left for the United States on special Visa, and in 2017 he became a US citizen. Before long he enlisted in the US Army and by 2018 was translating for the troops back in Afghanistan. Said was now a proud Afghan American serving our country, and in 2020 after being honorably discharged from the Army he returned as a US citizen to the same village he first saw those troops 20 years prior.In 2021 Said had a new mission, to bring his whole family to the US – Not an easy task, even as a US Citizen and Army Veteran. His plea made it to Massachusetts Congressman Seth Moulton's desk, and along with creative planning by staff member Neesha Suarez, made the mission a reality – On August 27th, Said's family was instructed to enter the gates of the Kabul airport, get to a gas station and connect with a Marine to give the straight-out-of-Boston code word, “Tom Brady.”A household name like Tom Brady to us New Englanders may not have meant anything to Said's family at the time, but it's now unforgettable for them all. The Buccaneers brought Said and fellow comrade and Patriots fan Steve Morse to Tampa for a game, and Mr. Brady sent a personal message thanking US Army Veteran Said Noor for his service to our country. Said brings us deeper into his story of a kid that just wants his family to survive and thrive, and how in these times as we look to Ukraine, human suffering should never exist no matter what. Said is proud of the Afghan people, and of the US citizen and veteran he has become, and it's really an honor to bring this conversation to you. ###Follow Home Base on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedInThe Home Base Nation Team is Steve Monaco, Maureen Roderick, Laurie Gallagher, Karianne Kraus, Lucy Little, Taylor Orlando, with COO Michael Allard, Brigadier General Jack Hammond, and Peter Smyth.Producer and Host: Dr. Ron HirschbergProducer, Sound, Editor: Lucy LittleChairman, Home Base Media Lab: Peter SmythHome Base Nation is the official podcast of Home Base Program for Veterans and Military Families, a partnership of the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Red Sox Foundation. To learn more and connect with us at Home Base Nation: www.homebase.org/homebasenation. To Donate to Home Base where every dollar goes to the care of veterans and military families that is cost to them, go to: www.homebase.org/donate.The views expressed by guests to the Home Base Nation podcast are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by guests are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Home Base, the Red Sox Foundation or any of its officials.

    Arms Room Radio
    ArmsRoomRadio 09.11.21 Memories of September 11th

    Arms Room Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 101:54


    This week the guys talk about their memories of September 11th. They also discuss women protesting the Taliban in Kabul. David "The Waco Kid" Chipman is pulled from consideration for Director of the ATF. Rick Rescorla, a hero of the World Trade center attack is given a tribute. And finally, the guys talk about the worst five handguns, ever.

    The John Batchelor Show
    #AfterAfghanistan: Benign neglect for Islamabad and Kabul. Bill Roggio FDD. Husain Haqqani @husainhaqqani, former Pakistani Ambassador to the United States; Director, South & Central Asia, Hudson Institute

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 12:05


    Photo:    Islamabad — Horned deities on an Indus Valley seal (Harappa) #AfterAfghanistan: Benign neglect for Islamabad and Kabul. Bill Roggio FDD. Husain Haqqani @husainhaqqani, former Pakistani Ambassador to the United States; Director, South & Central Asia,  Hudson Institute  https://en.mehrnews.com/news/187883/3-blasts-across-Afghanistan-leave-11-killed-or-injured https://www.voanews.com/a/taliban-claim-killing-8-isis-k-militants-in-northeastern-afghanistan-/6613497.html

    Allies
    Episode 6: Allies Refuge

    Allies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 57:53


    20 years of war and broken bureaucracy culminate during the US withdrawal at the Kabul airport. Thousands of Afghans rush to the tarmac where American forces sort through the crowds. Veterans, advocates and politicians try to get their allies out while the Taliban rapidly takes control of Afghanistan. You'll hear first-hand accounts of people fleeing Afghanistan. And how thousands more were left behind to face an uncertain future. Guests: Hakimi, Chris Purdy @itsapurdy, Jawad Sukhenyar @JawadSukhanyar, Seth Moulton @sethmoulton, Peter Meijer @RepMeijer, Elliot Ackerman, @elliotackermanFor anyone needing help or advice relating to relocation and resettlement from Afghanistan, the independent Evacuate Our Allies Coalition staffs a operations center 7 days a week that can be reached at:Email: evacuateourallies@gmail.comPhone: +1 (213) 358-7953 (live Monday - Friday, 7am - 7pm PT; Saturday & Sunday 9am - 5pm PT)More information on the Coalition is available at http://www.evacuateourallies.org.Lawfare and Goat Rodeo are not part of the Coalition and cannot provide legal advice or referrals. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Fallacious Trump
    Pooh Pooh Fallacy - FT#102

    Fallacious Trump

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 77:44


    In the one hundred and number two episode we explore the Pooh Pooh Fallacy, starting with Trump calling the Green New Deal childish and describing a reporter's question as stupid.In Mark's British Politics Corner we look at Dominic Raab calling various things ridiculous nonsense, including the fact he was on a beach in Crete when he should have been coordinating the evacuation of Kabul, the fact that evacuation had been foreseen for a while, and the outrage over the illegal prorogation of Parliament.In the Fallacy in the Wild section, we check out examples from Blackadder, The Divine Comedy song Something For The Weekend, Futurama and Airplane!Jim and Mark go head to head in Fake News, the game in which Mark has to guess which one of three Trump quotes Jim made upThen we talk about the upcoming Jan 6 committee hearings. At least they were upcoming when we recorded it, but now they've started.And finally, we round up some of the other crazy Trump stories from the past week.The full show notes for this episode can be found at https://fallacioustrump.com/ft102You can contact the guys at pod@fallacioustrump.com, on Twitter @FallaciousTrump, or facebook at facebook.com/groups/fallacioustrumpSupport this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/fallacious-trump/donationsAdvertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

    Historia Universalis
    HU226 – Der erste anglo-afghanische Krieg und der Rückzug aus Kabul (Schlachten der Weltgeschichte 17)

    Historia Universalis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 102:58


    In dieser Folge begeben sich Elias und Flo von Indien aus auf die Reise nach Afghanistan. In der ersten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts, im Rahmen des sogenannten »Grand Game«, entschied die britische Regierung und Kolonialverwaltung, dass man sich in die inneren Verhältnisse in Afghanistan einmischen solle – zu groß war die Gefahr, dass es ansonsten Russland täte. Gesagt getan, marschierte eine »britische« Armee gen Nordwesten in Richtung Kabul und versuchte den Schah von Afghanistan gegen einen Marionettenkönig auszutauschen. Doch auch aufgrund der … besonderen Anführer und Generäle scheiterte dieser Feldzug mehr als krachend (oder auch nicht krachend, also ohne Artillerie). Aber was genau passiert, und was es mit dem Rückzug aus Kabul auf sich hat, dass musst du dir schon selbst anhören.

    The Good Fight
    What Went Wrong in Afghanistan

    The Good Fight

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 64:06


    Yalda Hakim is a BBC World News correspondent and broadcaster. Born in Afghanistan and raised in Australia, Hakim has reported from Afghanistan for many years, often dealing directly with the Taliban. In recent months, she has also reported from western Ukraine. Her foundation offers academic and professional opportunities to Afghan girls. In this week's conversation, Yascha Mounk and Yalda Hakim discuss the dramatic changes the Afghan people have felt since the Taliban's return to power, the parallels between Kyiv and Kabul, and the role of women in both conflicts. This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity. Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight. If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone. Email: podcast@persuasion.community  Website: http://www.persuasion.community Podcast production by John Taylor Williams, and Brendan Ruberry Connect with us! Spotify | Apple | Google Twitter: @Yascha_Mounk & @joinpersuasion Youtube: Yascha Mounk LinkedIn: Persuasion Community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The New P&L - Principles & Leadership in Business
    The New P&L – Principles & Leadership in Business speaks to Oliver Percovich, founder & Executive Director of Skateistan

    The New P&L - Principles & Leadership in Business

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 52:59


    This week's guest on The New P&L – Principles & Leadership in Business podcast is the awesome Oliver Percovich, founder and Executive Director of Skateistan. A lifelong skateboarder, Oliver moved to Afghanistan from Australia in 2007 when his then girlfriend took a job in Kabul. Looking to explore, he would skate the city, and street-working kids would follow him around and ask to try. In 2008, Oliver founded Skateistan, a grassroots 'Sport for Development' project on the streets of Kabul. Today, Skateistan is an award-winning international organization with Skate Schools and programs running in Afghanistan, Cambodia, South Africa, Jordan, Lebanon and Belgium, to name a few. The organization is the first international development initiative to combine skateboarding with educational outcomes. Skateistan's programs are for children aged 5 to 17 with a focus on girls, children living with disabilities and those from low-income backgrounds. Through their innovative programs, Skateistan aims to give children the opportunity to become leaders for a better world. W: http://skateistan.org/ Insta: @skateistan Twitter: @Skateistan If you'd like to join our movement at The New P&L and keep up to date with all our latest news, go to www.principlesandleadership.com and subscribe. Twitter: @TheNewPandL Insta: @principlesandleadership LinkedIn page: Principlesandleadership --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/principlesandleadership/message

    Battlegrounds: International Perspectives
    War Crimes In Ukraine: The Pursuit Of International Justice

    Battlegrounds: International Perspectives

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 72:08


    In this episode of Battlegrounds, H.R. McMaster and David Schwendiman discuss the evolution of human rights law, international criminal justice, investigations and prosecutions, and its implications for prosecuting war crimes in Ukraine.  H.R. McMaster in conversation with David Schwendiman on Wednesday, June 8, 2022 at 9:00am PT. ABOUT THE SPEAKERS David Schwendiman served for over twenty-five years as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the District of Utah. He was the Chief Prosecutor of the Kosovo Specialist Prosecutor's Office in The Hague from 2016 to 2018 and previously oversaw investigation of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in Kosovo in 1998, 1999 and 2000 as the Lead Prosecutor of the EU's Special Investigative Task Force (SITF). Schwendiman investigated and prosecuted atrocities committed during the war in the Former Yugoslavia as an international prosecutor in the Special Department for War Crimes of the State Prosecutor's Office in Bosnia and Herzegovina. He also served as the U.S. Justice Attaché in Kabul, Afghanistan from 2010 through 2013 and spent 2014 as the Assistant Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) and Director of Forward Operations for SIGAR.  He is now an Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Utah's S.J. Quinney College of Law.   H. R. McMaster is the Fouad and Michelle Ajami Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University and the Japan Chair at the Hudson Institute.  He is also the Bernard and Susan Liautaud Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and lecturer at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business.  He was the 26th assistant to the president for National Security Affairs. Upon graduation from the United States Military Academy in 1984, McMaster served as a commissioned officer in the United States Army for thirty-four years before retiring as a Lieutenant General in June 2018.

    The President's Daily Brief
    June 7th, 2022. Afghanistan is an Al-Qaeda Safe Haven. Wheat Wars Continue.

    The President's Daily Brief

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 18:15


    It's June 7th. You're listening to the President's Daily Brief. I'm your host and former CIA Officer Bryan Dean Wright. Your morning intel starts now. First up, Afghanistan has once again become a safe haven for al-Qa'ida. We're going to talk about the latest from Kabul, including when you should expect that al-Qa'ida will be able to hit the American homeland once again. As always, I'm keeping an eye out for developing stories. Put these two on your radar. First, Wheat Wars. Our State Department sent out message to 14 nations around the world telling them to reject stolen Ukrainian wheat. But most of those 14 countries are desperate for food. We'll discuss.  Finally, China's building a secret new naval base near very important shipping lanes in the South China Sea. And that has major implications for our economy. I'll explain the latest. All up next on the President's Daily Brief. ------ Please remember to subscribe if you enjoyed this episode of the President's Daily Brief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Doc Project
    The Girls Who Escaped The Taliban

    The Doc Project

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 27:27


    The Marefat School in Kabul, Afghanistan earned an international reputation for being a place where democracy, freedom, and education could flourish. The co-ed facility mentored young men and women aged 14-20. But when the Taliban took over the country in August 2021, many of the female teachers and students had to flee for their lives. This documentary tells the story of a music teacher who – with the assistance of a small group of lawyers, journalists and human rights activists around the world – helped bring more than 200 students and their families out of Afghanistan to safety in Saskatoon.