Podcasts about Excellent

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Best podcasts about Excellent

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Latest podcast episodes about Excellent

Sports Krunch w/DKROM
#337: Dash To The Draft 2022 (AFC East Draft Recap with Jeff Barnes)

Sports Krunch w/DKROM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 27:04


1. Jets -Can you see Sauce Gardner making a similar impact for the Jets his rookie year as Patrick Surtain did for the Broncos? -What does Garrett Wilson bring to the Jets receiving corps that Elijah Moore and Corey Davis do not? -With Jermaine Johnson now in the fold, would you be surprised if the Jets DL is regarded as the best such unit in the NFL either later this season or some time in 2023? -How do you see Breece Hall and Michael Carter splitting the workload at RB this season? 2. Dolphins -Thanks to the Tyreek Hill trade, the Dolphins cupboard of picks was pretty bare, as they did not pick until 102 overall. That said, I personally think they landed EXCELLENT value by selecting Georgia LB Channing Tindall with that pick. What were your thoughts on this pick and do you think Tindall will eventually outplay that draft slot? 3. Patriots -What was your pre-draft evaluation on Cole Strange and do you think he'll be worth this pick long-term? -Do you think Tyquan Thornton is an ideal target for Mac Jones in the passing game? -Can you see the Patriots having a package of plays for Marcus Jones on offense this year? 4. Bills -Does Kaiir Elam immediately upgrade that position and if so, why? -How does James Cook make the high-powered Bills offense even more dangerous? -Do you think Khalil Shakir should be able to stick around and eventually become a trusted target for Josh Allen in certain situations long-term? 5. Name a player (either drafted or UDFA) from each team we have not yet discussed that you think will have a successful NFL career -Jets: Jeremy Ruckert -Dolphins: Cameron Goode -Patriots: Jack Jones -Bills: Luke Tenuta

Investing For Good
Making A Difference Through Excellent Parenting And A Passion For Education with John Palfrey

Investing For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 40:46


How fulfilling an academic-centered careerInsights about the younger generations who lived during the digital eraAn excellent perspective on upbringing and raising your own childrenOverview of growing the financial endowment of a charitable foundationThe importance of balancing career and family  The Life & Money Show Spotlight:Your Life & Money: What is one thing you're doing to live a meaningful and intentional life by design?Other's Life and Money: What is one life or money hack that you can share that will make an impact in others' lives right now? Life & Money in the World: What's the one thing you're doing right now to make the world a better place? RESOURCES/LINKS MENTIONEDBorn Digital by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser | Paperback & HardcoverThe Connected Parent by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser | Hardcover & Audiobook ABOUT JOHN PALFREYJohn is the President of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation which is one of America's biggest philanthropies with assets accumulating to over $7 billion. He is an author of the award-winning books Safe Spaces, Brave Spaces: Diversity and Free Expression in Education, and Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives. He is a seasoned educator, innovator, and legal scholar with well-respected expertise in how learning, education, and other institutions have changed because of new media. Additionally, he is committed to rigorous thinking, disruption, and creative solutions often made possible by technology, accessibility of information, and diversity and inclusion. John served as Head of School at Philips Academy, Andover, and oversaw the creation of the Tang Institute. He was the Henry N. Ess III Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources at Harvard Law School. From 2002 to 2008, Palfrey served as Executive Director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, founding board chair of the Digital Public Library of America, and is the former board chair of LRNG, a nonprofit launched and supported by MacArthur. He holds a JD from Harvard Law School, an MPhil from the University of Cambridge, and an AB from Harvard College. CONNECT WITH JOHNLinkedIn: John PalfreyWebsite: MacArthur Foundation CONNECT WITH USTo connect with Annie and Julie, as well as with other Investing For Good listeners, and to get the latest scoop on new and upcoming episodes, join Life and Money Show Podcast Community on Facebook.To learn more about real estate syndication investment opportunities, join the Goodegg Investor Club.Be sure to also grab your free copy of the Investing For Good book (just pay S&H)--Thanks for listening, and until next time, keep investing for good!

Go Long with Dunne & Monos
Sleeping in the office isn't the best idea

Go Long with Dunne & Monos

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 58:08


It's the question central to every coach's life in the NFL: How much of your time do you pour into this profession? Bill Belichick's staff set a ruthless standard a couple decades ago and so many coaches across the league seem hellbent on following by sleeping in the office. Is that really the best approach? Sean McDermott said he's trying to find the balance, though it is a struggle. He most certainly is not alone. Also on the pod, we get into the crazy life of the NFL offensive line coach and why it takes a special character to live in the trenches. And once more, we take your questions and they do not disappoint. Excellent submissions. By far, the best came from Go Long subscriber Jimmy Pawlowski: "Would you rather have to fight a orangutan with a sword once a year, or a chicken every time you got into your car?" We debate. Enjoy the podcast? We'd love it if you gave us a five-star review and shared with a friend. Thank you for helping this podcast grow! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Crash Landed on KDramas
What Are We Watching - WAWW

Crash Landed on KDramas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 37:06


What dramas have we recently watched/ are currently watching - We share our impressions of these dramas. Currently Watching: Sangeetha's Picks: Eve : Seo YeJi's comeback drama. It's a revenge drama with Seo YeJi playing the protagonist who is out for revenge from the chaebol family. Why Her: Legal drama which is a women centric drama with Seo Hyun Jin playing the lead protagonist. Started it for her and has liked it so far. Kiss Sixth Sense: Based on the webtoon which both Sangeetha and Minal have read. Enjoying it and the lead actor Yoon Kye Sang is a favourite of both Minal and Sangeetha. Bloody Heart: Watched 6 episodes purely for Jang Hyuk, good so far. Minal's Pick: Black Dog : Another Seo Hyun Jin drama that revolves around school teachers and the politics amongst them. On hold currently, but will definitely pick it up again for the different plot. Completed Dramas Secret Royal Inspector Joy : Poonam recommends this primarily for a progressive female protagonist played by Kim Hye Yoon set in the Joseon era. She meets the male lead TaecYeon who is a Secret Royal Agent and together they work to solve cases. Sky Castle : Minal loved this drama . It is a tragicomedy, a satirical take on the obsession of upper-class parents in South Korea to get their kids in the topmost universities at the cost of destroying others' lives. Excellent acting by a great ensemble cast and writing/direction. Sound of Magic: Poonam and Sangeetha loved this musical drama while Minal had mixed reviews. The drama is about a 30 year old magician and 2 struggling teenagers who try to chart a path of their own against societal norms. 6 episodes only. Again My Life : Lee Joon Gi is back as a prosecutor action hero with a fantasy element where he gets to redo his life. Minal and Poonam loved it. Recommended watch, especially if you are a Lee Joon Gi fan. Soundtrack : Friends to lovers trope starring Park Hyung Sik and Han So Hee. 4 episodes - short drama. Sangeetha recommends it. Love All Play : A surprise package which was the right blend of romance, sports, friendships with an emotional storyline. The supporting cast is good and Chae Jong Hyeop and Park Ju Hyun's lead pair chemistry is top notch. Whilst it is not perfect, Minal recommends it for the best boyfriend ever written and portrayed to perfection by Chae Jong Hyeop in KDramaland. Music Credits: Music from Uppbeat: https://uppbeat.io/t/mood-maze/trendsetter. License code: LU8KUCTYYYAA2KKL Cover Art: Purva Bakalkar Contact Us: Email: crashlandedonkdramas[@]gmail[.]com Leave us a review or rating on the podcast app. Twitter: @CrashLandedonKD Instagram @crashlanded_onkdramas --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/crashlandedonkdramas/message

Good Doctrine
Ep. 114 | Independence and Association

Good Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 56:19


A lot's happened in some big American denominations recently, so what should churches who want to part ways with these denominations consider before cutting loose? Our sponsor (and an EXCELLENT resource for Bible study): Logos.com/gooddoctrineIntro/Outro music from bensound.com

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
Breaking The Stigma w/ Mind Yr Life Founder Dr. Luisa Sanz

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 17:34


 Dr. Luisa Sanz is a psychiatrist with over 25 years of experience working mainly with young people. She is immensely passionate about her work, and at the root of all she does, is the drive to help others through understanding, acceptance, compassion, respect and love. Such passion and devotion are unquestionably the results of having two brothers with schizophrenia and living its consequences from the age of 7. Being originally from Madrid, Spain, she moved to England at the age of 26 to specialize in Psychiatry and still lives there. Throughout her professional career, Dr. Sanz has actively contributed to developing services, improving the provision of care for individuals with ADHD/ASD and their families, including developing pathways to optimize diagnosis and treatment. Her special interest has always been in neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly ADHD but also ASD, and this is where she's mainly focussed her work. During her recent career break working as a regional Clinical Director for Mental Health services in the National Health Service, Dr. Sanz founded Mind Yr Life for the purpose of eradicating the stigma around Mental Health (MH). Mind Yr Life does so by, firstly, sharing credible information on MH conditions/illnesses, secondly, having open and honest conversations about personal experiences with MH problems and, thirdly, adopting an attitude towards a) acceptance and love, b) humbleness with an open mind, and c) staying grateful and positive. Today we're talking about her organization and the path that lead her here. Enjoy! In this episode Peter and Luisa Sanz discuss:   1:12 - Intro and welcome Luisa!  2:17 - So what pushed you towards focusing your work towards ADHD, ADD, ASD? 3:20 - Talk about some of the challenges you went up against; how attitudes towards the neurodiverse and the environment there was prior to, and after your time at NHS? 5:30 - What have you noticed in terms of changing the conversation/ breaking the stigma? 7:22 - How to break stigma? 8:53 - Tell us about your organization Mind Yr Life! 10:00 - We don't exactly have a blood test for all things neurodiverse, do we 10:50 - Dr. Sanz on her family's experiences with mental health 11:20 - A bad attitude and ignorance are usually contagious  12:17 - When people don't know about mental health illnesses, or about most things for that matter they may feel fearful or threatened; and often times they try and put a person down because that makes them feel more in control, more secured. So.. there is a lot of work to be done!  12:54: How can people find more about you and what you're doing?  On the Web: www.MindYrLife.com Socials: @MindYrLifeMYL on Twitter  Facebook @mind.yr.life on INSTA and Luisa Sanz on YouTube 16:00 - Thank you Luisa! Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love the responses and the notes that we get from you so please continue to do that! Tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you ever need our help I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  16:30 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits — TRANSCRIPT:    [00:00:38] Peter: Ladies and gentlemen, good day, and welcome to another episode of Faster Than Normal. My name is Peter Shankman. This is the number one podcast on ADD and ADHD and I'm thrilled that you joined us today. We have an unusual guest well all of our guests are a little unusual. This one is unusual, cause she's actually a Doctor. As you know, we have people from all over the world who join us at Faster Than Normal from, from professors to rockstar actual rockstars. Remember we had the band Shinedown. We've had politicians, we've had CEOs. We've had regular ordinary folk and occasionally every once in a while, we've brought in an actual doctor and today is one of those days.  Please welcome Dr. Luisa Sanz who is a psychiatrist with over 25 years of experience working mainly with young people, incredibly passionately. Her drive is to help others through understanding acceptance, compassion, respect, and love. She's originally from Madrid. She moved to England at the age of 26, specialized in psychiatry, still lives there throughout her professional career. She's contributed to developing services, improving the provision of care for individuals with a ADHD and ASD and their families, including developing pathways to optimize diagnosis and treatment. She spent good number of years as a regional clinical director for mental health services in the national health service, she also founded something called Mind Yr Life for the purpose of eradicating a stigma around mental health mind your life does so by sharing credible information on mental health conditions and illnesses. And by having open honest conversations about personal experiences with mental health problems, and thirdly adopting an attitude towards acceptance and love humbleness and open mind and staying grateful and positive. Well, we are grateful and positively thrilled that you joined us today. Dr. Sanz thank you! So for taking the time.  [00:02:10] Dr.Sanz: Oh my pleasure. Thank you to you for inviting me! [00:02:14] Peter: So, what pushed you towards focusing on ADHD and ASD  [00:02:20] Dr.Sanz: I believe that when I first went into specializing in psychiatry, initially I went into adult psychiatry, but I found it a little bit overwhelming because I, I have two brothers who had schizophrenia, and there was too much of the same outside and inside, you know, outside at work and inside at home. So I decided to specialize in children and adolescent, and I thought that I could possibly intervene early life. Uh, of these, of these people and make a bigger difference. And, uh, without a question of doubt, ADHD is the most common condition in mental health altogether, but much more in children and adolescents. So being such a common condition, I was just driven towards, um, to, you know, to, to these, these, these conditions.  [00:03:11] Peter: Interesting. And what was the attitude before you joined, um, national, uh, health service? I'm assuming you spent a lot of time focusing on changing the environment and changing the conversation. How was the attitude before you joined and, and, and can you cite, uh, sort of some of the challenges you went up against, uh, in changing that conversation?  [00:03:32] Dr.Sanz: Yeah. Uh, I think Peter that, uh, for me, because, because I grew up with mental illness at home, you know, through my brothers, I think I, from, from day one, when I became a psychiatrist, I was different in a way to many of the psychiatrists. Because I had believed mental illness from, you know, very, very close in the household. Uh, so my, my approach was different and I, from the very beginning, I always empathize the empathize, the, the, uh, you know, with patients and, and, and, and felt, felt them closer in my heart. And, uh, and you know, the conversations that I always had were, were around. Being more compassionate and, and definitely, definitely not judging, not making assumptions and just accepting people for who they are. Um, in, in with ADHD. I, I, I always believe everything happens the, the way it's meant to. And I was meant to specialize in, in know, neurodevelopmental disorders, ADHD in particular, because, um, more than anything ADHD. I realize that, you know, precisely we can't judge, we can't make assumptions because most of the times those are wrong and people with ADHD my daughter, Peter has ADHD, but people with ADHD are so incredibly creative, charismatic, uh, you know, gifted and, and because of, of others judging and criticizing, we tend to. You know, hinder all those talents and, and, and beautiful, beautiful personalities. So, um, you know, you, your question was how, how have I tried to change those conversations? How have they changed? I suppose that from, from where I stand, my conversations have always been similar. The response I've had is different because for people that know me now, they know they know the type of conversations they can have with me. [00:05:30] Peter: What have you noticed in terms of changing the conversation? I, I kind of feel sometimes, and I I'm gonna continue to do it, you know, until my last breath, but I sometimes feel like it's like emptying the ocean with a, trying to empty the ocean with a teaspoon. Right. It's it's, you know, for every person that we talk to and explain. That, uh, different does not equal bad or that, or that, you know, this is not a disability per se. Uh, we come across schools or, or doctors, whatever who, who treat this exactly as such as a disability. And, and when you're seven years old and you're diagnosed with ADHD, uh, and you're told the first thing you're told, the first thing your parents are told is that you are less than everyone else. That's a hard stigma to shape.  [00:06:10] Dr.Sanz: It, it is aweful and, and the conversations have changed because when I first started, you know, working in ADHD 20 odd years ago, um, the, I had to speak to professionals, to doctors about the fact that. It was a genetic condition. It wasn't about bad parenting. It wasn't about children just being awkward and difficult and naughty. And that those conversations were with professionals. I still occasionally have one of those conversations with a doctor, with a teacher, but not as often more often, uh, than not now people accept that it is a condition, that it is a genetic, uh, inherited, uh, condition. But generally people don't understand how it shows and how it really, uh, what it really means. And again, this, this very wrong assumptions about, you know, when people, don't people with ADHD, don't do certain things. This is still this assumption that they've just been awkward and oppositional, whereas, you know, they don't see what really is happening. In the brain in the executive, you know, function in the, in the brain and in the neuropathways pathways of the brain. So those conversations are still going on and will continue to go on for a very long time. But Peter, that is about stigma and that is about. You know, uh, you know, how, you know, lack of understanding because there's two aspects to the conversations. One is the lack of understanding of what it really means. And the other is, uh, seeing it as a, as you very well defined it as a disability, as a, as a, uh, people are less for having ADHD. So it's, it is both things. 1. People don't understand the actual signs and symptoms and how it really presents. And two then is, you know, very stigmatized and is very derogatory the way it's spoken about. [00:08:11] Peter: It's interesting because you know, other diseases, for lack of a better word, other conditions, you know, they, they don't seem. I guess they don't see it as stigmatized. Right. You know, you don't, you don't look at, um, I mean, mental health as a whole, it has always been stigmatized, but you know, you're never gonna tell someone with cancer. Oh, just pull yourself up by your bull straps or just pay attention more. Right. And yet when the condition is unseen, uh, like ADHD or any foreign mental health, it, it, it it's always seemed like it's much easier to, um, I don't wanna say mock it, but much easier to sort of dismiss it. Right. Which is, I think very, very frustrating for millions of people. Talk to us about, um, uh, Mind your life. I'd love to know a little bit about, uh, this, uh, organization you founded  [00:09:01] Dr.Sanz: well it's, uh, I'm, I'm incredibly passionate about it because the, the purpose, the reason why I created my new life was precisely to eradicate the stigma. And you very well just mentioned Peter, that, um, you know, with mental health, we, at this moment in time, we can't get away. You know, the stigma that is attached to it. And you're absolutely right with other physical illnesses. You know, people are much more understanding, supportive and, and caring with mental health, uh, is very difficult to get that genuine attitude from, from people in general. And the reason comes from the lack of, uh, uh, research and, and investigations with cancer. You can get, you know, some, uh, radiology, uh, Investigation to prove, oh, here there's a tumor. And you can see it is in your livers in here or there, you can do some bood tests and say, yeah, you've got anemia. And this is, this is how it shows with mental health. We can't really, we don't have any x-rays any blood tests or any other physical. Investigation that we can prove what the reason, what, the reason which leads to people, just having opinions. You know, we, um, I sometimes have to laugh when, you know, I hear conversations I'm on the, you know, on, on the cafe, whatever people are making, you know, diagnosis about anxiety, depressions, schizophrenia, even. And I, I think, gosh, you know, most of the psychiatrists you know, that struggle to really, you know, with challenging presentations to get it right. Nevermind people in the streets, but, but we all think we know more than we do. So mind your life was founded because I, I am, you know, uh, very frustrated when I. See in general public, uh, making assumptions about people with mental health problems. And I lived it. I, you know, I was seven years old when my eldest brother became ill with, with the first signs of his schizophrenia. And, and I, we suffered as a family, the stigma we had to move, uh, house because the neighbors were really harsh and, you know, and then, and then I was a teenager when my second brother became ill. So even more of the same. And I, you know, I was, I was a young person thinking, gosh, you know, why, why? You know, public professional services are making life so hard for my brothers and for myself, there's no need for that. And unquestionably Peter. And this is where my heart is. We make people, we make, conditions much harder, much harder because of our, our attitude, because of the way we judge him, the way we, we assume. And, and, and I know my brother one, my eldest brother passed away last January. And, you know, I had beautiful conversations with him before he passed. And I asked him, you know, what, what he would, you know, want to tell people that have mental health problems and, you know, and his words were along the lines of, you know, we we've got each other, we understand what we go through. We just can't take it to heart, what people say and assume about us, because that would kill us. And, and it's really sad when, when people with mental health problems live lives like that. So Mind Yr Life was created to really try and influence people's attitude towards anyone with mental health problem. In fact, Towards anyone that is considered to be different. Um, because when we, when we don't know, we feel threatened and, and people don't know about mental health illnesses about mental conditions and, and they feel threatened because of the ignorance most times. And then they judge and they try and put them down because that makes them feel more in control, more secured. So, you know, there's, there's, there's a lot of work to be done there about eradicating the stigma. But, you know, we, we can, you know, we bit, bit by day by day, you know, we get there,  [00:12:54] Peter: no question about it, Dr. Sanz how can people find, uh, more about you and, and, and where can they go to get more?     On the Web: www.MindYrLife.com Socials: @MindYrLifeMYL on Twitter  Facebook @mind.yr.life on INSTA and Luisa Sanz on YouTube [00:13:00] Dr.Sanz: I thought of the name. And I thought, um, you know, that mind obviously is about caring and looking after, and, and mind is about mental health and, and your, your is spelled with a Y and an R because I thought it's about you. It's about us, but it's about your responsibility and every single one, taking responsibility over, over mental health, over attitude and, and, and changing. And, and life is about, you know, precisely about why, why we live these lives, how do we live it and how do we, you know, live it in a way that is that we, we achieve happiness. Um, so mind your life spell, as I said, with the Y and R um, you know, I've got in the website, there's, I'm, I'm, I'm doing lots of interviews to people that, you know, very willingly speak openly about their experiences with, with mental health. I like to think that I lead by example. And I, I have an interview where I speak about what my experience growing up was, you know, when with, with mental health problems at home and, and, and we do do interviews and we, you know, I I've recently, um, wrote a, a journal, which is a wellbeing guided journal to help people. Particularly people, you know, with, it's not specific for ADHD, but people with ADHD tend to need more guidance, more support, you know, a little bit of a prompt. And, and this journal is to change behaviors. You know, that sometimes you think, oh, I wish I, I could eat more healthy or I could do more exercise or I could make my bed every morning or, you know, so, so it it's to. It's to, uh, support people in making those changes. And the journal starts with giving lots of information about why consistency is important, how, how the brain works and how this consistency provides the, you know, the, the, the, what is needed for, for changing behaviors. So in mind your life, we have. As I said, you know, um, interviews to, uh, to learn more about what people really experience. We have videos that I've, I've uploaded that I do them myself for, for everyone. They're not for professionals they're for everyone that want to learn a little bit more about ADHD, there are three videos on ADHD. There are some on autistic spectrum condition and that there'll be more ?___? We, we, we upload information, informa educational videos. We've got these journal as well. And we do loads of the things, um, that we keep, you know, uploading on the website to, to try and, you know, first make sure that people with mental health problems don't feel that they are on their own because we are all on the same boat. And, and, and second to help those that really want to understand mental health conditions better and support those with mental health conditions in a, in a healthier manner. You know, uh, we've got the information available as well. Excellent.  [00:15:58] Peter: Well, Dr. Sounds thank you so much for taking the time. We really appreciate you coming on faster than normal. And, uh, we'll have you back again.  [00:16:04] Dr.Sanz: Oh, I, I love that Peter. Uh, I would love that. Thank you so much for having me today.  [00:16:10] Peter: Always guys, as always, we appreciate you listening. If you like what you heard, you could drop us a review. I know I say that every week. I really mean it this time…. —   Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at shankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!

SDI and The Degenerate
Stuntin and Jeff Fox join the show with excellent Micrpophone quality! Jazz Chisolm Bobblehead on Saturday

SDI and The Degenerate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 101:12


Another all time Payaso this time from RTD.

No Limits Selling
Joshua Wall on How To Be An Excellent Team Player

No Limits Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 24:41


  Joshua Wall is a REALTOR® who loves to be a part of his clients' adventures in real estate. Each and every sale is its own journey and he takes pride in helping people start a new chapter. He's proud to be an integral part of the process -every step of the way.     Joshua is also a Brantford City Councilor for Ward 5 (Downtown/East Ward/Eagle Place). He is hyper-passionate about his hometown and can often be found loudly proclaiming what makes Brantford and its citizens so amazing. He places communication and education at the forefront of the way he wants to serve his term on Council.  Locally he also acts as a host, promoter, emcee, and/or volunteer of various events related to raising funds for community nonprofit organizations. Joshua often participates in events related to the support of arts, history, culture and heritage in Brantford/Brant.     Contact Joshua: Website LinkedIn Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Spotify

The Anxious Morning
122. A Letter From Your Ex...

The Anxious Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 4:05


Yes, I know this is a funny title. What is this edition of The Anxious Morning about? Why, Drew? WHY????You know that thing where you break up with your partner because no matter how hard you try and no matter how many times you beg, plead, reason, or argue, things are just not working out? You want it work out. You really do, but in the end you have to end the relationship because it’s never going to be what you hoped it would be.We’ve all been there. It sucks. Reality is super inconvenient and does not care about our feelings. Now imagine that you work through all the pain and the heartache and make all the adjustments that come along with a breakup. You do the hard work. You’re finally getting over it and moving forward with your life. Excellent! Then one day out of the blue you get a letter from your ex. WTF? What is this all about?According to the letter, your ex has changed. Lessons have been learned. Growth has happened. They’re better now. They love you. They want you back. You have a three page handwritten letter in your hand designed to convince you that THIS TIME WILL BE DIFFERENT! You know you should throw away the letter and never think about it ever again. Keep walking. Keep moving forward. Move on. But … reason is sometimes no match for emotion so you send a text and next thing you know the relationship is back in full swing and you are believing that this time it really is different.Until it’s not. Two weeks later you’re hurt, frustrated, disappointed, disillusioned, and kicking yourself for ever believing a word of that letter. Now you have to process the breakup again. More emotional heavily lifting now complicated by the fact that you are judging yourself really harshly for falling for the lies again. Raise your hand if you’ve been here before. Many of us have.Nice story, but what’s the point, Drew? What else rolls in on you when you think it’s over, dumps a metric ton of words and thoughts on you to convince you that THIS TIME is different and special, then leaves you wondering why you followed along and got fooled AGAIN?Think about it. I bet you know the answer.Next time you get a letter from your ex, acknowledge that they are super charming and very convincing. Acknowledge that you are drawn on an emotional level to believe every word and open that dialogue with them again. Allow yourself to be human and feel that natural pull. Recognize the PROCESS.Then stop. Be still. Allow all those emotions and feelings and desires to be there. Breathe. Make a little space for yourself to operate in. You can do that.Then take that letter from your ex, with all its marvelously persuasive language … and burn it.The rest of your day might be kinda tough once you do, but you’ll likely feel stronger, prouder, more capable, and even a bit more confident tomorrow.Sorry, ex. Not today.I’m currently reading Love Notes from the Hollow Tree by Jarod K Anderson. It’s the second poetry/prose compilation from this author, and I’m enjoying his thoughts as much in this book as I did in the first. Oh, and I’m reading it with someone very special. You know who you are. Every Tuesday I’ll let you know what I’m currently reading. I read quite a bit on psychology and philosophy, but really you never know what I’ll have in my Kindle or Audible libraries! If you’re on Goodreads and into books, you can follow/friend me over there. Here’s a link to my “currently reading” shelf. I’d love to see what you’re reading and what you recommend. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit theanxiousmorning.substack.com

Making Kayfabe
The Mad King Reigns Supreme

Making Kayfabe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 67:42


This week, Dylan dives into an Eddie Kingston booking, and shows how AEW could use this ultra-popular wrestler more effectively.  It's damn-near undoubtable these days that Eddie Kingston can talk interest into ANY storyline - so how would he fare going up against some of AEW's absolute best?   00:08:06 - Catch up on Eddie Kingston in AEW 00:17:42 - The Fantasy Booking 00:48:41 - Kayfabe Tombola 01:01:17 - Outro   WANT TO SUPPORT MAKING KAYFABE? We're on Patreon! Subscribe today for as little as £5 / $7 per month to unlock 18 exclusive Making Kayfabe re-bookings, with more coming each month. www.patreon.com/makingkayfabe   Making Kayfabe is presented, written and produced by Bryce Kitcher & Dylan Copeland. It is edited by Bryce Kitcher using Mixcraft 5. EXCELLENT episode art by Tyler Mortimer @ Blank Page Digital - https://www.instagram.com/blankpage_digital/ & twitter.com/dyslexic_tweets   TWITTER: www.twitter.com/MakingKayfabe EMAIL: makingkayfabe@gmail.com   Our standard Intro/Outro Music is Digital Dream (Azureflux Remix) by Starbox www.freemusicarchive.org   The music for breaks between show segments is Old Video Game Music” by  David Fesliyan www.fesliyanstudios.com   Unique intro music is Cold World (Eddie Kingston Instrumental) by CDBaby - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAr9De1H_ng   Booking background music is "Final Fantasy VI LoFi Remix" by Béo! (https://soundcloud.com/ohbeobeats/final-fantasy-vii-lofi-remix)   Thanks pardnah, Bryce & Dylan

The Bledsoe Show
The Patterns Running Your Life with Mike & Max

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 71:06


00:00.00 mikebledsoe I Think yeah I did one of those um inner Tube River Lazy River thing never done it before been Whitewater raft and canoeing always in Rivers never did the I'm not can hardly do shit as I let the water take me. 00:00.00 Max Shank Sounds good to me. 00:08.26 Max Shank The Lazy river. 00:37.76 Max Shank Aha. 00:39.42 mikebledsoe Yeah, so it took a friend organizing it with a bunch of people who I actually like to spend time with to get me to do nothing on a river and I got out there I got out there and it was. Ah, there was a crowd it was it was like bumper boats for 4 hours in this river it's in Austin yeah south of off and Marcos and when we got there, we're like holy shit's busy and the people working there go oh hasn't gotten busy yet. So. 01:28.44 Max Shank This is in Austin. Well yeah. 01:58.72 mikebledsoe Anyways, yeah, that was ah that was my weekend that and barbecue and laughing with friends. 02:05.46 Max Shank Lazy River is exciting. 02:17.38 Max Shank I'll tell you what makes me laugh is your story about you having some very close friends give you permission to just float in a River it sounds ah like this joke about um, meditation and yoga. It's like. 02:45.76 mikebledsoe Ah. 02:51.56 Max Shank People in None world countries need someone from a None world country to remind them that it's okay to do nothing for 20 minutes it's like you get permission to do nothing for 20 minutes with meditation class or yoga or something like that. It's like. 03:07.20 mikebledsoe Yeah. 03:27.88 Max Shank You just do nothing. 03:28.88 mikebledsoe Yeah, we had a friend of her for dinner on Friday night and we talked about that which was you know talking about you know oh I got a meditation practice and I got a visualization practice and I got qi gong and it's like all these practices and talked about just. The value of not you know, getting trapped in the in the practices and the value of just sitting on the side of a lake and staring at the water and doing absolutely nothing and not worried about your posture or anything like that in just that space. 04:36.56 Max Shank Well, it's like not concerning yourself with the outcome right? Like you don't you don't care if you have produced more widgets or harvested more grains right. 04:44.40 mikebledsoe You know. 05:04.32 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's kind of like play. 05:09.82 Max Shank And that's what we're doing. That's that's like how we judge if if we're good in a lot of relationships because that's where we gain our judgments from is these relationships that we've had so we say it's good to do this. It's bad to do that and. What's interesting is how few people can balance out both and I'm speaking from my own experience as well. It's like None or the other typically and figuring out how to rive the natural cycles which is a wave. 06:11.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 06:26.68 Max Shank Um, is super valuable. Skill no wind to float in the Lazy River and you know when it's time to climb up the mountain or dig out the gold mine or ah till the field you you go get that shit done with total focus and it. Kind of goes back to what we talked about with the the Jungle cats and the lions and predators of various kinds. It's like they they basically are in rest mode rest and recovery and form bonds with the family or focused. They're not.. They're not hurrying typically right? There's a difference between being hurried and being focused and that's what I try to do sometimes I even get it Sometimes I do it where I'm I'm just focused or relaxed and if I'm relaxed I'm. 07:42.62 mikebledsoe Yeah. 08:20.22 Max Shank I'm letting my focus diffuse into a soft glow like a lantern that you could look directly at it doesn't hurt your eyes or you can focus down like a laser pointer or a laser cutter and you can actually slice through metal with it so being able to. Lazy River or Whitewater Raft. You know that sort of thing or lantern versus laser. 09:10.70 mikebledsoe Yeah, um I think back in my early days of all a not not understanding the value of the space of doing nothing and just playing with no outcome and and how much benefit that gives me on the day. Ah. When I do want to focus the ability to do so is there and I like we were saying about the the lantern and or the laser yesterday is a good example that is I did float on Saturday but yesterday my fiance. 10:02.80 Max Shank Earth. 10:20.94 mikebledsoe So I got says I I need a lot I got a lot of work to do and I said you know what I got a lot of work to do too because I've got a summit coming up and you know there's a I've got a long list and I've got a couple podcast episodes to record this week so there's some things I need to prep for but I'm not gonna. You know it's Sunday and I know that I've got I'm working till next Sunday I don't have a day off between now I'm next Sunday and I'm going to take it easy I probably was more productive and enjoyed my work more without worrying about how much I got done that day. 11:33.44 Max Shank I mean. 11:36.74 mikebledsoe And yeah, it's I find that especially when I was younger a lot of time spent a lot of times spent chugging coffee and overstimulating myself for the purpose of thinking that was going to help me do something better. 11:56.46 Max Shank Totally power through baby well and you'll be more good as judged by all of your peers. It's all the program that's been installed and if everything is sacrificed for the outcome. 12:21.24 mikebledsoe Right here. 12:33.34 Max Shank The extreme example is someone who's going to blow themselves up because the programming was so effective That's crazy so being able to draw boundaries is really what it comes back to is can you draw a boundary for space for yourself. 12:44.32 mikebledsoe No no. 13:12.84 Max Shank And I actually remember a conversation I had with a member at my gym once and I watched this person transform over a period of time I learned about how their work and their life goes and things like that and they were you know real high performer Worker. And her her biggest challenge was to set clear boundaries for herself to do things that were for her I mean she was give give give essentially I'll I'll get all the work done and then just pile some more on and then I'll get that done too and. 14:03.52 mikebledsoe A. 14:29.96 Max Shank Always the last priority and I remember she was asking if she could drop the the personal training from her membership and just do the classes and I said look ah personal train do classes. Whatever you want to do but make an appointment for yourself every week. That you never miss Basically like you have to keep that as a priority and that's one of the reasons that personal training works is because the person is heavily invested to show up at the given time and once that billing and scheduling is all dialed in. 15:11.62 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 15:44.54 Max Shank It makes it very easy to show up every time but if it's ah, a group membership and no one really is going to follow up if you aren't coming in there. It's a totally different Thing. So I think it comes back to drawing boundaries. Between those times where you are allowed or allowing yourself to do nothing. 16:27.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, my None task on Monday mornings is to schedule out my rejuvenating activities for the rest of the week when am I going to work out when am I going to go song a cold plunge when am I going to hang out with my friends. 16:46.86 Max Shank He. 17:06.56 mikebledsoe All that scheduled out None thing Monday morning before I even look at what I need to do for work that week and yeah it for me it. It requires that level of of commitment to self in order to follow through on that stuff. 17:13.81 Max Shank Oh. 17:35.76 Max Shank Oh draw boundaries. That's why relationships don't work right? Well, that's why relationships go South is ah, people didn't draw boundaries quick enough. Basically. 17:41.36 mikebledsoe But most people never do it. Yeah, didn't yeah, they just don't even consider the boundaries in the None place. Yeah, you know? Yeah, they're not even aware usually like the the boundary most people. 18:12.96 Max Shank Right. 18:20.32 mikebledsoe Discovered that the boundary even exists when they get mad like ah, a boundary getting crossed it it triggers anger and then a lot of times the the right? the right person to be angry at yourself. But. 18:41.28 Max Shank Um, it's internalized like right. 18:55.16 mikebledsoe It's projected out and blamed on someone else when you know my big thing is anytime I get angry with somebody else I check in with myself to say you know what boundary was crossed and did I communicate that boundary and most of the time I didn't and then I got. 19:13.96 Max Shank Yeah, yeah. 19:32.70 mikebledsoe Check out in myself. But then I go have the conversation about where my boundary is with that person and you know it's always things usually clear up after that. 19:38.68 Max Shank Um, yeah, yeah, um I would I would agree I think people um often don't check their boundaries. Quick enough and hold true to those lines and it makes it very difficult. Ah, and it's kind of an ah accumulating Burden I think even and you don't really know how much you. 20:16.74 mikebledsoe Now just. 20:40.72 mikebledsoe Yeah. 20:51.56 Max Shank Like resentment and blame you can start hanging onto just just because 100% your responsibility you should have drawn boundaries. That's why anytime like what you're saying oh I'm mad at this person. It's like well that's silly because. Whatever happened happened and that was possible from from back when you started that relationship right? That's that's fine. Whatever just ah, try to learn from it and this back to the thing about being focused versus hurried or. 21:32.56 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. 22:05.72 Max Shank Whatever there's a big difference between just putting all your focus onto something and being emotionally charged up about it. 22:17.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, so we want to talk about today. Yeah I think we've done boundaries before. 22:25.10 Max Shank What do I want to talk about I want to talk about the well. Okay, last week we talked about stuff basically which was cool. We talked about stuff. Making stuff. 23:01.80 mikebledsoe I Only remember what what stuff will we talk about. 23:10.30 Max Shank Um, we were talking about how come on you we were yeah but you're supposed to treasure mine forever. Whatever I say I'm sure you have like a separate diary just for the conversations that you and I have. 23:24.26 mikebledsoe I've had a lot of thoughts between last week and right now and it gets cluttered. Oh. 23:50.24 Max Shank I mean I know like everyone can tell that you get really excited throwing a word the round throwing around the word fiance now. So I know you got a lot on your mind. You're you're going to be this new person. You're going to be like oh well, you know now that I'm married. 24:08.94 mikebledsoe M. 24:24.28 Max Shank And it's going to be just like last week when you said well now that I'm you know a little older a little wiser I think it's just going to play in to that that guru status that you've developed because now you'll be older wiser married get some kids going and then your avatar. Will be complete so you can you know really have some authority on these messages for the men who listen to us significantly long that we shouldn't even see the neck on that tank top. It should go down at least ten more inches gandalph style. 25:12.22 mikebledsoe Yeah I need ah I need a longer beard too. 25:30.18 mikebledsoe Now see what Ashley says about that. 25:39.66 Max Shank No, we were talking about making stuff though last week like the the value of making stuff physically with your hands and there's and there's a lot of truth that is discovered when you do that because there and it kind of ties so I would tie back. 25:49.84 mikebledsoe Oh oh yeah. 26:04.98 mikebledsoe Yeah. 26:18.26 Max Shank We talked about last week into the so that was the matter or the stuff and maybe we could go into the pattern of things so we could talk a little bit about vibration and rhythm and frequency if if you wanted to It's kind of a. Challenging topic to really follow, but it's um, the reason it reminded me is father's day. It was father's day and you know the word father comes from the word ah pattern and the word mother comes from the word matter. So there's. 27:10.80 mikebledsoe Um. 27:28.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, why say we go with that. Let's go with that. Yeah I'm I'm down to tackle the pattern conversation that sounds good. 27:31.68 Max Shank Matter and pattern so it seems like a nice logical transition. 27:53.38 Max Shank Yeah, so let's say we try to break it down into ah patterns of human beings which is kind of like programs of human beings. So we have that which is I would say that's the most practical level. Is the patterns of humans. Ah we also have ah Dna is a pattern and another synonym for pattern is code. 28:57.40 mikebledsoe I think. 28:59.20 Max Shank So you have Dna you got computer programming you got programming human beings. You got the different ah frequencies and wavelengths of things as it relates to the materials we make. 29:28.84 mikebledsoe Yeah I think it's gonna be a fun topic Actually the more the more you're talking I'm thinking and yeah, this will be a full. 29:43.46 Max Shank Um, you could argue that matter and Pattern are the only topics that we could discuss. 29:56.40 mikebledsoe I think so yeah, everything falls under those 2 categories. That's right. 30:06.70 Max Shank Stuff and not stuff like okay here here's ah, an interesting example right? We have all these forces which is the way we describe. Okay, all right? No, we're Okay, we're we're kicked. 30:23.88 mikebledsoe Hang on hang on. Let's kick the show off and then get into it. Yeah I think I think we're set are we clicked I wrote the date on the top of the page. Um. 30:41.42 Max Shank Okay, you took some notes. 30:55.12 Max Shank I have this I have this fantasy in my mind when I see you looking down and writing something that it's like oh these like excellent notes are like a mind map or something like that or maybe a checklist of things to cover. Really you've just written your name in the date in the corner. 31:23.40 mikebledsoe Um, no half the time It's the date I'm practicing spelling my name. Yeah. 31:38.76 Max Shank Okay, so we'll talk about Pattern for in honor of father's day. 31:47.70 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah I said I say ah why don't you go ahead and do the intro and then we'll talk about the the membership site and then you can go into your explanation for. Father and pattern How about that and then we'll just go from there. 32:31.50 Max Shank And the membership site just so I'm clear is in the beginning of the show I put my camera to expose the nipples and then when the public show starts I tilt it back up. So the nipples are ah not visible is that. 33:03.86 mikebledsoe You got it. You got it? yeah. 33:09.94 Max Shank Is that right? I'm a simple man I like a simple plan. My nips are only free to me but not to you. 33:27.22 mikebledsoe All right? You want to kick off the intro today. All right? yep. 33:32.94 Max Shank Yeah let's do it already. Ah None 2 None welcome back to Monday mornings with max and Mike Today we're gonna. Follow up what we talked about last week last week was a heck of a fun conversation about stuff matter substance working with your hands a little bit about manufacturing. It was a crazy excellent conversation. Go check it out Today. We're gonna talk about the other side. The pattern. I think it's very cool that the words mother and father are actually derived from matter and pattern and so that's what we're gonna talk about today. We're gonna talk about how pattern is present in your Dna your cell phone behaviors of human beings. And much much more and welcome welcome again. Mike thanks for sitting down with me I'm very excited and a little intimidated to tackle this topic today. 35:20.58 mikebledsoe Well said. 35:41.48 mikebledsoe Ah sorry I can make a bunch of bullshit up. Ah so for for those of you who who love this show. 35:51.98 Max Shank I Don't like it for the record folks I don't like when he does that. 36:04.22 mikebledsoe Ah, but for um, all we we decide to open up the membership site and we're gonna be posting exclusive content. There's a conversation that always happens previous to this show today's show we had 16 minutes and 55 seconds of content. Of us figuring out what we were going to talk about. But of course we can't help ourselves from delivering gold at every moment. So if you yep, None nipples on the preshow. So do that one. 36:53.52 Max Shank There were also 2 nipples on the pre-show in case that matters I don't know why why should people do that one like what are they going to get out of that. Are they going to get some more interaction with us. 37:17.16 mikebledsoe 1 maybe it's exclusive content for now we're going to see where it goes. Yeah well I had a guy. 37:25.32 Max Shank Just exclusive content I Think yeah, we should see what people want though also because I could see ah I could see something really cool forming out of this So I just want to serve our our customers The best way I can. 37:54.20 mikebledsoe Yeah I had a guy ah on Instagram Atx window tent and clean. He sent me message it and said he would donate for more podcasts with me and you so um, what I want to do is we're gonna set it up. It's not set up. As of today. But if you're listening to this what I'm Goingnna do is I'm going to create a link on the http://bloodsoio.com. So if you go to there. There's going to be a place where you can sign up for this and it's gonna be pay what you want so it's donation based anywhere between a dollar and $5000000 ah. 38:58.12 Max Shank Love it. 39:09.36 mikebledsoe And we'll set up a we'll make it a monthly subscription and as long as you're. 39:13.16 Max Shank Are we sponsored by Austin Tint and window by the way atx tint and window. 39:23.34 mikebledsoe You know we may mention him more depending on the size of his donation or her donation I'm not sure if it's a man or woman. So I the this. 39:49.66 Max Shank So wait. So wait, you're telling me they can pay what they want and we don't even really know what they're going to get yet. We know they're going to get exclusive content. There's no question. You're going to hear words there that you won't hear anywhere else but there might be even more than that is what you're saying So it's like. 40:14.90 mikebledsoe Yep. 40:24.34 mikebledsoe Well well part of this yeah part part part of this. Well the thing is the people that are going to donate to the show. They're going to contribute funds to make sure that this show keeps happening because you know what it takes a couple hours out of max and I week 40:29.48 Max Shank Ah, bonus price Mystery box That's incredible. 41:02.62 mikebledsoe And you know we got to keep the lights on and all that. But ah yeah, so the people. 41:09.12 Max Shank Well you vote with your dollars too I'm I'm a big fan of that. So if you like really want more of something then you know that's that's the only way you can really influence it I say that in your whole life too. You know, buy what you like. 41:36.94 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, spend money where you want things to improve So Ah so for one if you enjoy the show and you just want to Contribute. It's a great way to do it. You're also going to get exclusive content And. Ah, you are going to have the loudest voice out of everyone who has an opinion about what we should be doing So We're more likely to listen to those who are donating the most amount of money So That's all that's all on that So we'll get that set up I've got a summit coming up this weekend. So. 42:35.80 Max Shank Very exciting. 42:48.40 mikebledsoe My team is completely distracted with things that they think is important so that I can do the show. But. 42:59.82 Max Shank It must have taken a lot of ah instruction to organize all those people together for a summit. He segwayed perfectly because someone has to orchestrate. 43:15.70 mikebledsoe Instruction. Um, yeah, yeah, there's a ah lot of direction. 43:37.32 Max Shank Someone has to orchestrate the code for getting that job done and if you think about the Pattern. So the bread. The the dough is the stuff. The recipe is the pattern. The sperm is the pattern. The egg is the stuff. Matter mother Pattern father. So It sounds like you are the father of this event because you have determined the structure of its organization. 44:36.70 mikebledsoe Yeah, we create this structure and then I brought in a lot of speakers who are going to contribute so they they bring a lot of stuff and I organize it and I time it I announce it I create a container. 44:55.22 Max Shank Right. 45:10.16 Max Shank Oh. 45:13.70 mikebledsoe So it's a container of time so it starts at a certain time ends at a certain time we we do have a frequency of of time in between so this speaker starts here ends there. There's also a consideration for what type of content is gonna presented it. Be presented in what order to make the most sense so that we can stare step people through a series of understanding. So while I also have no idea what the speakers are going to say like I I know their topic but I and I know they're good because almost all of them been in the industry for twenty plus years 46:09.48 Max Shank Right? right. 46:27.00 mikebledsoe So I know it's going to be good I Just don't know what exactly that content's going to be and that's actually a lot of fun for me. 46:40.28 Max Shank And that's the that's the practical side of patterns. That's the most practical side of patterns because most of our interactions are with people or or with stuff but usually with people I would say unless you're just specifically with materials and. 47:04.92 mikebledsoe Um, yeah art. 47:18.36 Max Shank That's what teaching is it's basically ah, it's like the least substantial thing there is is pure instruction because there's no stuff being transferred. There's only code. Being transferred.. There's only the pattern that is being sent to another person. 48:07.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 48:13.64 Max Shank But that's what drives people and the bible is a program. The constitution is a program these are patterns. These are these have their own ah force and vibration to them right. 48:44.12 mikebledsoe What I'm glad you bring that up. 48:49.16 Max Shank When it comes to the way that humans interact and behave and you take that plus it's like that plus Dna those are the None intersecting patterns that sort of weave together and you could I don't know I think the nature versus nurture argument is the wrong. Perspective I think it's nature and nurture and it's all the same kind of. 49:33.32 mikebledsoe Yeah, and and everything you were just saying right there and we look at the patterns that have had the longest staying power. So like we talk about the bible or christianity. It's a pattern that has had really long staying power a lot of other religions have fallen by the wayside. 50:07.36 Max Shank Relative to other human religions. It's had incredible staying power. 50:11.88 mikebledsoe And yeah, yeah, now the the patterns you talk about nature versus nurture. But what I one of the things that I've found to be ah, really powerful is studying the patterns of nature and then either mimicking that. 50:37.32 Max Shank Then oh. 50:50.84 mikebledsoe Or if we're going to be working with nature which we always are is how do we harness that if you try to create a structure that is not in alignment with nature. You're going to be. You're going to lose that battle and so there is and I think it creates some. 50:55.86 Max Shank I will know. 51:30.56 mikebledsoe Difficulty so one of the ways I like to think about patterns and frequencies and I think about frequencies specifically and I like to start at the macro and work our way down to the micro and then when we do that I think people really start getting an understanding of how the universe works. And this was pointed out to me by a guy named Daniel Schmackenberger he explained it to me and I go huh that act that that's in person in person. He explained it to me. 52:18.34 Max Shank Um, did he explain it to you in person. What an interesting character that guy is I've listened to a few of his things and he's a very interesting cat. But. 52:39.16 mikebledsoe He used to live down the street from us and I probably had a sit down with him every three months when I was living in Socal and we jammed and the guy. The guy is one of the most intelligent people I've ever met. Um, but ah, we were talking about seasons and cycles and. 52:54.60 Max Shank Um, about that. Yeah. 53:18.70 mikebledsoe And lunar and solar and we look at the yeah we look at the pattern and we look at the patterns of nature. We look at patterns of the universe and the the None one the one that's easiest for us to all be aware of is probably the lunar cycle. So. 53:24.66 Max Shank There's a pattern. 53:53.90 mikebledsoe Or the 4 seasons. Um, these are both cycles the 4 seasons all happen in an annual basis. It gets hot it cools off. It gets really cold. It gets warm. It gets hot. It does that ah to. 54:16.72 Max Shank So like the days and the moons. Ah, and the years are easy are like easy to notice. Outwardly. 54:35.80 mikebledsoe They're easy to notice and so you have the lunar There's you know about thirteen lunar cycles in a year. Um some may ah some do argue that the fact that we have twelve months in the year and we have 13 lunar cycles is actually fighting nature a little bit. And we might be better off if we had a little bit different system. But this thing is pretty ingrained the gregorian calendar. Ah we have the lunar cycles which are which are monthly and then inside of that they're really the the weekly cycle Monday through Sunday is. 55:21.94 Max Shank Oh man. Yeah, we. 55:46.18 mikebledsoe I don't really see anything demonstrated in nature that seems like to me a very human construct to divide up those 28 ish days ah between lunar cycles and we want to like look all the way back through history. Yeah into weeks. 56:10.26 Max Shank into into weeks um I don't know what the origin of the week is actually is kind of an interesting question. 56:21.98 mikebledsoe And days are obvious the the daily cycle the sun comes up the sun goes down and I have no idea I mean somebody Dm me let me know and the. 56:52.54 Max Shank We're just we're gonna trust your dude. Okay, this is why you are not in charge of the fucking research department I'll wait for the None direct message on Instagram to give me the answer and then I just get a fucking go with that you you lunatic speaking of moon. 57:09.48 mikebledsoe Ah, no I need a starting point I need a. 57:23.70 Max Shank That's where the luna lunatic comes from fucking lunatic. Yeah, so just Dm your effect that's like slightly less reliable than Wikipedia. 57:26.78 mikebledsoe I. Well no I want to I want to I want the people in the audience to participate in the process of us finding information. They said it to me I'll I'll still verify it I'll look it up but I I'm gonna let someone initiate. So um. 57:59.74 Max Shank Ah I'm just kidding I Love Wikipedia. Okay, so we have ah we have years we have moons so we have solar year we have moons. Let's forget about weeks. Let's go straight to heartbeats from there so we got year. 58:13.68 mikebledsoe So about. 58:34.60 mikebledsoe That's ah, that's where I was. That's where we're going is That's exactly what I've written down. Actually we're on the same page but it gets down to you get up and go to sleep. You have a Circadian rhythm you have a hormonal. 58:38.74 Max Shank Moon day heartbeat. 58:58.98 mikebledsoe Ah, rhythm throughout the day based on the sun coming up sun going down moon coming out all these things and then yeah it it comes down to heartbeat brain waves brainwave frequencies and so yeah. 59:22.96 Max Shank Which is a lot faster because hertz is the way we measure frequency and hurts is calculated in cycles per second. So if something is it and I think we have the ability to hear things between oh gosh. Ah. 1 d-ish hurts to None something around there so we have a pretty big. There's ah, there's a great thing um to visualize the spectrum of frequencies but just remember that hurts is in cycles per second so your heart. Ah. 01:00:11.98 mikebledsoe I should know that. 01:00:40.80 Max Shank It beats once every second so cycles per second would be like 1 basically right. 01:00:42.30 mikebledsoe Once a second. Yeah. 01:00:56.26 mikebledsoe You know? Yeah, so we have all these different frequencies and None of the one of the ways reasons I like to think about frequencies in this way is because it allows. Me to see more clearly how I'm connected to the entire universe it. It reduces the amount of separation that I'm perceiving and whole with it. Yeah and I'm tuned into it once I learned this I I got a lot better about going down with the sun and coming up with the sun and. 01:01:33.92 Max Shank You feel more whole with it. You feel more part of it. 01:01:55.64 Max Shank Oh. 01:02:01.20 mikebledsoe My health improved and all sorts of things. So I like that the idea of talking about the micro macro to the micro and the pattern is always present. There's nothing that we can observe that doesn't have it and it's not participating. 01:02:33.60 Max Shank Yeah, there's a great little chart if you type in em spectrum into Google images you can find ah a really nice little visual aid I think it's really important. 01:03:02.92 mikebledsoe Em spectrum. 01:03:06.66 Max Shank Yeah, just type in em spectrum into Google and hit images and that'll show you ah you know on the 1 hand when you have ah something like the visible light spectrum and then. 01:03:43.36 mikebledsoe E. 01:03:43.60 Max Shank You go beyond above it. You have ultraviolet spectrum and then you have infrared so below what we can see and there's all this stuff happening and the way to tie it all together and simplify it in my mind is to say that vision. 01:04:00.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:04:21.86 Max Shank Doesn't show you everything. That's there. It just shows you? What's important and there but there's so much stuff vibrating everywhere and everything's got its own um frequency to it and that goes all the way down like. Most watches are set with a quartz crystal actually because it vibrates at a certain frequency and I think ah the way an atomic clock works is with something like caesium. 01:05:19.48 mikebledsoe Everyone's cell phone has a quartz crystal in it. 01:05:40.34 Max Shank And so you think here's this this like bunch of stuff like a crystal but it's got this frequency that it's emitting from it all the time. 01:06:01.68 mikebledsoe Man I spent hours talking about crystals on Saturday night with some friends. The I think we might open up a crystal shop here in Austin the next the next business venture. You think it'll be good I think we could we could pull. 01:06:27.60 Max Shank I Think if you focus on it. It will be I think if you focus on it. It'll be awesome and if you ah, don't try that hard then it depends on who you partnered with. 01:06:46.98 mikebledsoe All right? Yeah I'm I'm looking for solid partners for crystal shop here in Austin Texas. 01:06:55.54 Max Shank I Like talking about crystals too but not with people who only know the esoteric side of Crystals I need someone to like bridge the gap between the physics and the more esoteric kind of philosophical Astro astrology because. 01:07:14.66 mikebledsoe Boy Yeah I have a friend. 01:07:35.28 Max Shank I'm I'm hip with it and I I like to know what's really going on in there. 01:07:44.98 mikebledsoe Well, both sides are really nice I What are my buddies he used to be in the crystal business and and he can talk about how the crystal in your phone works and tie that into more of the esoteric as well and so he can He spans the whole thing I'm gonna have him on the show. 01:07:54.82 Max Shank You gotta work them together. 01:08:12.20 Max Shank Right. 01:08:21.88 mikebledsoe Here in the next month or so and I don't know if we'll talk about Crystals because he's an expert in other things as well. But maybe we'll cover that for everybody. 01:08:28.34 Max Shank Yeah I have a friend actually who I have a friend who his whole ah career. Basically right now is studying crystals so his his equipment that he has available in the lab is so tight that he can actually fire a neutron beam. To see really really tiny crystals of proteins to make for pharmaceuticals so his whole job is like trial and error. Let's let's throw some fucking heat and some of this over here and he's basically in a laboratory and then firing a little beam. Neutrons to look at the shapes to see if they're going to be able to bind or unite ah with other molecules in the body. It's it's really fascinating and you look at how all of those different interactions are things usually have a charge like positive or negative. And they often will also have a ah conforming shape and you can take that all the way down. It's it's easy to get lost with how many branches that you can take this down in terms of the energy transformation because that's really all we're doing is we're taking. Energy and we're transforming it into some other type of energy. That's really what family is about. You're taking energy from outside and then you're adding it to the family fungus is doing that we're doing that Orca are doing that. Basically you're trying to assimilate more energy and grow. Size of your empire ants fungus us and yeah and ah different creatures do it in different ways like ah in the life of a mycelium fungus that's slowly branching out a myceoleal network. 01:11:46.14 mikebledsoe Simulate organize create a structure with that energy divert that energy. 01:12:18.34 Max Shank They don't really budget time for ah like deviance and pleasure and vacations and things like that and we we do. We have all this crazy stuff Beyond grow the family but that's the that's the prevailing pattern because. 01:12:43.68 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:12:56.64 Max Shank If you don't have that then that branch of the family tree cuts itself. So you you almost have it's why religions kind of follow the same thing Thou Shalt have no other gods before me because this has to be the foundation of your pattern of your programming. 01:13:02.14 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:13:33.34 Max Shank Right? You can't like just pick and choose oh hey like you know you hindus. That's pretty cool but I like steak So I'm not going to go with this crew and you Christians are great but I want to eat pigs or you know whatever they don't like that doesn't it doesn't have the same um unity. It doesn't have the same. 01:13:55.80 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:14:11.50 Max Shank Ah, resonance and harmony of the the the vibration there isn't it interesting that they also sing every Sunday that that's a big thing is singing together. We got to get back to that though. 01:14:18.66 mikebledsoe Yeah I. Yeah, yeah I notice having interacted heavily with the new age spiritual Community and I I've never really considered myself new age. But the. The new age Spiritual Community is interesting because it does feel like a lot of the people in that community are adopting they're picking and choosing. They're cherry picking things from different religions and then creating their own little thing but it really does lack a foundation that I. 01:15:30.88 Max Shank E. 01:15:46.62 mikebledsoe I Think that the that community it feels very wishy-washy feels very too flowy to there's there's some people in in this community that are very popular and when they post things and when they talk about things. Sounds very flowery. But I don't know exactly what they mean and I don't think they know what they mean either. 01:16:36.34 Max Shank Oh you mean like a flower like that thing that is designed to attract I'm not surprised.. The only thing we can possibly get is people being little flowers. There's no way. We you? you can't rise above the noise unless you make yourself into a pretty flower like you know you could tell people the truth is like look um there there are a lot of tools out there that we can use and you don't really know what the. 01:17:13.68 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:17:46.26 Max Shank Potential benefit and potential cost of those tools is you? You don't really know how those tools can be used. You don't know the pattern or the code of how to put those tools to the best use and that's also what coaching and instruction is it's how to get the most out of those tools. So. The recipe for bread the recipe for making ah semiconductors and computers and automobiles. Ah what is that without the instructions. It's just stuff without the the instructions to put it all together. It's just stuff. Dna same thing. It actually determines where the protein is going to go where the collagen is going to get laid down. It's insane ah to try to like differentiate those 2 things because. 01:19:38.32 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:19:43.90 Max Shank What is the stuff without the the movement of the stuff. What I mean there's there's nothing. That's perfectly still is kind of ah a weird ah trip to think about and I think a lot of that um can be described by like. Atomic structures as we understand it like the density of the packing of the atomic nuclei and the lattice work that they take ah see this. We're like way too far outside of my understanding but basically things are packed much tighter. When they are more denser so you have a ah gal you have ah an air compressor. You can compress the air and actually shove more into that same space and then as you get harder and harder Materials. There's less and less give that you can shove into that same space. 01:21:03.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:21:35.60 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:21:40.20 Max Shank And that's also why in order to have a faraday cage which doesn't let ah electromagnetic radiation in it has to be made out of metal. It can't be made out of wood because it can get through because wood is less dent like how crazy is that when you think about it because the wood is still solid. 01:22:17.42 mikebledsoe Yep. 01:22:18.96 Max Shank But the reason you need it to be metal is because of the closeness of the lattice of those atoms. So. There's actually less space than usual and then with air with wood with metal. Tungsten Plutonium All that other stuff it's because it's more and more tightly packed and that's that's also um, how nature patterns itself pretty much if you look at a tree and a set of lungs. It starts out with a big pipe. And then it splits and splits and splits into little branches and ah leaves and branches branches little capillaries alviolles and things like that. So you're trying to maximize the ah surface area right? It's like giving yourself more. 01:23:59.14 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:24:07.72 Max Shank Ah, relationships with the environment. 01:24:10.60 mikebledsoe But that Pattern works best with the planet Earth for the exchange of of air of Oxygen carbon dioxide. Whatever it is whatever the exchange of these molecules are and when you're talking about Oxygen Carbon dioxide. It's no. A mystery why the lungs in the tree look very similar. It's just a shit works. Um, yeah. 01:24:57.56 Max Shank Gas exchange happening all the time and that's a pattern that's a relationship between those 2 inhale exhale without algae and trees. We'd all be dead. 01:25:22.40 mikebledsoe Very true. The I want to break this down and into and a 4 different quadrants. So I'm I'm a big fan I've I've talked about before of Ken Wilbur's a call map a qal so if you Google a cap a q a l space. Map then you'll get an idea of what I'm you'll get a visual of what I'm talking about here and so it's ah the upper quadrant is the individual the lower half of the quadrant is the collective. The left side of the quadrant is the interior or the inside and the. Right side of the quadrant is the exterior. So if we go to the upper left hand quadrant what we're looking at is the interior self. So if we want to look at I really like talking about this map because it allows us to break down a topic as big as something like patterns into something that. We can look at and step by step and talk about it so to really simplify what's happening in the upper left hand quadrant which is the interior of self I really think about that as like thoughts and feelings your thoughts and your feelings. It's your internal world and there's patterns there. And so we have emotional patterns we have thought patterns and we have psychoemotional patterns where the thoughts and emotions have a pattern between the 2 of them. You have an emotion then there's a pattern of making meaning of what that emotion means and then. That can cycle cycle cycle so we have psycho emotional patterns that we need to be aware of and the certain certain things trigger those different patterns and it could be something like father's day something could get someone thinks about father's day and. The pattern may be celebration feeling really good make it mean call your dad that day. So I like to think about no. 01:29:30.90 Max Shank I'm sure that's everybody's pattern. 01:29:45.30 Max Shank Ah. 01:29:45.32 mikebledsoe But but the ah but I like look what do what? you think about the Psycho emotional patterns. What have you noticed and learned about that. 01:30:06.18 Max Shank So I think of it in a pretty simple way as people repeat what gives them a predictable result. Not even what gives them? ah an excellent result just a predictable one. So that's basically what a pattern is is. 01:30:31.70 mikebledsoe M. 01:30:43.56 mikebledsoe And people people do seek predictability. There's ah, there's a lot of people. They do ah a lot of. 01:30:43.86 Max Shank There's predictability to it. So it's why people prefer people prefer the ah ah familiar pain to the unknown. 01:31:07.52 mikebledsoe Yeah I've worked with a lot of people who they they came to me and there's something in their life. That's not working I mean that's that's really the the job of a coach is we work with people who they want something to be different in their life and. They want to change it and usually it's the the individual is trying to change something externally in order to create a different internal experience and a lot of times what we got to do. 01:32:12.00 Max Shank Which can work. 01:32:18.00 mikebledsoe Which can work but which does work which we can get into because we can talk about Environmental patterns. Ah. 01:32:25.22 Max Shank Because a pattern is a relationship with your environment. There's a relationship within yourself which is kind of what you're talking about. But you're never in a vacuum. You know you take someone out of their existing environment and you put them into a different one and suddenly all their aches and pains go away. 01:32:43.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:33:03.12 Max Shank Worked with this guy joint pain everywhere everything hurts ah instead of being in Boston at home. He goes down to Florida on vacation none of his shit hurts and it's like well why do you think that is like you have to explore what it is about that environment that you're that you have unresolved. 01:33:39.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 01:33:41.46 Max Shank That your body is like essentially crying out because your ah pain is basically your brain saying ah not like this. That's all just not like this.. It's not ah, it's not. Ah, like bad.. It's not Shameful. It's not good. Sometimes it's incorrect where where you feel it isn't necessarily where the resolution is going to be Found. It's just a nonspecific signal that says not like this if you do it a different way. Maybe so. 01:34:36.18 mikebledsoe Right? just. 01:34:52.28 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah, so people at that spot on it pain is just ah, always talk about pain as a teacher. It's it's trying to teach you something and most people just sit in the pain because it is ah familiar. 01:34:54.20 Max Shank But not like this. 01:35:24.30 Max Shank Um, familiar I. 01:35:31.88 mikebledsoe And people feel safe even in when it's painful. They'd rather feel if they feel safe in pain. They'll take that over you know the uncertainty and freedom and the a lot of times people want. You know who have been focused on changing something in their external environment even that they're not even really willing to make too many external environment changes because of what's happening internally of what that might mean for them and so yeah chicken of the egg. Yeah, and so if. 01:36:21.98 Max Shank Um, that's a chicken or the egg type of situation too. Um. 01:36:37.40 mikebledsoe If you've been beating your head on 1 way of making change and changing a pattern you may want to look at something else. So if you've been trying to change something environmentally or you've been trying to change your physical body and it's not working. Maybe you need to look at the internal body or you need to look at your relationships with people instead of just the environment. 01:37:11.94 Max Shank And some people thrive on incremental change and some people thrive on radical change and is different for everybody you know, ah a lot of a lot of times where you make a leap forward in what you might call progress. 01:37:14.92 mikebledsoe And so. 01:37:32.18 mikebledsoe That's that's very true. 01:37:48.16 Max Shank Because you took a giant leap toward a different environment or a different ah day-to-day Pattern It can be incremental or it can be radical. 01:38:02.56 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, so a lot of times these these internal patterns if we can shift those there might be ah emotions that we're making mean something with our thoughts and then that keeps us from maybe moving from Boston to Florida. 01:38:39.32 Max Shank Right. 01:38:41.28 mikebledsoe You know I I remember coaching one woman at this point and she she did not want to be working her job. She's like I do not like my job I want to get out of my industry I don't want to do this at all. But I'm not good at anything else. That was the story that she had. She had this internal story of yeah, that's the pattern. Yeah, and so it once we got to a point where she and she made really good money is is. 01:39:20.92 Max Shank That's the pattern. That's some software. Yeah. 01:39:40.84 Max Shank M. 01:39:47.70 mikebledsoe We had to really sit down and and break down is it worth the you know is it worth possibly a lifestyle change downward which by the way is one of the people just don't do it once they hit a certain level of lifestyle coming back down that is incredibly difficult. Um, if you're used to living off $200000 a year and now I'm gonna ask you to live off $100000 a year people I I would I would have a very hard time with it people freak out wouldn't they just don't know how to do it. It's pretty much stuck there. But um. 01:40:54.24 Max Shank Tell you? what though they would figure it out if they had to and I can I can guarantee that you know what I love speaking of patterns. So a prison that's that's a series of matter and patterns woven together to keep people inside. 01:41:03.80 mikebledsoe They would fake Always do always do. 01:41:29.12 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 01:41:33.60 Max Shank Designed by allegedly pretty smart people and guys still escape. So prison is full of the criminals who got caught so arguably the dumbest of the criminals because a smart criminal is still outside of the Jail That's what prisons do. 01:42:01.84 mikebledsoe No. 01:42:08.62 Max Shank They put all the dumb criminals in Jail to leave the really clever ones out of Jail so they can have the easier pick of what's left. But if you take the smart architects who are putting together this box those really smart guys. But the level of desire to be free of that Burden seems to supersede all of that technical Expertise All of the guards all of the stuff I mean it's what doesn't happen a lot but it still happens. 01:43:05.60 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, there's I mean if if you just study what's happening in the prisons right now not even escape but Gangs drugs. There's basically there's nothing but illegal activity happening in the prisons and the you know. 01:43:25.50 Max Shank Gangs gangs. 01:43:40.20 Max Shank Yeah, how could you stop it. 01:43:43.86 mikebledsoe Ah, the stated the stated intent is for them to not be to not experience that. But yeah, you're basically just concentrating a bunch of people who got caught and ah will continue to do things. 01:44:08.26 Max Shank Well I mean the prison system is a bad pattern. Um, because it it maximizes for ah, shame and isolation but not actually for compensation to the fucking victim of the crime.. The only thing we should care About. It does nothing for.. Ah. 01:44:50.12 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, I mean if if somebody violates. 01:44:56.80 Max Shank It's like it's like it's like okay so a crime was Committed. What are we going to do are we going to help out the victim. No What we're going to do is we're going to take a little bit of everybody's money including the victims and then we're going to take the bad man to a bad place so he can. Get really isolated and angry at everybody and probably link up with a murderous gang. Ah, That's what we're going to do I'm waiting for the punchline but there it's there's nothing. There. Yeah. 01:45:55.84 mikebledsoe Yeah, that's a very poor social pattern. So so I mean that's that's the that's the inside of you know of culture right? culture is the inside How we how we pattern our so our society. So. 01:46:24.60 Max Shank Right? Well how you discipline how you discipline society right? because Rule rule is the threat and discipline is the act right? So if you if the culture. 01:46:28.86 mikebledsoe The criminal Justice system. 01:47:02.78 Max Shank Is in a bit of a dysfunctional abusive schizophrenic relationship with its policing of Behavior. Do you think that naturally a lot of people would do the same thing internally so that internal or pattern of how you ah Govern or police. Or discipline your own behavior whether you do it with blame and shame and isolation of that part of you versus acceptance and learning and reeducation of that party right? It's like you're putting the same experience through a very different. 01:48:03.64 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:48:17.88 Max Shank Filter which I mean look the way we make Filters is really really tinier and tinier Meshes just like a net a water filter and a net that you catch fish with the the main difference is the size of the openings. 01:48:49.26 mikebledsoe Yeah, well, it's interesting when I think about these patterns I think about how they begun or began begun began and um these these patterns are fractal in nature so they usually started off as. They always start off as something small if we look at the pattern of humanity and um, there were not that many people on this planet five hundred years ago if you if you went to Paris France Five hundred years ago there weren't that many people there. I mean it was big for its time but compared to now it was just so tiny but all the rules all the ideas about how society should be governed stem from that time and. 01:50:07.24 Max Shank M. 01:50:29.82 Max Shank From France five hundred years ago or from the greeks like two thousand ish years ago like de ah when was democritus. 01:50:38.58 mikebledsoe Well yeah, you keep going for their back but I'm just using people can I think people I think people can possibly like if we don't go too far back. But yeah you you keep going further and further back you go to the greeks you go to the hebrews you go to the Egyptians and you you follow the the thread. 01:51:04.88 Max Shank Right? I for an eye you follow the thread which is interesting because it's like um how they did history for a while was through these tapestries and they would actually tell a story through the the chain. 01:51:16.40 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:51:30.24 mikebledsoe A. 01:51:44.20 Max Shank So it's it's really funny ah connection I made the other day and there are too many word puns to follow, but the funny connection I made is that a link is one connection and a chain is multiple connections in sequence Dna multiple connections in sequence. So that's a big difference. Um. In how those connections work together. Ah um, a chain is many connections. A matrix is also a different orientation of many connections and so different elements have different structures. That are more matrix-like or more chain-like like for example, long chain fatty acids that sort of thing so there are these um, different ways that we connect to things and a lot of it like you said tracing the thread. Back that's what we try to do. We're trying to go back and figure out where those connections started being made and the further back you go. It's none becomes None None becomes 2 None becomes 3 3 becomes all things that was in the dao two thousand years ago that's a pattern that a guy wrote down and we still can't ah absorb it. We can regurgitate it we can bounce it around. We can modify it but all those all those written things left a pattern and that is I think the story of. Human supremacy when you get right down to it. It's the fact that we were able to accumulate written knowledge and access it really quickly so you can take I mean right now on Youtube there's a thing learning about how materials are put together. Ah, Youtube channels called us auto industry and they take you through hydraulics and gears and aerodynamics and drag and they take you through all of these different things. The videos are super crystal clear simple and it's like you took that expert. His whole life and synthesized it into 10 minutes but those 10 minutes were based on generation after generation after generation of patterned ah accumulation of knowledge. So it's like ah, an external brain so we could. Ah, decode for later just very similar to Dna. It's basically a code for making a car or Dna is like a code for making proteins. But it's all it's all based on our ability to keep a record of it and a Dna of course is a living record. 01:57:14.86 mikebledsoe Yeah, well I think about what you were saying with written. Ah we have records written and up until what one hundred years ago most people were were illiterate and a small percentage of the population could even read. So only a small percentage of population had access to understanding and not only that the books that they had access to they usually existed in a university and so there was ah a highly It was a high concentration of knowledge that. People studied that were dictating society and then about one hundred years ago literacy started to really take hold and you know because they talked about the printing press but the printing the printing press it preceded literacy without the printing press. There wouldn't be literacy but the technology. Ah. Of there being an abundance of books caused the human mind to go be curious about that enough to study how to read to learn it and now we fast forward. 01:59:36.12 Max Shank Printing press I think that was a big thing for the gutenberg bible right. 01:59:39.38 mikebledsoe Yeah, and I think the I think the benefit of back then was there was a limited amount of things that you could consider and you didn't have to look. You didn't have to sift through as much to go back to the beginning. Or as far back to the beginning as you could now we pull out our phone and there's videos and everything that have trapped us in what's happening right now. The the average American Yeah, the average. Yeah yeah, it's not right now right now it's it's they're sucked into. 02:00:37.10 Max Shank Somewhere else though. 02:00:55.80 mikebledsoe What's happening. Well no way that they're they're they're considering what's happening today. What is happening today that matters. 02:01:11.20 Max Shank Ironically, it's a portal to anywhere else than here and now that's what's funny because you're saying it's like they're looking what's happening now elsewhere but ironic you're right? But it's also kind of ironic because you're looking for anything else. 02:01:37.78 mikebledsoe Yeah, but the yeah my point is that time the time consideration is is so short like what happened last week doesn't matter anymore. It only all that matters is today and people are so people are so yeah. 02:01:40.80 Max Shank But here and now. 02:01:53.80 Max Shank Yeah, yeah, yeah, okay so that's insanity. That's insanity full on insanity. 02:02:15.48 mikebledsoe People people are so engrossed they have so much data coming in about what matters today in the whole world that they think they should yeah they don't have boundaries but that person is totally ingrossed andgross in what's happening now doesn't have the opportunity to look back in history. 02:02:29.48 Max Shank Because they can't draw boundaries. 02:02:54.90 mikebledsoe To go back and say how was consciousness formed. How did we come to these considerations. What actually is science. There is. 02:03:07.94 Max Shank Well think of the usefulness of code and the usefulness of 24 hour news it is antithetical so a book is code a person is the computer Basically that runs that code. And so if you want something to be organized. It should be organized by outcome or by subject or by material. But if you have it organized by what the fucking pricks are talking about on the Tv today. That's the worst organization possible and it's very difficult to get any kind of good information out of that and you're going to be basically putting out your own schizophrenic psychological fires because you're like oh my god didn't realize what was happening in Serbia and then the next week you're like oh my god I didn't realize what was happening in. South Africa and then you're like oh my god I didn't realize what was happening to the veterans and then pretty soon you're whipped up into this frenzy where you're upset about everything but you can't do anything about it and it makes you feel so disconnected because. What you're aware of your radius of awareness and your radius of control are so far apart and that goes back to why working with stuff with your hands even just moving stuff around like moving weights around with your hands that'll make a big difference. It'll connect you to reality. 02:05:55.26 mikebledsoe Yeah. 02:06:07.56 Max Shank Go climb a tree. Go take a walk Boom you're immediately connected into reality into moving your body locomotion or projectiles moving other stuff and if you are if you're just whipped into this frenzy because you know people are trying to program other people. It's all we do. In fact. 02:06:24.40 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 02:06:46.70 Max Shank Pretty much as we try to program other people. Ah usually with the best of intentions too like I'm sure there are None of people who think school is like a good idea and and I just don't but that's fine. Yeah yeah, they they probably want people to like. 02:07:08.60 mikebledsoe Yeah, their heart's in the right place You think it's best for the kids. Well people also think that it's um, ah just they they think I think a lot of people they go Well I did it so it must be good. So other people should do it I mean that's. 02:07:21.12 Max Shank Behave themselves and like get married and like kept. 02:07:41.16 Max Shank Um, well and that's even a different thing like it. It's like hazing. 02:07:47.92 mikebledsoe That's big in the military of like I'm looking at the training and I go this doesn't really make sense. We're not really optimizing for getting better at our job. They're like well this we we went through it and no I'm like all whatever. 02:08:14.64 Max Shank Sometimes things are done a certain way because it really is the best way and sometimes things are done a certain way literally just because that's how they've been doing it and no one can imagine a different no one even tries to imagine a different way. 02:08:25.96 mikebledsoe Sometimes. 02:08:54.30 Max Shank You know and that's why you don't want to fight things Anyway, speaking of patterns when you fight something you immediately create a counterforce even if you punch the shit out of that thing upon that connection of your fist and that fucker's face. There's a counter force going right back into your fist and then more. Metaphorically speaking you're going to create a counter response to your active opposing Force. So That's why it's always better to obsolete than to fight if you have the option. 02:09:52.98 mikebledsoe Yeah I was reading a book yesterday that was talking about that is the the the people who are censoring are fighting. They're really fighting decentralization but censorship creates the necessity for decentralization and. You know Twitter Facebook Instagram they're trying to fight misinformation but the harder that they tried to fight misinformation with censorship the more prolific decentralization becomes because people start getting they start leaving the platform to go. 02:11:07.18 Max Shank It's natural. It's like cat and mouse. It's like it's natural cat and mouse evolution. The cat evolves longer claws. The mouse gets smaller and more clever. Ah same kind of idea right? You have hackers and then you got people who work in. 02:11:09.80 mikebledsoe To go to something That's not a platform. Yeah. 02:11:42.86 Max Shank Ah, software security which of course are also hackers. But they're basically like 1 upping each other all the time just the way that creatures have seemed to ah grow and evolve and fork out into these different sort of test branches almost. 02:12:13.96 mikebledsoe Now. Yeah. 02:12:20.66 Max Shank So it's better to obsolete and speaking of the patterns like we were talking about. Ah, it's hard to recognize which of the programs coming in are important and not important a lot of the time I think that can be a real challenge. 02:12:53.38 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, well that's a pattern too. The things that you're filtering what's important and not important so fast that it's it's built up over the years of life that you go. 02:12:57.58 Max Shank Most everything is ah like not important that. 02:13:31.62 mikebledsoe This is this is important. Not important people decide really quick and they miss opportunities really great opportunities all the time just pass right by them. There's there's this thing called the reticular activating system are familiar to ah Ras. Okay. 02:13:41.52 Max Shank Oh. 02:14:02.20 Max Shank No, but I'd like to be. 02:14:

Create with Franz
Episode 97: Creating excellent content

Create with Franz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 22:48


Creating content that resonates with the client and you are passionate about is a must when you plan your videos. In this episode I will outline the 6 aspects you might want to consider as you design your presentation. Thinking ahead of the type of client you serve, his needs, what he resonates with and how your message will come across will give you a better product, ensure greater impact and ultimately create a healthy connection with the people you want to help.

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
594: Dr. Joanne Kemp, PhD: How to Manage Hip Pain in Young Adults

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 31:28


In this episode, Principal Research Fellow at Latrobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, Dr Joanne Kemp PhD, talks about hip pain treatment and research. Today, Joanne talks about the common causes of hip pain, the difference between men's and women's hip pain, and the outcomes for patients that “wait and see”. How can PTs design and conduct evidence-based treatment programs? Hear about treating overachievers, referring out and using other treatments, and the upcoming Fourth WCSPT, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “It's important that patients understand that exercise is good for them and is not going to cause damage.” “With any strengthening program, you only need to do it 2 or 3 times a week to be effective.” “It's probably going to take 3 months for our rehabilitation programs to reach their full effect.” “If you don't get it right the first time, and if it takes you a little while to find your space, that's actually okay, because it's about the long journey, and you'll get there eventually.” “Don't stress about failure. It's about what you learn from that failure and how you adapt and change what you do.”   More about Joanne Kemp Associate Professor, Dr Joanne Kemp, is a Principal Research Fellow at Latrobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre and is a titled APA Sports Physiotherapist of 25+ years' experience. Joanne has presented extensively on the management of hip pain and hip pathology in Australia and internationally. Her research is focused on hip pain including early onset hip OA in younger adults, and its impact on activity, function, and quality of life. She is also focussed on the long-term consequence of sports injury on joint health. She has a particular focus on surgical and non-surgical interventions that can slow the progression and reduce the symptoms associated with hip pain, pathology, and hip OA. Joanne maintains clinical practice in Victoria.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Pain, Hip Pain, Pain Management, Injuries, Research, Osteoarthritis, Exercise, Physiotherapy, WCSPT, To learn more, follow Joanne at: Email:              j.kemp@latrobe.edu.au Website:          https://semrc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/ Twitter:            @joannelkemp ResearchGate   4th World Congress of Sports Physical Therapy.   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hey, Joe, welcome to the podcast. I'm so happy to have you on. I've been wanting to have you on this podcast for such a long time. So thank you so much.   00:10 Thanks, Karen. It's great to be here, finally.   00:13 And of course, today we're going to be talking about hip pain, hip pathology, that is your zone of genius. So let's just dive right in. So let's talk about some common causes of hip pain in adults. And does this differ between women and men?   00:36 Yeah, look, it's a great question. And I think probably, we, I think we're starting to change our perspective on that difference between men and women and the causes of hip pain. I think that previously, we've sort of been very aware of the burden of hip pain in men and particularly young male athletes that there's been, you know, a growing body of research that's looked at at the prevalence and burden and causes of hip pain in young men. And probably that's led to a misconception that it affects men more than women. But it's only really that the research has been done in men, less and less so in women, like we see across, you know, the whole medical space. So if we think about the common causes of hip pain across the lifespan, when we're looking in sort of the adolescent and young adult population, you know, typical causes can be things like hip dysplasia, and that's actually is more common in women or young girls and women than boys and men so probably affects three times as many girls and women as it does men. And I think the prevalent when we're you know, the prevalence is perhaps higher than we previously thought. So, some studies are suggesting that up to 20% of adults have some form of hip dysplasia are shallow, hip socket shallow, so turbulent, and, and that that does lead to an increased risk of developing hip osteoarthritis in later life in later life. And even as young adults, sometimes we see patients with hip dysplasia, presenting with arthritis who need to go to hip replacement at a really young age in their 20s and 30s. So, hip dysplasia is a really common one. Another one that we've heard a lot about in the last 10 years is femoral acetabular, impingement syndrome, or FAI syndrome. So that's traditionally thought to be where there's impingement between the ball and the socket, either due to extra bone on the ballpark of the hip, which is can morphology or deep or retroverted socket, which has pencil morphology. And that's probably where a lot of the studies have been done, particularly in that young male adult adult population. But what we're now seeing when we look at the big cohorts, particularly of patients that end up presenting to hip arthroscopy is that it's about 5050. It's about 50% men and 50% women. So that burden is pretty equal across men and women. And that's another thing that does lead to an increased risk of hip osteoarthritis in later life. But the risk is not quite as high in FAI syndrome as it is in hip dysplasia. And it certainly is, it tends to be a slower burn. So these patients present for their hip replacements probably in their 50s and 60s, whereas hip dysplasia, we're seeing these patients in their 20s and 30s, with hip osteoarthritis. So that's probably the second most, the you know, the second cause in that younger age group. Then as we move into older adults, so sort of, you know, people 35 Plus sort of middle aged and older adults, that's where we really see hip osteoarthritis presenting itself, and it can be due to dysplasia or FAI syndrome. But it can also just sort of be that idiopathic arthritis that might be due to occupation, lots of different things. And again, that's reasonably equal men and women, but we do see women probably having a little bit more arthritis than men and more women going to hip replacement than men. And the outcomes for hip replacement are not as good in women as they are in men. So that burden is still probably skewed towards being higher in women than men. And then the other cause of hip pain that we see particularly in the middle age and older women is other gluteal pathologies or lateral hip pain, sometimes called you know, TRAQ, enteric, besides gluteal, tendinopathy, gluteal tendinitis, it has lots of different names. But that's a burden that definitely disproportionately affects women, over men. And particularly, once women get into that perimenopause, or menopause or post menopausal age group, there seems to be a relationship with with with hormones and with estrogen levels and the likelihood of gluteal tendinopathy becoming symptomatic as women sort of transition through that change. And so that's another really common cause. And we're now starting to be aware that often these women will present with combined hip osteoarthritis and gluteal tendinopathy. And that's where it can get really, really, really tricky as well. So yeah, look, it does. There's different, you know, different things that you see across the lifespan, but the burden is definitely I think, disproportionately higher in women than in men in a number of those conditions.   04:58 Yes, and I am firmly In the last group that you mentioned, I am just getting over, if you will, getting over gluteal tendinopathy, where I have to tell you it that is some serious pain. And, you know, when you're a physical therapist and you have people coming in, and they're explaining their pain to you, and you try and sympathize or empathize now I'm like, it is painful. Like I couldn't walk, I couldn't stand for more than like, four minutes. Yeah,   05:29 at least I've had the same thing. And, and I've been lucky that mine, I was sort of able to get on to it, knowing what it was and what to do fairly quickly. But it's very, and I think this is the thing with hip pain until you've had hip pain, whether it's glute tendinopathy, or intra articular, hip pain, it's really disabling. And it really affects everything you do in life, you can't sit without hurting, you can't walk without it hurting, you can't stand without it hurting, you can't lie on your side, without it hurting, you're getting in and out of the car, getting dressed, you know, trying to put your shoes on, it just affects every aspect of your life. And you know, and the pain can be quite intense and severe. So it does. You know, for people who are affected by hip pain, the burden is huge. And we see it reflected in the studies as well, where if you look at outcome scores for quality of life, young people with things like displays your FAI syndrome, their quality of life scores are as bad as people who have hip arthritis who are waiting for hip replacement. So it does, it's very, when you've got it, it's very, very impactful. And I think people until you've experienced it, perhaps people underestimate how bad it can be.   06:33 Yeah, and it can be really, like you said, it's very, very disabling. And it also can can make you very nervous. So you know, when these patients come in to see you. So as the physio, when these patients come in to see you, it really behooves you to sit and listen and really get that whole story so that you can make that differential diagnosis as best you can, if you don't have the diagnostic test to back it up, which often happens. Yeah, absolutely.   07:01 And I think that's the thing when the patient's present to you, and they're complaining of pain in that hip area, you can't just go to one test or one scan and say, Oh, it's definitely these, it's actually there's lots of pieces of the puzzle puzzle that you've got to put together, it can be really complex, and you absolutely have to listen to the patient. And I think fear, like you just said, is a huge thing. And we've seen this in our some of our qualitative work that's currently under review, but others as well that these patients are terrified to move, or to do exercise because they think it's going to hurt more. And they're really scared that it's going to cause more damage. And, and the irony is that exercise is the thing that we know is like is going to make them better. And once they get moving, they do feel better, but they're so scared to move because they're scared, they're gonna break something or make it worse or end up needing a hip replacement that they they don't they don't move. And it fear is a huge problem, you know, with these people.   07:53 Yeah, I mean, even myself as a physio I knew I needed to exercise, I sort of outsource my physio exercises to a friend of mine, Ellie summers, who's on the, on the west coast here in the United States, and she sent me exercises and even doing them, like it's not super comfortable. But within a month, I felt so much better. And now, you know, I'm back to running on the treadmill and doing all the things. But oftentimes, these patients and I may be wrong, but they're not sort of picking up on this within the first month of pain, you know, they might say, Oh, um, it'll go away. Let me give it another couple of weeks and have a couple of weeks. Whereas I was like, Okay, this is really painful. I'm getting to a doctor asap and starting these exercises ASAP. So what have you seen, even through the literature about when patients start to seek out care for this? And how can that affect their outcomes?   08:52 I think it's one of the things with hip pain that patients often will just leave it and they'll wait and see. And so we do know that in the younger age group, like if you think about FAI syndrome, for example, people will often not present for two or three years, they will pull up with the pain because it kind of comes and goes so they'll have a flare up, they'll be bad for a few weeks, it'll go away for a few weeks and have another flare up. And so because it's coming and going, they, I guess remain optimistic. It's human nature to be optimistic that it's going to get better by itself. And so it can often be a couple of years. We see this in the literature, you know, two or three years, but I see that in my clinical practice. And I'm sure you do, too, Karen, that patients, they'll come to you and they'll say, oh look, I've had this for two or three years, I was waiting for it to go away and now it's you know, suddenly getting worse and that's when they seek out care. And I think too, you know if we think coming back to what we were talking about with women is that these problems affect women who are really busy so they are often have busy careers. They're looking after families often, they they might be studying as well. They're juggling lots of things. So for them to try and fit in the medical care or, you know, physio care or whatever they need. It's really hard for them to find to make the time to do that. And I think that that's probably why they potentially delay seeking, seeking treatment as well.   10:12 Yeah, so many factors go into it. But bottom line is it hurts. Now, how let's talk about the physio side of things. So how can PTS design and conduct an evidence based treatment program? For, we'll say, for adults with hip pain? Yep.   10:31 So I think we probably the first thing is to set really good expectations for the patient. So often patients will come potentially looking for the quick fix. And so I think it's important that right up front, we say to our patients, that it does take a while for things to work, you should be starting to improve over that time, but they need to be committed to an exercise program that we know needs to be now at least three months long. So I think both the therapist and the patient need to be prepared for that longer term commitment as well. So I think that's the first thing is setting expectations, right. And then around those expectations, it's also really important that patients understand that exercise is good for them and is not going to cause damage. So you're really trying to get the confident to be able to exercise part of that is an understanding that it will like you just said like when you did your exercises, it's not super comfortable. But that's okay, they need to they don't want to be in a lot of pain, but they will probably have some pain and that that's actually okay and normal to have that. And it doesn't mean that they're causing more damage. That's just a normal part of the body adapting to the exercise process. Sometimes I find with patients to you in order to convince them of that, because sometimes they're a bit skeptical, they don't quite believe you that they give you know, they will do exercises for a week, just look, just have a week off the exercise and see what happens to your pain. And what they find is pain is no better when they're not exercising. But sometimes it's worse, it's usually worse or the same. And so then they're like, Oh yeah, now I understand the exercises and actually making my pain any worse. And so sometimes you might need to do that to get them to buy in. So I think getting them to buy into the timeframe the commitment that they're going to need to do and the fact that they will have a bit of pain, that's probably the biggest thing, then once you've done that, then you can start to develop your exercise program and the foundations of our exercise program. I like to think of it as being sort of two pronged. So the first one is the local exercise that we're doing for the hip joints. So that's where we do a lot of our strengthening exercises. So strengthening up the muscles around the hip. So the hip abductors, and the adductors flexes in the extensors. But then also really focusing on the core and the trunk is important because that controls the acetabulum, which controls the socket. So putting that in and then you know functional exercises as well. So teaching them how to do things like squats and lunges and going up and down stair. So our local rehab exercises should have primarily a strength focus, they might also need to have a range of motion focus as well. But we need to be careful with ranges of motion because sometimes those ranges of motion might be provocative for patients. So going into a lot of rotation or a lot of flexion could provoke pain. So strength is probably our big biggest focus. But then the second prong of our rehab program should be around general fitness in general activity. So you know, we know that the physical activity guidelines say that everybody should be doing 150 minutes of moderate activity a week or 75 minutes of vigorous activity, then that's just to be a healthy person, regardless of whether you've got a sore hip or not. So I think trying to get them to do general fitness, cardio, whatever you want to call it alongside their hip specific rehab is, is the thing that you need to do. And then what I try and do is I try and make that hip specific rehab, sort of normalize it as fitness training, rather than rehab. Because people get, they're going to be like, don't want to do rehab, everyone gets bored of rehab, you know, at home with your little bands. So trying to get them to do things like you know, incorporated as part of their twice a week strength training, where they go to the gym, for example, is really important. And with any strengthening program, you only need to do it two or three times a week to be effective. So people don't have to do it every day. So I think that's important too to for them to know, they'll get they'll have days off where they don't have to do it. But to find two or three days a week where they can commit to this the strengthening component of the program, the cardio fitness component of their program can fit in around their schedule. And something that I really like to do with patients is to sit down and actually look at their weekly schedule and help them schedule it into their diary. So don't just say to them, you go do this, you know, five times a week, you actually have to fight help them find those chunks of time where they can do it and they can find 30 minutes in their day to be able to commit to that exercise program.   14:50 Yeah, I really love that you said to emphasize that the strength thing has to be done two to three times a week, because oftentimes Well, I mean, I'm in New York City where you have a lot of is like very driven, sort of type A folks. And they think if you're not doing it every day, then it's not working. Yeah, you know, so to be able to reframe that for them and say, Hey, listen two to three times a week is what our goal is, and be very forceful on almost holding them back. Do you have any tips on how to hold people back? For those folks? Who are the overachievers?   15:26 It's hard. Yeah, it's really tricky, isn't it? I think sometimes I think people have to learn for themselves. So you kind of have to let them find out the hard way, maybe, and be prepared with some painkillers to settle things down. But ideally, you don't want to do that, if you can help it, I think, I find that presenting the evidence can be really, really helpful. So you know, talking about the strengthening guidelines that that show that two to three times a week is where you're going to get the maximum effect of strength. And if you do more than that, it's not going to really add to that you'll have already sort of hit that ceiling, and potentially give them something different to do on those other days, if you don't want them doing strength training two to three times a week. If there's someone who wants to do something every day, helping them find other things on those other days, so perhaps, you know, mixing it up with some cycling, walking or jogging, if they are able to do that some swimming, you know, sometimes, you know, it might be appropriate or safe for these patients, if they enjoy things like yoga or pilates, they can do that if it if it doesn't hurt in addition to their other things. So I think those type A personalities, you might need to fill the space on those other days. Give me something else to do.   16:33 Yeah, I think that's great advice. And now, sometimes, as physiotherapist we have to refer out. So when is it appropriate to refer out or to use other treatments such as surgery? How do we navigate that as a physio?   16:50 It's tricky. And I think the most important thing is that that has to be a shared decision that we make with our patients. And at the end of the day, they will have their beliefs and their priorities that will probably take them in certain directions. Having that three month rule is a good rule, I think that we know it's probably going to take three months for our rehabilitation programs to reach their full effect. But but it doesn't mean to say you keep doing things for three months, if you're not getting any improvement, we really want to see them starting to head in the right direction, probably within around about four weeks. Within, you know, two or three treatments, you should be starting to see some change even though we know it's gonna take longer than that to get the full effect. I think that if you're not seeing change within that first month or so, you have to start asking yourself questions about well, why why why aren't I getting changed? Do I need to look at this and red flags here? Do I need to potentially refer the patient to their GP? For some imaging, we know that, you know, people have a history of cancer, that breast cancer and the gynecological cancers and prostate cancer really caught the hip joint is a really common point from you know, where the cancer metastasizes. So, I think bearing in mind our red flags, you know, women with guide other gynecologic non cancer, but other gynecological issues, you often get pain in that same area. So, being open minded about some of the non musculoskeletal causes of pain and being prepared to refer on if someone's not improving in that time is important. Imaging, you know, we don't want to jump to imaging straightaway, it's not always necessary, but it is sometimes it is necessary. And I think don't be frightened to refer for imaging. If someone's not improving. The one thing that I and it's different in every country and our health systems are all different. But here in Australia as physios, we can refer for imaging, but I if I'm if I'm suspicious that there's a red flag, that's a medical thing that's outside my scope of practice, I will refer them to the GP for the GP to refer for imaging. And the reason for that is I if you refer for imaging, you need to be able and confident to tell the patient the results of their imaging and interpret them and then refer them on for appropriate care now, for those medical things. I think as physios that's way outside our scope of practice and we shouldn't be you know, if the scan comes back with cancer, like we can't that's way outside our scope and we shouldn't be having to to explain those results to patients, I think only refer for imaging yourself with your confidence of what you'll be able to interpret those findings. So don't be afraid to refer to the doctor. Some patients often need pain relief as well or anti inflammatory. So that's, you know, if you're not getting improvements in that four weeks, you may need to refer them to the doctor to get pain relief or anti inflammatory medication. Things like injectables again, we don't want to inject give people lots of injections but we know that the hip joint is often sign up at green flame. So you know a judiciously used cortisone injection can be helpful in in some cases. So I think it's been not afraid to refer on you know, when you just turn the video off, when you need when you need to, to, you know to those other things and then surgery is probably your last resort, but There are a small number of people who will potentially need surgery as well. So, but you wouldn't actually be looking at surgery until you really finish this full three months of rehab.   20:09 Yeah, that all makes perfect sense. And now as we kind of start to wrap things up, where there, is there anything that you know, we didn't cover, that you would really like the listeners to know, or to take away, whether that's from the literature or from your experience when it comes to hips?   20:31 Yeah, I think, look, I think we've covered most things. But I think what it is, is just being really confident to prescribe a good quality exercise program. And if you don't feel like you have the knowledge or skills to do that, don't be scared to either refer to a colleague who who might have more knowledge or skills, or to, you know, to look up the evidence with, you know, that the evidence is has really grown in the last couple of years. And we published a consensus paper in V jsme, 2020. That was a consensus paper on what physio treatment for hip pain in young and middle aged adults would be. So that's a really good resource, it's got some some good examples in that paper of the types of exercise that you should be doing. And then my colleague from the US might Raman also lead a consensus paper in that same series on the diagnosis and classification of hip pain. So that's another really good resource that you can go to that will help you clarify the different diagnosis in the hip and what what what sort of things you can do to confirm your clinical suspicion and your diagnosis.   21:34 Perfect. And now, you will also be speaking at the fourth World Congress of sports, physical therapy in Denmark, which is August 26th, to the 27th, you're doing to sort of 15 minute 15 minute talks repeated twice. So one talk repeated twice. On the second day of the conference, can you let the listeners know a little bit more about that. And if you have any sneak peak that you want to share?   22:04 Yeah, so I'm going to be doing that talk in combination with a with a great colleague of mine, a Danish colleague, Julie Jacobson. And so we're going to be talking about hip pain in women specifically. So looking at the common causes of hip pain in women and as as physios, or physical therapists, what we should be doing to manage to manage that, because it's a congress of sports, physio, or sports, physical therapy. It'll be slanted probably towards the younger, more athletic population. But I think there'll be some really great takeaways for anyone treating women in particular with hip pain. So we're going to be really, I think, trying to focus on what it is about women with hip pain that's unique and different to men, and really helping the therapist develop a rehab program that really targets the things that are important for women. So the impairments that women have the physical impairments, but also really targeting some of those, you know, we've got to think about the biopsychosocial model. So some of the psychological challenges that people with hip pain have that we've sort of touched on in terms of being fearful to move, but then the social challenges too, because we know that we do live in a gendered environment. And it's no different for women with hip pain, where they might face additional barriers to, you know, in this the way society is constructed to be able to access the best care. So it's also helping helping the clinician really become an help patients navigate some of those challenges as well.   23:27 I look forward to it. It sounds great. Now are what is there anything that you're looking forward to at the conference in Denmark? Have you looked through the program? Are there talks that you're looking forward to?   23:40 I look, there's there's going to be so many great talks there. Like it's such a I can't believe how many how much they've packed into two days, like for two day program, I'm actually really excited. by so many of the different tools, I think the thing I'm most excited about is after two years, it'll be nearly three years by then that we've actually been able to see each other face to face, just to have the opportunity to catch up face to face with so many great colleagues that I've worked with before, but also meet new colleagues as well, and have the chance to travel to beautiful Denmark. You know, I haven't been to the conference venue, but it looks amazing being on the coast. In summer, it's going to be beautiful. I know the conference Organizing Committee has got a great social program as well organized and the Danish conference dinners are always a highlight, I think of any program. So I'm really excited about that as well. Yeah, I just I just can't wait.   24:31 Yeah, it's it. You have the same answer that so far everyone has said as they just can't wait to be in person and to network and to hang out with people and to meet new people. So you're right along with everyone else that I think a lot of the other speakers that are going to the conference, and now where can people find you if they have questions, they want to see more of your research, where can they go?   24:55 So, um, so I'm on Twitter, so my Twitter account is at Joanne L. him. So L is my middle initial. And you're welcome to send me a message via Twitter. But you can also contact me via email. So my email address is the letter j.camp@latrobe.edu.au. And then our sports medicine allotropes sports and exercise Medicine Research Center has a has a webpage and a blog page where a lot of our research is highlighted there as well. So if you just Google up Latrobe, Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Center, that's the first thing that will pop up as well. And we have a lot of, you know, a lot of really good information. We've got a really our Research Center has a really strong knowledge translation arm and so a lot of my colleagues, which credit to all my colleagues who work in this space, have developed a lot of really great resources to infographics, videos of exercises, lots and lots of different things that can be found on our on our research, our centers, webpage and blog page as well. So lots of good resources there.   25:57 Excellent. And we'll have links to all of that in the show notes for this episode at podcast at healthy, wealthy smart.com. So one click will take you to all of the resources that that Joe just mentioned. And last question that I ask everyone is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career? What advice would you give to your younger self? So maybe straight out of physio I pick pick a year, any year you'd like?   26:22 It's great question. And it's funny because I was actually talking to my son's girlfriend the other night, who's at university, and she's finding it stressful and hard. And I actually shared with her something that I'm not afraid to share that I actually nearly failed my first year of university, because I was too busy enjoying the social aspect of uni life. And I think what I would say to my young, and that stressed me out and really upset me at the time. And I think what I would say to my younger self is if you don't get it right the first time. And if it takes you a little while to find your space, that that's actually okay, because it's about the long journey, and you'll get there eventually. And so if you hit hurdles and bumps and you don't, you're not always successful every time, it actually doesn't matter. Because as long as you keep on trying, you'll you'll get there in the end. So don't don't stress about failure. It's about what you learn from that failure and how you adapt and change what you do.   27:12 What excellent advice. Thank you so much. And thank you for coming on to the podcast. This was great. And I think the audience now has a better idea of what to do with their patients when they have hip pain. And if they don't, they can head over to Latrobe, they can go over to the website and get a lot of great resources from from you all and also look up a lot of your research. And if we can also put your Research Gate. Yeah, we can put that up in the show notes as well if that's okay, so that way people can kind of get a one stop shop on all of your research because it's extensive. So we'll have that up there as well. Thanks, Karen. Thank you so much. And everyone. Thanks so much for tuning in listening and we hope to see you in August in Denmark at the fourth World Congress Sports Physical Therapy again, that's August 26 and 27th. If you haven't registered, I highly suggest you get on it and hopefully we'll be able to see you in Denmark. So I look forward to seeing you then. And everyone have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

RBaseball Weekly
Episode 76 - Foolish Baseball Returns! - Some rookies have excellent starts, some vets have sad ends

RBaseball Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 75:12


In Episode 76 of RBaseball Weekly (the weekly podcast from the baseball subreddit), Naaim and Dylan discuss the news of the week, including a pair of immaculate innings (in the same game), the end of a pair of 10+ game streaks (in the same game), and a bunch of injuries (not in the same game). Then, Mazz and Shane sit down with the one and only Foolish Baseball AKA Bailey to discuss his channel's growth since his last appearance, as well as just some general baseball fun. 30:45 - Foolish Baseball Interview Listener Survey - https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfemd6o7B_Ss65_IZSvjvGM_UKP6IX2yZu-JgyN8iCdvUpDmw/viewform?usp=sf_link

Wisdom's Echo
The Most Excellent Way by Parker Thomaston

Wisdom's Echo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 16:45


The Most Excellent Way by Parker Thomaston

BOSSMACK PODCAST RNS (BOSSMACKNOSISLIVE)
EPISODE #708 - EXCELLENT GAME W BOMPTON BOOGALUE (FULL EPISODE)

BOSSMACK PODCAST RNS (BOSSMACKNOSISLIVE)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 87:16


http://www.instagram.com/BOSSMACKTOPSOIL CASH APP http://www.cash.me/$BossMackTS Pay Pal BossMezzy@Yahoo.com http://www.instagram.com/ChefBoy_Heeeem If You Need Game txt 562 704-7878 CASH APP http://www.cash.me/$BossMackTS Host http://www.instagram.com/BOSSMACKTOPSOIL Hit me on Pay Pal BossMezzy@Yahoo.com Merch http://www.bossmackstreetwear.com Merch http://www.instagram.com/BossMackStreetwear Podcast http:// http://www.instagram.com/TheBossMackPodcast

Telugu Christian Messages
యేసుని వదలవద్దు | Excellent Sermon by Pastor Peter garu | Kakinada.

Telugu Christian Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 48:45


నా ప్రియ సోదరి సోదరులకు క్రీస్తు పేరిట వందనాలు! ఈ దైవ వాక్యాన్ని మీకు అందించుటకు దేవుని యందు మేమెంతో ఆనందించుచున్నాము. ఇవి మిమ్ములను ఆత్మీయంగా ఎంతగానో బలపరచాలని దేవుణ్ణి ప్రార్ధిస్తున్నాము. ఎందుకనగా... """{ ప్రతి మనుష్యుని క్రీస్తునందు సంపూర్ణునిగా చేసి ఆయనయెదుట నిలువబెట్టవలెనని, సమస్తవిధములైన జ్ఞానముతో మేము ప్రతి మనుష్యునికి బుద్ధిచెప్పుచు, ప్రతి మనుష్యునికి బోధించుచు, ఆయనను ప్రకటించుచున్నాము. - కొలస్సీయులకు - 1 : 28. }"""" కావున ఈ వర్తమానాన్ని పూర్తిగా విని మీరు ఇతరులకు కూడా దీవెనకరముగా ఉండవలసిందిగా కోరుచున్నాము. సమస్త మహిమ,ఘనత మరియు ప్రభావములు దేవునికే కలుగును గాక! ఆమెన్. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/teluguchristianmessages/message

Leaders in the Trenches
Attracting Quality People and Excellent Levels of Service with Peter Green at MASSIE R&D Tax Credits

Leaders in the Trenches

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 22:38


The two biggest challenges in business today are attracting quality people and retaining them. In this interview, we dive into attracting quality people to help you scale your business. Today's guest is Peter Green, CEO at MASSIE R&D Tax Credits. Inc Magazine ranked its company #3465 on the 2021 Inc 5000 list. MASSIE R&D Tax Credits is an innovators in R&D tax credits helps clients identify tax savings opportunities and work with the IRS to capture those benefits. Peter discusses the importance of attracting quality people to your mission. We discuss today's crazy job market. If you struggle attracting quality people to your company, you want to lean into today's interview.   Get the show notes for Attracting Quality People and Excellent Levels of Service with Peter Green at MASSIE R&D Tax Credits Click to Tweet: Listening to a fantastic episode on Growth Think Tank featuring #PeterGreen with your host @GeneHammett https://bit.ly/gttPeterGreen   #AttractingQualityPeople #GeneHammettPodcast #Inc2021 #GHepisode897 #taxsavingsopportunities #R&Dtaxcredit Give Growth Think Tank a review on iTunes!

Logansville Church
A More Excellent Way

Logansville Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 45:04


Pastor Dana Kidder preaching from I Corinthians 13: 1-7 at Logansville Church in Bellefontaine, Ohio.

Amor A Proverbios
Reading AA literature

Amor A Proverbios

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 24:55


Excellent joy to the fellowship

And the Winner Should Have Been...
Hell or High Water

And the Winner Should Have Been...

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 71:39


It's another episode we recorded well ahead of time (you'll notice easily enough when Bob gets the episode number wrong and fails to know that we'll use this format with The Northman and The Batman), but this was one that was particularly fun. The spoilers on this are heavy throughout, and we really suggest strongly that you watch the movie first. It's a good one, and it's worth seeing unspoilt.Music:Intro and Outro music excerpted without alteration other than length and volume from AcidJazz by Kevin McLeod under a Creative Commons (CC BY 3.0) license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode00:10 Intro and getting the episode number wrong, and then getting the novelty of this format wrong because we recorded The Batman and The Northman after this, but published them sooner.1:01 How we chose to discuss Hell or High Water3:12 Digression on the Oscar Best Picture mix-up4:07 Deciding to avoid spoilers for the first section of the podcast5:04 (Mostly) spoiler-free synopsis (no more spoilers than one would get from the trailer) Jump to 7:10 to skip synopsis entirely7:10 How the movie reveals the plot and motivations slowly and how the trailer short-circuits some of that effort8:54 Taylor Sheridan9:28 Ambiguity regarding the morals and motivations of many of the characters10:44 The odd quasi-mirroring of the pairs of antagonists and the relationship between them15:50 HERE DO THE SERIOUS SPOILERS BEGIN!15:58 Comparison to No Country for Old Men19:26 Ben Foster's portrayal of the older brother, Tanner21:39 Scapegoats and sin-eaters23:54 Viewer impressions of Tanner25:21 Plot discussion: change of bank target at the end of the film27:27 How Tanner's character leads to the final outcomes28:33 Tanner and staying out of prison29:30 Texas and frontier justice30:25 The film testing the viewer's loyalty to the protagonists in the third act32:11 Bob's favorite scene and character38:09 Mark's favorite scene40:08 If that ain't Texan, I don't know what is40:56 Excellent writing creates sympathy for the villains41:31 Sympathy from other characters46:48 Frank view of human frailty and failings and expressing affection when culture forbids it53:29 The expression of grief and loss56:17 The final showdown1:00:00 Reversal of roles, mirroring of the pairs1:06:43 Spoiler for the end of Inception, comparing endings1:08:03 One more scene...1:09:31 Closing thoughts, hidden gems

Knitmoregirls's Podcast
Riverbottom- Episode 678- The Knitmore Girls

Knitmoregirls's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 50:32


This week's episode is sponsored by: Carry your creativity with Erin Lane Bags! Whether you show your fiber fandom with the woolly wonder Sheepleverse, or dive into history with the Curiosities collection, our project bags, totes, and hook and needle organizers are at the ready to keep your hobby happy. “Go to HelloFresh dot com slash knitmore16 and use code knitmore16 for up to 16 free meals AND 3 free gifts!”   Have you ever had to frog because you forgot a step several rows back? Or lost your spot because you dropped your magnet board or lost track with your highlighter tape? Instead of wrestling with paper, use the knitCompanion app. It keeps you on track so you can knit more and frog less. knitCompanion works with ALL your patterns and is available for Apple, Android, and Kindle Fire Devices Wearing a color you love is like wearing a truly great pair of boots. You stand taller and walk proud. You carry a sense of purpose. LL Yarn Co.'s 2 woman dye-studio inside a century old former wool mill in Louisville, KY creates bold and energetic colors. We are driven by fashion, culture, and cause to put our passion for color onto stunning yarns. With LL Yarn Co. on your needles and hooks you are telling the world you aren't afraid to be noticed. Afterall, your knitting is an opportunity to share your passion with your world. LL Yarn Co., for when your knits need to speak louder than words. Are you feeling dis-GRUNT-eled about your stash? Are you browsing Insta-HAM looking for knitting inspiration? Is color "kind of a PIG deal" in your life? Oink Pigments offers over one hundred forty PIG-ture perfect colorways to make you SQUEAL with delight. For a limited time only, bring home the bacon with code KNITMORE and get fifteen percent off in-stock yarns and fibers at oinkpigments dot com. Shop soon, because these pigs will FLY!     On the Needles: (0:39) Gigi : Andrew's socks, working on second one  Jasmin finished the cashmere/cashmere silk hat with beads out of the UFO bin (ancient yarn)  Gigi :the Elton cardigan, super wash merino, from Neighborhood Fiber Co, and did right front shoulder, working on the 5th mohair stripe Jasmin pulled her Viajante out of Area 51, and is working on the beaded mesh. Gigi tube socks: Always Be Kind Yarn, Inclusive Pride Stripes, with a yellow mini skein for Genevieve. Thigh high, working on second one  Jasmin is progressing on her crocheted the XY scarf in the 19th Amendment kit from Lady Dye Yarns. Jasmin is making progress on Sam's Gramps cardigan by Tincan Knits knit in Magpie Fibers Nest Worsted "Twilight Dark”. More projects being unearthed from Area 51 Gigi:bound off one Andrew sock, and cast on the mate Jasmin is working on the L'Escargo Bleu shawl in Sea Change fibers Ecola Worsted   In Stitches:(17:02) Gigi wore the thrifted dress, quilt, A-line skirt Jasmin wore her Cardizen   Events:(18:28) Jasmin & Diane from Lady Dye are co-hosting a KAL! The Sea Glass Pullover (in DK). Pushed back to June 20 Stash Dash has started! May 27 - End of August Rhinebeck! (Hopefully.) STITCHES SoCal in Pasadena! Nov 10-13     Mother Knows Best:(23:42) We answer questions about Fair Isle knitting Philosophers fair isle knitting   When Knitting Attacks:(33:19) Viajante. Mesh looked off. Was off.   Knits in Space:(37:19) Gilded Age : New Money Old Rules: The Gilded Age podcast episode 6. Excellent discussion of Mr Raikes  Brian Cox at the Golden Gate theatre The Caged Monkey podcast   Book : The Fabric of civilization ; How textiles made the world , By Virginia Postrel Bolt Threads!!! Spin silk out of protein powder. It is wet spun. Bolt defines itself as a biology based materials company.  Also make leather substitute called Mylo from mycelium (=mushrooms) they are protein - polymer microfibers Lanital protein fiber made out of skim milk in 1937 Italy    And Sew On:(46;35) 8646:Vogue dress , sleeves

The EBL2017 Podcast
Fabio Vieira is an *EXCELLENT* signing!

The EBL2017 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 19:31


Fabio Vieira is special. He's has Bernardo Silva's gait and press resistance along with the ball striking and directness of Kevin De Bruyne... it's another Mikel Arteta masterclass.

Proverbs Daily Podcast

1 Better is a dry morsel with quietness, than a house full of feasting with strife. 2 A servant who deals wisely will rule over a son who causes shame, and shall have a part in the inheritance among the brothers. 3 The refining pot is for silver, and the furnace for gold, but Yahweh tests the hearts. 4 An evildoer heeds wicked lips. A liar gives ear to a mischievous tongue. 5 Whoever mocks the poor reproaches his Maker. He who is glad at calamity shall not be unpunished. 6 Children's children are the crown of old men; the glory of children is their parents. 7 Excellent speech isn't fitting for a fool, much less do lying lips fit a prince. 8 A bribe is a precious stone in the eyes of him who gives it; wherever he turns, he prospers. 9 He who covers an offense promotes love; but he who repeats a matter separates best friends. 10 A rebuke enters deeper into one who has understanding than a hundred lashes into a fool. 11 An evil man seeks only rebellion; therefore a cruel messenger shall be sent against him. 12 Let a bear robbed of her cubs meet a man, rather than a fool in his folly. 13 Whoever rewards evil for good, evil shall not depart from his house. 14 The beginning of strife is like breaching a dam, therefore stop contention before quarreling breaks out. 15 He who justifies the wicked, and he who condemns the righteous, both of them alike are an abomination to Yahweh. 16 Why is there money in the hand of a fool to buy wisdom, since he has no understanding? 17 A friend loves at all times; and a brother is born for adversity. 18 A man void of understanding strikes hands, and becomes collateral in the presence of his neighbor. 19 He who loves disobedience loves strife. One who builds a high gate seeks destruction. 20 One who has a perverse heart doesn't find prosperity, and one who has a deceitful tongue falls into trouble. 21 He who becomes the father of a fool grieves. The father of a fool has no joy. 22 A cheerful heart makes good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones. 23 A wicked man receives a bribe in secret, to pervert the ways of justice. 24 Wisdom is before the face of one who has understanding, but the eyes of a fool wander to the ends of the earth. 25 A foolish son brings grief to his father, and bitterness to her who bore him. 26 Also to punish the righteous is not good, nor to flog officials for their integrity. 27 He who spares his words has knowledge. He who is even tempered is a man of understanding. 28 Even a fool, when he keeps silent, is counted wise. When he shuts his lips, he is thought to be discerning. Listen Subscribe: Proverbs Daily Podcast Psalms Daily Podcast

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard - A STITCH IN TIME - Reissue of the week

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 33:13


A poor but nerdy taxidermist is hired to mount the trophy of a lifetime.   Cast List Debra Meeks - Emmatrice Devan Curt - Cole Hornaday Dougie - George Dunn Da Boss - Reynaud LeBoeuf Mrs. Olsen - Femnomena Zalmoxis - Danar Hoverson Roderick - Julie Hoverson Music by Deied Theme music by Kevin MacLeod (Incompetech.com) Editing and Sound:  Julie Hoverson Cover Design:  Julie Hoverson [Taxidermy pics used with permission from Custom Creature Taxidermy Arts] "What kind of a place is it? Why, it's the street outside a taxidermist's workshop, can't you tell?" ************************************************************************   A STITCH IN TIME Cast: Olivia Debra Meeks, lonely taxidermist Curt Buchner, low-level thug Dougie Block, ranking thug William Buchner, high-level cultist Mrs. Olsen, next door with cats Zalmoxis, ancient god OLIVIA     Did you have any trouble finding it?  What do you mean, what kind of a place is it?  Why, it's the street outside a taxidermist's workshop, can't you tell?  MUSIC SOUND     INSIDE CAR NOISES (not driving), RAIN SOUND    RADIO TURNS OFF, MUSIC OUT CURT    [sincere]  Nice night. DOUGIE    Nice?  You like rain? CURT    [eager] Yeah.  Course, it's better when there's lightning too. DOUGIE    You wouldn't want to be in the car then - too much metal CURT    [eager] Oh, no, just the opposite - the tires would protect us.  Keep us from being grounded. DOUGIE    Right.  Whatever. CURT    [musing] Especially wouldn't want to be outside if you had a metal plate in your head. DOUGIE    A what?  [half a laugh] How many people do you actually know with a freaking metal plate in their head? CURT    Um...  [thinks] six. DOUGIE    Six?  you know six freaking people with --  Nah!  You're so full of shit your eyes are brown. CURT    Six.  Benny the geek, Mr. Jones, my gramps - got his in Okinawa, my uncle Lenny - in Nam, my niece Bevvy-- DOUGIE    Your niece?  She see action overseas too? CURT    Don't be silly, she's five.  Playground accident, but she's doing fine - her dad even shaved his head to match hers so she won't feel so self-conscious til her hair grows back to cover the scar. DOUGIE    So who's number six? CURT    Hmm? DOUGIE    That's five, who's six? CURT    Oh!  [chuckles] Me. DOUGIE    Great, runs in the family. CURT    Guess you could say that.  I-- DOUGIE    Oops.  Time to bring in the packages.  Don't want to be late - you know the boss. SOUND    GETTING OUT OF THE CAR DOUGIE    "D. Meeks, Taxidermy"  Hey - that's funny, "D. Meeks" CURT    Huh? DOUGIE    You know, D. Meeks'll inherit D Earth, and all that. [laughs] CURT    [missed it by a mile] Oh.  Um, I guess so. DOUGIE    [Exasperated noise] MUSIC DEBRA    [very uncomfortable, searching for excuses] Never done anything big - I mean, I did take a prize for mounting a bear, but it was a really really small brown. WILLIAM    ["mob boss"] I don't think you understand my... uh... position, dear lady.  I have come to you, not with a request, but a requirement. DEBRA    But why me? WILLIAM    I have seen your work, and know of the prizes you have taken, and believe you are the only one who can do the job I need done with the grace and skill I need it to be done with. SOUND    THUMPING AS SOMETHING BIG AND HEAVY IS DROPPED IN HALL.  THEN A TENTATIVE KNOCK AT THE DOOR WILLIAM    [sigh] Both of which are qualities sorely lacking these days.  [sigh] Raoul, let them in. SOUND    FOOTSTEPS DEBRA    What exactly do you need stuffed? WILLIAM    We will get to that in a moment, first-- SOUND    DOOR OPENS WILLIAM    --Ah, Curt, Dougie, so glad you could join us.  DEBRA    [quiet, to herself] That's funny, I once had a cat named Doogie.  No, that's wrong - I once stuffed a cat named Doogie. DOUGIE    [fawning]  Glad to help, Mr. Williams. SOUND    DOOR CLOSES WILLIAM    The young lady here is Debra Meeks - a true artiste.  I believe you have something for her, Dougie? DEBRA    [quiet, to herself] Doogie mouser. DOUGIE    Right here, Mr. Williams. CURT    [Snickers, getting her joke] SOUND    FOOTSTEPS, BRIEFCASE SET ON BENCH, LATCHES SNAP, CASE OPENS DEBRA    Holy crow!  Is that--? WILLIAM    Two-hundred, fifty thousand dollars.  Which, coincidentally, is just about twice your total debts, what with the failing business and the house and all - rounded up, of course, since no one likes small change... DEBRA    And I just have to do the one job? WILLIAM    Just one.  But I must have your absolute assurance and agreement before I can show you the subject in question. DEBRA    [thinking, muttering]  I could really-- SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY DEBRA    --really use that, wouldn't have to do any more crummy data entry-- WILLIAMS    The offer expires in 30 seconds, my dear young lady.  Please think quickly. DEBRA    [muttered]  Hang gliding, jello body rub, Trip to Mall of America, scatter dad properly... WILLIAMS    Five.  Four.  Three. DEBRA    All right.  Whatever you want. WILLIAMS    I do require absolute discretion.  Can you guarantee that?  DEBRA    Ye-es.  Yes.  WILLIAMS    Good.  Why don't you boys bring in the other package. DOUGIE    Gotcha.  Sir. SOUND    DOOR OPENS AGAIN, HEAVY ITEM ROLLED IN DEBRA    [gasp] MUSIC DEBRA    [hyperventilating into a paper bag] CURT    Come on, it ain't that bad. DEBRA    But -- [gasp, goes back into bag] CURT    You musta seen all kinds of dead things before. SOUND    BAG SNATCHED AWAY, SQUEAKY TOY STARTS UP DEBRA    Not a person!  CURT    Just think of it as a really big ... badger or something. WILLIAMS    [off, sweet] Are you ready to hear the rest of your commission, Miss Meeks?  [harder] Curt? CURT    [calling over shoulder]  Just about.  [back to her] Come on.  DEBRA    Badger.  Right.  [deep breath]  A big, [gasp] bald, [breath] badger.  [bad accent] We don't need no steenkin'-- CURT    [low] You might want to stop with the squeaking.  I think it's getting on the boss's nerves. DEBRA    The..?  SOUND    SLOW LET GO OF THE SQUEAK DEBRA    Oh.  It helps with stress. CURT    Yours, maybe - but his...?  Ya know. DEBRA    Um-hmm. SOUND    SQUEAKY OUT WILLIAMS    So glad you could rejoin us.  I apologize for the shock this must be, but you see now why I was forced to extract your agreement before I could show you the subject? DEBRA    Uh-huh. SOUND    SLOW SQUEAK, IN-OUT MUSIC DEBRA    [irritated, "move out of my way"] Excuse me. DOUGIE    [snort] DEBRA    Can you bring ... that ...on in here?  I have to... well, I have to see what needs to be done. DOUGIE    It's not as heavy as it looks.  Get it yourself.  I'm just supposed to keep an eye on you.  Make sure you don't phone no one or louse this up. DEBRA    Your boss said you were supposed to make sure I got it done right. DOUGIE    Yeah, well, who's stopping you? DEBRA    [loud sigh/growl of exasperation] SOUND    ANGRY FOOTSTEPS, TRYING TO MOVE A HEAVY OBJECT [COFFIN] ON WHEELS, BUT BANGING INTO WALLS DEBRA    This is a two person job! DOUGIE    I ain't in the mortician's union. DEBRA    Fine. SOUND    COFFIN LID RAISES, SLAMS INTO WALL DEBRA    It would be the feet end.  [sigh]  Ok -- ew! SOUND    SCUFFLE OF FABRIC, SQUEAKY TOY GOES A MILE A MINUTE DOUGIE    Leave off, already! DEBRA    He's still warm!  Ew! MUSIC     SOMBER, FUNEREAL SOUNDS    THROUGHOUT, ODD PLOPS AND DRIPS, CUTTING NOISES CURT    So if you've won all these awards, how come you're broke? DEBRA    Not much call for taxidermy, these days - PETA, all that.  We fly a little under the radar, since fur coats are a bigger splash in the news, but we take our share of flack. SOUND    HEAVY PLOP CURT    So why do it?  DEBRA    I'm good at it.  You don't stop doing something you're good at just cause no one cares, do ya? CURT    But what if what you're good at doesn't ... well... get you anywhere? SOUND    ALL AMBIANCE STOPS, EXCEPT DRIPPING NOISES DEBRA    [wipes face with back of sleeve] Like what? CURT    I ran track.  A lot.  But what does that do for you, unless you want to be a fugitive on Cops? DEBRA    [giggles] CURT    Why're you taking off your glasses? DEBRA    Just trying to picture you with your face all blurred out. SOUND    CUTTING AND NOISES BEGIN AGAIN, A MOMENT OF JUST THIS, THEN: DEBRA    How'd you go from track to - um - CURT    Wiseguy? DEBRA    Is that what it's called? CURT    Good enough.  [shrugs] Mister Williams is my uncle.  It ain't a bad job.  [beat]  What got you into this?  This dead animal stuff? DEBRA    Promise you won't laugh? SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY CURT    Sure. DEBRA    No really, promise. CURT    I promise. DEBRA    I was about seven.  It was a - bad time.  My folks were using me as the tug in a divorce tug-o-war, so I took apart my teddy bear, to see what made him squeak.  I very carefully picked out the stitches and pulled this out‑‑ SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY CURT    Your keychain? DEBRA    No, I put it on there years later.  CURT    Most kids, when they operate on a toy, decide to become doctors.  [shrug]  Or serial killers. DEBRA    Yeah, but I restuffed and sewed him back up again.  Over and over again.  I kept sewing different things into him, too.  Trying to see how much I could hide in there. SOUND    BIG PLOP DEBRA    Uhhh.  Hand me the hose? MUSIC AMBIANCE    SCRAPING SOUNDS DEBRA    I had to choose between maintaining the carcass or the skin.  Your boss indicated he needed the skin as intact as possible-- SOUND    MAGAZINE PAGE TURNS DOUGIE    Whatever.  You know, I ain't actually listening to you.  DEBRA    --So I won't be able to make a mold from the original carcass, since I'm having to sacrifice the smaller bits, like fingers-- What? DOUGIE    I'm not listening. DEBRA    Why not?  You could learn something. DOUGIE    I could also lose my lunch.  [sigh] SOUND    MAGAZINE SLAPPED DOWN DOUGIE    How does a moderately cute dame like you end up elbow deep in guts on a daily basis? DEBRA    I-- I don't know.  SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY A COUPLE OF TIMES DOUGIE    You almost done here?  The boss is supposed to be back with your next set of instructions this evening. DEBRA    Just the hardest bits are left - you know - very delicate, paper thin skin, lots of crenellations.  I wonder if I could just cut 'em off, hollow 'em out, and rebuild 'em later? DOUGIE    [very creeped]  Ohhhhh.  Now I'm really not listening.  Urp. SOUND    RUNNING FOOTSTEPS, DOOR DEBRA    What's he got against ears? MUSIC WILLIAMS    And the progress? DEBRA    I got the hide off, but it's not all in one piece - humans just don't come apart that easily.  Our... skin... is really ...um.... too thin.  I can stitch it back together, but there's also no pelt to cover up the stitches-- WILLIAMS    The stitches will be fine.  And I've brought you the stuffing materials-- DEBRA    Mounting.  We prefer "mounting".   Anyway, really what I need next is a drum of grease cutter - mild dishwashing liquid'll do - don't want anything too harsh that'll dry out the-- WILLIAMS    Dougie will get it for you.  [an order] Won't you Dougie?  For now, I have brought you your mounting materials.  You understand that it is very important to use what I brought and only what I brought.  I even have special thread for you to use for stitching it all up again. DEBRA    But I - I need a framework - heavy sculpted foam works just fine, [slowing a bit] though I can't exactly order off the rack for-- WILLIAMS    You may have noticed this project is ... unique.  SOUND    RUSTLE OF A LARGE SHEAF OF PAPERS WILLIAMS     I have very specific requirements as to how you are to proceed. SOUND    KNOCK AT THE DOOR WILLIAMS    What is that?  You were supposed to-- SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY GOES LIKE CRAZY DEBRA    I'll tell them to go away. DOUGIE    [menacing] If you don't I will. MRS. OLSEN    [muffled] Debbie?  Dear?  It's time! DEBRA    Oh, jeez.  WILLIAMS    What? DEBRA    My landlady Mrs. Olsen - we have this standing agreement that whenever one of her cats dies, She brings it on in. MRS. OLSEN    Debbie?  I know you're in there! DEBRA    I'll go get Roderick and put him on ice until I'm done with [swallows nervously] your project.  WILLIAMS    Won't she notice if it takes longer than usual?  DEBRA    Nah.  She's pretty gone - up there.  I'll just keep telling her she only brought him in yesterday... SOUND    DOOR UNLOCKS DEBRA    Psst.  Don't let her see you. DOUGIE    Hmph. SOUND    DOOR OPENS MRS. OLSEN    Oh, there you are, Debbie.  Did I catch you in the crapper?  I'm so sorry, but poor Mr. Roderick's time has come. DEBRA    I'm so very sorry. MRS. OLSEN    That's all right.  He's in a better place.  Cream and honey.  Cream and honey.  Here's his poor little body.  You always do such a good job for me, Debbie. DEBRA    I know. Yeah.  I'll bring him back to you when he's ready to rejoin the family. MRS. OLSEN    So kind.  Now I must get home - Roderick's about to have kittens! SOUND    DOOR SHUTS DOUGIE    I thought ... Roderick was dead.  DEBRA    She names all her cats Roderick.  Saves on changing the names on the bowls. DOUGIE    How many have you--? DEBRA    Thirty four. DOUGIE    How many does she--? DEBRA    Depends on how big a litter Roderick has. MUSIC WILLIAMS    So, now you have these big bags of--  Dougie? DOUGIE    Yeah?  Uh, here, boss. SOUND    HEAVY BAG DUMPED ON FLOOR, CRUNCHES WILLIAMS    We'll just call them Tana leaves.  Got it?  They must fill up the bulk of the body.  SOUND    BAG BEING POKED DEBRA    They're kind of pokey.  Might tear the ... hide.  Can I grind them?  WILLIAMS    Hmm.  I don't see why not - but let me get back to you on that before you go off and do something unfortunate.  DEBRA    Ok.  Um... SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY WILLIAMS    [waits a second, then]  Yeah?  Speak up? DEBRA    I only ask, because it does affect how I do my job, ok? WILLIAMS    Only ask what? DEBRA    Is this - the whole thing - something that needs to...um....last?  Is it going to be moved around a lot? WILLIAMS    Let's say - yes. DEBRA    And you really sure you don't want a central framework?  Not even wire reinforcement? WILLIAMS    That's what I said. DEBRA    I need to reinforce the hide somehow or those leaves will rub the crap out of it.  CURT    The skin can tear real easy. DEBRA    Yeah. WILLIAMS    I'll check on that.  You got stuff to do until I get back to you, right?  Good. MUSIC SOUND    SOMETHING LARGE PULLED OUT OF WATER.  DRIPPING CURT    What's all that? DEBRA    Once all the fat's sloughed, you have to cure the hide.  Stop it from rotting.  Attracting insects.  You know. CURT    [shudder] Bugs, man.  I hate 'em. DEBRA    Why?  They're... Well, they're kind of everywhere. CURT    That's part of the problem - no matter what you do, they're there.  They don't keep out, and they don't go away. DEBRA    That's why hating them is so - pointless. CURT    Mostly they just creep me out. DEBRA    Let me guess.  Did you grow up with cockroaches? CURT    Palmetto bugs.  Huge freaking whistling cockroaches. DEBRA    I lived with cockroaches for a while. [almost a chuckle] CURT    You think they're funny? DEBRA    Only when you spray them with non-stick oven spray by mistake. CURT    Why? DEBRA    They go sliding down the wall, little legs pumping - ee-eh ee-eh ee-eh.  They get completely freaked out. CURT    [half teasing] Now you creep me out some too. DEBRA    [pleased snicker] MUSIC SOUND    PHONE RINGS DOUGIE    [around a mouthful] Figures.  [quickly swallows] DEBRA    Shouldn't you get that? DOUGIE    Tell me somethin I don't know.  [one last gulp] SOUND    PHONE PICKED UP DOUGIE    Yeah?  Right.  Fer you. DEBRA    Ok.  [really hesitant] Hello? SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY - one squeak WILLIAMS    [phone] I got an answer for you.  On the leaves. DEBRA    Uh huh? WILLIAMS    [phone] No grinding.  Apparently that's out.  You can cut them up some.  I'll show you.  I'm also bringing some other things you can use for packing. DEBRA    Oh.  Good. WILLIAMS    [phone] We don't want him walking around like a big old teabag, eh? DEBRA    [trying to keep it in, but it comes out a whisper] Walking? SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY WILLIAMS    [phone] Uh.  Figure of speech. DEBRA    Goodbye.  [gulps] SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY, SLOW RELEASE MUSIC SOUND    THREAD BEING SNIPPED DEBRA    There.  That's nice.  That thread hardly shows, doesn't it? DOUGIE    [off] You talking to the dead guy again? DEBRA    [covering] No. SOUND    PACKING DOUGIE    [off] Oh, hell, no.  What's this bag next to my lunch? DEBRA    Roderick. DOUGIE    A dead cat?  That ain't hygienic! DEBRA    Technically your lunch is in HIS cooler. DOUGIE    Yeah, like he's gonna be the one to object. DEBRA    [to body]  No more than you will, Bob. SOUND    PATS CORPSE, SLIGHT RUSTLE OF LEAVES MUSIC SOUND    COMPUTER KEYS TAPPING DEBRA    Tana Leaves.  One N or two...?  Hmm...! WILLIAMS    [off] Find her. DOUGIE    Hey chickie? SOUND    HASTY KEYSTROKES DEBRA    Just a sec! DOUGIE    What are you doing?  [annoyed, yelling back] She's on the computer, boss! WILLIAMS    [coming in, tsks] What did I say about that? DEBRA    You - well, you didn't say anything...  You said not to contact anyone, and I didn't - wasn't.  I was looking up ... delicate stitching techniques for very thin hides.  Remember, I haven't done this before. WILLIAMS    Hmm. DEBRA    I wouldn't have said anything to anyone.  After all, I promised. WILLIAMS    You need to look anything else up, you ask Dougie for your laptop.  [commanding] Dougie? SOUND    LAPTOP SLAPPED SHUT MUSIC SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY THROUGHOUT TO PUNCTUATE DEBRA    I'm worried about .... well, what this is all FOR.  CURT    Maybe it's not that bad.  Like the Aztecs. DEBRA    The Aztecs?  But they were...  pretty bad. CURT    No, no they weren't.  Not to them.  I mean, we all think "ooh, human sacrifice" and "man I wouldn't want my heart ripped out" right? DEBRA    Usually. CURT    But we don't realize that was the way they believed.  They figured without constant sacrifice, the world'd actually end.  They had to feed a bunch of hungry, thirsty gods, who had a really big human jones. DEBRA    [slight snicker]  CURT    For the victims, it was like winning American Idol - you got to be famous for a day.  DEBRA    Um.  [deep breath]  But didn't it hurt? CURT    Oh, yeah.  But they were all kinda masochistic back then.  Hurt yourself to prove how tough you are and stuff.  They'd even pierce their tongues and run cords covered in thorns up and down through the hole. DEBRA    On the victims? CURT    No - the bigwigs did it to themselves.  DEBRA    Ugh.  But this.... CURT    Look, I'll see what I can hear - without asking too many questions, you know?  [teasing] I don't want my heart ripped out. MUSIC DEBRA    [whispering] Oh, Roderick.  I'm so sorry about this.  But I have to see... SOUND    STUFFING LEAVES DEBRA    And a little of this... SOUND    GRIT BEING SCOOPED DEBRA    And a few stitches.....  There.  And we wait.  What's the worst that could happen, eh? SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY MUSIC CURT    I got a metal plate in my head. DEBRA    [interested] Oh?  Where? CURT    About here.  You can see the scar if you want. DEBRA    I've never seen a metal plate - I mean, animals don't usually get them, and I've always mounted animals.  I mean, not that I'd want to mount you, just that it would be kinda different-- [shocked] oh! CURT    No, no - I understand.  I didn't think you'd want to, uh, mount me. SOUND    SQUEAKY SQUEAKY DEBRA    I mean, I'm sure you're very nice and all.... CURT    I'm nicer up and walking than with a stick up my butt - or at least that's what my mother always says. DEBRA    Oh.  Yeah.  [nervous laugh, then double take] She says--? CURT    No.  Just wanted to see you laugh. DEBRA    [laughs]  Where's Dougie, anyway? CURT    He ain't feeling so well - he says. DEBRA    Figures.  CURT    Are you getting close to done? DEBRA    Kinda.  It takes a lot of work, especially sewing the fingers and stuff back together. SOUND    AWKWARD SILENCE CURT    I-I hope I didn't gross you out with the whole Aztec thing.  I just figured that--  well, being in your profession, you might-- DEBRA    Have a strong stomach? CURT    No.  Well, I mean, yes.  Yes, but.  But I figured that maybe you would be the kind of person who could take a step back and look - I mean, there are a lot of people out there who don't understand what you do and why you do it and why you love it, right? DEBRA    Yeah, but I don't kill anyone.  Any thing. CURT    I'm just comparing the misunderstanding.  To themselves, they were just doing what they had to do.  They probably thought "hey, those Mayans, they're some crazy freaks!"  DEBRA    Or "wow, those Incas - you wouldn't believe what they're up to!" CURT    See?  You got it. DEBRA    Yeah.  Ok. CURT    So, there was really a point before I wandered a bit.  What got me all started here was that this has something in common with the Aztecs. DEBRA    It does? CURT    Well, yeah - they had this one god, and this is a really good example of misunderstanding - named Xipe Totec [zhippy toe-tec] who they called the flayed one-- CURT    --cuz each year the sacrifice was flayed and the skin preserved for the priests to wear for the upcoming year.  See, now, to us that's disgusting, but to them it symbolized life, fertility, and the changing of the seasons.  Cuz each year, like a seed sheds its pod, the priest would eventually shed the long-dead skin and be a new man. DEBRA    [uncertain] I guess I can see that. CURT    'Course, the victim was probably flayed alive, so-- DEBRA    ew! SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY SOUND    SCRABBLING NOISE CURT    [casual] What's that? DEBRA    [trying to sound casual] Don't... know.  SOUND    SQUEAKY TOY GOING A MILE A MINUTE CURT    It's coming from the bathroom. DEBRA    I'll look! CURT    No let me. DEBRA    I - I guess. SOUND    DOOR OPENS, RUNNING CAT FEET CURT AND DEBRA    [both gasp] CURT    Just a freaking cat. DEBRA    [completely freaked out] Yes.  Must be one of the Rodericks. CURT    Jeez.  [calming her] It's OK.  He musta come in through the window or something. DEBRA    [barely a whisper] Something. MUSIC DEBRA    Keep an eye out - there was a cat in here yesterday.  It was pretty freaky. DOUGIE    Hey, at least it ain't some damn dead thing.  DEBRA    [shudder] Yeah. DOUGIE    You don't like animals? DEBRA    Live ones are too messy.  Eating and pooping.  Dead ones are much more manageable. DOUGIE    It's kinda cruel, though ain't it? DEBRA    Why?  They're dead.  It's just whether they end up cute forever, or rotting in a ditch somewhere.  CURT     Like all those people who say we shouldn't eat meat - sure, just let all the cows go.  They won't survive on their own. DOUGIE    Do you have a point? CURT    So is it more cruel to put them out to starve?  Do those people expect farmers to feed the cows and NOT sell them?  Doesn't anyone ever think of the hardship to the farmers? DEBRA    I don't eat meat. CURT    Oh, sorry. DOUGIE    Figures.  You make no damn sense, lady. DEBRA    Oh, it's not a moral issue.  Just that it clogs me up real bad.  [beat] That's too much information, isn't it?  CURT    Um... DOUGIE    I'm not listening! DEBRA    Still surprised that I prefer dead animals to live people? MUSIC SOUND    PHONE RINGS, PICKED UP CURT    [into phone]  Yeah?  [up] Debra? DEBRA    [takes phone] Yes? WILLIAMS    You must be finished by tonight.  I will arrive at seven with the final component.  Be ready to make the final insertion. DEBRA    Where? WILLIAMS    [exasperated]  At your shop, there. DEBRA    No, I meant where does it go?  I need to finish sewing everything else up, if you're looking to ... take it home tonight. WILLIAMS    Oh, right.  Hmm.  Leave a spot for the heart. DEBRA    Ohhhh. MUSIC CURT    Do you think that's what the boss is up to?  Something like Xipe Totec? DEBRA    Hmm.  I'd say no.  A lot of the herbs and stuff on the stuffing list are old world, not Central American at all.  CURT    Point.  So you rule out my pals the Aztecs.  DEBRA    How'd you know so much about them anyway?  [kindly] Apart from being a complete freak? CURT    [chuckles ruefully] Eighth grade history project.  I was a crap student, but this one time I shoulda got an A - I did drawings and wrote a lot of stuff - I think I grossed out the teacher, so she only gave me a B minus. DEBRA    That's not fair. CURT    Yeah.  I mean, she raised rabbits. [they both think on that for a moment] CURT    I didn't just remember all of it, though - I'm not that much of a geek.  I googled it again last night.  Refreshed my memory. DEBRA    [somewhat relieved] Oh!  [beat, then quiet] did you kill this guy? CURT    Me? No.  I smack people sometimes if uncle needs it done, but I don't whack anyone.  Kinda too bad, since the money's real good, but I don't got "the cold" that bad, you know? DEBRA    [kindly] You're too sympathetic. CURT    [rueful] You say that like it's a good thing. SOUND    A COUPLE OF SQUEAKS, THEN A DELIBERATE STOP DEBRA    [calm, even] They're going to kill me. CURT    What?  No o'course not - why would they have paid you, then? DEBRA    Any way I look at it, they HAVE to kill me. SOUND    STRANGLED SQUEAK CURT    [fierce] I won't let 'em.  [reasonable] No reason to, anyway - you'll keep your mouth shut, right? DEBRA    [resigned] Yeah. SOUND    SOME STUFFING CURT    Oh, hey, I almost forgot - the boss mentioned a name. DEBRA    Name? CURT    I think it's what he's doing - what the whole point of this is. DEBRA    Oh.  [very dry sarcasm] That helps a lot. CURT    Zalmoxis.  DEBRA    Gesundheit. CURT    No, no.  I looked it up.  And it took a while, too, trying to figure out how to spell the damn thing.  It was some old Thracian god.  He had something to do with that triangle guy-- DEBRA    Who?  Isosceles? CURT    No.  [uncertain]  I'm pretty sure that wasn't it.  Anyway, this guy got made into a god somehow and promised immortality of the soul.  And, get this - the name "Zalmoxis" comes from the Thracian word for "hide".  DEBRA    Hide, like skin, not like "and seek"? CURT    Yup. DEBRA    But what does that all mean?  I mean-- CURT    What I heard the boss say-- DEBRA    Yeah? CURT    He said "when Zalmoxis arrives." DEBRA    Oh.  [gulp] SOUND    SQUEAK MUSIC SOUND    KNOCK ON THE DOOR DEBRA    [surprised shriek] SOUND    SQUEAK CURT    Don't worry.  Everything's gonna be cool. SOUND    HIS STEPS, DOOR OPENS CURT    Sir. SOUND    WILLIAMS AND DOUGIE ENTER WILLIAMS    [way too excited] This is the moment. DOUGIE    Boss, um, you said-- WILLIAMS    Yeah, we got [checks] eight minutes.  I was being dramatic.  This is a very dramatic moment, Dougie. DOUGIE    Sorry boss. WILLIAMS    The vessel is prepared? DEBRA    The--?  Oh, yes.  All ready. SOUND    A SLIGHT SQUEAK WILLIAMS    Very nice.  [impressed] Good stitching.  DEBRA    [trying to sound happy] Thanks. WILLIAMS    So the time is nigh. CURT    Uncle?  Got a moment?  Can I ask you something?  Like in private?  WILLIAMS    One moment, yes.  CURT    [low, confidential]  You're not gonna have this poor chick whacked, are you? WILLIAMS    [not sincere] Whatever gave you that idea? CURT    Look, she's a nice lady.  She's no danger to you - um, us. WILLIAMS    After tonight, no one's a danger to me.  CURT    What's that mean? WILLIAMS    [chuckles] SOUND    CHUMMY SLAP ON THE BACK CURT    But--? WILLIAMS    [up, dramatic] And now for the final key to unlock eternity! DEBRA    [uncertain] Um, ok. WILLIAMS    Hold out your hands. DEBRA    [almost shaking with fear] Um, ok. SOUND    SOMETHING LARGE PULLED FROM A POCKET DEBRA    That's - whoa - heavy. WILLIAMS    The heart of Zalmoxis.  Once it is sealed in his chest, at the right moment, he will rise! DEBRA    Now? WILLIAMS    No.  152 seconds left. DEBRA    Right.  Can I put it down? SOUND    GUN DRAWN AND COCKED DEBRA    [gasps]  What? WILLIAMS    Let's just call this insurance against you - [pointed] or anyone - trying to stop me this close to my goal! DEBRA    Uhhhh.  What's... going to happen? WILLIAMS    [matter of fact] Zalmoxis will rise and take over the world, and I, being the one who brought him here, will be rewarded with power and glory. DEBRA    Oh, Ok.  Just say when.      MOMENT OF SILENCE WILLIAMS    Put it in - I'm watching you!  And then start stitching. DEBRA    Can someone hold the hole open?  This takes both hands. CURT    Got it. SOUND    MOVEMENT NOISES AS THE HEART IS INSERTED SOUND    CAT SCREECH WILLIAMS    What the--? SOUND    GUNSHOT, CAT SCREECH DEBRA    Oh no! CURT    Here! DEBRA    Jeez, I almost dropped it! WILLIAMS    Damn cat.  You done? DEBRA    Just a few stitches.  WILLIAMS    You do that, I'll start the ceremony.  [begins creepy chanting in the background] CURT    I told him you're ok.  He don't need to kill you. DEBRA    Thanks.  Can you put your finger, there? CURT    Oh, sure. DEBRA    Good. SOUND    SNIPS DEBRA    Done. WILLIAMS    Excellent!  Rise! SOUND    RUSTLING NOISE DEBRA    Oh, jeez!  It moved! WILLIAMS     He moved.  Master! DEBRA    Um, Curt, is it--? CURT    Yeah.  Yeah, it is. SOUND    ONE HEAVY FOOT ON GROUND, THEN A SECOND WILLIAMS    Master, is the vessel acceptable?  It was made to all your specifications! ZALMOXIS    The vessel is [choking noise] WILLIAMS    What? ZALMOXIS    The vessel is-- SOUND    SQUEAK, BUT DEEP AND SPOOKY LIKE HIS VOICE WILLIAMS    What's that? CURT    You didn't--? SOUND    KEY RING JINGLES DEBRA    Uh, yeah. SOUND    DEEP SQUEAK ZALMOXIS    No!  Flawed!  You must die! WILLIAMS    Master!  [choking noises] DOUGIE    Boss? CURT    [whispered] We should go. DEBRA    Ya think? SOUND    SCURRYING OUT, SNATCHING UP A CASE ON THE WAY [the argument recede as they leave] WILLIAMS    [choking] Get this thing off me! DOUGIE    Come on! SOUND    SLAM, DEEP SQUEAK DOUGIE    [gurgle as he smacks into wall] SOUND    DOOR SHUTS, OUTSIDE NOISES DEBRA    [breathless] Did wikipedia have anything to say about if the vessel was flawed? CURT    Uh, no.  go on! DEBRA    But you? CURT    Meet you on the corner. SOUND    DOOR OPENS, SOUND OF COMMOTION MUSIC DEBRA    {making squeaking noises} SOUND    EXPLOSION DEBRA    Holy crow!  [gasp, musing] There's a lot of flammable stuff in taxidermy.  CURT    Nervous? DEBRA    [startled noise!] CURT    Track came in handy after all.  [chuckles, then serious] I figured we shouldn't let it loose... DEBRA    [worried] My ...house? CURT    I'm thinking the dough-- SOUND    PATS BRIEFCASE CURT    Is enough to start a new life on? DEBRA    [interested]  Or ...two? CURT    [pleased] Yeah. SOUND    CAT MROW! CLOSER  

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Strategic Acquisitions

The Deal Board

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 56:01


Welcome to a new episode of The Deal Board Podcast. This week, Andy and Jessica are talking about businesses that decide to grow through acquisition, and share how to buy to grow. They tell the stories of small and big companies that have grown in this way, including Transworld Business Advisors and they receive a very special guest: Jonathan Wolfson, who started Nature's Experts along with his brother Jeff 14 years ago, and today they are the owners of six companies. Jonathan shares valuable information and lived experience for anyone interested in growing through acquisition. Listen to this episode to find everything you need to know about strategic acquisitions and why companies have been choosing this way to expand their services, raise, and increase their profits. Listings of the week:-Bobby Coffey (Houston) is selling a training center for youth and sports. Their revenues have increased every year; it was $2.5 million in 2021. EBITDA: $1 million. The owner has been running it for eight years. Excellent location!-Joseph Hertz (Jamaica) is selling a dietitian and nutritionist practice that has great contracts with insurance companies. Asking price: $2 million (negotiable). SDE: $300,000. Key takeaways:[2:40] Step 1: Set the goal.[3:46] Step 2: Have a budget.[5:06] Step 3: Agree on the criteria and be flexible.[7:21] Step 4: The search is a full-time job.[8:26] Step 5: You need to enlist a business broker.[10:39] Step 6: You will need a transaction team.[12:46] Step 7: Make offers (aggressively).[15:13] Step 8: Integrate the companies.[18:23] Andy and Jessica explain why now is the time to consider growing through acquisition.[20:39] Jonathan Wolfson (Nature's Experts) talks about the several acquisitions his company went through.[28:18] Jonathan tells the story of the business he started with his brother Jeff (whom he met at that time through Facebook.) 14 years ago.[43:29] How does Jonathan encourage people to get started in their growth-through-acquisition journey?[52:06] Listings of the week: Bobby Coffey (Houston) is selling a training center for youth and sports. Their revenues have increased every year; it was $2.5 million in 2021. EBITDA: $1 million. The owner has been running it for eight years. Excellent location![54:23] Listings of the week: Joseph Hertz (Jamaica) is selling a dietitian and nutritionist practice that has great contracts with insurance companies. Asking price: $2 million (negotiable). SDE: $300,000. Mentioned in this Episode:The Deal Board PodcastSubscribe to The Deal Board Podcast YouTube ChannelUnited Franchise GroupTransworld Business AdvisorsTransworld on LinkedInTransworld on FacebookCall us — (888) 719-9098Email us thedealboard@tworld.comNature's ExpertsEmail Bobby Coffey at bcoffey@tworld.com or call (832) 481-4406Email Joseph Hertz at jhertz@tworld.com or call (0 516) 535-9690

Ideas Untrapped
UNDERSTANDING INNOVATION

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:39


Innovation is the key ingredient to human material prosperity and an essential factor in economic development. But the importance of innovation is often misunderstood because of the common belief that poorer nations need not invent anything new and can always copy existing technologies from the richer nations - hence innovation policies are often missing from the development agenda of most developing countries. My guest today is social scientist and innovation policy expert Dan Breznitz - and he has made many significant contributions to changing the conversation and policy around innovation. We talked about the distinctions between innovation and invention, why the Silicon Valley model of innovation does not fit all contexts, and how innovation policies can be set in the long term.TRANSCRIPTTobi;Where I will start, basically, is innovation as the engine of economic growth is a view that has been pretty much validated through economic history. But when we think of innovation, we still think of new things, invention, which is kinda like a distinction you made in the book. So briefly, just tell me what is the difference between innovation and inventing new things, which most people understand innovation to be.Dan;So there's a big difference between innovation (and that's what we should care about) and invention. We should also care about it but it does not necessarily lead to economic growth, especially not where it happens. So if you and I would go back to my lab or your lab in the university, or just a lab in the back room, and we come up with a new idea for a new product or service. Even if we move it to a level of a prototype or have a patent on it, that's great, that's invention but that's not innovation.Innovation is taking ideas and actualizing them in the real world. So taking the idea that we develop and actually make it into a product (if we talk about economic innovation) or service and sell it to people. It can be novel ideas, but it's across all the arrays of activities from coming up with novel ideas, to improving them, to recombining them with others, to innovation in their production, to even innovation in their assembly and after-sale. And innovation is important and creates welfare, not in the moment of invention but because it's continuous. So let me give you two examples that are very prominent because of Covid.The one which is the most simple, since I know you love new cars, right, Tobi, and you ordered at least three in the last year, right. And you can't get even one of them. And the reason you can get one of them is not because people cannot produce cars, but because there are not enough semiconductors. And the reason there are not enough semiconductors in the world is Silicon Valley, which is called Silicon Valley because it was in semiconductors [but now] no longer knows how to innovate in the production of semiconductors. There are actually only very few companies. two be exact, and they both come from Taiwan, that knows how to create semiconductors, and how to actually innovate in their production.But a much better example is COVID itself. I mean, it's great that we came up with new vaccines. But that was not enough, right, with the molecule. We had to innovate in their production, we had to innovate in material science creating a new glass vial, so we can move them around. We have to innovate in their distribution. But it's now very, very clear that that's not enough. True welfare for humanity and the ability to live with Corona would happen when we innovate to a level, which is now very clear, of producing billions of units of said vaccines and distributing them to every human on earth. Okay. That will probably allow us to put Corona behind us.So it's not the moment of invention. I mean, the moment of invention is great. But innovation is the actualization of ideas all across the [value chain], if you want to call it the supply or the production, network, and stages, in order to constantly come up with better and improved products and services, and its impact, real impact start to happen when either all or most people on earth actually have access to it. And that happens because it's continuous.So you and I talk on Zoom, which is a very old invention, right? Telemedia. However, you and I can talk - you're in Nigeria, I'm in Toronto - and not even think about the cost of this because hundreds of millions... not because somebody invented it, but because after somebody invented it, hundreds of millions of engineering hours, if not days, went into improvement in fiber optics, improvement in software algorithm, improvement in memory, improvement in CPU and speed to the level that now you and I can do zoom as if this is costless. And that's the real impact of innovation.Tobi;There's so much to unpack in that answer. But now today, like you said in the introduction, when people talk about innovation what usually comes to mind is Silicon Valley, and that's the model that you've critiqued quite a lot, rightfully so, in my opinion on many points, but just give me a brief. What are the limitations of the Silicon Valley model of innovation today and why is it an inappropriate example of what innovation should be?Dan;So let's understand what has changed in the world. And what has changed in the world in the last 20 to 30 years is before, when somebody came up with an invention and a novel innovation, it was then produced, it was transformed into industries, in production around that area. So let's think about HP, or Apple computers, as it was known there.It used to be that when they came up with new products, they will produce that product very close to their headquarters. So Apple and HP employed 1000s, if not 10s of 1000s of engineers around Silicon Valley or in places like Colorado, around it. And those people will have great jobs in what you and I will now call advanced manufacturing, and all boats will be right. What we now have is a global system of fragmented production.So let's talk about semiconductors. Okay. In semiconductors, now, we look at Tel Aviv, Silicon Valley, Taipei, Shinshu Park, Taiwan, Seoul, Korea, Shenzhen, in China, all of those places have unbelievably successful semiconductors industries. And if you look at those places, you'll also see that many of the same companies work in all of those places. So you think great, but then if you look at what the companies in those places do, it's completely different.So in Silicon Valley and Tel Aviv, it's the first stage, we think about new ideas to put on silicon. In Taiwan, as you now know because you can get your car, it's the only place where they can take those ideas and actually make them into silicon. And Seoul, in Korea, Samsung and LG control very critical niches. So for every smartphone that you buy, the second-highest profits go to Samsung and LG because of memory and the controller of the screen, the touch screen. And in Shenzhen, it's the only place where we can work with different materials, constantly changing components [that] actually produce a product that works, for example, this iPhone and all the rest and sell it.So all those places are extremely innovative, but they do different activities. And in order to succeed in each one of them, you need therefore different innovational capacities, but also different finance, different institutional system, different education system. And there are real, for two reasons, those options of where you work. One is because once you develop those capabilities and systems, you can excel in one or two of those stages but not in others. And the second is because they also define who is enjoying the fruits of the success, who is being employed, and how we're being compensated for that employment.[What] happened in Silicon Valley and in Tel Aviv is that when move, we move to fragmented production, and we have a new model of venture capital. We moved [away] from actually having an industry which is really about innovation. So if you want to be completely cynical about it, the industry is about creating companies for cheap and selling them for a financial exit within five to seven years for the highest bidders, preferably 1000s of percent, right? It's not really for most of those people about changing the world. And in this system, the only people you employ are the engineers of the top universities (so not the people we should really care about or worry about). They are getting wages that are at the top wages of the US and Silicon Valley, or Tel Aviv, it's the same wages. So they're on their way to becoming a millionaire and they're getting stock options, right, basically lottery tickets to become billionaires.But who are the people that enjoy this system, it's only the GEEK ELITE, their financiers, maybe a few celebrity chefs and that's it. No one else is really employed in that level. And as soon as they finish with their work, all the rest of innovation goes somewhere else to be done. So what happened in both Tel Aviv and Silicon Valley is suddenly from a system that created a lot of good employment and jobs for everybody in that society, you're employing only the top 15 percent who are already basically extremely well off, the rest of it 85% are on a treadmill to nowhere.We all heard about what happened in San Francisco and Silicon Valley. But let's talk about Israel. Israel moved from being the second most equal society in western democracies in the 70s when it started that process, to now moving into a position where one of every five families in Israel is under the poverty line, which means they don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. And that's the fruit of a success they enjoy from this tremendous, maybe the most amazing innovation miracle in the second half of the 20th century. 20% of Israelis, including children, don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. So I wonder why people, even if they can imitate Silicon Valley, why do we think this is a good model for our community?Tobi;Now, you touched on something that I want to sort of press on, which is the finance of innovation and how it has come to be dominated today by venture capital finance model. Now, we all know how even Silicon Valley itself got started with a lot of public funding, either in Defense Research, which created lots of companies from IBM, Oracle, even Microsoft… how DARPA funded Google initially. So my question then would be why did the public, in this case, governments (whether at the city level or at the federal level) stop funding [research]? How did venture capital come to dominate the finance of innovation, and public financing just kept dwindling and dwindling, is it because we stopped believing in innovation as a source of growth, and policy sort of shifted to things like redistribution and things like that?Dan;So I will say that it really depends. There are some countries, multiple countries that still have a lot of public support for innovation. Canada, for example, is one. However, the problem with some of them is that they don't know how to transport that investment in basic invention into real innovation. And then all that great wealth, intellectual wealth, if you will, and all those inventions are then being taken away, and becomes great innovation somewhere else with what you say private money. So I wouldn't be as harsh on that. What I think has happened is that we have developed together with what people will call the neoliberal worldview. A firm belief with Silicon Valley is the only model. And then a very thin understanding of how Silicon Valley really works. And that's a belief that actually helps a lot of government if they so wish because then they don't have to be responsible and the only thing we need to do is to allow venture capital, whatever that is to come into the play, instead of actually looking cases of success, real success, from China, to Taiwan, to Korea to Finland, to actually all the Nordic countries.Whereas a significant role for public money and very interesting division of labor between public funding, public money and what it's trying to do, and where and how, and I think that's the most important thing, how private money and private investment in innovation are done, regulated, and most importantly institutionalized. And the way to think about it remember those stages we talked about?Tobi;Yes.Dan;Each one of them necessitates a completely different financial system in order to excel in it, right. If your aim is to supposedly create a new Alphabet, Google, or Facebook, you need maybe a system that resembles venture capitalist [...]. I have to say venture capital work only in ICT in biotech so far. So if you are in any other industry, maybe you should look for other ways of financing it. But if you're, for example, in the business of Taiwan where in order to excel as TSMC, you need to build new fabrication facilities, basically, factories at the tune of several billions, if not 10 or above billions a year, Venture Capital, Private Equity and even the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ are just not the way you can find this type of behavior.There is no venture capital on earth that would allow you to spend hundreds of millions or billions every year on basically capital equipment. You need to figure out the different financial systems that allow you to do that and judge you. The metrics of your success are different than the metrics of the success that your VCs and NASDAQ uses. From return on assets, to a margin of profitability, all those things need to be changed for you and your financiers to actually be able to make money.Tobi;So not to defend Silicon Valley, I'm not in any position to do that. But I'm just thinking from the perspective of say an African startup founder, for example. And we are talking about the proliferation of this model. So my question is, don't you think this model, the Silicon Valley model, venture financing startup as an approach to innovation spread the way it did because it is permissionless? So for example, I can start a startup right here in my room, in Lagos, Nigeria, whereas the current political economy might not let me be able to build a factory, because then I'll have to go through all kinds of regulatory red tape, I have to know someone at government ministries, I'll have to navigate a whole bunch of things. So an African found out my hear your argument and think, Well, the only way I have this opportunity to rise is because of the Silicon Valley model. So what would you say to them?Dan;So I will say that A, you're right. And, and I'm not against the Silicon Valley model. The two things that you have to take into the equation, and again, as a community leader is A, it's very, very hard to innovate with the Silicon Valley model, which is fine.  But the second, if you are successful, really successful, one of the results will be growing inequality if you really imitate it. So you might as well think about it in advance and figure out ways how to at least limit this inequality, or, you know, the growth much more positive and wide, instead of, you know, like Israel, who understand that they have a problem, but now for at least a decade now have programs after programs trying to diffuse the miracle with mixed success because they're already stuck in that model.So from a point of what you just said, yeah, all power to you. The question is, how can we then widen the, in Lagos, or in Nigeria.... the impact of your startups? One thing is what I call in the book, play [...] is, you say, Yeah, that's a model, that's a financial system and it works. And that's one problem. Once you put venture capital into your firm, Tobi, you will need to supply them with a financial exit, right? That's how they make their money. But what I want as the mayor of Lagos is for your company to grow as big as possible, preferably in Lagos.So we need to then figure out how to do two things. A, how to allow you to grow as big as possible in Lagos for as long as possible before a financial exit. Because then two things happen, A, if you're big enough and successful enough in life your venture capitalist wouldn't want to move, they would like you to be in Lagos. Not only that, then is the biggest you are and the most successful you are the chances are that your financial exit will be an IPO, which means that you will stay as an independent company. And then when we do an IPO, should you go to a NASDAQ IPO or should you go to a local IPO or should you go to an [...] IPO there are several options, right? Each one of them has consequences on your growth. The second if you grow big enough and successful enough, even if the financial exit is somebody is buying you, Tobi, because you by then have already 300, 400 employees in Lagos and you have customers all over Africa, the foreign company that will buy you will probably keep you maybe even grow you to become their main division in Nigeria.So it's not that the only thing that Lagos will get is you, your co-founders and some of your employees becoming millionaires and then the employment disappearing. But not only you as some of your employees grow and become bigger and employ more people. And as we do that, we also need to think about what will be the financial incentives I'll have you if you're big enough, so you can employ people who are not just r&d engineers. So I would call it, you know, playful delay. So the Nigerian startups or any African startups that now happen, grow as big as they can, for as long as they can before they're being bought by someone else.Tobi;So now, if I am the governor of Lagos, the Mayor of Lagos and I'm trying... So my first question before I get that would be, are there geographic? So I'm thinking along the lines of things like new trade theory, economic geography, and specializations. So are there geographic determinants of innovation? Or can innovation be deliberately nurtured and directed in any location? So I had a conversation recently about the supply chain, which you also touched on on semiconductors. And it took the pandemic for me to know that probably two-thirds of the global supply of hand gloves come from Malaysia. But I didn't think, unless you tell me I'm wrong, that Malaysia did set out to become the global supplier of hand gloves. So are some of these innovative niches and economic dominance based on innovation, are they serendipitous or can they be deliberately nurtured in a particular location?Dan;So let's talk reality. Okay.Tobi;Yeah.Dan;And I'm going to use Israel and Taiwan as an example, just because both of them are famous enough that people at least heard about them. So both of them started at the same time, okay. And since I interviewed the people who were responsible, if I tell you that they really knew how the end outcome would look, I'll be lying, and they would be lying as well. But they made particular choices that really define their success. So Israel, even before Silicon Valley became famous and all the rest says, Look, we have no natural resources, we don't have a lot of money, what we have is brains. And we actually have no clue in what industrial sector those brains will transform things into to growth. So we are going to create an innovation policy, which is a horizontal technology policy. Back then just so you understand how limited knowledge was, they called it science-based industries because the term high tech was not yet created. And they said, in order to do that, we will focus all our attention on coming up with new ideas and making them into products. Okay, and we'll derisk will help private [companies] and private companies need to do that. And we will create policy, after policy, after policy to make it happen.And then those companies started to be created. Then very early on like a year after the NASDAQ was established, there was already an Israeli IPO on NASDAQ. So the state co-evolved its policies to slowly but surely worked down this model. So it's not a surprise that Israel ended up basically as an engine of startups. It's not a surprise because it was horizontal. So it was whatever was successful in the market, it followed very closely in the footsteps of the US in new industries, first hardware, and then software. But the Israelis had no clue that this is what was going to happen. They also invested a lot in Agri-tech companies and in geothermal energy and then all the rest. Okay. But their model of how do we know that we are successful is, we will have a lot of new companies with new products that are exportable and we'll build the financial system to allow that to happen. Taiwan was almost the opposite.Taiwan says for both political reasons other is we do not want to have very big corporations like Japan and Korea, which is a model we see to our left. And because we are isolated, we can take that risk. We also don't think that we can be successful completely imitating Silicon Valley. So where we can be successful is in new industries working with the US. It's not just Silicon Valley back then, it's the US as a whole. So we will put bets on this new industry called semiconductors. But unlike Japan or Korea, we will not put bets on a specific niche. But we will create two capabilities that will allow Taiwan to excel in what we want to excel, which is basically the sub-suppliers for American companies, maybe Japanese. Remember, there was nothing else in the world back then. So they spent resources on innovation in the production of semiconductors. So all those companies that we talk about TSMC, UMC, Taiwan Mask Company, all of them came from a public research institution, which created projects that basically took the technology from abroad, brought it to Taiwan, created the company that then allow the ability to, you know, produce semiconductors in Taiwan, that was one.And the second, [is] a huge amount of attention to design. So you want to do something with silicon, you need to do two things. Actually produce the silicon but also design what it is that this chip does. And again, through the same public research institute that was diffused. But the aim was not an industry like Silicon Valley that comes up with new ideas, but the aim was you need much more simple semiconductors, for example, in toys. So we will figure out where there are niches where you already have a need for semiconductors and we'll make those semiconductors more reliable and cheaper. We're not going to invent new ones.And we will be able to do that because we just created those factories so we can do those two things and be these great sub-suppliers for very big multinationals. So without even understanding how the global system is getting fragmented, they opted for one industry and in one part of that industry. When they created TSMC they didn't know that they were going to completely change the global semiconductor industry. But they had a very specific strategy of thinking, what would success look like to Taiwan? So the ability to do over design and supply for big American, European and Japanese companies, the ability to innovate in the production, and the ability to innovate in second-generation innovation and semiconductors and multiple companies that will grow big but most of them are SMEs, and that was the vision. And then as industry changed, right, they co-evolved.In both places, there was nothing, really nothing before the government started. So in Israel, there were 860 Something people with any kind of academic education doing any kind of r&d in the whole business sector. So probably less than in one lecture hall in your university. And in Taiwan, not only that the private industry did not want to do semiconductors but even after a few very successful spinoffs from ITRI, (that public research institute I'm talking about) when they wanted to spin off TSMC (maybe one of the world's most successful companies), private investors in Taiwan refuse to participate, and it ended up in a small Dutch company called Philips [which] became the biggest investors in TSMC. So again, did they know how they were going to change the global industry? No. But did they have a very specific vision of what is success and what would it do to Taiwan and Israel? Yes.Tobi;Excellent. That brings me to my next question, which is kind of broad. Like I mentioned earlier, if I was the governor of Lagos, or the mayor of a city, or even maybe the President, and I want to design innovation policy, I really want to exploit innovation for real inclusive, widespread, broad-based growth that tries to avoid some of these problems that you have mentioned, both in the book and even in our conversation on Israel, Silicon Valley and all that. What should I do? What should I be funding? What complimentary public institutions do I need? And how should innovation policies be designed generally?Dan;So I think you're missing the most important step. The most important step is what, as I just said, Israel and Taiwan have done, maybe even unknowingly. What I will tell you as the governor of Lagos is that, Okay, let's assume you're successful as a first step. 15 years from now, what does Lagos look like? What kind of companies do you have? What kind of people do they employ, what kind of things do they sell to the global system and what kind of things do they buy from the global system? Okay, now that we have this vision, let's do reverse engineering, and figure out how we get into that vision knowing that we, I mean, the world is constantly changing, we might have to, you know, change course, but we have a vision of what success is. And that vision is not the one that too many cases are now [that] when they talk about innovation, they talk, oh, I want to go to VCs and I did a lot of patents. No.What does your society look like? Once you do that, A) we can reverse engineer and figure out exactly what financial system you need, how you develop it, what changes you need for your education system, how you also tie yourself into those global networks so you get the outputs you need, which are not just physical outputs but the constant knowledge and ideas, and how do you move it back? And as you do that, you also need to look at several things: what are your current strengths and limitations? what you can build upon? And what are gaps that you have that [you think] is reasonable for you to assume you can fix? And then we can start to be much more targeted. Not necessarily in industries, but the way I think about it is in capabilities, where do you want to operate in those four stages? And then we can maybe talk about industries, maybe just talk about core activities of what you need in order to excel in that and build all those institutions and programs. But without that vision, you're basically going into a very rough ocean with no map and the no goal. So the only thing that will happen is, at best, you'll be drowned.Tobi;That's powerful and poignant. Final question, Dan. And this is a bit of a tradition on show. What's the one idea, it may be from your work, it may be something you admire, it may be something that is probably even old and the world has forgotten about, what's the one idea that you would like to see spread everywhere, you'd like to see people discuss more, you'd like to see people think about a lot more? What's that idea?Dan;That idea is that: believe in human agency, or believe in the ability of humans to do things and to make things better. Right? So if you think about what makes us human, it's really to innovate is to take ideas and make them part of the world. Right? That's what we do. And for too long, everybody has been taught that there's only one way to success. And I think that that's the main problem of modern economics and modern social science. We look too much at structure, and not enough at the human agency. And we need to believe in the ability of societies, humans working together, figuring out new ways to make our communities better. But in order to do it, they have to understand how the world works and how they work. And doing that I think we now have more options than ever before to make communities both richer and more inclusive. But it has to come from the communities itself. Lagos and a lot of places in Africa need to dream their own dreams and stop dreaming the European or American dreams. The other successful countries that have done that manage at least to tailor the American dream and make it into their, I don't know, flavour [of] dreams - from Japan and Korea to Taiwan, Israel, Finland, all of those places that have moved from being poor to successful after World War Two.Tobi;Terrific. Thank you so much, Dan, for doing this with me. It's been educating, it's been enjoyable. Thank you so much.Dan;You are very, very welcome. I hope that one of those days, maybe after, we will finally innovate our way out of COVID...Tobi;YeahDan;Then I can meet face to face.Tobi;Yeah, I would I would love nothing more. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Aer Lingus Launches its 2022 Apprentice Scheme

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 3:10


Aer Lingus has launched its 2022 Aircraft Maintenance & Engineering Apprentice Scheme and is calling on motivated, enthusiastic, and technically minded candidates to apply for the four-year programme. Aer Lingus has a longstanding apprenticeship programme and is offering 10 places on the scheme this year and is keen to encourage a mix of female and male candidates. Successful applicants who complete the programme will be fully qualified aircraft engineers and will continue to work at Aer Lingus. This forward-looking programme helps ensure Aer Lingus has access to a pipeline of talented and qualified engineers for future growth. The four-year Aer Lingus Aircraft Maintenance & Engineering Apprentice Scheme is run in conjunction with both SOLAS, the State further education and training agency, based in Shannon, and Technological University Dublin. It consists of seven phases and through each phase, successful applicants will move between classroom training in both Shannon and Dublin, and on-the-job training at the Aer Lingus Maintenance and Engineering Hangar at Dublin Airport. Apprentices will be working primarily on line maintenance and will be focused on the delivery of Aer Lingus' guest experience. The launch of this year's apprenticeship scheme comes at a pivotal time for the airline as it continues its recovery from the pandemic and returns to full capacity and growth. The investment in our people, including the Aircraft Maintenance & Engineering Apprentice Scheme, will help underpin this strategy. Aer Lingus Chief Technical Officer, Javier Jimenez, said: “Aer Lingus has a proud history of providing opportunities to people starting out on their careers. Since we launched the Aircraft Apprentice Scheme in 2011, we have hired 113 maintenance and engineering apprentices directly from the programme. “We continued to recruit new apprentices during the pandemic, and this year we are again looking for highly motivated and technically minded candidates to apply for the programme. “This is an opportunity to build a rewarding career in aircraft maintenance and engineering at an exciting time in aviation as we move to a carbon-neutral future. With our unique brand, world-class reputation and modern fleet, Aer Lingus is at the forefront of commercial aviation, giving successful candidates the opportunity to be part of something special.” Application process for Aer Lingus's apprentice scheme The application process consists of submitting a CV application, followed by online assessments and an interview. Applicants need to be 18 years of age by 1st September 2022. Successful candidates will have a technical and mechanical aptitude and also display maturity, commitment, flexibility, and a willingness to accept responsibility. Excellent communication, interpersonal and teamwork skills are also essential qualities. The application process for the 2022 programme is now underway at http://careers.aerlingus.com and will remain open until 26 June 2022.

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner
6 Keys to Creating an Excellent Customer Service Experience

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:17


EXCELLENT CUSTOMER SERVICEIs excellent customer service dead? If you've ever been on hold for what feels like forever getting menu to death by dumb artificial intelligence or struggled to reach a knowledgeable person who actually answers the phone, can speak your language, pay attention to details, you might definitely think customer service is dead. But today's guest, Mitche Graf, helps you discover how to deliver six-star service in a one-star world.  What You'll Discover About Excellent Customer Service (highlights & transcript):https://businessconfidentialradio.com/?p=185238&preview=true# (HIGHLIGHTSCLICK HERE FOR AUDIO TRANSCRIPT) * How Covid has dumbed down excellent customer service expectations * How reducing friction in customer touch points contributes to excellent customer service * How social media influences our ideas about excellent customer service * Where businesses can begin to improve customer service * How to best respond to a negative online review about customer service * Most common mistakes businesses make in relying on technology to deliver excellent customer service * And MUCH more. ♥ Share this episode with someone you think will benefit from it. ♥ ♥ Leave a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential (Lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential )♥ Guest: Mitche GrafBest-selling author, serial entrepreneur, international-renowned business speaker, 2-time nationally-syndicated radio show host and former All American Track & Field athlete Mitche Graf has been a passionate serial entrepreneur for over 35 years, dangling his toes into the ponds of many intriguing industries along the way. In the middle of all of this, he took a year off from running his own companies to become the President of a Class A affiliate of the world-champion San Francisco Giants baseball team for a season, and undertook a organizational re-brand which culminated in a 12% increase in attendance, one of the best in all of professional baseball in 2019. Over the past three decades, Mitche has created two award-winning restaurants, a bustling catering & events company, a national spice manufacturing business with over 4000 accounts, an award-winning photography studio, a cribbage board company, an award-winning limousine business, a portable hot tub rental business, a drive-through espresso company, an multi-million dollar educational products company, an athletic fitness testing corporation, and even a night crawler company. His nationally-syndicated radio shows ‘Business Edge Radio' and the ‘Business Edge Minute' were launched in the spring of 2020, and are now available on nearly 75 radio stations across the country, with more coming on board every month. As an educator and motivational speaker, Mitche's high-voltage seminars and workshops have been delivered around the world to over 75,000 people in nine countries and nearly every state in the U.S. He is the author of 9 books, including https://www.amazon.com/Customer-Service-DEAD-Delivering-6-Star/dp/173203446X (Customer Service is Dead: Delivering 6 Star Service in a 1 Star World).  Related Resources:Contact Mitche and connect with him on https://www.linkedin.com/in/mitche-graf-5b846826 (LinkedIn) and https://www.facebook.com/mitchegraf (Facebook).  Join, Rate and Review:Rating and reviewing the show helps us grow our audience and allows us to bring you more of the rich information you need to succeed from our high powered guests. Leave a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential (Lovethepodcast.com/BusinessConfidential) Joining the Business Confidential Now family is easy and lets you have instant access to the latest tactics, strategies and tips to make your business more successful. Follow on your favorite podcast app http://bit.ly/bcnlisten (here) as well as...

Church on the North Coast
May 29, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Excellent Service

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


May 29, 2022 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Excellent Service | cnclove.org