Podcasts about Fantastic

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 5,123PODCASTS
  • 8,846EPISODES
  • 51mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST
Fantastic

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Fantastic

Show all podcasts related to fantastic

Latest podcast episodes about Fantastic

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast
Photon - the BEST CoCo 3 exclusive! The CoCo Show Episode 25

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:38


Fantastic graphics, multiple audio tracks, speech synthesis, and a perfect difficulty curve--there was no better reason to own a CoCo 3 in 1991 than Photon!

PhotoBizX The Ultimate Portrait and Wedding Photography Business Podcast
435: Helen Bartlett – Photograph your way, deliver a great service and have a fantastic business

PhotoBizX The Ultimate Portrait and Wedding Photography Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 43:18


Premium Members, click here to access this interview in the premium area. Helen Bartlett of www.helenbartlett.co.uk describes herself as London based portrait photographer offering location-based natural family photography. In saying that, she also offers newborn, baby, children and teenager photography. Helen made the creative decision to only offer black and white photography since starting her [...] The post 435: Helen Bartlett – Photograph your way, deliver a great service and have a fantastic business appeared first on Photography Business Xposed - Photography Podcast - how to build and market your portrait and wedding photography business.

Green Planet Blue Planet Podcast
Ep. 288 Louie Schwartzberg & Fantastic Funghi

Green Planet Blue Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 41:58


Louie Schwartzberg is an award-winning cinematographer, director and producer who has spent his notable career providing breathtaking imagery using his time-lapse, high-speed and macro cinematography techniques. Schwartzberg is a visual artist who breaks barriers, connects with audiences, and tells stories that celebrate life and reveal the mysteries and wisdom of nature, people, and places. He has made many meaningful films, his recent production is called Fantastic Funghi, which explores the world of mushrooms and mycelium and illustrates how this fascinating organism can provide sustainable solutions to some of the world's greatest problems, treating cancer, Alzheimer's and PTSD, saving the bees, cleaning the atmosphere, and shifting consciousness. Awakening us to seeing in full sight that we live in a LIVING UNIVERSE. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/julian-guderley/support

Golden Age of Cardboard | A vintage sports card podcast
The Fantastic 1950's -- Vintage Breakdown w/Don & George!

Golden Age of Cardboard | A vintage sports card podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 68:15


Just talking the 50's with the boys. Get 7 Days free on CardHedge: https://benchclear.us/CardHedge MUST BUY SUPPLIES: Rollo Thermal Printer: https://benchclear.us/RolloThermal 4x6 Thermal Labels: https://benchclear.us/ThermalLabels Sorting Tray: https://benchclear.us/CardSortingTray Blaster Box Ship: https://benchclear.us/BlasterShip Mega Box Ship: https://benchclear.us/MegaBox Small Envelope: https://benchclear.us/SmallEnvelope Large Envelope: https://benchclear.us/LargeEnvelope 3200 Count: https://benchclear.us/3200Count Free USPS Supplies: https://benchclear.us/USPS EasyShip: https://benchclear.us/EasyShip Bench Clear Media Production Check out Bench Clear at: http://www.benchclear.us --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/goldenageofcardboard/support

Castle of Horror Podcast
Castle Talk: New "This is GWAR" and "Who Killed the KLF?" defy the usual music doc tropes

Castle of Horror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:21


Jason chats with writer Tony Salvaggio about two new music documentaries that premiered at this year's Fantastic Fest: This is GWAR and Who Killed the KLF?

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #41 Identity Shift with Anthony Trucks. He breaks down the three phases of his "Shift Method".

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 41:52


In this interview former NFL player, American Ninja athlete, and transformational public speaker Anthony Trucks breaks down the three phases of his "Shift Method".  See, Shift, Sustain.  And the best part, he gives actionable steps within each phase.  You can literally listen to this interview and begin to transform your life.  And he tells amazing stories about crushing quarterbacks in front of 50,000 people!  Um…it's amazing. Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out Anthony Trucks here: https://anthonytrucks.com/Take his Identity Quiz that helped me so much here: https://go2.bucketquizzes.com/sf/4e63da08Get his book and free gifts here: https://identityshiftbook.com/Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: [music]0:00:06.4 Mischa Z: Welcome back to The Tools For A Good Life Summit. Right now, I would like to introduce to you Anthony Trucks, Ex-NFL player. This is a foster kid turned NFL athlete and serial entrepreneur with one serious superpower; making shift happen no matter what, by assessing the power of identity. You have overcome 30-plus traumatic life events, navigating the identity shifts that followed. Anthony has come to be known as the leading expert in shifting, which is making a shift internally to elevate how you operate externally, which in turn changes your life. Your system is called the Shift Method, and you weave together neuroscience, psychology, technology, and hard fought life lessons to help anyone with a desire for more in their life, achieve any goal they want or have ever wanted. I especially like this next sentence, "Before making it apparent that their goals were actually set far below their true potential in the first place." I love that. Like tapping into the potential that people don't even know that's there, it's beautiful.0:01:29.0 Anthony Trucks: And it's beyond, yeah.0:01:30.2 Mischa: Yeah.0:01:30.5 Anthony Trucks: Usually, it's far beyond their thoughts. We set limitations on our dreams without even knowing it.0:01:35.2 Mischa: Yeah, it's amazing. Buckle up, it's time to make shift happen.0:01:39.5 Anthony Trucks: Shift, shift and move.0:01:43.6 Mischa: [laughter] So first off, thank you so much for jumping in the fray with me. Very excited. And let's just maybe spend a few minutes, we can talk a little bit about your history and your 30-plus traumatic life events. I just... Looking at your history, one thing that jumped out at me was, you were 14, perhaps struggling a little bit in the foster home system. Yes, and then...0:02:09.6 Anthony Trucks: Yeah.0:02:10.3 Mischa: I read a note, you said, "Hey, I was a self-aware kid," and I recognized your pattern and you perhaps needed to change at that point. Maybe speak to that just quickly.0:02:21.5 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, well it's interesting, when I got to the age of 14, I'd already gone through years of crazy, We'll call it. I was given away at three, so I had a lot of different dynamics woven all into the personality and identity of who I was. It took a lot of years, but after a while, you start to see yourself for who you are. The problem is, I think, we are all self-aware, but we're aware of a self that we've crafted that's not always the most positive, so that's where why we beat ourselves up, "And we're not that good, not that great." And I think there's a separation when you can... In a positive way, a separation when you understand who you are seeing yourself through of the filter of the world, and then who you actually are. There is a difference. And so I think at 14, 15, I was still developing that. It wasn't until I was really like 15, that I got a chance to really see who I was. And I was like, "Oh, that's who you are," 'cause prior to that moment, I saw myself in a light that wasn't the best.0:03:15.3 Mischa: And was this a conscious change? Or was it sort of it just happened and looking back on it, hindsight, you're like, "Oh." Or was it... Does that question make sense, or...0:03:31.7 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, yeah, yeah, it does make sense. It was more of a hindsight, I think it took time and in the distance, and the background to get it.0:03:38.6 Mischa: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. You're just on the phone there, now you wanna put the...0:03:42.3 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, there's someone at the front door, but I'm not gonna talk to him.0:03:44.9 Mischa: Okay.0:03:45.6 Anthony Trucks: Somebody delivered flowers to my house, and it was the wrong person. So I think she's taking them, which is good, I hope she takes them to the person that deserves them 'cause someone deserves them, and they were not my flowers, but I'm good now.[chuckle]0:03:58.9 Mischa: All good. I'll be able to... We'll strike that. Strike that.0:04:02.1 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, yeah. Well, we could leave it in, it would just be weird, but that's the scatter brain-brain that is my brain. I'm the only one home, so my dog started barking, I gotta like, "Is someone at the door?" So yeah.0:04:10.9 Mischa: Yeah, yeah, yeah.0:04:11.9 Anthony Trucks: Now, we're good though. That's part of my identity. I can keep rolling, man. I mean you can keep it in, you don't have to keep it in.0:04:17.9 Mischa: Yeah, no, I love it. And we'll keep rolling. I think it's good.0:04:21.0 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, it's life.0:04:21.7 Anthony Trucks: What's that?0:04:22.4 Mischa: It's life, man.0:04:23.2 Mischa: That's life, especially these days.0:04:25.7 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, seriously.0:04:27.5 Mischa: Yeah. And then of course there was the, your very brief stint in the NFL. And I think the...0:04:37.5 Anthony Trucks: Yes, three years.0:04:39.3 Mischa: Yeah, yeah, the striking part there was you only got to play in one pre-season game and then you had an injury, or?0:04:44.8 Anthony Trucks: Well, my third year, I got hurt in my first pre-season game. So my first year, second year, I was cut the first year, cut the second year, third year, I was finally looking like I was about to make the team. And then I tore my shoulder and the season was over. So that was the first pre-season game. So no, I played in games. It wasn't like I just was there for a year and out of there, but it was, it's unfortunate man, there's a lot of build up to that whole situation, but the NFL is an interesting beast. It's the highest level in the world. So any time you get to the highest level in the world for anything, I don't care if it's the highest level of the world for, I don't know, kitten sock knitting, there's gonna be crazy things that go on, 'cause you got so many people involved, it's cutthroat.0:05:25.3 Mischa: Cutthroat.0:05:26.1 Anthony Trucks: It's ruthless. It is demanding at levels that are beyond human typical logic. 'Cause the typical human, I don't think that they... And this is not like saying people are better, right? But you're not typically in a race or in a competition to be the best in the world out of seven billion people, you know what I'm saying? So you're not... You're not at that... So now that you do, it's like the average human doesn't get the logic behind, why would you subject yourself to so much difficulty and pain and anguish? Why would you do that? It doesn't make sense. And I'm like, "It's right, it doesn't make sense that I would live a mediocre life, that is one I don't want to see what I'm fully capable of." It's a back and forth, you know what I'm saying?0:06:05.6 Mischa: Yeah.0:06:06.5 Anthony Trucks: So it's not that anybody is right or wrong, it's just, what's logic. And I don't think people use that... "Well, it's not logical." No, it's not logical to your brain, and that's okay. It's not logical that you would marry that person because they're a horrible person. There's just different things that are logic, and so I just... I've got to the point of realizing in life, the beauty is the difference. What is good for me isn't good for everybody else. I'm not a good fit for everybody, and that's okay. That's completely okay, and if you can get to that point, it alleviates so much more stress and anxiety and just weirdness that happens in life.0:06:40.3 Mischa: It's so empowering, it's very empowering.0:06:42.4 Anthony Trucks: Freeing, yeah.0:06:43.1 Mischa: A Place to be. Yeah, frank, I love that. I was curious, did you have any glory moments, sort of those stadium, 50,000 people.0:06:53.2 Anthony Trucks: Did I? Oh man.0:06:55.9 Mischa: Yeah.0:06:56.1 Anthony Trucks: How many do you wanna know about, man?0:06:57.3 Mischa: Tell me a couple. Tell me, I wanna know.0:07:00.7 Anthony Trucks: Here's a good one. Here's a good one. Here's a good one. It's two. These two are gonna be Oregon ones 'cause I had fun in Oregon. I had fun everywhere else but Oregon was a good one. So there's one play where we're playing against Arizona State, they had come to our house, junior year, and I'm trying to find, we're trying ball, right? And what happens, it was junior year, it's what it was. And they're at our house and we gotta beat them, we're trying to obviously make our way to get to another level and trying to get some ball game stuff going on, and they come to our house. And there's just this one specific play to where if they line up a certain way I blitz, and if they shift out of that, I don't blitz anymore because they have an extra person. Because if I blitz, somebody's open, so we'd be screwed. It's like 3rd and 12 or something, and the ball is... They get up to the ball, they get lined up. I'm supposed... Slits, they move. I don't realize it. So I am supposed to cover and in my head, I'm like, "I'm going, I'm going, I'm going, I'm going, I'm going."0:07:52.5 Anthony Trucks: I can see in the video, my line back with a mic sitting next going, "Don't go." You could see his hand motion, but it's Austin Stadium and Austin Stadium is one of the loudest in the country. You can't hear anything. So you gotta know it, and I'm just dialed, "I'm gonna get this dang court," as my head's here. And all of a sudden like you can see me in the balls hike, and I take off. Now, I don't know how that's happened, but their right guard was the guy who's supposed to guard me, guard or tackle, completely misses me, doesn't whatever it is, and the quarterback rolls out to me, and as he's rolling out, I barely... And he gets like a step away, I have to leave my feet, and if both of my hands don't grab this man in mid-air and grab him like a carnival game. You Know. I jump out, I'm in full Superman, I get one hand on his shoulder, one hand on his hip, I take him down and I celebrate, and the whole stadium just erupts, turn over on run downs, and we get the ball back. It was crazy. That was one of them. Another one...0:08:52.6 Mischa: So first of, wait, wait a minute. So that's on accident that that happens?0:08:56.0 Anthony Trucks: Oh yeah. After the play, if you look at the video, we have it after the play, I'm cheering my linebacker guy comes up, grabs my helmet, and you can see him yelling at me, "You've messed up, but you didn't mess up. Great job. Don't do that ever again."[chuckle]0:09:07.5 Mischa: That's so good. Okay, next one. Okay.0:09:09.8 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, and then other one was, we're playing against... So at my senior year, I'm balling against... All the teams are playing. I end up leading my senior year, the Pack-10 at the time, in sacks, tackles for loss, forced fumbles and fumbles recovered, I was like 6th in total tackles, but I missed a game against USC to a high ankle sprain, but I was balling that year. And I was doing well, I had three sacks against ASU, as a matter of fact, the next year at their place, and so I'm feeling good about myself and my coach ran a meeting one time we were about to play Cow, Cow is coming up to Oregon. And I'm talking I'm proud of how good I am, he's like great job. He goes, "Hey I don't want you to think you're the greatest," he says, "You ain't the greatest until you go in there, you sack, you force a fumble, you recovered the fumble, you pick it up and score a touchdown. Then you can start talking, right? So he says this and he's serious, but joking at the same time.0:10:00.5 Mischa: Of course.0:10:00.6 Anthony Trucks: This was like early in the week. Now we come to the game, I was like the second or third quarter, I can't remember what it was. And they line me up and they give me a blitz, so I'm like, "I'm gonna go get this guy," right? And in my head, I'm not thinking about what he said earlier in the week, I'm just doing my thing. So I come around the bend and the running back goes to block me. Somehow, he misses me completely. I sidestep him, he goes flying by. So I go up, the quarterback doesn't see me, blind sight, sack him. Forced ball comes out, forced the fumble. Fumbles on the ground. We both go to the ground. I recovered the fumble. Now it's college football, so your knee is down, so I didn't score a touchdown. I mean, the whole crowd's erupted. Everybody is crazy. Everybody's... I'm excited, I come to the sideline. I'm high five'ing. Hey man. Hey man, I come to a coach. He looks me dead in eyes, and he goes, "But you didn't score a touchdown." That was Don Kellum.0:10:54.0 Mischa: Ruthless. Don.0:10:54.3 Anthony Trucks: Ruthless dude. That's how he was. He was the hard-nosed dude. But he...0:10:57.3 Mischa: That's cold-blooded.0:10:57.9 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, I got a whole bunch of weird ones like that. I got stuff from the NFL, High School. We got a whole bunch, but those are two of my fun ones.0:11:01.3 Mischa: That's beautiful. Yeah. And so when you hurt your shoulder, and career is over, that's pretty deflating to go from those highs to those lows, obviously.0:11:14.5 Anthony Trucks: Pretty much though. Yeah, you go from being somebody to being nobody, at least in your head, internally. Any time a human being has put their heart into something, whether it's being a parent and the kid goes to college, leave the military, you leave sports, you lose a job, you leave a job, you sell a business. When you no longer can show up in the capacity of that role anymore, you lose a sense of yourself. And so for me, it was football and I've lost a sense of myself in that realm, and so yeah, I definitely had a little downward spiral, we'll call it.0:11:43.0 Mischa: Yes, and then you were able to make it through a dark time, come out the other side. Have a pivot point where, "Hey, I think coming through that perhaps close to suicide moment," yeah?0:12:00.3 Anthony Trucks: Most definitely. Yeah, unfortunately.0:12:01.9 Mischa: Yeah, unfortunately, it's a dark place to be. So you create a tool, which I'm staring at, at least the result of the tool, so now you...0:12:12.2 Anthony Trucks: One of them.0:12:12.7 Mischa: What's that?0:12:12.8 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, it's one of them for sure. I make a whole bunch of weird stuff now.0:12:15.5 Mischa: Yeah, cool. Oh, go ahead.0:12:17.5 Anthony Trucks: That's a good tool you got right there. That's the slow or go identity. It's a good grid right there.0:12:22.3 Mischa: Yeah, it's great. I just wanna tell you that, as I said before we started recording that you are very influential in me helping get the summit.0:12:33.1 Anthony Trucks: Nice.0:12:34.2 Mischa: Continuing with the summit process, because I took your little... You go to... Anybody can do this. They can go to Anthonytrucks.com and click on the what's my identity type button.0:12:46.8 Anthony Trucks: Easy.0:12:47.8 Mischa: Yeah, super easy. And the quiz I was taking it like... Yeah, we'll see. Honestly, I was like, "Yeah, what's this?" And I took it and that it was right on the money, my friend, and I was [0:13:00.4] ____.0:13:00.4 Anthony Trucks: Is it kinda weird?0:13:00.4 Mischa: Yes, it's very weird. Turns out, I hate to admit it, but I will, I'm a dabbler. And so it helped me... One thing you have on the dabbler is to find little successes to help propel you forward and to have a contingency plan for when you go into that dark spot, that shiny object.0:13:27.2 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, 'cause dabblers are people who chase opportunity, but they shut down in oppositions sometimes.0:13:31.3 Mischa: Yes.0:13:31.7 Anthony Trucks: So in order to push forward to be a doer, all you have to do is spend time doing more, which means you have to tackle the oppositions.0:13:39.6 Mischa: Yeah, perfect. Love it. So that moment helped me progress forward with my summit, 'cause it's lots of inviting and potentials for rejection and stretching, right?0:13:53.2 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, I agree.0:13:54.3 Mischa: So thank you for that, Anthony.0:13:54.4 Anthony Trucks: You're very welcome, man. What it's for? What I made it for, man. Yeah.0:13:57.8 Mischa: Yeah. So that was... I just... Beautiful. So I'm gonna get to the point here. So you're gonna answer a question for me. I'm gonna set up a scenario and why we're all here. So here's the scenario. We've got somebody... And it sounds like you have been through it multiple times in your life, so you are gonna be familiar with it, so we've got... Let's look at life, the three-legged stool, relationships, finance and health, and then... Yep, now, so now someone who is successful or once successful, and they... You have two legs of those stool come out from under you, that can be a very dark place, and you were there.0:14:40.1 Mischa: And so for me, I had that. I had had success in my 20-year sales career, all of a sudden, career upheaval. I went through a divorce out of nowhere, financial distress, and both my parents died in rapid succession within two weeks of each other, and it was a very dark time. And the thing was, was that to pull myself up from my bootstraps attitude that, "Work your way through it," wasn't working. I needed extra, I needed a little nudge, I needed something like this. So my question to you is, thinking of your tool, your modality, all your bag of tricks, what are the exact next steps you would offer a person like me that was in that scenario, so that I know that I'm headed in the new, right direction, that I'll have positive momentum towards getting my life back on track?0:15:36.4 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, so the one thing that's good about this is it's not a guessing game. I think some people, they will navigate this by guessing little pieces that could be beneficial, and for me it's like, I look at the whole revamp. See you've mentioned and alluded to earlier, I've had 30-plus randomly weird situations that have... I could say each one of them would have... Has knocked other people off track for an entire lifetime.0:15:56.2 Mischa: Yes.0:15:58.7 Anthony Trucks: Very odd. It's very odd, and I didn't even think of it and notice it until I was in my early 30s, to be quite honest. I was like, somebody else brought it to the forefront and I was like, "Yeah, I did, oddly have a way of doing this, and so I'll tell you what I've done every time that that's happened to me."0:16:12.0 Mischa: Fantastic.0:16:12.7 Anthony Trucks: So I did it accidentally at first, and now I do it proactively. I think we do have that unfortunate life, we do proactively choose to eat healthy sometimes, but most of the time we react to life, we're not responding in a chosen manner. So what I've done is I've gone back and said in those moments, I needed to look at who I was, not so much what I knew or what I had access to. And in my life now, I'm always like, "I got a problem. Who is Anthony right now? My wife and I are arguing, who am I? I'm not the best father. Who am I? I'm not working out the way I'd like to, Who am I?" And there's a reason why I say, "Who am I?", not, "What do I gotta do?" Because if you are the person to do those things, you wouldn't even question what you have to do, you just do that stuff. That's just the simple nature of it. Like if I'm the person who just... If it's who I am to work out every day, I'm gonna work out every day, I'm not gonna worry about that. If it's who I am to be the most amazing, loving, caring, paying attention husband, that's who I'll be every day.0:17:09.5 Anthony Trucks: And so when someone's in that space, typically we say, "What's wrong? What do I gotta fix? What do I gotta do?" And I'm more like, "Who do you gotta be?" 'Cause if you don't realize that there's a certain core person of you running all this, then you're gonna keep repeating the same situation, you'll keep landing in the same place. And this is why a lot of my work is in identity, it's all in that realm of, "Who are you?" So what I first have people do is you have to have them see. And the see phase... It's a three-step phase called the shift method. The first stage is the see phase, and the see phase is where you get to go in and take a look at what is really going on, and it usually isn't fun to see. It's the stuff where you get exposed to the true aspect of your humanity and you go, "Yeah, I don't like that part of me," but for the first time in your life, maybe you actually accept it and go, "I gotta work on that." 'Cause not everybody does.0:17:58.4 Mischa: Oh, absolutely. It can be hard. Can I ask you a question in that regard?0:18:01.6 Anthony Trucks: Please.0:18:02.0 Mischa: So is there like... Give my audience an actionable step in that regard to...[overlapping conversation]0:18:06.7 Mischa: Yeah, absolutely.0:18:07.6 Anthony Trucks: Here we go. So this is dead serious, is we have something we call triad talks, and it's a certain series of questions in a certain order and a specific way we do it, but I'll give you the overarching. What you do is you go and select a group of questions that essentially would get to the root of you, that you don't even... That you'd be scared to hear the answer to. We'll call it that. Get to the root of the questions. And then what you do is you go find people who you know and that you like and that they're positive humans, and you ask them, "Hey, can you answer these questions for me, about me?" And this is something where there's a way you go through it to where you do certain things to where you're not actually, we'll call it, cannibalizing your ability to get great answers, but what you'll do is you'll get feedback if you do it the right way. You'll get feedback from people that is really hard to swallow.0:19:00.0 Mischa: And usable, so let's just... I wanna tackle that. So we've got step one of the see... Step one is the see phase and a tool within that is a triad talk, and so... Fantastic. So give me an example of one, two or three questions, so like...0:19:19.3 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, easy. So I guess, well, one question I ask them is, if you were to get rid of a part of me, like, okay, you'll remove a certain part of how I do things. What would it be and why? If you were to rate my... If you could do this actually. Rating is usually fun. If you were to rate and you'll give me a number based from zero to 10 on how good of a friend I am or how good of a blank I am, is a good question there. What is the most frustrating thing about me that you feel like you have to endure, and I'll never change? Like little stuff like this.0:19:56.2 Mischa: Oh, those are good.0:19:57.1 Anthony Trucks: And they let them... And you ask the questions, but you have to be prepared for the answers. You have to actually absorb those answers a certain way, and if you do it right, it will break your heart, you'll feel like you wanna retort and you can't, but you'll get gold, you'll start to see yourself, and that's I think one of the biggest gifts is to see through the veil of really what's going on that other people can see, but I'm just blind to it, there's a statement that I love is you can't see the label when you're inside the jar. And a lot of us are in that jar and we don't even know what's going on or operating.0:20:33.2 Anthony Trucks: It's like, "How come no one's coming around? 'Cause it says poison on the outside," dude.[chuckle]0:20:36.5 Anthony Trucks: Like, Have you seen yourself?[laughter]0:20:38.2 Mischa: Right. Oh my God.0:20:38.7 Anthony Trucks: You gotta figure that out.[laughter]0:20:40.4 Mischa: Oh my gosh, that is amazing.0:20:43.6 Anthony Trucks: That's one of the first pieces, man, is, is going to a level of actually, that's the tactical thing is, What in the world do I gotta work on? And then the second thing that we do is we go through the shift phase, which really is where the action is taken, we are shifting internally and making shifts actionably externally because of those internal ones. And what it allows us to do is take a look at our life and then you actually change your life, 'cause shifts make the change, right? If I wanna change the destination of a plane, I am shifting the trajectory, right? I'm not... I wouldn't call it like I'm gonna change the trajectory. You'd kinda shift it like, I'm gonna go a little bit one degree this way. And I'll change the destination, right? That's what we're doing, we're trying to change the destination in your life. It's just a shift, not crazy.0:21:25.2 Mischa: You know what's so good about that and so hopeful about that is we don't necessarily need to do a 100, we don't need to move the ship completely.0:21:33.7 Anthony Trucks: No.0:21:33.8 Mischa: Right, it's like, "Hey, let's take those next little incremental things to get us going in that right direction, Right?."0:21:40.0 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, if you go... I literally Googled this, if you were to choose to go from San Francisco to the, say, Orlando Airport, if you on the way there made a one degree shift in trajectory from the get-go you would land 40 miles south in Lakeland, Florida.0:21:57.5 Mischa: Wow.0:21:58.3 Anthony Trucks: One degree.[laughter]0:21:58.9 Anthony Trucks: Isn't that crazy?[chuckle]0:22:00.2 Mischa: It's crazy, one degree.0:22:01.0 Anthony Trucks: That's the difference. So people are like, you don't gotta go and overhaul your entire life, man, just... 'cause the plane's always in the air. It's always going somewhere. Just adjust the trajectory. It's a shift and you're good.0:22:15.1 Mischa: I love it. So let me ask, how about an actionable step in the action step phase, so you've gone out and you gave me a few questions, so give me like an action step to help make that degree change.0:22:27.7 Anthony Trucks: Oh, yeah. So it's just fun but everybody can do this. All you gotta do is ask yourself, what's that one thing that's been lingering, and I'm gonna say why this is important. Let's purpose it with this, if something didn't scare you, it wouldn't be important to you. There are things that scare you that wouldn't scare me because they're important to you, and vice versa, there's things that I would be deadly afraid, deathly afraid to do it. You wouldn't even care. Like surfing, I'm gonna get eaten by a shark. I'm not gonna do that. But you're like, "No, bro this is easy." You see what I'm saying.0:22:55.5 Mischa: Yes.0:22:56.0 Anthony Trucks: The difference is, it's because what's important to you. Now, here's the thing, if that thing is lingering didn't scare you, it would already be done by now. It just would. If I'm like, "Hey, I want a hamburger and a milkshake," and I'm not gonna feel guilty, I'm going to the store right now.[chuckle]0:23:12.1 Anthony Trucks: I'm going to get it now... Any of you've done, I'm not afraid of it, I'm looking forward to it.[laughter]0:23:16.2 Mischa: Yes. Yes.0:23:16.6 Anthony Trucks: So a lot of these ideas and things that linger for a lot of folks, they're like, "I'm good, I just gotta get... " No you're afraid of it, and that's okay.0:23:25.2 Anthony Trucks: Right? So the first action you take is in the direction of the fear, and if you don't know how to do that, you take the fear and you find ways to open it up until you find the smallest pieces of it and then start attacking the small pieces, right? It's... What is that earth invaders? When you hit the...0:23:42.7 Mischa: Oh, space invaders?0:23:42.8 Anthony Trucks: And it turns into little ones and little ones...0:23:44.0 Mischa: Yeah, yeah, yeah.0:23:44.8 Anthony Trucks: You gotta make it the small ones, that's obviously the wrong game to do that, but when you can make things small. 15 minutes, it's much easier to overcome the fear for that 15 minutes than it is to perceive, "I gotta do this for the next week. Oh my God, okay, I'm gonna do that next week," and then next week and the next month, and then... So chunk it down to the smallest minute steps and then attack it that way, but it's usually gotta be in the direction of something that scares you or could linger for too long.0:24:12.1 Mischa: So any real-life example you've seen recently or you see...0:24:14.9 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, you wanna launch a podcast, you wanna launch a summit, right? Summit or podcast, right? And I'm not saying you're afraid of it at all, but I'm just saying, this is what... Some people are probably afraid of doing it. Yeah, he's maybe a little bit afraid, right?[laughter]0:24:25.8 Mischa: Yeah, maybe.0:24:26.5 Anthony Trucks: So you didn't just one day go, "Alright, I'm gonna do everything today," you're like, "Alright, I'm gonna send an email first." Small step.0:24:32.6 Mischa: Yeah.0:24:33.0 Anthony Trucks: Write the email, send it out, you wanna do it. Okay, great, okay, okay, now I gotta buy some equipment, I gotta figure out what the email thing look like. I gotta say, Okay, how do I time this? How am I gonna deliver it? How people are gonna opt in? When they opt in what are they gonna get? How I set a checkout page? How am I gonna get 'em to pay for this? Do I do a PayPal? This is all the stuff that goes into it. It's minute little steps, but you didn't just wake up one day, say I'm gonna figure it out today, you looked at little by little by little, and chunked it apart to where now it's real, it's live and it's coming to fruition.0:25:01.7 Mischa: I love that. Yes, thank you. Perfect, so then, so we've got the see phase, the action phase or the stuff... What did you define?0:25:11.2 Anthony Trucks: Shift. The see and shift.0:25:12.3 Mischa: Yes, yes.0:25:12.8 Anthony Trucks: And the last stage is sustain.0:25:19.7 Mischa: Sustain.0:25:19.9 Anthony Trucks: The sustain phase. See, Shift, Sustain.0:25:20.7 Mischa: See, shift, I couldn't read my own writing. See, shift.0:25:25.3 Anthony Trucks: Me either.[laughter]0:25:25.4 Mischa: Sustain. Sustain. So tell me about sustain.0:25:27.2 Anthony Trucks: Sustain phase is the one where... We as people unfortunately get to the point of we have success and then we stop doing what it took to get there because it either wasn't who we were, we just were pushing, or we got lazy. We're like, "I'll have this and maintain it'll be there," but we don't realize that you've gotta sustain the amount of effort to sustain a level of success and if you wanna have more success, you have to sustain the drive to continue to keep achieving more. So what happens is some people will... Like I had my gym business. I would focus on, "Let me get past this hump, I gotta make some money." And I would do all these things to get to the point that I make that money to pay the bills and go, "Oh, I can relax now." And then three months later, I'm in the exact same place. I gotta fight real hard because every time I would get to the top, I would stop doing what it took to get to the top.0:26:13.7 Anthony Trucks: Imagine if I just kept doing that stuff, the amount of momentum. So people don't have sustainability in life and it's not because they don't know how or don't have the skillsets, they just stop when they feel like they don't need to have that kind of effort and push 'cause they're not looking at shifting into being that person. And there's reasons that this happens. I think sometimes we lose sight of why we're doing things. It's not anchored consciously as to why I'm moving every day, I'm just getting up and doing it 'cause it's what my job is now.0:26:41.0 Mischa: Yep.0:26:41.0 Anthony Trucks: And then also I think sometimes we float around the wrong people. I think the hive, the environment's difficult 'cause there's a statement of, "You are the average of the five people you surround yourself with." And I think it's halfway right. I think you're the average of the expectations of the five people you surround yourself with. If you think about it, if I wanna... Say I have a million dollars and I wanna make $2 million dollars. Well, there's people I could hang out with that maybe have a million dollars, but what if it's a person that makes a half a million dollars, but they wanna make 2 and the million dollar people are content?0:27:15.7 Mischa: Yeah.0:27:16.5 Anthony Trucks: Well, the expectation of the half a million dollar person, they're like, "Look, I'm not shooting for 1, I'm shooting for 2." "Well, I'm shooting for 2 also. Let's figure it out." Whereas the million dollar people are like, "We've got a million dollars, we're cool." There's nothing wrong with them, but for what I want, I need to be around the expectations of what it takes to get there 'cause that half a million dollar person is not gonna let me sit idle at 1.2 or 1.3. They're gonna be like, "No, you keep pushing. You gotta get to 2." Whereas the 1 million dollar people, they're like, "Well, you're good. Slow down. What are you doing? Are you crazy?" So I think when you get into the sustain phase, if I'm gonna sustain my trajectory, I must consistently have a hive of people who have expectations at a level that are at or above where I wanna have them myself.0:28:00.0 Mischa: That's a great... I like the expectation piece in there because the... I like that added bit because the perception is, "If I hang out with a millionaire, bam, that's gonna... That is gonna help me elevate." Not that that's the all end all, but as an example.0:28:16.3 Anthony Trucks: Yeah. You'll get there. You can, but then, you can, but it's hard to get past there. Not that you can't, but it's hard to get past there 'cause you'll get to the point of... Think about what I just... Logically. "I got a million. Alright, cool. I'm gonna hang out, put my feet up. I'm gonna golf with Bob." And I'm like, "No, bro, I wanna make a $2 million dollar business. I can't go golfing and do that. I gotta go keep working." You know what I mean? There's just things you gotta look at. And so it is. It's an expectation piece and then if you don't sustain it, man, you'll lose it.0:28:44.8 Anthony Trucks: You'll just lose to be in place. And then I think at a certain level, for me, the sustain phase is, "I gotta find out why I gotta keep growing." And what I've found is anybody that's had a nominal level of success, there's a certain heart, for the majority in my opinion, to give back. They thrive, they wanna do well, and I found that there's this thing called marginal utility. And if I have 10 hamburgers, well, if I eat one 'cause I'm starving, that first one is delicious. Now the second one, it's still pretty good. Third one, I don't know. Fourth one, I can't do it, I can't do it. I got seven more hamburgers, what am I doing right now? I wanna feel good though. What do I do? I can't keep eating hamburgers.0:29:23.7 Anthony Trucks: Well, if I wanna feel good, what if I give them to somebody else who's starving? Different kind of good, but I feel good, so I give him the hamburgers. He does the same thing. He eats three and he's like, "Alright, I got four more." He keeps on passing it along. Well, the idea is if you do that, you'll notice, "Wow, I really like how it feels to give back and to serve. Who do I have to be, to be able to do that at a higher level?" And guess what it does? Puts you right back to seeing who you are and who that next person is that can do that. It's a cycle.0:29:54.6 Mischa: I think that's such a great space to work from as well. It's initially where perhaps when we're younger or what have you, it's that financial, build the family, find that success that pulls us forward and then it can be such a great place to work from, to shift to that, "Alright, how can I be of service on a broader scale?" So that's a great... That's a great thought as far as sustaining. So what are two or three habits that you have to help propel you on a daily basis or perhaps to find that...0:30:38.8 Mischa: That service piece, yeah. Go.0:30:40.3 Anthony Trucks: Yeah, yeah. So here's one thing is I fall in love with the day, not the destination. I think sometimes we spend way too much time looking at, "Well, am I there yet? Am I there yet?" like a 5-year-old in the car. But I love the days and I have a certain amount of space and time in my day that I operate and I love it. I love to be in motion. I think all humans... We love the motion. There's magic in the motion. There's something too... Like I can sit here with all this stuff off in my office and hang out, but there's more joy talking to you. Just like you. I'm sure before you could be in your house and be content, but when we get on like this, it's a different kind of joy we get to hang out in. There's no anxiety, there's no stress, we're just chatting, two guys talking. This is the motion of the magic, right?0:31:25.2 Mischa: Yeah.0:31:25.6 Anthony Trucks: And so what I look at is I need to be always in a position where I'm doing things that are keeping me moving, but the right things. So when you say, "How do I keep that consistent?" I just... I have a certain block of my day. I love being in the groove of working, but I make sure the things inside that groove are the ones that still scare me, are the ones that move that move the needle, are the ones that are useful to what I'm doing and habitually I just commit to falling in love with the day. And if I do that enough and if I have things that I enjoy, eventually, 'cause they're the right things, I end up at a destination and then I'm like, "Cool. I wanna get back to climbing the mountain." You spend way less time at the peak than you do on the journey. I want to enjoy the journey. So that's a big piece of it. And then if I'm hiking a mountain, I don't wanna be with a person who won't shut up that's annoying.0:32:17.9 Anthony Trucks: I wanna be with people who are like... Cheer me on, who could have similar conversations. 'Cause the thing about whenever you're out for a hike, time flies by with great conversation.0:32:27.6 Mischa: It does.0:32:28.6 Anthony Trucks: It melts away. So if I'm gonna be on this hike and I'm gonna enjoy the journey, I wanna have people that I can enjoy it with. And then when I get to the peak, I get to celebrate. They're taking a picture of me, I'm taking a picture of them. We get some lady I don't know to take a picture of us. It's this cool experience because you have the people and you are loving every step of the journey, quite literally.0:32:49.3 Mischa: Yeah, that's great. Do you calendar your sustainability, those activities?0:32:57.3 Anthony Trucks: Oh, man. I have a very ridiculous dialed in calendar for how my life is. It's right here. It's like my life is rolling it's... But here's the beauty of it, I have the method I use that I teach people, it boils down to execution. I think that's the one thing. Some people give a lot of insight, information, theory, and then leave it on you to figure out how to make it real in your life. Whereas for me, we teach, we talk, we boil things down to very specific actions, and even then I don't leave you hanging. Then I'm like, "Alright, great. We're gonna go... We're gonna put them in your life now, we're gonna make sure... " I just had a client call today, we broke down her entire morning routine down to the exact hour and a half she'll do it. I think an hour and half's kinda long, but for her it fits. But the idea's like I'm not just saying, "Go make a morning routine," and she's like, "Alright," and then walks away. We work through all of it, every piece, so there's understanding for it and the timing behind it, and then it's like, "Alright, now we take the action on it."0:33:54.6 Anthony Trucks: And it's that action that creates the difference, it creates a change. And so when I'm doing these things, I'm not just theory, man. I'm like, "I want you to finally have these things real in your life, because when they are that's when the true confidence comes in, the transformation comes in. It's not in the planning." We as humans feel better there. I think people fall in love with a safe work. "I wanna start a business." "Okay, start a business. What are you gonna do?" "Okay, I'm gonna get my business cards done, I'm gonna make a landing page, I'm gonna think of a name, I'm gonna, follow the... " That's not the stuff that you need to do to make the business. It sounds like it is. It's the safe work, though. You could do it in your house at night, making a little website, it looks pretty.0:34:29.0 Anthony Trucks: But the scary thing that actually makes it a real business, not you in the background, or having a hobby, getting bored, is when you can go, "Okay, pay me for this. This is what it's gonna cost you to actually get this improvement in your life." It's a business and that's the scary work. Now, the safe work and the fun work that has a place, but that's not what does it, man. And that's the thing is people are afraid of doing the scary work. They don't understand the sacrifice that it takes sometimes.0:34:58.3 Mischa: Yeah. It sounds like you are not only gifted at doing that scary work yourself, but you've systemized a way to...0:35:08.0 Anthony Trucks: Oh, very much.0:35:09.7 Mischa: Yeah, to pass it on to other people.0:35:10.2 Anthony Trucks: I have to. If I don't, then I'm just talking. If I was to sit here and give people all this information and not give them some way to apply it, I have done a massive disservice. I think we have a lot of people in this space that are doing a disservice because all they do is talk. Which means all you do is point the problem out and you inspire and motivate, but then you don't tell them what to do. It's kind of like people leave events and they're, "I'm excited. I'm gonna do this." And they're all gripping the steering wheel, they can't... They go to bed and one day they wake up like, "Where did it go? What do I do now? I don't feel completely inspired. I forgot how I'm supposed to feel, what's the next step?" And then it turns into this, I think, an immediate switch, it turns into, I don't know, sadness, a lack of self-esteem because I'm like, "Man, I didn't even do anything. I suck." And now it's even worse.0:36:00.5 Mischa: Yeah, it's like that emotional roller coaster, right? The one that... Yeah, I get that.0:36:05.2 Anthony Trucks: Yeah. I'll inspire you, but I'm gonna be very clear. The real motivation comes from “can you get up in the morning and do something?” And it's like that will come from, did you do it? Did you take an action? Because the moment I can give someone a guiding point and then they go execute on it, they feel amazing. It's palpable. You can't take it from them. That person is the one that's gonna get up every day because they're looking forward to that feeling. It's not how I yelled at them or that video that I made that was super cool with great drone shots. That's alright, but the thing is “is did you do something with your life that I guided you to do yourself so you created the pride that you get to keep”?0:36:42.6 Mischa: Anthony, that's beautiful. I think that that is a great place to end this section. Don't forget, we're gonna do another interview, but I just wanna say quick to everybody watching and listening to Anthony and I, if this was fantastic and you want to get more of what Anthony has to offer and see more, upgrade to the All-access pass for the bonus interview because Anthony and I are going to go even deeper. And I have a few more amazing questions and I'm gonna go let you pick what we wanna talk about. Before we end this section, is there anything that you think we missed or you wanted to say before we stop this bit?0:37:27.9 Anthony Trucks: I don't. No. I believe those who wanna be better will go join. There's always this thing that years ago someone explained to me was like, "You wanna make an investment, but you can go and try to invest in a company, right? But the best investment is always in yourself." And those who pay, pay attention, because it's worth more. And if it's worth more, you'll do more with it. So those who are like, "I really wanna commit to doing something great," yeah, go ahead and take that next step because we're gonna get in here in a second and those are the people that can raise their hand and we'll look back years ago and go, "That person is successful." Why? It's not by accident. They took those next steps.0:38:04.1 Mischa: Yeah, thank you so much for that, Anthony. And then again, a quick reminder to everybody, you can go to anthonytrucks.com, click on the, “What's my identity?” Take this test. It is awesome. It helped me. And then you can also book a call, there's a link to book a call with you. So I would encourage anybody, if they don't upgrade and see the next section, to at least click on anthonytrucks.com and take the identity type quiz.[music]——————-

The Back of the Range Golf Podcast
Brooke Matthews - U.S. Curtis Cup Team

The Back of the Range Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 47:42


My guest on this episode helped Team USA capture the Curtis Cup in Wales.  Brooke Matthews is coming off a record-breaking win this season for Arkansas as well as a successful title defense at the Blessings.  Fantastic insight and laughs in this episode with one of the longest hitters in the women's game! Brooke Matthews - University of ArkansasBrooke Matthews - Instagram Subscribe to The Back of the Range Subscribe in Apple Podcasts and SPOTIFY! Also Subscribe in YouTube,   Google Play , Overcast, Stitcher  Follow on Social Media! Email us:   ben@thebackoftherange.com Website: www.thebackoftherange.com  Voice Work by Mitch Phillips Cover Art Photo - USGA

Design Much
127 - Building a Super Fantastic Design Team

Design Much

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Sir Ben Picard submits a very regal topic for Andy and Patrick to dissect

The Big Boo Cast
The Big Boo Cast, Episode 255

The Big Boo Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 56:32


Naturally we kick off this week's episode with Melanie's recap of the A&M / Alabama game, which was all manner of memorable for her (and most people who love college football, I would add). We also break down other big match-ups from this past weekend, complete with Side Eyes and I See Yous. Plus, we discuss some recent TikTok fascinations (for me), and I share my Five Favorites. Enjoy, y'all!  - Our Amazon Shop - Live Show Tickets for October 16th (there's a livestream option now!) - Become a Patron Show Notes: - Patreon episode that's all about the A&M / Bama game - Alabama blocks A&M's punt - Achane runs back Alabama's kick-off - the Sarkisians' gameday pants (FANTASTIC) - the frozen chicken fillets from Aldi - The Defined Dish Pot Roast Chicken - Mordenmiss loose sweatshirt (sizes are limited, but the fabric is dreamy) - T-Fal 12" non-stick pan  - Emily Mariko's salmon and rice dish on TikTok (I mispronounced her name on the episode; it's Mah-REE-ko. Just wanted to correct myself.) - Women's mid-rise wide leg sweater pants - Ninja XL Air Fryer (I don't like kitchen gadgets. I love this one.) Sponsors: -  Rothy's (use this link to get $20 off your first purchase for a limited time) - Stamps.com (use promo code BIGBOO for a four-week trial, free postage, and a digital scale) - June's Journey (download in the Apple App Store or Google Play) - Noom (use this link to sign up for your free trial)

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
What's Next for The Real Estate Market? With CoStar's Senior Economic Consultant Joseph Biasi | EP74

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:31


Joseph Biasi spends his Days Analysing Economic Trends and their Relationship with Commercial Real Estate for CoStar – the Leading Real Estate Data Analytics and Aggregator in the US.  In this episode we talked about: Joseph's Bio & Activity Commercial Real Estate Market Outlook Retail Property Analysis Industrial Real Estate Overview Interest Rates Government Policy Single Family VS Multifamily Real Estate The Effect of Inflation on Real Estate Investors Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://www.costar.com Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. All right, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to working capital the real estate podcast. My special guest today is Joseph Biassi. Joseph spends his days analyzing economic trends and the relationship with the commercial real estate sector. And he works for CoStar advisory services. For those of you that don't know what CoStar is, they're the leading real estate data analytics and aggregator in the us. And I'm not sure if Canada as well, but I wouldn't be surprised we use them pretty much every day. They're our go-to for analytics, for properties, for research and a part of our underwriting process. Joseph, how's it going? Great. How are you doing? I'm doing great. Do I have that right, Joseph, in terms of CoStar where they're at today, maybe you could, you could let the audience know a little bit about your position there and CoStar in general and what you guys do. Sure. Yeah. Joseph(1m 10s): CoStar is a data analytics platform and a data vendor. We, we track pretty much every commercial building that we can at least get research on across the United States. We are moving into Canada as well, more and more. We're getting better coverage in Canada and as well as Europe, my job in particular is I sit on top of that data as a consultant. I'm a senior consultant with advisory services. And my job in particular is to advise client both developers as well as investors on macro economic and commercial real estate trends Jesse (1m 45s): Right on. Yeah. What I've noticed is we have, I think 84, 85 offices now, and we've, we've pretty much switched over completely to CoStar and that goes for Canadian and, and us markets, but it's definitely come a long way in terms of the coverage that we have at least, you know, in our major markets, you pretty much, you've got everything covered there. Speaker 1 (2m 7s): Yeah. I mean, we've been really pushing research recently. Speaker 0 (2m 11s): So this was, this was something we were at, we were at this panel and in new Orleans this past, I guess two weekends ago now, and we were talking about, you know, where, where people can find information, those people looking for deals in the market and a lot of, a lot of what we do on the investing side and not just in brokerage, but we'll, you know, when we tried to track down owners, a lot of times we're looking at properties on CoStar trying to find the beneficial, the true owners and reach out to them directly for off market deals. Speaker 1 (2m 38s): Yeah. So I, I, before actually, before I worked at CoStar, worked in brokerage. And so I was, I I've been a user, it's a fantastic site for anybody who wants to do any kind of real estate deals, right. On a little biased, but Speaker 0 (2m 52s): Yeah, a little biased. So in terms of the, the actual market, I thought what would be, will be just that would be useful and educational for our listeners is talking a little bit about what's been going on in the market over the last year or two and the outlook for the next, let's call it a mid to mid to longterm. And by longterm for me, I think five years, I don't think longer than that, but yeah. You know, let's talk a little bit about the commercial real estate market in general, over the last two years, how have things changed in terms of the data that you're seeing in terms of the way you approach the market and, and your analysis? Speaker 1 (3m 31s): Great question. Yeah. So, you know, when the pandemic hit, I think there was a lot of fear going around and that translated into a lot less commercial real estate deals, particularly in the office sector. Everybody began to work from home. We knew, we noticed a pretty steep drop off in transaction activity, which has since returned. And that's, that's pretty much been the story is we had this initial 20, 20 decline, a couple of, a couple of quarters of, you know, pretty severe transaction volume decline. And it's all become back effectively, but it's come back in a very different way. And that's the actual story behind what's happening in the commercial real estate market is if you look at the macro macro numbers, you know, total amount of transaction, the total transaction volume is back. But if you look at where that's happening, it's very different. For example, the Dallas Fort worth had more transaction activity in 2020, the first half of 2021 than New York. That's not normal. We're seeing, we're seeing those rooms moved down to, if you're talking about retailer, multi-family, we're seeing them move down to the south, the study United States, as opposed to, you know, the new York's and the San Francisco's of the world. Phoenix is another market we've seen, which is, I suppose, as a Western market, those, those Sunbelt markets are where we're seeing the most demographic growth. We're seeing the most transaction activity. And we're seeing the biggest pricing gains across all four, four major property types Speaker 0 (4m 55s): In terms of the, to go from geographic to the property types, if, you know, starting with retail, I guess. Cause that's, that's the one where when the pandemic first started, there was the big question of retail, which I think for, for the most part has been overbuilt. I don't think it's a surprise in the U S Canada. Canada's pretty. Yeah. I mean, we are as well, but I think we're somewhere in between the U S and in most European countries on a per square foot basis. But talk about retail, you know, how has that analysis been over the last, you know, call it a year to two years? Speaker 1 (5m 29s): I think retail, it, at least in my opinion is one of the most fascinating property types. Like, yeah, you're absolutely right. There needs to be some level of rationalization. If the landscape has changed, it is no longer the place where people go deep. The only place people go shopping to buy goods, that doesn't mean it's going away and there's still, I would argue opportunities. And I think that's the way we've been trying to, to talk about retail, which is look, you know, you're not, if you're looking at a class B or class seem, all those are going to struggle, but if you're looking at, you know, there's still good opportunities and you just, there's a lot more nuance and a lot more detail that you need to look into for a retail building the tenants matter so much in a retail building, even more than an office or an industrial building, because if you have a good grocery anchor, a neighborhood center in a well-populated area, that's still a good asset. And that, that I think has kind of been, under-reported just due to the fear around retail during the pandemic and the fear around retail because of e-commerce. Speaker 0 (6m 36s): Yeah. It's a, it's one of those things that we've always talked about that, you know, good grocery store, anchored retail. I can't imagine in a lot of these markets, if anything, they were a bit, some of those properties were buoyed by the fact that the only places that were open were the Walmarts or, you know, these grocery stores that were anchored. Speaker 1 (6m 54s): Exactly. And we're, you know, we are seeing, you know, returns to normal leasing patterns in the Southern states where, you know, where retail really does follow rooftops. And in those Southern states, we've seen pretty much a full recovery, and we've seen a pretty much a full recovery in terms of pricing as well. Whereas if you talk about, you know, these, these tertiary markets in the Midwest, or some of these coastal gateway markets that have really struggled during the pandemic, there's still, there's still losing people. They're still struggling to kind of recover. Speaker 0 (7m 25s): So have you seen, I know you, you track a lease terms and different differently structures. Have you seen a difference in the way that retailers are approaching their leases? You know, where you could have some retailers in the past doing 5, 10, 15, 20 year leases, has that, has that shifted or is it, is it too early to tell Speaker 1 (7m 43s): It's a, it's a little early to tell, just because we're, we're finally kind of getting back at least down south, but the, the tenants that they're looking for at certainly become far more focused on either, you know, necessity based retail, certain tenants like dollar stores. So these, these discount stores are doing really well. And then experience-based tenants have done are something that landlords are really looking into as a long-term longer-term play. At some point, this pandemic will become less and less, have less and less of an effect on the economy. And a lot of landlords believe that the future of real estate of retail is experiential. That you're drawing people there for something more than just a shopping experience. Speaker 0 (8m 28s): Does CoStar track the rezoning or reclassification of buildings in terms of, for example, one of the, one of the, the guesses that, you know, that we have is that retail and, and certain types of office buildings may be converted, maybe switch the use might be switched even in hospitality, potentially hospitality going to multi-family. But if do you track that type of thing? Speaker 1 (8m 54s): Yeah. It hasn't occurred as much as you would think, given the amount of airtime, not an ink that's been spilled on it. It really hasn't happened. It does happen, you know, so I went to college in Worcester and the Greendale mall in Worcester got turned into an Amazon distribution center, but that isn't really the rural quite yet. They're still working on that because, you know, it's, a lot of people think that a mall is going to turn into an industrial center, like a distribution center, and it's more likely to be knocked down and turned into multi-family center because it's still the highest and best use is, is multifamily for a dense urban area. We're, we're, we're starting to see some of these malls really struggle. Speaker 0 (9m 36s): Yeah. I think you're absolutely right with the amount of ink that's been spelled as a that's been spilled on it because it is one of those things, I guess, more of an academic thing. It's logical to think that okay. But I think the reality is you get in transaction costs the actual time it takes to convert these things. There's a little bit more that goes on with it. If you, if you kind of slide from retail, move into the, the office space. So my partner and I on the brokerage on predominantly work in office investment sales, as well as leasing, they, I don't, you know, despite some of, you know, what, what has been said last year, that markets haven't been affected. I just think a lot of people were saying certain things were, what we saw was a large, large drop-off in office. And not surprisingly, I'm assuming that's, that's what you S what you've seen. And if not, maybe you could provide some insight there. Speaker 1 (10m 26s): All right. No, absolutely. I, I, if you look at where most of the transaction activity has fallen off, it's been an office and it really has a lot to do with uncertainty. Right. It's, you know, what will work from home look like in five years from now, because if you, and you know, this probably better than I do, if you're buying an office for your leasing office, it's, it's a five to 10 year lease or three to 10 years typically. So you're, you're really guessing what's going to happen down the road. So when you're buying office, it's, it's a little scary right now. And I, I understand that the shop view for CoStar advisory services, and I do not speak for all of CoStar district health, say for CoStar advisory services, is that, you know, the office, there will be less demand for office because I work from home, but we don't believe this is the death of office everybody's going to be working remotely. And we also don't believe that. And I personally don't believe that, you know, these downtown offices are going to, you know, go away anytime soon. I I've in that downtown, these downtown clusters are going to severely struggle. I think the actual concern for office, if we want to think about where, where we might see struggle is those class B offices in urban areas that have less, that don't have as good a commutability score that aren't dark, aren't able to draw. Don't have the same amount of amenities. Those, I think are the ones that well, we think are going to struggle a little bit more. Yeah. It's funny. You Speaker 0 (11m 53s): Mentioned that I was having a conversation with a, with a colleague of mine. And I was, we were talking about that specific thing where a lot of suburban markets actually, haven't been doing particularly poorly with office and then these downtown connected, but there's, these Midtown markets are like these markets that are tertiary markets, that if, unless they have good connectivity, it's a really, you know, there's a question mark about how they'll do well, we've also seen though, is that the, the office side, like you were saying before, the underwriting has changed to the extent that, you know, we, they want to see is what type of tenant, what, you know, where are they in the lease? What are their rights? And, and it's funny too, that you mentioned five-year and then kind of went back to three-year because what we've seen is that, you know, when I started in brokerage, really, it was rare to find even three-year head leases. It was typically a five-year minimum. Where now, if one thing has happened from COVID, we've seen all kinds of different lease lease terms. Speaker 1 (12m 47s): Yeah. I mean, if you, if you think about going to selling a building, occupancy matters more than anything else, even, you know, that's the, that's the first and only thing I, if you have to take some rent losses, you'd rather take some rent losses and lose occupancy. So peop landlords are for office buildings are, you know, it is definitely a tenants market right now, but we, in terms of the, the urban areas, I think the reason they lose out is because the downtown offices have that commutability and then the suburban offices have that advantage of being able to drive to them. If I'm in, I'm in Boston, which is a famously difficult Metro to drive in. And there's no way I'm going to go drive to, let's say Brighton, which is just outside the main city to go to an office there, but I'd be willing to go to suburban office and I'd be willing to take the T down to than the downtown crossing, for example. Speaker 0 (13m 37s): Yeah, for sure. And you, you know, one thing too, is like we've had, what we've seen is that the CFO or COO, depending on, or the real estate, you know, facilities manager, whoever's dealing with the company's real estate. It has been a lot of like kicking the can down the road, because like you said, it's, it's, you're making a decision. That's going to impact five, 10 years. Whereas if you're buying an investment, one thing you can say is that interest rates are where they're at right now. You can, you can, you know, logically pursue maybe a little bit more risky investment, but for the people that work at a company, they're like, I'm not going to make a decision where in a year from now I could look like this was the terrible, the worst thing I did for the company. Speaker 1 (14m 12s): Right. Right. Exactly. Speaker 0 (14m 14s): So if we, okay, so that's retail office. If we switch now to, to industrial, because one thing that was really a cool stat that I saw when, when COVID just happened was the fact that retail sales did not decrease. It's just where the sales happen changed. Right. There was a pivot to online sales, total sales didn't D decrease, at least at the beginning of the pandemic, the data that I was looking at. So I'm curious, I mean, I think it's no surprise industrial's doing pretty well today. Speaker 1 (14m 48s): Yeah, no, it's not. It's no surprise. And it continued to do well. The pandemic, you are somehow seeing cap rate declines, which I think if you said two years ago, most people would be like, there's no way, but I just given how quickly we begun to really shift into e-commerce and the, you know, the room to run in terms of e-commerce. If you look at Europe, Europe uses e-commerce far more than the United States does still, but kind of going back to your point about retail sales it's, I've been tracking it very closely for that specific reason. If you look at retail sales, and this is because, you know, the government stepped in and enacted a lot of stimulus by, by June of 2020 retail sales had more sales than you would expect, given what you would expect pre pandemic. So if you forecast it out pre pandemic, but retail sales should be, and it's a fairly linear trend, you would expect them to have, you know, X amount of retail sales. And we're, we've seen exceed that basically since June of 2020, and about 35% of that is e-commerce, which is impressive when only 16% of retail sales is e-commerce right now. So e-commerce is pushing along, is pushing along retail sales. And realistically there's only, only it can only go up in terms of e-commerce. I want to be careful in saying that, because I know that's gotten people in trouble before. It can only go up in terms of e-commerce industrial is starting to become, starting to see a lot of construction. If you want to talk about the property type in particular, we're starting to see more speculative construction, but on the, at the, at the, at the other end of it, you can make the argument that it's pretty easy to turn off the industrial tap. If you it's just, you're building a big slab of concrete and yeah, exactly. It's a slab of concrete. Got you build a box and you're good to go. And there's a lot of reasons to believe that structural shifts from retail, from onsite retail to e-commerce means strong sales, and that's not even getting into three PLS and manufacturing tenants that we do also expect to do quite well. Amazon alone accounts was one, a hundred million square feet of absorption in 2020. And I, I don't know if they're going to do that again, but they are already, they're already in the, you know, they continue to be the player in the market and continue to push industrial. So do you think, Speaker 0 (17m 20s): Look at the, on the topic, the three PL or third, third party logistics and last mile delivery, like, do you, do you, do, do you break down industrial into these sub categories for your analysis? Speaker 1 (17m 31s): Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you almost have to, right, because that's how, that's how tenants think about it. You have these big distribution centers and then you have these last miles and, you know, these last miles tend to be these, these crappy frankly buildings that are in well better located areas. And the great thing, if you're looking from an standpoint about these last miles, they're not usually the highest and best use. So there isn't a ton of new construction in the last mile, despite the huge amount of demand for the last mile, at least according to what we're seeing. Speaker 0 (18m 5s): So in terms of the, the actual investment sales side of the industrial coin, when, you know, we see in our market, which I think pre pandemic, we were at 2%, I know Toronto is, I know LA and Toronto you'd know better than I would, but I know that we were at the top and north America with the, in terms of how lower vacancy rates were and continue to be on the industrial side. And what we've seen on the investment sales side is there's only so much product that, you know, you've seen, oh my God, that thing's traded again, that's traded three times in the last year. Are you seeing that same stuff in these really hot markets where properties have, basically, I'm assuming it's a constraint on the, on supply right now. Speaker 1 (18m 45s): Yeah. I mean, I, you know, everybody is out for industrial and they're continuing to increase their allocation. It's it's, you know, when we talk to clients, it's the first thing they always say is don't worry, we're going to increase our allocation to industrial really? Usually at the cost of office and retail. Well, not usually, always at the cost. No. Yeah. It, it, you know, that's, that's the other side of the coin, right? Is we saw 6% rent growth so far in 2021, we can be concerned about construction and market specific. If you look at like, you know, inland empire, for example. Yeah. There's a lot of construction or, you know, Las Vegas, for example, there's a decent amount of construction, but at the same time, the amount of demand that we're seeing come in and given it's a structural shifts, it means that you could, you should expect continued demand. That being said, we're getting to a point where cap rates are going to struggle. Maybe a little bit to continue to decline. Speaker 0 (19m 45s): I was going to say, it's for reminds me like economics 1 0 1. We're like, no, that the shift it's the whole demand curve moving, not just going up along, right? Like there's a, there's an innovation here. There's, there's a structural shift to less retail and more, more industrial distribution. Speaker 1 (20m 0s): I was actually trying to the other day to think of a, a good comparison. And I think we landed on radio for retail retail's radio where it it's still gonna have a use, but it's not the same use that it used to have an industrials TV now, the television. Cool. That's the entertainment. Yeah. Speaker 0 (20m 22s): So where does, where does vaulty Rez line up with that? If we, if we go to multi Rez, which you have to think that, you know, prior to the pandemic, we were like, can cap rates keep going down? And then they kept going down. And even right now, buoyed by I'm sure interest rates are multi-res team. I think, did their, did their had a banner year for 2020, like a record year for them? Speaker 1 (20m 46s): Yeah, we we've hearing that a lot is that, you know, 20, 20 and now 2021 in particular, it's been a great year. 2021 saw the largest increase in rent we've ever seen quarters for Q3. So we just finished up two, three, we're still finalizing the results, but shaping up that Q2 Q3 and Q1 of 2021 are the top three years in terms of demand for multi-family. And it, you know, that's across the board. However, if you start breaking it down by markets, the south in particular is really, really very strong. I mean, I'm going to keep harping on myself just because it is as strong as it is, but you know, multi-family is price per unit has gone up by 30% compared to pre-recession averages in Sunbelt markets rents in, like, for example, Austin increased by 15%, six months, you get, you kind of become to begin to become worried more about affordability than anything else, which is at some point, this becomes a economic macro economic problem, which of course then comes back to haunt investors. You know, a lot of that gain has already happened and really have seen a deceleration, which you would expect given seasonal trends in multi-family. And, you know, in some of these markets, you really are beginning to hit the, the affordability limit. And that's where you can start making a great argument for like, for manufactured homes or for mobile home parks. For example, particularly in the south, the Southern states, they don't work as well in the Northern states. I would argue at least mobile home parks. Speaker 0 (22m 27s): Yeah. Neither up here. Speaker 1 (22m 30s): It gets a little chilly. I know, but it's, multi-family has done, has probably been the outperformer, which, you know, given all the news around how well single-family pricing has done is isn't that surprising. And if you, if you look at single family, a single family price growth compared to multi-family rent growth, single family price growth in almost every single market has grown faster. So it's not like your, your other options is getting any easier to, to afford. Speaker 0 (23m 8s): Yeah. And in terms of like your outlook on this, in terms of the actual properties themselves, like, are we finding that in these markets that there are underperforming assets that are now being utilized to their, to their, you know, market rents, you know, value, add deals. Do you think that is what's happening in a lot of these markets? Or do you think that the pressure of lower interest rates is, is what's fueling most of, most of the acquisition in, in multifamily being an asset class that's pretty much being subsidized or was subsidized for the last year, year and a half by the government in most in countries. Speaker 1 (23m 46s): Yeah. I mean, that's a huge part of it. And then on top of that, I think lower interest rates is extremely helpful for multi-family acquisitions. You know, part of it is it, some of it has to be just the inflation hedge that you'd get for multi-family. If, if you were to all concerned about inflation and you want to look in real estate multi-family is probably your best bet just given. And we can talk about this at some point, just given the short lease term is, but the, the eviction moratorium also, at least in our opinion, has had a pretty big effect on multifamily demand because on one end, you're, you know, you are seeing a huge spike in terms of demand, but then we kind of scratch our heads at it for a while. But then if you think about it, we weren't evicting anybody. There's 800,000 evictions in the U S per year. I don't know what it is for Canada. That's 800,000 units that aren't going, that aren't in negative demand. We aren't, we aren't building, you know, these, these class C units were, if we're building anything, it's, it's a class, a, a, that's the only thing you can really afford to build right now that will, that will pencil. So, you know, people are, people are basically sitting in their home, sitting on their apartments, they're unwilling to move. So we aren't seeing that, that negative demand. And on the other, the other side, we're seeing a huge uptick in people separating how tools, if you're, let's say you're a 22 year old kid and you you're living with four roommates, we're seeing people decouple those households and begin to move out into their own places. All of that kind of leads to these, this huge spike in, in multi-family. Speaker 0 (25m 36s): Yeah, I guess the real question, like you said before, it's, it's the affordability aspect you have, like you said, 30% increase, I think in evaluation, but 15% increase in rental rates. And there is, there is a certain level where, you know, you, you just hit a, you hit a wall in terms of affordability from the, from the consumer point of view. Speaker 1 (25m 56s): Yeah. I think it's, it's going to have, it was a concern even before the pandemic was, you know, a home affordability shelter affordability, and it certainly did not get better. Speaker 0 (26m 8s): And on the construction end, you, you, you mentioned class a, are you seen quite a bit of construction on the multi-family side? Generally, Speaker 1 (26m 14s): It's pretty, it's pretty much in line with the last couple of years, to be honest with you, which was pretty significant. But on the other end, we saw a huge amounts of construction delays even before the pandemic. And it, it kind of acted as this filter for, for supply being added, frankly, especially, especially down south where there's huge amounts of demand, there's huge amounts of supply waiting to be added. But at th at the same time, they just can't get it out. Whether it be supply costs, labor is certainly a problem. Anybody and anybody who's trying to build multi-family right now has told me that labor is almost impossible to find at this point. Yeah. Speaker 0 (26m 51s): I mean, just even on the small scale or we're doing projects in our area, it's, it is extremely slow. And, you know, you talk to anybody in the construction industry. They'll, they'll tell you the same thing right now. Not just supplies, but labor as well. If we shift over to, to that piece on inflation, it's been a hot topic in terms of ink spilled. I'm sure it was one of those things that, yeah, the over the last little while there's been enough fuss bulled over on, on the inflation side, what's your view from the data that you guys are seeing? Speaker 1 (27m 25s): Yeah. I, I take the view that I am in agreement with the bond market and the fed that it is transitory. I think the definition of transitory has been changing pretty significantly because at first I think it was six months and now it's probably going to be a little bit longer than that. Kind of where I begin to split a little bit from the fed at least, is that it's inflation is likely to be higher for longer. I don't think it's going to be quite as high as it has been. A lot of that. A lot of the reasons it's been high currently, it has a lot more to do with the pandemic and kind of short-term factors. You know, you can think about shortages and chips. You can think about shortages and car parts, for example, or appliances, as well as transportation demand, which should burn itself off and on top of the stimulus. But the fed changed how it does it targets inflation. And I think it really went under reported. I think a lot, it, it didn't really make as much noise as it should have because what they're essentially doing now is they're saying, okay, we need to make up for really chronically low inflation in the, the last cycle. So we're going to allow inflation to run hot, to get the labor market gains that we saw at the end of the last cycle. Because if you look at between 2018 and 2020, the federal site statistics around minority wage gains, for example, it didn't really begin to appear until the economy was basically at full employment. What that three, 3.5, 3.4% unemployment rate. They want to see that again, that's Jerome Powell has basically explicitly stated that that's what they're looking for. That being said, the fed has begun to sound a little bit more hawkish. Cause I think they, I know they were taken by surprise by the how high inflation got, and they're, they're likely going to raise rates by the end of next year. All of that said, I, I still believe the fed is willing to let inflation run above that 2% mark for the next couple of years. Speaker 0 (29m 30s): So for those that don't know what you're referring to in terms of the under-reporting is the fact that they've, they've broken off of the, the, what they used to be the 2% target, is that right? Speaker 1 (29m 40s): Yeah, I, yeah. I mean, I was in colleges, every continent was, you know, they target 2%, they adjust rates based off of that. That's obviously a little more complicated than that, but now they're targeting a longer term inflation average of 2%. And because inflation from 2010 to 2019 ran between, you know, according to their measure of inflation PC around between 1.5 and 1.8% for most of that, they view allowing it to run from two to 3% as making up for some of that loss, those loss pricing increases over the last cycle. Speaker 0 (30m 15s): So in terms of, from the investor perspective, if your outlook as to how that informs your decisions from a real estate point of view, you know, what does, what does that leave us with in terms of the discussion that we've had even today in terms of the different asset classes and how you view economic decisions and investment decisions? Speaker 1 (30m 35s): Yeah, I mean, look, inflation is here to stay at, which is actually fair, especially since it's not, you know, hyperinflation I, where the fed is going to be forced to raise rates quickly. Hopefully, you know, it's actually good news for real estate. Real estate is a real asset, you know, I'm sure, you know, everybody, every economist has said this at some point, you know, real estate is a real asset. It, it benefits from a real value gains and holding real value, which means that in an inflationary environment, commercial real estate itself is a good play within those property types. There are some that are better than others, especially if you're unsure of how stable and the inflation rate is going to be the shorter, the lease term, especially in a higher demand property types that, you know, you can think about industrial or especially multi-family, it means you can adjust your, your rent increases to match inflation. If you look at, and we've seen this actually in the market, if you look at NOI gains real NOI gains from Nate grieve since 1990, there was only two real periods of actual real NOI gains from the nineties to the, from early nineties to the late nineties and from 2010 to 2015. Other than that, if you deflate real and alive for multi-family, it's basically flat, which, which essentially means that NOI is just, is, is working as an inflation hedge. You get the same real return year after year. That that makes multi-family really attractive. Industrial actually has not done that well, based on that same measure up until very recently. Speaker 0 (32m 12s): Yeah. I liked the idea. I was always told by a mentor of mine there where, you know, real estate is one of those few industries investment that you can download inflation to your, to your customer, you know, pretty much one for one. Speaker 1 (32m 27s): Yeah, you can, it, it is extremely easy to just pass on that inflation to the investor, unlike pretty much any other asset class. I mean, if you think about bonds, for example, you can't do that for the most part. You just, you know, if you invest in a bond, you you're losing real value every, every coupon payment. Speaker 0 (32m 44s): Yeah. And I th and I think to your point earlier where you have those shorter terms with multifamily, it's obviously easier to do, but I was just reading a lease yesterday that was kind of the old school lease where the, it was over 10 years, but the, the bump ups, the step-ups and rent were basically the CP attached to a CPI inflator. So we haven't seen those as much, usually landlords, if anything, at least prior to the pandemic, they would just say, okay, it's, you know, 10 bucks a square foot now 12 bucks 14. And usually that would be more than inflation, but they have some mechanism in there. Speaker 1 (33m 17s): Yeah. Well, I was going to say, the other thing landlords might want to start thinking about is, is indexing it to inflation and that's, that's actually the great part. I mean, that's why we target a specific inflation rate is because then you can make these easy decisions. I know inflation is going to be 2%, it's a very stiff assumption. So, you know, we can, we can just assume a 2% going forward. Now you have to start thinking about, okay, is it, you know, is it going to go, you're making a bet. Is inflation going to be long-term? Is this higher inflation could be long-term or is it going to come back down? How much is it going to come back down? It's really difficult. And while it does sound really nice to indexed, to inflation, if you're an office, a landlord right now, I think you struggle a little bit because you don't have the negotiating power necessarily that you did two years ago. Speaker 0 (34m 5s): Yeah, absolutely. So in terms of, so in terms of that, how that view informs the interest rate discussion, the way that, you know, the fed will respond, if, you know, if employment is higher than, or full employment, or if changes in inflation that, that they're measuring, how, how do you see that impacting the interest rate decisions? Speaker 1 (34m 27s): Yeah, so I, I I'm, I think I'm in the minority here, at least in terms of the broader economics where I really don't see interest rates increasing significantly. And I know that's a really economist answer to touching it a little bit, but I don't see interest rates hedging or increasing significantly because one of what the feds, the fed said about how they're going to react to inflation, they said, they're willing to let inflation run hot. They care more about the labor market gains right now on that needs us more liquidity in the system for longer, which, you know, can go only a few places. It can, it can drive. And we have seen equity increase by multiples. And then the only other place we can go really is bonds for, you know, those multi-trillion dollar that multi-trillion dollar liquidity pool we have right now. I mean, it's at the point where the banks just basically don't know where to put the money. All of that, to me suggests a, you know, short, you know, lower interest rates on top of that. If you think about the demographic factors that are affecting the United States, you know, slower demographic growth going forward, that's not going to change. That's baked in effectively. Unless people begin to move here in a mass on top of technological change, you know, you would expect to see more automation going forward. I think it's coming faster than a lot of people like to acknowledge that pushes down prices, which then pushes down interest rates. And I know globalization is no longer it, maybe isn't moving forward as quickly or as moving forward at all. But globalization still means a lower interest rate environment. You know, the fed in 2018, tried to push interest rates to 2.5% and ran into huge liquidity problems in the market. There isn't there, they don't and they view, and this is their view. They don't view the neutral interest rate as much higher than rate where they're no longer stimulating nor creating drag on the economy is much higher than two or two and a half percent. So all of that, to me suggests maybe slightly higher interest rates from what was the tenure at. At one point I, you know, 50, 50 basis points, but maybe not, it's probably gonna be lower than it was before, before the pandemic. Speaker 0 (36m 45s): Would there be something that would change that view for you or, or a few factors that would change that view for you in terms of where interest rates could go? Cause, I mean, that's usually the big thing where a lot of people say, oh, if inflation is going in this direction, interest rates have to, you know, come up to that, you know, come up as a result of that. But yeah, what are, what are, what are some factors that may, may kind of give you pause to, to think it might go the other way or at least increase over what you're, what you're talking about? Speaker 1 (37m 13s): That's a great question. And, you know, as inflation has continued to stay high, it's been something I've been thinking more and more about, but the, you know, inflation first and foremost above all else, if inflation gets out of hand, it, it becomes a inflation spiral. That's when I think, you know, you'll begin to see interest rates really start to hike. The other, the other concern would be the fed. It depends on who Biden dominates next year for the fed. If we get someone who's hawkish, if we see you're going to see some more hawkish fed governors, I think that in a more hawkish fed chairman that could change my view on interest rates. And finally, we begin, we begin to S you know, removing chewy really begins to drain liquidity faster than I thought it would. No we're right now, we are still buying billions of dollars of bonds every month. I don't expect removing QV would do that, but that could drive interest rates higher if the, if the market begins to react to, or begins to become concerned about liquidity in the us, into global bond markets. Right. I, I sh I should mention real quick that also there are wars and pandemics that I can't predict. I learned that last year. Speaker 0 (38m 40s): Yeah. That was a, it was, I remember two, two or three years ago. And I won't say who the company was, but, you know, I remember it was couched almost as a joke, you know, barring any geopolitical disputes or a global pandemic. And I was like, oh my God. But yeah, those are always the things you're like, you know, there's these extra exogenous factors that you're not going to be able to, to forecast these black swans. So I guess the, you know, from the real estate perspective, that's a good overview of where we're at today in terms of the different asset classes. And we're, you know, the view of the economy is just want to be mindful of your time. Joseph, we have four questions. We ask everybody before we, we end the episode. So if you're okay with that, we'll kick it off. Speaker 1 (39m 25s): Absolutely. Speaker 0 (39m 26s): What's something, you know, now in your career, you wish you knew when you started. Speaker 1 (39m 32s): That's a great question that it's okay to be wrong and it's okay to make a mistake. I think I was, at least at the beginning of my career was a little more concerned about mistakes and being wrong. If you're, if you're an economist, if you work in economics, you know, if you work in real estate and you're trying to forecast trends, you're, you're going to be wrong and that's okay. It's just, just, don't be wrong. You just learn from the mistake. Don't make the same mistake twice, twice, I think is what I needed to learn as opposed to you have to be right the first time. Speaker 0 (40m 1s): Yeah. It's all always lies. I camera it was like Truman or something that said, ah, give me a one-handed economist. Everyone says on the, on one hand, on the other hand, but yeah. I Speaker 1 (40m 11s): Mean, I'm certainly, I'm certainly guilty of that Speaker 0 (40m 15s): While you want to be precise with your answers in terms of mentorship, what would you tell younger people coming into the industry or your views of mentorship in general? Speaker 1 (40m 25s): Oh, I would not be where I am without mentors. I think it's so important to talk to people who that are in a place that you want to be, or are doing things that you want to do. I've had some fantastic mentors for both in real estate and in, in economics before, before I worked in commercial real estate, I was working in banking regulation. I was thinking regulation research, I suppose I worked with some fantastic economists that taught me everything I knew, including, you know, my, my advisor in college. I, I, you know, like find someone that you think is worthwhile to talk to and then just bug them. I think I was my first job. I was in the chief economist office, every opportunity I could just asking questions, being curious, trying to learn as much as I could cause that, and it's, it's paid dividends for me. Speaker 0 (41m 25s): Awesome. Are there any recommendations you could give a book recommendations, podcasts, I guess, with the spirit of this conversation, maybe in real estate or economics? Yeah. Speaker 1 (41m 34s): There's, that's not a good question. There's two, there's two, there's two that I, one that I love just for all time, which is thinking fast and slow by data economy, which, you know, I, I like to think that I don't necessarily subscribe to the, the basic, the, what a lot of mainstream economists think about in terms of models. I think there's more to it than that. And David Kahneman does a really good job of breaking down how people think and how that relates to economics. Fantastic book. It's a really interesting read, even if you're not an economist and the other one is the rise and fall of economic of us economic growth. I believe it's, I'm reading it right now. So I should know the name. Speaker 0 (42m 17s): Yeah. We'll put a link. I think I know the one, the one you're talking about, Speaker 1 (42m 23s): I, you know, the first economist I worked under was an economic historian. So he instilled that interest in me. And it basically shows that, you know, the century from 1870 to 1970 was a period of unbelievable technological change and economic growth. And I it's really fascinating and it informs a lot of what I think will happen going forward in terms of slower, you know, slower but steady economic growth. We're not going to see those four to 5% GDP gains without, you know, huge amounts of stimulus anymore. And it was good. Speaker 0 (42m 54s): Yeah. I have a, if it's Robert Gordon, is that a that's right? Yep. Okay. We'll put it. Speaker 1 (43m 0s): I think it's a fantastic book. I really like it. If you liked economics, I would suggest that it's. Speaker 0 (43m 6s): Yeah, no, it's, it's one of those things where I w was interested in reading, but unless you get like a recommendation, sometimes you go down a rabbit hole, but the Conaman that's I think, correct me if I'm wrong. I think Conaman was the first non economist to win the Nobel prize in economics. Speaker 1 (43m 23s): Yeah. He was a psychologist and I it's, it's a lot about how the brain thinks and makes decisions and you know, it really attacks that idea of rationality and really looks at why people actually make decisions. It's, it's a great book. It really changed how I thought about, you know, economic modeling and where I work, how we, how markets work. Speaker 0 (43m 45s): Very cool. We'll put a link to both last question. First car, make and model. Speaker 1 (43m 51s): Oh, I had a 2004, a Honda accord, which is it. And it was, it had a bigger engine than it was supposed to have, which was great because if you've ever driven in Massachusetts, all of the on-ramps are about five feet long, so you have to really gun it. And so that was a fantastic car. I missed that car still. I would rather drive that than when I'm driving now. Speaker 0 (44m 20s): Right on. I feel like a lot of engines were stuffed into those older Accords and civics, Joseph, for people to connect with you or a, you know, anything related to the information or data you do with CoStar work and they reach out, Speaker 1 (44m 34s): Yeah, we have a website, I'll send it to you for blankets, CoStar advisory. You know, you can always find me. I write a lot of articles for the website, so you'll see me on CoStar, if you have it, which I would suggest otherwise, you know, just I'm on LinkedIn. Speaker 0 (44m 54s): My guest today has been Joseph Biassi Joseph. Thanks for being part of working capital. Speaker 1 (44m 59s): Thank you for having me. Speaker 0 (45m 10s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse, for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five-star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.

The Rough Cut
The Rough Cut: Kevin Becomes a TikTok Star - 10/13/21

The Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:37


Trailer Round-Up: Scream, Home Sweet Home Alone, The Shrink Next Door -  Will Poulter IS Adam Warlock for the MCU -  No Time To Die is a FANTASTIC end to this era of James Bond -  The Rough Cut's Real or Fake

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast
Episode 175: Tim Ohai on Strategic Decision-Making to Lead Transformation

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:49


Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast, I am Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space, and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs. Today, I’m excited to have Tim Ohai from Workday join us. Tim. I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role in your organization to our audience. Tim Ohai: Hey, aloha everybody. This is Tim Ohai and I am a director at Workday. We provide cloud-based solutions in HR, and fins, and strategic sourcing, and employee engagement areas. I work specifically with our Salesforce globally around helping them figure out how to be better in the conversations and interactions they’re in. And we work heavily with not only the AEs, but the RSDs, the RVPs, and then cross-functionally with our pre-sales organization and value, etc. And I get to play in all those spaces. SS: I love that, Tim. And we’re so excited to have you here today. We’ve been connected for some time and on LinkedIn, you actually wrote an article earlier this year on the impact of poor decision-making. So I’d love to start there with our conversation. What are some of the factors that can drive poor decision-making for business leaders these days and how can poor decision-making impact the organization? TO: Wow. So, yeah, that’s a huge topic because I’ll lead off with this idea that the number one reason that businesses fail is poor decision-making. And you could take that down to initiatives and projects, etc. Decision-making is where you not only get off on the right foot, but you stay on the right foot all the way through to execution. The biggest problem I see is there’s often a lack of clarity of what success looks like and in that article you mentioned, I talk about goal clarity and role clarity, and they’re huge. Man, go back to the 1970s and then the eighties with GE when they were pushing really hard to be a number one or number two in their industries and one of the things that they drove, part of the secret of their success back then, was to make sure people had goal clarity and role clarity. The result is, if you make it really clear what success looks like and bring people into alignment so they all have the same goal, they’re all pursuing the same definition of success, it’s amazing how people naturally just clean up in their efforts. The same thing then comes right down with role clarity. If you know what the goal is, and everybody is doing their job and not undoing somebody else’s job or redoing somebody else’s job, it changes the entire execution. So all of those elements are contingent upon great decision-making. Unfortunately, A, we don’t provide that clarity so people wind up making their own information up as they go and that affects decision-making in the moment. And B, we have a tendency to inject a lot of bias in how we think, so if we don’t have that information, we don’t have that clarity, then you wind up seeing leaders actually stumble over each other. Well-intentioned, wonderful human beings are literally causing conflict in their own organizations and it’s really true. It’s really true in sales enablement. So when I think about how poor decision-making impacts an organization, I have to think about how great decision-making impacts an organization. That’s where I would say, what can you do as a sales enablement professional to both surface that idea, bring it into the discussion and say, okay, how can we make sure that we’ve got clarity? Because if you’re asking the question, what does success look like? You can go one step further and say, what’s the outcome you’re looking for? What are the metrics we’re going to apply? And what are the requirements you’re expecting as a sponsor of this initiative that we should all know? I’m amazed at how often those three questions get, well, I won't say blank stares, but you will get senior leaders and senior executives going, that’s a great question, I haven’t thought that through. So it cleans up dramatically, not only your alignment with your executive sponsor, but all of a sudden when that is stated and then shared, everybody starts moving in the same direction without even telling people they need to make better decisions, they’re going to. SS: I love that and I think that leads into the next question. I’d love some advice for our audience. What are some things that leaders, from your perspective, can do to make better, more impactful decisions? TO: Well, that whole definition of success conversation is critical, I start there. Actually, I’ll start with who’s the sponsor and what’s their definition of success? People often say it’s got to be better and I go, well, so that’s not very specific, walk me through the outcome that they’re really looking for and how we’re going to measure it. If people have that answer, fantastic, we aligned very quickly. If they don’t, then it becomes a door opener. Should we go talk to that person now and ask them directly? Or can you do that? It’s always better, of course, to go there with that person, but it’s not always possible. But when you get that clarity, one of the things I’ll ask is, especially if I’m talking to the leader directly, I’ll ask him or her I’ll say, “Hey, are you saying that if we achieve this outcome, we measure it this way, and we meet the requirements that you just stated, and I’ll list them out, you promise you won’t complain about anything else?” That last question it’s incredibly crystallizing because if a leader is spot-on then they go, “Nope,” and that’s exactly what I want. Fantastic, we’re ready to run. But if they have that intake of air, they go, “Oh let me think for a second,” it completely changes the entire dialogue and goes one click deeper and you really make sure you’re getting those spoken and unspoken things figured out. But the key here is that you're having that leader say something that they may have only said in their head. If you can really master that conversation, all the other things that are in your toolkit open up. If you take away that conversation, all the other tools in your toolkit become an extra weight to carry. SS: Now you alluded to data earlier in your response and you also wrote an article on how to make data meaningful. I’d love to learn from you, how can sales enablement leverage data to make better decisions and what is the impact of doing so? TO: Sure. So in that article, I talked about how a lot of times we over-rotate into our pipeline data and my experience, actually what we do at Workday and what we teach our leaders as an expectation, even we’re changing how we run our QBRs, lead with the people data first. Your people data are driving what you’re seeing on your pipeline data. So if you have great results, or you have horrible results, or you have in-between results, at least 80% of the time, that’s going to be driven by people's gaps or people's strengths. So when I talk about people data, I’m looking at the classic stuff like, do we even have people enrolled? So in some places, especially right now with a great resignation, there is a lot of open headcounts and at the same time, we’re calling it the great swap, because there are some people leaving, but there are people coming in. We have this nether space to fill, but at the same time, it’s going deeper. So people data for us is around the capabilities of the individual players, not just AEs, but also the sales leaders themselves. So we have two different frameworks and that people data tells us that if people struggle, for example with account planning, we have correlational data from our analysis that says, “Hey, that’s going to affect your win rate.” Or we have a gap in deal size, or we see some groups are doing better than others. We can go into the people data and see which capabilities are driving win rate and which capabilities are driving deal size and get very specific by market. We can then tie into how we do things with other leaders, like around recruiting or even promotion and saying, “You want to copy your best performers? Then use this people data to drive those sales results. From this, we’re literally seeing regions around the globe turn around their performance by leveraging people data before their pipe data and that's the game-changer. Unfortunately, if you only focus on pipe first and maybe people data comes later, or if people data comes at all, you want to play whack-a-mole. How do we increase our win rate? How do we get deals? How do we get better velocity? How do we get all of those different things, better presentation rates, et cetera? It’s just whack-a-mole and you’re going to constantly be chasing after KPI busting instead of actually driving a true revenue engine. SS: Absolutely. I love the whack-a-mole analogy. I was playing that with my son yesterday. TO: Hey folks, if you’re laughing at whack-a-mole or more important, or you’re living in whack-a-mole, trust me, we all are. SS: No, I love that. Now you mentioned this earlier and you also actually wrote an article on this, which we’ll share with our audience later, that when functions within an organization compete with each other, that time and resources are just completely wasted. So how can sales enablement gain internal alignment to kind of help increase that efficiency and maximize business impact across the organization by creating a sense of collaboration? TO: So that’s a huge topic, right? So let’s back up. We open with, how do we really drive a great business? With decision-making and one of the most important decisions you can make is how you prioritize. I go so far as to say, prioritization is the Achilles' heel of strategy. You can have a great strategy, I mean, a phenomenal strategy, and you can have really smart people, really highly collaborative inputs, but when it comes to execution if you don’t prioritize appropriately, what’s going to happen is either, A, everything is a priority therefore for nothing is, and or, B, resources will be used in the wrong way. So because you didn’t prioritize accordingly, you don’t have the resources you need when you’re in the middle of execution. That is what I’m talking about when I see functions competing with each other, whether it’s marketing and sales, or business development, or enablement, and field sales ops, and corporate sales ops and all these other groups because everybody is trying to help. Let’s just pause and recognize that nobody’s trying to break this thing. Everybody’s trying to help, but if we don’t prioritize together and really create a unified roadmap then we’re going to struggle to execute. That is when you start getting into how to get a much tighter, shorter list of focused objectives? Then we put everything we have behind the shorter, tighter list. That’s really the key here. SS: Absolutely. Now I want to close on a question, because from my perspective and I’d be willing to bet you agree with me Tim, I do believe that sales enablement is a significantly strategic arm of the business within any organization and in particular, I think that they are uniquely positioned to help the executive team set the strategy within the business. I want to kind of tie that back into the topic at hand. How, from your perspective, is enablement uniquely positioned to help executive leaders in their decision-making? As an enablement leader, what are some of your best practices for bringing insights to the leadership team to help inform their strategy? TO: Wow. So this could be its own podcast by itself. It’s really big. It’s a big thing because if you don't position yourself as a true business partner with your business leaders, you’re going to lose your credibility and credibility is our currency. It’s true in sales and it’s very true in enablement. If you don’t have credibility, you’ve got no resources, so to speak, to be able to leverage when it comes to making a difference in the business. I want to be very clear on what I say, so I’ve got three points for this question. The first one is, start with understanding is the request from the business or the need for the business to transform or optimize? Because if you’re putting a lot of your time and energy behind optimizing things, when the real need is to transform, you’re going to lose your credibility. Then you’ll be given what I’ll call the tactical projects and everybody’s got onboarding, we all get that, but you may be just onboarding. That may be all you get to do because just make it better, just fix it, just to keep it going. If you really need to understand how to position yourself differently, that is a whole other discussion. But, start with understanding is the need to transform or is the need to optimize? Transformation, I always challenge or I press and lean in on the conversation, so I'll go, “So how much disruption are you asking me to generate? Because if you’re not going to give me permission to disrupt, I cannot transform. Or if you want me to optimize, then I get the goal of optimization is to minimize or reduce disruption,” and have that discussion as well. That’s first and foremost because that sets your strategy and unfortunately, sometimes you get in a case where you get transformation overload. Everything has changed and you just need to stop and pause and say, “Look, leaders, stakeholders, everyone. Let’s calm down for a minute. Let’s pull the firehose back. Can we go spend some time, maybe a quarter, maybe a year on just reinforcing what we’ve already transformed and just optimize it? One of our leaders talks about extra coats of paint. Can we just get extra coats of paints on this thing and even just give it time to dry? If you do that, just by that alone, you’re going to position yourself as a huge business advisor to the leaders that you’re serving. Secondly then, is to focus on manager enablement. The number one enablement you can give any AE is a great manager and that is beyond salespeople. Invest in leadership development and invest in manager enablement. The way I kind of test how we’re doing overall as an industry is, how many individual seller podcasts are out there versus how many sales leader podcasts are out there? There are a few really good ones. One of my favorites I’ll give a shout-out to is Mike Weinberg, just as a person, he gets this, but generally speaking, there is a constant appetite for leaders to find stuff and they have to often go outside of sales leadership and get into generic leadership, where there is a gap in how we provide manager enablement. But, if you can be that gap, if you could bring in your own leaders, do your own internal podcasts, that’d be huge. But it’s beyond podcasts, it’s really about getting involved and helping people grow and develop into the best version of themselves as a senior leader and not as an individual contributor. Lastly, that gets right into this third point of are you trying to fix the system, or are you trying to fix the function? Not everybody has this mandate though, so I want to be careful here with this last one because this is a little bit of playing with fire. But, our reality is that our customers need us to show up in the most coordinated way possible and that means we need to think like systems thinkers, not just function thinkers. It’s not just about helping sales, it’s about helping the sales experience and more importantly, that customer experience and designing backward. I love the way that we’re starting to talk now about the customer journey and that broader, bigger perspective of how do we design backward from that customer’s experience, from the very beginning and all the way through to renewal? We need to be thinking around that whole system because it’s the content, it’s the technology and tools, it’s the behaviors, and it’s the coordination of all those things that come together. If you really, really, really want to change your game as an enablement pro, go there. SS: I love that, Tim. Thank you so much for taking the time out to join our podcast and provide this advice to our audience. I really appreciate the time, Tim. Thank you. TO: My genuine pleasure. SS: To our audience, thanks for listening. For more insights, tips, and expertise from sales enablement leaders, visit salesenablement.pro. If there's something you'd like to share or a topic you'd like to learn more about, please let us know. We'd love to hear from you.

tbs eFM Men on Air
Q&A with Masters (헤어 전문가 박내주원장) / Joel's Fantastic, Elastic Charts

tbs eFM Men on Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 72:52


Spiritual Entrepreneur
EP 273: Episode From the Road

Spiritual Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:23


In this episode of the Spiritual Entrepreneur, my husband and I share the things we are enjoying and learning throughout our RV trip. Together with our 3 cats— Bart, Nugget, and Juniper we've been through all sorts of different states and states of consciousness as we've traveled. What you will learn in this episode: Our RV trip stops and routes RV trip tricks-- toll booths, parking ideas, styles of RV, and more Travel stories from the road A sneak peek at the episode: [1:00] “We started in Germantown where we picked up the RV in Maryland and then swung by home in DC and then hit the highway and went up to Delaware.” [23:28] “You can get coffee and have breakfast in the RV with the cats, and they're eating their food and you're having yours wherever you want to be with the windows open. It's like having a really nice window view of whatever natural place you're in this. Fantastic!” [36:11] “But I enjoy that kind of thing. And that's why we're very spontaneous, which serves us both really well. If you're traveling with someone, another trick is to travel with someone with similar values to you, because it's way easier.” PS - The Spiritual Entrepreneur Playground is open. If you are interested in getting more information about that, you can go to deviadea.com/sewaitlist. We'd love to have you join us in that community. To get weekly updates and the latest episodes, follow me on Instagram @deviadea.

Locked On Knicks - Daily Podcast On The New York Knicks
Season Previews: Can Derrick Rose repeat his fantastic 2020-21?

Locked On Knicks - Daily Podcast On The New York Knicks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 51:40


Alex and Gavin are joined by Jeremy Cohen (@TheCohencidence on Twitter) of Knicks Film School and The Strickland to get into previewing Derrick Rose's season, including how hard it was to adjust opinions on Rose after his first stint in New York, whether he can keep up his blistering shooting, how important finishing is to his future, and how he can continue to mentor Immanuel Quickley. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Light After Trauma
Episode 64: You'll Be Glad You Kept Fighting: One Woman's Journey From Child Abuse with Christina Vitagliano

Light After Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 39:50


Christina Vitagliano shares her story from enduring child abuse to going on to start a multimillion-dollar business and publishing her own memoir. She breaks down the ripple effects that child abuse had on her life and why some of the effects of child abuse hit much so much harder in adulthood. Support the Podcast Light After Trauma website   Christina's Website   Transcript:   Alyssa Scolari [00:23]: Hey, warriors. Welcome back to another episode of Light After Trauma. I'm your host, Alyssa Scolari, and we have with us today, Christina Vitagliano. Now, Christina is an author, entrepreneur and the founder of a successful family entertainment concept, Monster Mini Golf. Having spent three decades working on her memoir, Christina hopes to share her story and touch the hearts of readers with her account of childhood abuse, empowering survivors to reclaim their lives and learn to thrive, despite their trauma. Her passion is to provide affordable, fun entertainment that the whole family can enjoy. Monster Mini Golf is a multi-million dollar company with 30 locations across the USA and Canada. Without any further ado, I would love to introduce our guest today. We're going to be talking about childhood trauma with Christina. Welcome, Christina, how are you today? Christina Vitagliano [01:31]: I am good. How are you? Alyssa Scolari [01:33]: I am good. Really happy just to update the listeners. I just learned that while Christina is currently in Vegas, she's originally from the New England area, which I love. As all the listeners know, I'm a Jersey girl through and through, even though I live in PA now. Christina's accent feels like a warm cup of tea for me. Thank you for being here. I'm really happy to have you on the show. Christina Vitagliano [02:02]: Oh, thank you for inviting me. Alyssa Scolari [02:04]: Yeah, of course. You're spreading awareness about, I think, one of the most taboo topics in the field, people really shy away from talking about child abuse. Christina Vitagliano [02:19]: They do. Alyssa Scolari [02:21]: You are doing anything but shying away from that. Christina Vitagliano [02:26]: Took me a while, but yes. Alyssa Scolari [02:28]: I think that's important to point out, right? That it doesn't happen overnight for sure. Christina Vitagliano [02:33]: No. Alyssa Scolari [02:35]: I guess let's start with take me back to how you even became somebody who spreads awareness on childhood abuse. What is your story? Where did you come from? How did you get to where you are today? Christina Vitagliano [02:53]: Well, a quick overview. It started when I was about four years old and it lasted until I left home, which was around 16/17 years old. Actually I didn't move out until I was 18, but it was that whole period. Alyssa Scolari [03:06]: That was the whole period that you ... So you started being abused around the age of four? Christina Vitagliano [03:06]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [03:06]: Okay. Christina Vitagliano [03:11]: Then I left home around 18 or when I legally could, I was out the door. Then I didn't tell anybody. I didn't talk about it. I didn't do anything. I'm sorry. That's my doorbell. Until I decided to sit down and write about it, which was about 20 something years ago. I sat down and just put it all on paper and then I sat on that for the last 20 years, and then finally published my memoir this year. Alyssa Scolari [03:42]: Wow. Christina Vitagliano [03:43]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [03:45]: Okay. You escaped your abusive environment. Now, when you were in your abusive environment, did you know at the time that that was abuse? When did you make that connection like, "Oh, this is what's happening here." Christina Vitagliano [03:58]: Well, God, at four years old I try to ... I remember ... I have a very, very good memory on some things, but I couldn't tell you what I had for lunch yesterday, but- Alyssa Scolari [04:06]: Same here. Christina Vitagliano [04:06]: ... I do. I have such vivid ... That's a curse and a blessing at times, but very vivid memories. I remember being that young, knowing that what was happening wasn't right. I didn't know why it wasn't right. I didn't know ... Because you're four. I mean, you only know so much, but whatever it was, was wrong. On the flip side, I didn't want to mess up our family. My mom ... This was my stepdad and they had just gotten married. My big thing was, "Don't make mom unhappy because she was so unhappy before and now this man makes her happy and I don't want to mess things up." You know? That's how it started. I think once you start down that path, and I don't know why, you just continue down that path of, "I am going to handle this myself. I'm not going to mess things up for anybody." I was terrified that I would get taken away from the family and thrown into an orphanage, which to me was worse than what I was dealing with. Kind of short version of that whole story. Alyssa Scolari [05:16]: You're speaking such universal feelings and thoughts that children have, which is children have this concept that the devil you know ... And even adults, right? Christina Vitagliano [05:16]: Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [05:28]: The devil you know is better than the one that you don't. I think so many children endure what they need to endure for the sake of keeping the family together and not risking being pulled away from their family. Christina Vitagliano [05:48]: Yeah. Oh, yeah. I think as a child, it's instinctive that you want to make your mom or your dad, whoever it is you're bonded to, or even if it's both of them, instinctively your job is to make sure that you do what you're supposed to do and make them happy because that makes you happy. I don't know. I mean, it's a vicious circle, but that's not true. You shouldn't do some things just to make other people happy. It took me 30 years to figure that out. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [06:21]: Yeah. Honestly, it takes some of us so much longer because that's what we think. You're right. It's, "I want to make this person happy. I see how happy my mom is. I don't want to be the bearer of bad news. I don't want to stir the pot." It's so difficult. How did you get ... Was it just that with age you began to change and then when you became a teenager, you were like, "I got to get out of here." Christina Vitagliano [06:49]: No. A couple of things. Like you said, you know it was wrong. I did know it was wrong at a very young age, and as you get older, boy, do you learn it's more wrong. I mean, so now this ridiculous thing of, "Wow, I'm going to protect everybody else." The wrong part gets so hard and as you get older, much harder because you learn more, but you keep dealing with it. Then when I met my now husband, he was the first one that I ever told and he's the first one that ever approached me and said, "Hey, what's wrong with you?" I mean, short version, you know? Alyssa Scolari [07:25]: Right. Christina Vitagliano [07:25]: Hey, what the hell's wrong with you? He just did it in such a blunt way. We were young. We had been dating for maybe, I don't know, weeks. I had been previously married and divorced. Didn't tell him, didn't tell anybody I'd ever dated. Now I was about 30 years old, so I don't know if it was him in my face being so blunt and the only one who said, "What the hell happened to you?" Or if it was a combination of that and at 30 years old, you kind of ... I don't know what it is. You hit these milestones in life. 30 is one of them though. You say, "What am I doing with my life?" You think you're an adult and you're not an adult at 30 because that's bullshit. I don't even know if I'm an adult at my age and I'm in my 50s. It's just, you start to question yourself as to what you think you know and, "Hey, maybe it's time I stand up and stop doing what I've been doing to myself." You're abusing yourself really for so many years. I listened to one of your podcasts where you went through your relationship and I was like, "Dear God, how many of us have been down that same exact path with the same exact reasoning within ourselves?" Then one day you wake up and say, "Holy cow, I'm a dummy." In a good way though, it's a good thing to say because you realize you don't need to be that dummy all the time, you know? Alyssa Scolari [08:50]: Right. It's not like I'm a dummy in a disparaging- Christina Vitagliano [08:55]: No. Alyssa Scolari [08:55]: ... a self-disparaging way. It's almost like you wake up one day and the pieces fall together and you're like, "Oh, God." Christina Vitagliano [09:04]: Where was I, man? I know. Alyssa Scolari [09:07]: Right. I feel so disconnected from the person that I was when I was in it and in those bad relationships. You also realize that the bad relationships that you then continue to have in your teens and 20s are because you didn't really know any better. Christina Vitagliano [09:28]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [09:29]: [crosstalk 00:09:29]. Christina Vitagliano [09:29]: Or you've conditioned yourself to be who you are and it's instinctive, "Well, I'm going to make this person happy. I don't want to upset the applecart." I do that to this day. I still do that. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [09:42]: Oh, yes. The chronic people-pleasing and not wanting to upset anybody. There are people ... I say this all the time, especially with, oh, one of my clients in particular where we talk about the red flags and how all the red flags look green. Even the red flags that are so bad, they're on fire we choose to look past. Christina Vitagliano [10:03]: Yep. It's almost you'll do anything to avoid turmoil. I don't even know why that is, but it is a common thing like, "Oh, geez, I don't want to make anything bad." You know? I don't know. Alyssa Scolari [10:14]: Yeah. I think it's because we're taught when we're so young that other people's feelings matter more than our trauma and what happens to us. That's the narrative that we carry around, that it doesn't matter. Yes. I'm unhappy and yes, maybe this person is hurting me, but this person is giving me love, some sort of love. Even if it's not what I really truly need or want, it's something and something is better than nothing. At the end of the day, my partner's feelings matter more than mine so I stay. Christina Vitagliano [10:50]: I remember. I went through a similar relationship that you spoke of in one of your podcasts and I thought to myself, "Oh, you can relate to every single word that you were saying." Then you wake up one day and say, "Hey, I know this sucks. I know I'm in a bad relationship. I know that he's really f'ing with me. You know what I mean? But I'm afraid to live alone. I'm terrified to be on my own. What would I do by myself?" Then one day you wake up and say, "I don't care what I do by myself." I remember saying to myself, "If I sit in a room and I'm stuck watching TV for 12 hours a day because I have nothing else to do, I don't have any friends anymore because he's alienated everybody, then that's okay with me." As soon as you decide that whatever it is, is okay, and is better than what you were dealing with, the door opens. Then you're just like, "Well, this is all good." You realize everything you thought was complete bullshit." Because it's not that bad out there by yourself. You know? Alyssa Scolari [11:52]: Yeah. Eventually you'll get to a point ... Well, I shouldn't say everybody because some people spend their whole lives in- Christina Vitagliano [12:00]: Oh, you're right. Alyssa Scolari [12:01]: ... one toxic relationship to the next, which breaks my heart and is part of the reason why we sit here and talk about this. It's just about awareness. Yeah. I think some people do get to a point where the pain of being in the situation is greater than the pain that it would take to change. That's when change comes. I guess I'm wondering for you, what do you think got you to a point where you were like, "Okay. I'm going to sit down and I'm going to write all of this out." Because you said this was what? Like 20 years ago that you wrote all this down? Christina Vitagliano [12:37]: Yeah. I don't know because once my ... It wasn't my husband then, but once he asked me, "Hey, what happened to you?" When I answered that, you've held that in for that long. Now all of a sudden it's raw and it's in your face and he's the kind of guy that just asked and asked and asked. He won't stop asking. Alyssa Scolari [12:57]: He doesn't let it go. Christina Vitagliano [12:58]: He doesn't let it go, and I'm the person, and on the flip side, I'm still the people-pleaser so I answered all of those questions that I probably didn't want to answer at the time, but I did, which is a good thing I think in the long run because it was ... But once it was all out there, I was like, "Wow." As I'm talking about it, I'm teaching myself, "Wow. There's a lot of things I should have done differently and I don't want anyone else to have to deal with any of this. If you could help anybody at that point, you're like, "Holy cow, nobody should have to deal with some of this." I started to put it down on paper and I said, "I'm going to start from the beginning." And I just kept going. My husband, he teases me. He said, "For six months, all I saw was the back of your head on the computer." Because it's all I was doing, was writing, writing, writing. Then when I got done, I was like, "All right, now I want to publish this." Now, of course knew nothing about publishing, and 20 something years ago, self-publishing didn't really exist like it does now. I learned, "Holy cow, I have to have this professionally edited." Then I learned that cost about $5,000 plus at the time. I didn't have any money. Then that was the next hurdle. How do you get from this raw bunch of words to it being fine-tuned and ready to go to a publisher? Then, will anybody even want to publish it? I sat on that. I didn't have the $5,000. I had left my career when I married my husband because I didn't want to be a workaholic. There's a lot of things I think that when you come out of an abusive relationship, whether it's child abuse or whatever that's happened over a long period of time, you're not just affected with who you are mentally, but I don't know, my vice was working. I didn't drink. I didn't do any drugs, nothing like that, but I worked because work consumed my brain. When this all came out, I learned that I also have to fix that. I can't be working 70 hours a week and married to my job because if you're going to have a relationship, that person deserves some of you too. I wasn't capable of doing both of them. I knew that. I literally quit my career. Said, "I'm going to give this relationship thing a shot because I failed so many other times." I left that and went to work with my husband and started doing some things in odds and ends. Of course, we had no money. We're living on like peanut butter. After I wrote the book, I'm like, "I need $5,000. I don't have $5,000." I created a company called Monster Mini Golf and- Alyssa Scolari [15:34]: That's how you became the accidental entrepreneur. Christina Vitagliano [15:37]: Yes. In my head I was like, "I'm going to raise $5,000. I can do mini golf indoors, me and a friend, and when I raise the five grand, maybe I can get it published and then I'll be able to make enough money to live on too in the meantime. That was almost 20 years ago. Now we have 30 Monster Mini Golf locations. We franchised it. We've got two crazy locations in casinos in Vegas here, one with KISS and one with the Twilight Zone. I got sucked in and I became a workaholic and my husband owns this company with me so I kind of turned him into one now. Now he wants to be the workaholic and I don't want to be so that's its own battle. Yeah. Then when the pandemic hit, I sat down and said, "Oh, okay, we're closed. There's nothing to do. Hey, self-publishing is amazing. Look at all of this." I self-published. Alyssa Scolari [16:38]: Yeah. Yes. Now you have this book out titled Every 9 Minutes. Christina Vitagliano [16:45]: Yep. Yep. Alyssa Scolari [16:46]: Can you tell us a little bit about this book? Is this detailing your life- Christina Vitagliano [16:51]: It is. Alyssa Scolari [16:52]: ... and what you went through? Christina Vitagliano [16:54]: It is. It's titled Every 9 Minutes because every nine minutes there is a reported case of child abuse in the United States. Just in the United States, the rest of the world I can't even imagine, and that's reported. Alyssa Scolari [17:10]: Right. That's what's reported. Christina Vitagliano [17:12]: Child abuse, I think the majority is not ... I never reported mine because it's so taboo and you just condition nobody tells anybody about it and all kinds of very bad things are wrong with the whole subject. Anyway, that's where the title came from. The book is a memoir. I've changed a lot of names. I've changed a lot of places, just because respect for people that I ... Other people, good people. But I kept my name in it. It starts in 1969, which is when I'm four years old and it ends when I met my husband and how the whole thing came to light and I talked it. It spans 30 years, but I think a lot of people ... And I apologize with my dogs upstairs. I think- Alyssa Scolari [17:57]: Oh, is that what that is? Is that your dog? Christina Vitagliano [17:59]: We have two bulldog pups and they're insane. I think a lot of folks will ... And it's getting better. People will talk about child abuse and they'll talk about their experience of abuse. I think when I wrote this book, it spans that long because it's not just about the abuse. It's about the effect that the abuse has on you for that period of time. Alyssa Scolari [18:24]: That is so important that you said that because yes, when we talk about abuse, we cannot just talk about the incidents themselves. Christina Vitagliano [18:36]: No. Alyssa Scolari [18:36]: Because they have ripple effects onto your life for decades and ages to come. I love that you said that. I mean, it's so important not to just talk about, "Oh, this is what happens to me." But then what happened after. Christina Vitagliano [18:50]: This is what happened to me as a result of what happened to me. Alyssa Scolari [18:52]: Yes. Yeah. Christina Vitagliano [18:54]: This is why all these things happen. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [18:57]: You said it best. You said it best. Christina Vitagliano [19:01]: A lot of people don't talk about that because ... and there's nothing ... I think it's because when somebody hears that subject, it just is like, "Wow." It's so big on its own that people have to get what happened out. To me, and this is a really weird thing, what was happening was the abuse became so routine to me that, yeah, I'm like, "I can handle that crap." It's everything else that's happening to me that I couldn't figure out until I was old enough to say, "Oh, it's all because of that crap." You know? Alyssa Scolari [19:35]: Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. I mean, you're exactly right. I think it's so important and I guess one of the questions that I have for you is, what is your goal with this book? Are you trying to show people that they're not alone? Are you trying to show people that they can survive this? What was the goal for publishing this? Christina Vitagliano [20:02]: Yeah. I think you hit the nail on the head there. A few things. One, we're not alone. Two, I'm okay to talk about it if you guys can't, because there's a lot of people who can't talk about it. It doesn't matter whether we should or shouldn't. They just never will be able to. Sometimes knowing that somebody else is talking about it makes life a little bit better and yes, you can ... You know what's weird? I don't like the word survive it because I hate surviving shit. Surviving, it hurts. I don't want to hurt anymore and it's going to hurt forever and ever that never goes away. I think you have to try to overcome the intensity of it and overcome, you will never overcome it, but you have to outbalance it. You know what I mean? Yes, it's there, but I'm going to stay a step above it and keep it in check. Surviving it is bullshit because you never survive it. That's crap I think. Alyssa Scolari [21:02]: Yeah. Absolutely. I like what you said there, that it's not so much about surviving it as it is about managing the intensity of it. It's about not letting the memories and the flashbacks and the feelings and the urges swallow you whole and take over your entire life. Christina Vitagliano [21:23]: Yep. There are ... And it's weird. I think ... Some of it, I wrote about and some of it I don't because you can't write everything and you don't want to share literally everything. It's a hard subject to actually write about because people have a hard time reading about it too. You had to balance, "Hey, I have to share it and I don't want to share everything." I remember my editor when she went through it and you go through a child abuse scene in the book. She would come back to me and she would say, "Okay. Well, this is good. Change this. You have errors here and whatever." Then once in a while, she'll go, "Hey, detail this scene more." I'm like, "No. I'm not going to detail that scene more. Are you out of your mind? It's amazing that those words are there." But it was- Alyssa Scolari [22:03]: Right. Like, "You're lucky I even got this much. There's no way I can detail this." Christina Vitagliano [22:09]: Man, that was, I think ... You're like, "How was it writing it?" Writing it was one thing, dealing with the editing and having somebody above you or with you on your team say, "This is good but if you really want to share, and you want somebody to understand that you can outbalance this or do whatever, you have to show them what happened." Some of that stuff came back to me four and five times and finally ... It was over Christmas, this past Christmas before I published, right before I published. I sat on that book for about six weeks because of her notes. I was like, "I can't do it. I can't do what she's asking me to do." Another part of me was saying, "If you want this to be published and you want to share it and you want people to see what happened to actually make the point come across, then you have to do what she asked." It took six weeks and one day I got up. Just like I think we always ... Hey, you get up and all the puzzle pieces fell into place or kind of, and I said, "I'm going to give it a shot." I did, and when I got done it was like I had to go shower. I'm like, "I just got to walk away from that. Just don't ask me to read it again." You got the words, but somebody else read it now because I've just lived it too many times. Alyssa Scolari [23:24]: Yeah. That's I think another really important point, is I'm sure as you were writing it, or even going through the editing process, you find yourself right back in it. Christina Vitagliano [23:36]: Oh, it's brutal. The editing process was the worst because when you edit ... My book is about 370 pages. It started at 600 because for me to break from the time I was four, until whenever I thought the end was, I literally had to go through my entire life. Then somebody picks it up and says, "We don't need to know what you had for lunch one day." But I couldn't get from AA to B. We had to get rid of all that crap. Because it took me 20 years to publish, by the time I actually got it published, I had read that thing so many times it's just reliving it and reliving it and reliving it. Yes, it was good, but in some ways now, and I'm going to be honest, I'm very, very angry at things that I ... They just make you angry. It's like, "Why did these people let this happen? Why are these people today still siding with that guy?" Family members that were like "Oh, he's a saint." I'm like, "You're choosing not to see reality." That's a very hard thing to deal with. I have to be the person that says, "Well, that's your problem now." My issue is let's help people who want to be helped and band together. Alyssa Scolari [24:52]: That's the hardest part, is it's the reactions of the other people, right? Christina Vitagliano [24:52]: Oh, it's horrible. Alyssa Scolari [25:03]: You're bearing your soul and then there are people that go, "What are you talking about? He was a great guy. What are you doing this for?" That pure unfiltered rage, rage that you must feel like ... Yet, in this moment, you're in these moments where you are being almost like ... not forced, but you have the pressure on to share more and be a little bit more vulnerable. Then you're met with opposition from people, family members or friends or people who know you that are like, "What are you talking about? This is a good guy." In those moments, what kept you going? How did you stay true to the fact that this was right for you? Christina Vitagliano [25:55]: Anger. Alyssa Scolari [25:57]: Turning that rage into something productive. Christina Vitagliano [25:59]: Yeah. You say persevere, survive, overcome. Yeah, sure. All of that. Anger. I'm like, "No. You're wrong." More that I'm not the only one. I mean, nobody talks about this and in this day and age where we have ... And I will give ... Like well, let's say the millennials, because they want to cancel everything. On the flip side, people are speaking out more than anything in the world, but they won't speak about this. How do you want to do everything in the world and fix it all, ooh, but not that subject? That's too cool. That's too taboo. I don't want to do that. I want to get to the point where screaming about this too. Alyssa Scolari [26:39]: Yes. Christina Vitagliano [26:39]: You know? Alyssa Scolari [26:41]: Yeah. We're going to scream about this too. Christina Vitagliano [26:44]: Yeah. We're at that point where if enough of us are yelling, somebody will, people will say, "Okay. Well, it is about time." Celebrities have definitely been more vocal about it, and I think that's great that they are. I think being a normal person and not that celebrity and everybody protects ... not protects them, but they have the voice. I think that when you see a celebrity come out and say, "I was abused or this is happening in Hollywood." You're like, "Well, that's good. I'm glad somebody is talking about it." But you still feel like, "I'm just a normal person and nobody listened to me." I want to be the normal person that speaks out kind of. You know? Alyssa Scolari [27:24]: Yes. The thing is survivors of childhood abuse, we've all got rage and if we're not taking that rage and if we're not using it to speak up and speak out about this taboo topic and shout it from the rooftops, what child abuse is, how it affects people in the long-term, what this does to us, then that rage is still going to be there. It's still going to go somewhere and nine times out of 10, we're going to take it out on ourselves in ways that are self-destructive. Christina Vitagliano [27:56]: You are a hundred percent correct. Yep. Alyssa Scolari [27:59]: That rage has to go somewhere. There's so much power in using your voice, whether it's through writing, whether it's through speaking, taking that rage that you're talking about, which I'm glad you said it, because honestly that is what keeps us going. Rage. Christina Vitagliano [28:15]: It is. [crosstalk 00:28:15]. Alyssa Scolari [28:15]: Pure rage. Christina Vitagliano [28:17]: Yep. You have to keep it in check because we can't go running around with knives and guns, even though your head says, "Well, I wish I could." But you can't. Alyssa Scolari [28:24]: I wish I could. Christina Vitagliano [28:25]: I wish I could. Alyssa Scolari [28:25]: I wish I could. Christina Vitagliano [28:27]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [28:27]: I wish I could. Christina Vitagliano [28:28]: Yep, but this isn't the cartoons. Alyssa Scolari [28:29]: Right. You have managed to take all of that anger, all of that grief and turn it into something that this is your voice. Your voice. I have to ask you, when you look back on the years in which you were enduring abuse, were there times where you just wanted to completely give up? Christina Vitagliano [28:59]: Oh, of course. Yes. Just yes. Yeah. I think more as ... That's weird because even after I've talked about it and it was out in the open and I wrote it down before I published, more as I got older. I think there's something about this subject, well abusive of any kind, the older you get, it seems like because you get smarter and wisdom kicks in. I think when you're younger, you don't realize how bad it is or how wrong it is. Then you get more educated on people and then you realize how jaded adults are and they're teaching their children the wrong thing. You get angrier. In some ways it's harder to deal with the older I get, but because you're smarter and because you've learned a lot, you learn to balance it better. It's not easy by any means though. Alyssa Scolari [30:05]: I love that you're saying this because this is what happens. It's fantastic because I think that so many people scratch their heads over why adults tend to be so distraught about abuse that happened to them when they were younger. I think a lot of people ... I've seen a lot of people, even people when talking about themselves, and even me personally, when I started a lot of my memories were repressed. When I started to have all of these memories, I was an adult. There were moments that I've had, and I know a lot of my clients have had, where it's like, "Why am I so upset about this now? Why am I more upset about this today than I was 25 years ago when this happened?" It's because the older you get, the more you know, the more you understand and the more you feel and the more you have language to be able to put to what you feel. It's actually very, very natural. It's actually harder when you're older, so [crosstalk 00:31:16]. Christina Vitagliano [31:15]: Yeah. What makes me anger is as you know all of that and you say to yourself, "Goddammit, that's why these adults are abusing children because they know that." I got angrier and still get angry because I'm like, "Well, this person was a full grown adult and what they were doing was bad, but they were a hundred percent aware of what they were doing too and I think that's what makes you angrier as you get older, is you really, really did something terrible to a child with full knowledge of what you were doing. You know? Alyssa Scolari [31:53]: Yes. There's no excuse. No excuse for it. You knew, you know, you took full advantage. Christina Vitagliano [32:01]: You chose to do that. That's a choice. You know what I mean? It's not a sickness. That's a bunch of bullshit. You've chosen to do that. If it was carried on from your parents, then that's a shame, but this is why we're standing here today talking about it so that maybe it doesn't keep going because nobody seems to care that it is going. Alyssa Scolari [32:21]: Yeah. You know? When you talk about the whole, it's a sickness type thing. You know what? Whether it's a sickness or not, I don't give a fuck because you know what? I have a sickness. I have complex trauma and do I walk around hurting people? No. Christina Vitagliano [32:37]: Exactly. I don't care if it's a sickness. It still shouldn't happen. You know? Alyssa Scolari [32:42]: There's no excuse. It's not an excuse. Christina Vitagliano [32:43]: No. No. Alyssa Scolari [32:44]: Right? Christina Vitagliano [32:45]: Yep. Alyssa Scolari [32:46]: It wouldn't be an excuse for me to get drunk and get in my car because I had a night where I was traumatized. That's not an excuse, so why- Christina Vitagliano [32:57]: Yeah. Why is it okay for these other people? Alyssa Scolari [32:58]: ... why do we make excuses? Why do we excuse child abusers so often? It's infuriating. I could scream about it from the rooftops. Christina Vitagliano [33:09]: It really is. It really is. Alyssa Scolari [33:11]: It really is. This book that you've written, it feels like it's a message, not just for other people, but also for your younger self. Like a message to hang on because look at ... Could you ever have imagined the life that you have for yourself now? Would you ever have pictured it? Christina Vitagliano [33:29]: No. Not in a million years. Not even close. Yeah. Yeah, so weird. Alyssa Scolari [33:36]: I'm going to ask you another pretty candid question. Knowing what you know now about how your life was going to turn out, are you glad you stayed? Are you glad you hung on? Christina Vitagliano [33:52]: Through all of it, you mean? Alyssa Scolari [33:53]: Mm-hmm [affirmative]. Christina Vitagliano [33:55]: Yeah. I mean, not glad that it happened obviously, but yes. Yes. I always ... Part of me, I think survived ... And this is my individual case, I think is because my father was so jealous in some weird way that if I got a better grade in school than his crazy son did, that would piss him off. I learned, "Oh, well, then fuck you. I'm going to piss you off." In a lot of ways, I was like, "Oh, yeah, he's failing and you want me to fail too? I'm not going to fail." There's a lot of things that ... And I think a lot of us do that is, "Oh, you don't like that. There's a way I can piss you off, but not piss you off." You know what I mean? Alyssa Scolari [34:41]: Yeah. Christina Vitagliano [34:41]: I just became this driven, crazy person to not be like the rest of my family. I don't want to say there's good that comes out of bad because nobody wants to go through that bad. Nobody should ever go through that bad, but because of the abuse there are, I don't know, things about me that I'm glad that they're like that, you know? I don't know. It's a hard thing to explain. Not that I'm thankful for him for anything, but you know? Alyssa Scolari [35:17]: No. Right. We're not thankful. It's not like we're glad that it happened because it taught us a lesson. Christina Vitagliano [35:24]: [crosstalk 00:35:24]. Alyssa Scolari [35:23]: None of that. It's just a matter of I think for the people out there who are in this, in the thick of it and just want to give up and want to end their lives, and want to throw in the towel and say, "Fuck it." It's like, I think about you and your story and you've managed to go from being severely abused, to getting out, getting married, starting a multi-million dollar business, writing a book, being a voice for those who don't have a voice. I think to myself like, "If that's not a message for the listeners out there to keep going, I don't know what is." Because look at where you're at now. It's so inspirational and it gives so much hope, even though, you're very real about, listen, some days are bullshit. Some of this sucks. This sucks. It's still infuriating and I'm not over it because we don't get over it. We do not get over it, but we learn how to not let it consume us. Christina Vitagliano [36:43]: Yeah. That's the balance. Alyssa Scolari [36:46]: That's the balance. Christina Vitagliano [36:49]: Yep. It is. Alyssa Scolari [36:52]: Now, if people ... Because I just feel like this book ... First of all, for the listeners out there, this book has like well over a hundred reviews, I think I was looking on Amazon. Christina Vitagliano [36:52]: Yeah. Yeah. Alyssa Scolari [37:06]: Yeah. This book has well over ... almost 120 reviews on Amazon, extremely high-rated book. If people want to find more about you, want to find your book, what's the best place they should go? Should they go right to Amazon? You tell us. Christina Vitagliano [37:29]: Amazon's definitely the easiest so if you're in Amazon and search Every 9 Minutes, it pops up. My social media, I'm always obviously promoting my book, but if you look up Every 9 Minutes on anything, Twitter or anybody, it'll obviously pop up. My website and all my social media handles are 123ChristinaV, so whether you're on Twitter or Instagram or Facebook, or my website is 123christinav.com, you can find me there. You can message me from anything anywhere. I'm very responsive. Alyssa Scolari [38:03]: Fantastic. You said that's 123ChristinaV? Christina Vitagliano [38:08]: Yep. And .com is my website. Yep. Alyssa Scolari [38:13]: Okay. Okay. For the listeners out there, I'm going to link that in the show notes. Head on over to the show notes so you can find that. You'll have access there to everything. Christina is also ... She's a speaker. She does so much. Check out this book. The link will be in there. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. Christina Vitagliano [38:36]: Thank you. Alyssa Scolari [38:37]: It was an honor to talk to you. I think you're shedding light on the ripple effects of childhood abuse and you're screaming it from the rooftops. Christina Vitagliano [38:47]: Thank you for having me. Alyssa Scolari [38:49]: Of course. It was a pleasure. Thanks for listening everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma and on Twitter it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. Please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you. We appreciate your support.

Stop Me Project
Airey Bros. Radio / Gary Heferle / Fresh From the Farm Fungi / Mycelium / Fantastic Fungi / Episode 129

Stop Me Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 109:35


Gary Heferle from Fresh From the Farm Fungi joins us to talk about his mycology journey and the amazing benefits of gourmet and medicinal mushrooms. Gary and his wife Addie founded Fresh from the Farm Fungi LLC in June 2018 in Denver, Colorado. Originally from the Syracuse and Buffalo areas of New York, Gary and Addie met in college and soon after graduating, followed bigger dreams that led them to Denver in October 2013. Gary has always had a passion for gardening, plants and nature; and along with his microbiology background blossomed a love and enthusiasm for mushrooms. Stay Connected!!! http://freshfromthefarmfungi.com/ https://www.etsy.com/shop/freshfungi https://www.facebook.com/freshfromthefarmfungi https://www.instagram.com/freshfromthefarmfungi/ The Airey Bros. IG @aireybros / https://www.instagram.com/aireybros/ https://www.blacksheependurance.com/podcast Premium Content : AB/DC Programming / B-Role & Mix Tapes / Accountability Coaching https://www.patreon.com/AireyBros Value for Value https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=BHCAKFGH6TNF2 The Black Oxygen Organics products have been formulated to help reduce the effects of inflammation and oxidative stress. In addition to the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits, our effective products also help: Most Powerful Electrolyte in Existence Delivers Usable Oxygen into the Cell 70+ Trace Minerals Reduces Oxidative Stress Improves Immune Function Supports Healthy Circulation Boosts Metabolism Improves Brain Function, Memory, Mood Improves Heart Health Increases Nutrient Absorption Removes Toxins, Heavy Metals, Pesticides Cell Regenerating Enhances, Repopulates Gut Flora Helps Balance Hormones https://www.blackoxygenorganics.com/aireybros1

Krystine's FLR Podcast
Episode 0201

Krystine's FLR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:34


SEASON 2!!Let's kick season two off with some chastity talk because boys, it's LOCKTOBER! Are you all locked up safe and secure? Why not?? Ladies, get your boys locked up for fuck sakes. Maybe i'll have some insight that mighty be helful? Otherwise, the web is overflowing with blogs and such. I've recently been snidely called an expert. I'm no "expert". I'm here just to share what I've learned, and my opinions. I can't stress enough to do your own research!SHOW NOTES Sweet Revenge of Teamwork - A recent voiceover project.My Erotic Audio Samples PodcastTindra Lust - A Deck of Two Queens(PLEASE? Tindra is a dear friend of mine and an AMAZING author! If you like my podcast and what I talk about, you will LOVE her books. They aren't epically long novels, they are nice, quick reads. AND, I'm producing the audio versions for (hopefully) all of them! HOWEVER, do me (and Tindra, who REALLY needs it) a favor, and buy this 2 pack of cuckold books, for $6.00. That's right, I said $6.00! This is not an affiliate situation, this is me as a friend of her's, trying to help her in a way that I might be able to. She needs the help in a big way, and I'm hoping that the KFLR Podcast Nation will rise up and help "one of our own"!Be sure to visit my affiliates to support this podcast!Planetary Design's BruTrek, Airscape® and ethoz™ products cater to the passions of outdoor enthusiasts, coffee connoisseurs, tea lovers and foodies alike! We use their products almost everyday because they are passionate about ensuring their customers enjoy them as much as they do! Please use this link if you are interested in any of their FANTASTIC products! KFLR Link!Lovense brings sex tech to every bedroom. Their wide selection of sex toys can be controlled via Bluetooth, and even at long distances through their app. Find out how to take your experiences, and control, to the next level, at Lovense!Want to support the podcast and be involved with the behind-the-scenes, including voting on episode topics, as well as tiptoe with me into this whole "coaching" thing?Find me at  https://www.patreon.com/krystinekelloggInterested in custom erotic POV (JOI/SPH/ECT), ASMR, Voicemail Messages, and Erotic Hypnosis/Meditation Audio/Video featuring my voice, find me at  Fiverr/KrystineKelloggAlso, If you would like to see "a little more of me", as well as my torturing my subby, I'm uploading photos and videos and erotic audios to OnlyFans ($4.99/mo ALL ACCESS)) Fan me up at OnlyFans/KrystineKellogg!If you like full production podcasts that center around an FLR couple, loosely based on, well, my subby and I, give Control a listen. PLEASE rate and review to give it some traction?Check out my (beta version)MERCH!!!LinkTree: https://linktr.ee/KrystineKelloggKrystineKellogg@gmail.comKrystine's Phone/Text  (USA)   651-800-1153Theme Music by Wes @ https://www.fiverr.com/share/YokLQN (Thank you

The Fantasy Football Friends
Week 5 review: Austin Ekeler's fantastic finish, Stefon Diggs disappoints again, Kyle Pitts' breakout

The Fantasy Football Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:19


The Fantasy Football Friends review the Week 5 NFL action, from the wild Chargers-Browns game that saw massive performances from Justin Herbert, Mike Williams, Keenan Allen, Kareem Hunt and Nick Chubb to Tom Brady's dominance to Kyle Pitts' breakout game, as well as the disappointments from Keenan Allen, Stefon Diggs, Odell Beckham Jr., Damien Harris and Kyler Murray.Injury updates for Clyde Edwards-Helaire, Saquon Barkley and Juju Smith-Schuster.

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Noach - Join Geoffrey Stern, Rabbi Adam Mintz and Pastor Dumisani Washington of IBSI - Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel and Christians United For Israel for a live recording of a discussion on Clubhouse Friday October 8th with the Pastor regarding his book Zionism and the Black Church: Why Standing with Israel Will Be a Defining Issue for Christians of Color in the 21st Century. We follow a less traveled path down Noah's family tree. We discover the Biblical Mission of Africa and the bond between the Children of Shem and the Children of Ham. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/352058  Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 [To Reverend Dumisani Washington] Thank you so much for being with us. On on our clubhouse when you come up to the platform, we say first of all that you're coming up to the bimah [the podium or platform in a synagogue from which the Torah and Prophets are read from]. And then second of all, when we make you a presenter, we give you smicha... So that means that you are ordinated. So instead of Reverend, we'll call you Reb. Is that okay? Dumisani Washington  00:20 That sounds good to me. Sounds good, no problem. Geoffrey Stern  00:23 So anyway, welcome to Madlik. Madlik is every week at four o'clock, and we do record it and post it as a podcast on Sunday. And if you listen to it, and you'd like what you hear, feel free to share it and give us a few stars. And what we do is disruptive Torah. And what we mean by disruptive Torah is we look at the ancient text of the Torah, with maybe a new lens, or to see a new angle. And today, I'm delighted to say that we're not only looking at it through a new lens, but we're looking at it through another lens, a lens of a pastor, of a man of God, who we will learn about his mission. I heard about it on clubhouse one evening, I was scrolling, and I stumbled upon you Reverend, and you're on a mission and you see Judaism and you see Zionism from a whole new perspective. So I want to thank you for coming on. And I want to say that, as I told you, in my email that I sent you that you know, every week about Saturday on Shabbat, on Sunday, I start thinking about what I'm going to pick as a subject matter for the coming Madlik session. And I purchased your book maybe two months ago, and it was sitting by the side of my bed, and for some reason, and of course, I'm sure there are no coincidences in this world. I picked it up this Shabbat. And it starts with our portion of Noah, it starts by talking about the line less traveled by us Jews of Shem's son Ham. And I should say that nothing is written for no reason in the Bible. And when it gives you a genealogy, it's because of what comes in the future. And many of us Jews will look at the genealogy in Genesis 10. And focus on Shem... with Semites. And that's where the name comes from. And we go down that path, and your book starts. And of course, I should say that your book is called "Zionism and the Black Church, Why Standing with Israel will be a Defining issue for Christians of color in the 21st Century". And it begins by traveling down this path less taken, of Ham. Welcome to Madlik.  But if you could begin by touching upon our portion of the week, no off and and and discussing what you see in it, and maybe your mission. Dumisani Washington  03:06 Absolutely. And thank you, again, Rabbi for having me on. Yes, there are six chapters in "Zionism in the Black Church". And the first chapter is entitled The African Biblical Tie to Israel. And so we as I say, in the book started the beginning, right, we start at the beginning of the Scriptures, and so as you know, between the two portions of "Bereshi"  I believe whether the towards the end is when Noah was first introduced, but of course in "Noach" there's the explanation of the nations where all the nations of the earth come from, from Noah's three sons Shem, Ham, and Jafet. And so we recognize that in the Scriptures, it is said that Ham has four sons. And there's a couple of unique things as you know, you read the book, that the scriptures that in the law of Moses deals, Psalms and some of the prophets, there's a term that's given several times in the scripture about Ham's descendants harms the sentence differently, then either Jafet or Shem.  The land of Ham is actually something that's in the scriptures. And I don't know what that Hebrew word is ... "Aretz Ham" ... I never looked at that part of it, Rabbi but it talks about that, which is really interesting because there's not, to my knowledge, and I've kind of looked at for a little while, a similar rendering like the Land of Japhet or Land of Shem. Right? We're obviously the genealogy is there, right? But there's not the same thing that deals with the land and the peoples .... interesting and we've come to know that of the four sides of Hem, which are in order Kush, which you know, is where obviously the Hebrew for later on Ethiopia I believe is a Greek word, but from that region Mitzrayim, which is Egypt. Fut or Put which is Libya, and then Canaan, which is Canaan, right? So those four sons who come from him. But interestingly in the scriptures when it says land of Ham, it almost exclusively refers to Egypt and Ethiopia, what we would call today, Africa, right? This region. And again, you're talking about an antiquity these regions were much broader in size. And they are today if you look at the map today, you see Egypt as a small state and go down to the south, west, south east, and you'll see Ethiopia then you see Yemen, you see Kenya, well, obviously all those states weren't there that happened much later in modernity is particularly after the colonial period where those nations were carved up by a few states in Europe, and they were given certain names everything right, but these were regions in the Bible. And so Kush, the land of Kush, and the land of Mitzrayim, they're actually dealt with many, many times. Right? After the words obviously "Israel" and "Jerusalem". You have the word Ethiopia, I believe one of the Ethiopian scholar says some 54 times or something like that the word Ethiopia actually comes up in the Bible, obviously not as many times as Israel or Jerusalem but more than virtually any other nation other than Egypt. Right? So Egypt obviously that we know too. Africa plays a huge role in Israel's story right? The 430 years in slavery is in Africa, right? The Torah was received at Sinai: Africa. All these things happen in Africa. At some point God tells Jeremiah during the time of the impending doom, the exile that will happen at the hand of of Nebuchadnezzar and God says to to the Israelites to the Judeans, and "don't run down into Egypt, Egypt won't be able to save you." Why does he say that? Well, because historically the Israelites would go to Egypt when it until it got safer, right? For those Christians who may be on the call, you'll know that in the New Testament, Jesus, his parents take him down into Egypt because Herod's gonna kill him. Right? So there's this ongoing relationship between Ham and Shem, that's very intertwined. Moses, his wife, or his second wife, depending on how you interpret it....  Some of the sages. She's Ethiopian, right? She's kushite. So you have this interchangeable thing all the time, throughout the scriptures, but actually starts with the genealogy. And I'll say just one last thing, rabbis ..... we're opening up. This is also unfortunately, as I mentioned, the book as you know, the misnomer of the quote unquote, "Curse of Ham", as we know in the text, Ham is never cursed for what happens with Noah it is Canaan that is cursed. And he actually says, a curse that Canaan become a servant of servants shall he be, even though it was Ham who however you interpreted.... I've heard many different interpretations of "uncovered the nakedness he saw his father, naked," but somehow, for whatever reason, Noah cursed Canaan, not Ham.  Who is Canaan...  is one of him so's, his fourth son, as we know those who are listening, you may know that it is The Curse of Ham, quote, unquote, that has been used sadly, unfortunately, among many other things as a justification of the slavery of Africans. Right? That somehow, Africans are quote, unquote, "Cursed of Ham", therefore, the transatlantic slave trade, the trans Saharan slave trade, those things are somehow...  God prescribed these things in the Bible, the curse was making him black. That's why he's like all those things that are nowhere in the text whatsoever, right? skin color is not in the text. slavery as a descendant of Ham. None of those things are in the text. What's in the text? Is that Canaan is cursed for that? And so we start there, Rabbi, and from there trying to walk out this whole Israel Africa thing. Adam Mintz  08:47 First of all WOW... thank you so much. I just want to clarify in terms of color, I think that's a very interesting thing. It's very possible that in the biblical period, everybody was dark. Dumisani Washington  09:00 Yes, sir. I mentioned that in the book as well. But yes, sir. Yes, yeah. All right. Sorry, Adam Mintz  09:04 I didn't see that in your book. But that's important, you know, because a lot of people are caught up in this color thing. Did you know that there's a distinction, we don't know it for sure but it makes sense that everybody was dark in those periods. So that the difference in color was not significant. So when, when Moses marries goes to Ethiopia, maybe is king of Ethiopia, and marries an Ethiopian. And the idea is that he marries a foreigner. The fact that she's darker may or may not have been true.   Dumisani Washington  09:39 Yes, absolutely. No, thank you Rabbi. And I do touch on that, as well. We say in the terms in this modern term, even in my book, I use the term Christians of color and I don't usually use those terms just in when I'm speaking. I did it that way in the title so that it would be presented in a way that is going to deal with some provocative things but hopefully the people that they read it they'll see what I mean by that and if you're talking about the Israelite people, the Hebrew people they are what I call an afro Asiatic people. Israel is still at that at the point of where those two continents meet right Southwest Asia northeast Africa is landlocked with Egypt I tell people God opened up the Red Sea because he wanted to right ... He's big and bad and he can do what he wants to do but you can literally; I wouldn't recommend it obviously, but you could literally walk from Egypt to Israel and you always have been able to for 1000s of years that has always been the case and so you have a people that in terms of skin tone or whatever... Yes, absolutely, they would be what we would call today quote unquote people of color right and so unfortunately particularly in our country we all know race and colorism is such a huge topic and it's often so divisive and it's used in so many different ways and we know much of that goes back to whether slavery, Jim Crow, people being assigned work obviously based on how dark or light they are all of those things but the problem as you all know is that those things aren't in the Bible right? There's no God likes this person doesn't like this person, this person's dark this person's like, that type of thing. But again, that's what men do, we are fallen creatures, we read what we want to read into the text, and then we use it unfortunately, in a way that's not helpful. Let me just say and pause here, I can tell you that as a Christian pastor, over the years of my just delving into what we often call the Jewish roots of our faith, by studying Torah with rabbis and with other Jewish scholars, my faith has been more important to me than ever in that it helps me understand even more so right, what is the Hebrew in this word here? What do the sages say about that, that's been a fascinating journey for me, over the last 30 some odd years since I've been doing this particular work. Geoffrey Stern  11:58 So I just want to jump in, you said so many things. But there is in this verse that we are reading today, the word "ashkenaz", he was one of the children of of Shem, and you quote, an Ethiopian Rabbi named Ephraim Isaac, and this is a sample of some of the humor in your book or the sense of discovery. And somebody said to him, You don't look Jewish. And he said:, "Ethiopia is mentioned the Bible over 50 times, but Poland not once." And I feel like that was, that was a great line. And what it really talks to is our preconceptions, and your book, and your vision, and your mission breaks preconceptions of what it is to be a Jew, what the mission of a Jew is, but most importantly, what the relationship is between the Jewish people and the African people. And one of the things that you touched upon was the sense of Mitzraim and Kush , and in your book, you really talk about how many times they're interchangeable, because really, it is the same area and those of us who think about Mitzrayim, or Egypt, we focus on the Exodus story, we focus on the pharaoh story. But as you mentioned, the prophets later on, we're having to talk to the Jews about not going back, because ultimately, the experience in Egypt was always favorable, it was our neighbor, and it was our place of refuge. Abraham goes down there with Sarah twice, Jacob sends his kids down there during a time of famine. The relationship and the reference to a Ham and to Mitzrayim  and to Kush is a very positive one. And yes, it does say in our week's parsha of all of the children, it says, "b'artzetam v'goyehem" , that they have a special language, and they have a family and they have a land. So the fact that we are neighbors is so important in the biblical context. So I said if we were going to walk down this wonderful path, and I would love for a second to talk about your mission about reuniting our two peoples and some of the challenges that you have. Clearly you don't speak to groups like us very much, although I think that I'm going to have an opportunity later to say that I think you should, because there's so much that we can learn. But what is your mission? How did you discover it? And what are your challenges? Dumisani Washington  14:40 Well, I'll do it concise, just because I don't want to take up too much time to firstly touch as much as we can. I am the founder and CEO of an organization called The Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel. I started it in 2013 but for about nearly seven years, I was not as active I started it. I did a lot of touring and a lot of speaking throughout the United States, churches, sometimes synagogues as well. And with this mission, it was a mission that was really placed in my heart. Actually in 2012, my first trip to Israel, I went as a guest of Christians United for Israel, I would come later on to join the staff with CUFA. But I was a guest pastor, I knew some friends who were part of the organization. And the short version of that story was my first tip ever, I'm in Israel, I'm at the Western Wall of the kotel. And I have a very intense experience in which I feel although Africa and Israel were passions of mine already, but the fusing of those two things together and a real work in which we continue to strengthen the alliance between Israel and Africa. And then obviously, in the States in the black and Jewish community. And there and finished the first edition of the book now, what you have there Rabbi is the second edition. And we started this organization for that very purpose to do both of those things continue to strengthen the black Jewish relationship, and also the Israel Africa Alliance. And so the challenges have been probably more than any other thing disinformation, right? There's a lot of false information that's there, when it comes to those things that would seek to divide and separate when you're talking about whether Africa Israel, now we're talking about the modern state of Israel, obviously, the rebirth of Israel in 1948. Israel's close ties with African nations throughout the continent, starting especially with Golda Meir, the foreign minister, all the way up into the 70s, where you have, as I mentioned in the book, Israel has more embassies throughout Africa than any other nation other than the United States, African economy, some of them are thriving, a great deal. You have a lot of synergy between the African nations and Israel. And after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, like never before Israel's enemies target that relationship between Israel and its African neighbors for different reasons. One of those is voting in the United Nations, right? And that became very much of a challenge. So one of the greatest challenges is, is information. What we share in the book and when we do our organization, we teach what we call an organization "Authentic History” is really simply telling what happened, how did something [happen]. Whether we're talking about biblically, whether we're discussing the parsha or we're talking about historically, right? We're talking about what the relationship was, and is. Why those connections there? And I'll just give one quick example if you're talking about black Jewish synergy in the United States, not just Dr. King's relationship with Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel in the civil rights community, not that it happened, right? But why, what was that synergy about? Right? So we've delve into that. We share from the documents from the Rabbinical Assembly; Dr. King's most famous words regarding Israel that were recorded 10 days before he was killed, right, why? And as a pastor, what we call a prophetic moment. Why 10 days before he's taken from us, is he telling the black community in the world to stand with Israel with all of our mind and protect its right to exist? Why is he saying these things? What's so important about it. And even the generation before? Why was it a black and Jewish man who changed the trajectory of this nation, Booker T. Washington, and Julius Rosenwald; millions of now first and second generation, slave; free slaves, right? but who had no access to education, not in a broader sense, and why that synergy saw some 5400 Rosenwald schools built throughout the segregated south. We touch on those historical points, and we delve into why that black Jewish synergy has been so powerful for so many people for so long. So that is our mission to strengthen those ties, because we believe that there's a great future ahead. Geoffrey Stern  19:05 You did such amazing research. I mean, I can tell you I never knew that Herzl said about Africa, "that once I have witnessed the redemption of Israel, my people, I wish to assist in the redemption of the Africans." And that is taking a small quote out of a full paragraph where the histories of the two people are so similar. I mean, it comes to us as a pleasant surprise, these synergies but it shouldn't because both our peoples have really traversed and continue to reverse the same pathway. And you quote Marcus Garvey and even Malcolm X and William Dubois. Malcolm X says "Pan Africanism will do for the people of African descent all over the world, the same that Zionism has done for Jews. All over the world." there was a sincere admiration for this miracle of a people returning to its land, we were talking before you came on about this whole kind of image of an ark. And it reminds you of Odesyuss... and it reminds you of all of these stories of man going on this heroic journey to find their their roots to come back, gain, experience and come back to their homeland, to their Aretz.. On the one hand, your job should be very simple. I guess, like any other fights, the closer you are, the bigger the friction can be. And there's nothing bigger than the friction between brothers. But it's such a challenge to address, as you say the misinformation. Dumisani Washington  20:51 Absolutely. And this is, again, why that's our primary goal. And then as part of what our mission is, we have launched here just recently, an initiative called The PEACE initiative. And PEACE is an acronym for Plan for Education, Advocacy, and Community Engagement, and the short version of that, again: We recruit young, black American and African young people from certain cities throughout the United States, a group of them, they go to a 16 week study course having some of the same conversations we're having now, including the modern state of Israel, ancient Israel, the United Nations, all these things that intersect when it comes to the black Jewish relations, then they will travel to Israel for about 10 days, and returned to the cities from where they've been recruited, and be the hub of black Jewish synergy in their communities. We believe with our organization that one of the reasons for the synergy that we've seen in the past, whether it was at the turn of the century with Booker T Washington, and Julius Rosenwald, or the mid part of the century with Dr. King and Rabbi Heschel, right now we are in different challenges, there are challenges that face particularly the more vulnerable black communities. And we see that that synergy could really address so many issues, whether it's education, whether it's jobs, those types of things, they can be really be addressed in a very holistic way. And really harnessing that synergy between the black and the Jewish community. And this is what we are doing. An Israel advocacy that is also rooted in these communities. And it's amazing. We see already rabbis and black pastors are working together all over the country. So that continues to happen. But we want to highlight those things even more and go even further in meeting some of the challenges what we call MC ambassadors will be leading that in different cities across the country. Geoffrey Stern  22:02 That's amazing. I want to come back to this sense of self-discovery and pride. And we always talk about it from our own perspective. So if you're African American, you want to make sure that your children believe that black is beautiful, that they come from an amazing heritage to be proud of who they are. And if you're Jewish, you want the same thing. But it seems to me, and you kind of cage the question in this way, "Why standing with Israel will be a defining issue for Christians of color", when we as Jews can see ourselves in the black community as we did during the civil rights movement that redeems us. And that empowers us. And I think what you're saying, and I don't want to put words into your mouth, but the same thing works in reverse. That in a sense, when the African community can recognize in Israel, its own story. It also can find a part of itself. Is there any truth there? Dumisani Washington  23:50 I believe so Rabbi. I believe that that's exactly as a matter of fact, what we saw was the synergy. So let me use the example and go back to the early 1900s with Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald. The way that story happens, as you may know is that Booker T Washington writes his seminal book "Up From Slavery". Julius Rosenwald, who lives in Chicago at the time, is very active in his community. As a matter of fact, he was active, using his wealth; of those of you who don't know of Sears Roebuck fame, he is the one who took his company to this whole different level, economically and everything. And so with his wealth as a businessman, he's helping the Jews who are being persecuted in Russia. And one of his own testimony, I don't say this part of the book, but I kind of alluded to it, that here he is driving to work from the suburbs to where his factory is where his store is, and he's passing by throngs of black people who've left the South, right? looking for a better life, but they're living in very, very bad conditions, a lot of poverty and everything. And he says to himself, basically, if I'm going to do all of this to help Russian Jews right, way over the other side of the world, and I have this human crisis right here, where I live, I want to be able to do that and his, his Rabbi was Emile Hirsch, one of the founding members of the NAACP. Right? So his Rabbi encourages him. And we see this with our Jewish brothers and sisters all the time, see yourself, do help, do use your wealth, use your ability, right? To help. And so he reads Booker T. Washington's book he's taken with him, they begin to correspond. And Booker T. Washington says, Here's how you can help me I'm trying to build schools for my people who don't have access. And Rabbi to your point. Here is this man, this Jewish man who is very well aware of his history, he knows his People's History of persecution and struggle and triumph, right? Very much sees himself in that black story, and then he uses his ability. It's amazing even what he does; there's a Rosenwald film about Rosenwald schools, I believe his children were the ones who produced it. And they were saying that what he actually did was pretty ingenious, he put up a third of the money, the black community raised a third of the money, and then he challenged the broader white community to partner with them and bring the last third and that is how those Rosenwald Schools began.  Because what he wanted to do, he wanted to see people come together, he wanted to see them all work together. Even though Booker T. Washington passes away only three years into that, right, that venture continues on Julius Rosenwald goes and sits on the board of the Tuskegee college, Tuskegee University, right? There's this long connection that's there. So in that struggle, the black American community, and he connected with this black American leader, the one of the most prominent of the time, Booker T, Washington, and they, like I tell people, changed the world. Like, can we imagine what the United States would have been if you had those millions of now freed slaves, right? with no access, and particularly those who are living in the Jim Crow South, no access whatsoever to education, Would the Harlem Renaissance have become what it become, with the black Wall Street, whether it was in Tulsa, whether in Philadelphia, these things that explode because of the access to education to now these first and second generations of people coming out of slavery, right? So I believe that that's the case and which is why I'll say again, here today, some of those challenges are there, some of the challenges are different than they were, obviously 50, 60, 70, 80 years ago, but we believe in organization that those challenges can be met with that same amazing synergy between the black and the Jewish community. Geoffrey Stern  27:26 A lot of people would argue that the rift or the change of the relationship between the African American community and the Jewish community was when the Jews or Israel stopped being looked at as the David in the Goliath story and we won the Six Day War. And how do you ensure that the facts are told, but also as you climb out of the pit, and as you achieve your goals, you shouldn't be necessarily punished for being successful. Success is not a sin. It's an inspiration. But it seems to me that's one of the challenges that we have, especially in the Jewish community for our next generation of children, who really do see ourselves not as the minority and don't see ourselves anymore mirrored in the African American community. Dumisani Washington  28:25 But one of my favorite things about the Jewish tradition of the Seder, is that you all lean and recline in the Seder today, and you tell your children, when we had the first one, we sat with our sandals on, our staff, in our hand, our belts ....because we were slaves leaving slavery, but now we are no longer. And that whole ethos of telling children, right? There's a strong parallel in the black American community, right? The whole point of going from struggle to a place where you can live in peace or at the very least, you recognize and realize the sacrifice of the people who came before you right? And I won't step into the controversial for lots of different reasons, we'll be able to unpack it, but let me just say this, for the black American experience when you're talking I often teach this in our sermons and other things that arc .... and let me say again, no, people are monolith. Obviously we just kind of put that on the table, all the Jews arent' alike all black Americans aren't alike..... Having said that, there is an overarching story when you talk about black Americans, who, from slavery to Jim Crow, segregation, black codes, all of those types of things to the modern era. And that story cannot accurately be told without talking about God and His people. In other words, when you're talking about the spirituals "Go Down Moses". "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho" and I talked about that in the book, these songs that are rooted in the scriptures, most of the time in, in the Tanakh, our Jewish brothers and sisters' side of the Bible. I mean, sometimes in the New Testament, most of the time, these songs are being sung in hope. And that hope was realized, right? It's not an Negro spiritual song technically, but I put it in that category, part of the greatest one ever. I mean, how it culminates would be "Lift Every Voice and Sing" us a song that today has all these political things connected to it for lots of different unfortunate reasons. But when James Weldon Johnson wrote that song, wrote it as a poem? Those stanzas and anybody listening to this, I want to tell Google that Google Lift Every Voice and Sing"; just read the words. And this was a very powerful, very, very much God and God's love, and our hope and our faith and our trust, and our honoring the people who came before us; all of those things. And he talked about being free. Now, it's written in 1899. Right? You still have questions. I mean, there are no laws against lynching there going on, it's still crushing racism. However, he as a father in the black community is not only acknowledging what God has done, there's amazing things that are happening. One of the economist's that I quote, in my book, Thomas Sol said that the black community after slavery, and less than 50 years after slavery went from 0% literacy to almost 50% literacy, in that half a century, something economic historians say has never happened before. And now you're later on, you're talking about the black Wall Street, you're talking about black oil barons and landowners and factory owners, right? You're talking about this black middle class emerging. There's been no civil rights bill, right? There's been no Pell grants for school. These things don't even exist yet. We're talking about the 19 teens and the 1920s. You're talking about black people who had previously been slaves for hundreds of years. Why am I saying all that we as a people know full well; if we know our history, know full well what it is to come from all of those dire situations into a place of blessing, even though there may be struggles just like our Jewish brothers and sisters. We are convinced an organization that as we know, as a black community, particularly younger people that we are talking with, and teaching, as we know and appreciate our history, not the history that's regurgitated in terms of media and, and for political purposes. But truly our history, there is a great deal to be proud of about that. And to see, as I said in the sermon a couple of months ago, not only does it not a victim narrative, I descended from superheroes, my people went through slavery, Jim Crow, and still build on Wall Street still built the Tuskegee Institute. Still, we're soldiers who fighting for their own freedom in the Civil War. I mean, you're talking on and on and on things that they should have never been able to accomplish. When I consider what they accomplished with not very much help often. I recognize the greatness of the heritage that I come from, then that allows me to see an Israel rise like a phoenix from the ashes and not spurn that but recognize that our Jewish brothers and sisters have gone through millennia of this and Israel then to be celebrated, not denigrated. Adam Mintz  33:12 Thank you. We want to thank you. Your passion, and your insight is really brought a kind of a new insight to our discussion here. We really want to thank you, you know, we at Madlik we start on time and we end on time, Shabbat is about to begin in just a little while. Hopefully we'll be able to invite you back in the future as we continue this conversation. But I know I join Geoffrey and everybody on the call and everybody who's gonna listen to the podcast. Thank you for joining us and for really your insight and your passion. You really leave us with so much to think about as we begin the Shabbat. Dumisani Washington  33:51 Thank you. Thank you for having me. Adam Mintz  33:53 Thank you Geoffrey, Shabbat Shalom, everybody, Geoffrey Stern  33:55 Shabbat Shalom. And Reb Dumisani, you mentioned the songs. There's a whole chapter in your book about Negro spirituals. And as the rabbi said, w are approaching the Shabbat. And as you observe the Sunday we observed Saturday, but you know that the secret of living without a land or being on a difficult mission is that Sabbath, the strength of the Sabbath, and the connection between Noah and the word Menucha which is "rest" is obvious. And there was a great poet named Yehuda halevi. And he wrote a poem about the Yona; the dove that Noah sent out of the ark to see if there was dry land. And he he said that on Shabbat. Yom Shabbaton Eyn L'shkoach, "the day of Shabbat you cannot forget"  Zechru l'reach Hanichoach"  He also uses Reach Nichoach which is a pleasing scent,Yonah Matzah Bominoach, the yonah, the dove found on it rest v'shom ynuchu yegiah koach  and there in the Shabbat , in that ark of rest on that ark of Sunday or Saturday is where we all gain strength. So I wish you continued success in all that you do. And that this Shabbat and this Sunday we all gather the strength to continue our mission. But I really do hope that we get another chance to study Torah together. And I really hope that all of the listeners go out and buy your book, Zionism in the Black Church because it is an absolute thrill. And I understand you're coming out with a new book that's going to talk more about the Jewish people and the various colors and flavors that we come in. Dumisani Washington  35:55 Hopefully to put that out next year sometime. Absolutely. Geoffrey Stern  35:59 Fantastic. Well thank you so much so Shabbat Shalom and we are we are in your debt. Dumisani Washington  36:05 Thank you. Shabbat Shalom and looking forward to bye bye   Music: Lift Every Voice and Sing - Melinda Dulittle https://youtu.be/6Dtk9h1gZOI 

Out Travel The System
Fantastic Tips to Get the Full France Experience

Out Travel The System

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:06


Ooh la la, it's time for the last deep dive into an international destination this season - get ready for it, Out Travel the System is heading to France! In this episode, host Nisreene Atassi draws on the expertise of Jackie Kai Ellis, an author, designer, and classically-trained pastry chef with a home base in Paris, and Antoine Walter, a Director, Market Management in France for Expedia, to suss out everything you need to plan out a jaunt to live la belle vie. Listen in as they list off all of the many places you can dream about visiting, from world-class museums, houses of high fashion, and the prehistoric art of the Lascaux cave. Take in the sights that inspired Monet, Brancusi, and Rodin, and make sure to make time to stop at a cafe for a restorative coffee and pastry every so often. They share their inside tips on how to access the best of French history and culture, outdoor adventure, and family-friendly fun. From how to get around to what days to avoid visiting museums, it's all right here in this episode. Here are just a few handy links to inspire your planning inspiration in France: Paris Travel Guide Brittany for beach time Rodin Museum MuCEM in Marseilles See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Better Than I Found It
64 | John Smith Part 1 (The Athlete) - 2-time Olympic Gold Medalist & 6-time World Champion Wrestler

Better Than I Found It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:04


John Smith is the Wrestling Coach at Oklahoma State. The next two episodes will feature Coach Smith. This first part is about him as an athlete while the next edition will be about his coaching. As an athlete, he won two Olympic Gold medals and was the World Champion six times. He takes us through his mentality and extreme training techniques to become the world's best at his sport. Fantastic stuff in both episodes! Thank you for coming on, Coach. Subscribe to the podcast for future episodes. You can follow us on Instagram and Facebook —> @BetterThanIFoundItPodcast Associated social media accounts: Coach McGraw - @BearCoachMcGraw Mikkel - @MikkelGolf Baylor Men's Golf - @BaylorMGolf Music: DriftMaster by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/betterthanifoundit/message

Magic Rays of Light
"I think we figured out a way to do it, and it's going to be fantastic"

Magic Rays of Light

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 53:21


Presented by ScreenTimes.netScreen Times Apple TV Release CalendarScreenTimes.net- Tweet Screen Times Sigmund Judge - Tweet Sigmund JudgeUp Next: The Transformers Movie (1986)Up Next: The James Bond Collection Watcher - Tweet Amjid Khan Up Next: No Time to Die Nikki Buziak - Tweet Nikki BuziakListen to The Lasso Effect PodcastUp Next: Physical This Week's Highlights -Apple TV+ 'Acapulco'Apple TV+ 'Ted Lasso'Apple Arcade 'Crossy Road+' Contact the show through iMessage, audio message or email: mrolfm@screentimes.net

Suzie Kennedy: Living With Marilyn
Marilyn and surgery: Is plastic really fantastic ?

Suzie Kennedy: Living With Marilyn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 36:55


In this episode I am joined by Lorenzo and Emma Costello from SE1 Medical Aesthetics. We discuss how plastic surgery is now more widely available to not just Hollywood stars but to members of the public.We discuss the rise of the instant fix and the ethics behind delivering medical procedures.Marilyn her self had a chin implant after, allegedly,  hearing someone call her "chinless". We also talk about how Marilyn wanted to grow old without the need of surgery,I also discuss the surgery I have and not have undergone .Follow @se1.medical.aesthetics 

The Gaming Observer: Daily Video Games News
Weekend | October 9 | I Beat Spider-Man!

The Gaming Observer: Daily Video Games News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 8:44


Show Notes Hey! I beat Marvel's Spider-Man, which is supremely cool. Fantastic game. Let's talk about it! Get In Touch Thanks for listening to the show! If you want to get in touch, you can always follow me on Twitter, or send me an email at info@thegamingobserver.com. Here's some other links you might be interested in as well: ⭐Support the show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheGamingObserver Huge thanks to the TGO Producers who make this show possible: Anna Marie (Paws) Andrew Anthony Burny Raeyl Rawdeath21 redphlegm Rob Matzker Telesthesia ⭐ Read this show as an email newsletter: https://thegamingobserver.substack.com/ ⭐ Join the community on Discord: https://www.thegamingobserver.com/discord ⭐ Listen in your Alexa routines (US Locale): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FLQ9RB1/ ⭐ Subscribe on YouTube for exclusive video content: https://www.youtube.com/TheGamingObserver

Brothers in Tech
The October Brothers in Tech Suggestions (BITS) Episode

Brothers in Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 44:51


You know, sometimes you just have to give the audience what they want…and we know you want more BiTs! So, we are here to please. In this episode of Brothers in Tech, the Brothers each provide two BiTs (Brothers in Tech Suggestions) that we think you will enjoy. This round is all about apps and services to save time and increase efficiency (although the video browser could be used for evil as well...). Brian's Picks· Cardhop: App (Mac/iOS) for managing your contacts. Easy access in menu bar (Mac). $3.33/month (which includes Fantastical…a Fantastic calendar app!)· YouCanBook.me: Appointment scheduling service to allow clients/students to grab a time on your schedule and make an appointment without bothering you! Free for basic use (which Brian does), and $10/month for premium features.Alan's Picks· Bartender: App (Mac) for managing your menu bar. Hide, reorganize, and create rules for your menu bar apps in order to make the most of them. $15 (one time) or SetApp subscription.· Lift Browser by Yac: App (Mac) that will keep your videos (e.g., Netflix, YouTube) front and center while you work. $5. Your Hosts:Alan Jackson is a producer of online content with Jackson Creative and survey researcher with Jackson Insight.Brian Jackson is an professor of Kinesiology at Pacific University and Product Director/Consultant at Senaptec, Inc. Have any feedback for the Brothers regarding this topic (or future topics)? Email info@themesh.tv.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep
Lazy DM‘s Companion Kickstarter 2nd Q&A

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 60:41


Mike goes through more questions for the Lazy DM's Companion Kickstarter! Links Back the Kickstarter Contents 00:00 Start - About the Kickstarter 02:09 Any modifications based on upcoming D&D changes? No. 04:05 Will the Companion be useful for non-D&D games? Yes! 05:05 Can you show the book in action? Yes! Next time. 06:33 Will the spiral-bound Workbook be available post-Kickstarter? Yes! 07:36 Really? No Stretch goals? Yep, no stretch goals. 09:04 Will the PDFs come through DriveThruRPG? Yes! 09:22 Will we get the PDFs of existing books right away? Yes! 10:00 Will the digital versions include existing ePubs? Yes! 10:44 Can we get the physical versions of the "Fantastic" book add-ons? Not through the Kickstarter. 11:52 Is the Companion "Done"? No. First draft is done. 13:02 Can we see what the books will look like? Not yet. 13:30 Can we add audiobooks as add-ons? Unfortunately, no. 15:00 Can I print maps for my own private use? Yes. 15:17 Can I give away extra digital copies? Yes. 16:02 Can we get the digital art as a download? Yes. 17:41 Will these questions get added to the FAQ? Yes. 18:09 Will there be a retailer pledge? No, but... 19:16 Will the printed books be available on Amazon? Yes, eventually. 20:19 Will Return look like Babar in hardcover? No. 21:17 Going to any conventions this year? No. 23:05 How different are the printed books from PoD? Nicer! 25:03 Experiences with Off-set Printing? Too early to say. 29:12 Plans for different languages? Not at the moment. 31:30 How do you plan to cope with the next 21 days? It's great! 35:48 A look at the TOC and design of the Companion 37:03 The Lands of the Fey page and design 42:51 Turning a 1d20 list into a 1d400 list 45:23 Useful guidelines and generators each in a single page 48:00 Not re-creating existing guidelines 49:36 Monster templates 57:57 Can I mix and match physical and PDF orders? Yes!

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep
Lazy DM‘s Companion Kickstarter 2nd Q&A

Sly Flourish's Lazy DM Prep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 60:41


Mike goes through more questions for the Lazy DM's Companion Kickstarter! Links Back the Kickstarter Contents 00:00 Start - About the Kickstarter 02:09 Any modifications based on upcoming D&D changes? No. 04:05 Will the Companion be useful for non-D&D games? Yes! 05:05 Can you show the book in action? Yes! Next time. 06:33 Will the spiral-bound Workbook be available post-Kickstarter? Yes! 07:36 Really? No Stretch goals? Yep, no stretch goals. 09:04 Will the PDFs come through DriveThruRPG? Yes! 09:22 Will we get the PDFs of existing books right away? Yes! 10:00 Will the digital versions include existing ePubs? Yes! 10:44 Can we get the physical versions of the "Fantastic" book add-ons? Not through the Kickstarter. 11:52 Is the Companion "Done"? No. First draft is done. 13:02 Can we see what the books will look like? Not yet. 13:30 Can we add audiobooks as add-ons? Unfortunately, no. 15:00 Can I print maps for my own private use? Yes. 15:17 Can I give away extra digital copies? Yes. 16:02 Can we get the digital art as a download? Yes. 17:41 Will these questions get added to the FAQ? Yes. 18:09 Will there be a retailer pledge? No, but... 19:16 Will the printed books be available on Amazon? Yes, eventually. 20:19 Will Return look like Babar in hardcover? No. 21:17 Going to any conventions this year? No. 23:05 How different are the printed books from PoD? Nicer! 25:03 Experiences with Off-set Printing? Too early to say. 29:12 Plans for different languages? Not at the moment. 31:30 How do you plan to cope with the next 21 days? It's great! 35:48 A look at the TOC and design of the Companion 37:03 The Lands of the Fey page and design 42:51 Turning a 1d20 list into a 1d400 list 45:23 Useful guidelines and generators each in a single page 48:00 Not re-creating existing guidelines 49:36 Monster templates 57:57 Can I mix and match physical and PDF orders? Yes!

Casual Cinecast: Blockbuster Movies to Criterion & Classic Film
The Many Saints of Newark, Squid Game, Midnight Mass, Fantastic Fest 2021

Casual Cinecast: Blockbuster Movies to Criterion & Classic Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 72:16


This week Chris, Mike, and Justin review the Sopranos prequel film, The Many Saints of Newark. But first, they discuss Squid Game, Midnight Mass, and Chris gives us his favorite films he saw at Fantastic Fest 2021.  - Intro (00:00:00 - 00:04:54) - News on the March! (00:04:54 - 00:35:03)     - Fantastic Fest 2021     - Midnight Mass     - Squid Game - The Many Saints of Newark (00:35:03 - 1:11:39)     - Spoilers start at 00:46:30 - Outro (01:11:39 - 01:12:15) Also, for all your movie and game news, reviews, and more, check out our friends at www.cinelinx.com.Follow us on: Twitter Facebook Instagram Email us at: casualcinemedia@gmail.com Talk Criterion Collection, film, tv, and other stuff with us in our Facebook group at:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/casualcinecast Intro/Outro Music courtesy of Jake Wagner-Russell at www.soundcloud.com/bopscotch

Filmpocalypse
#93 Pig (2021)

Filmpocalypse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:05


Welcome, they guys start the show talk about movies premiering and appearing in the 2021 Fantastic fest, then they give their opinions on Nicolas Cage's triumph in Pig. Email: filmpocalypseshow@gmail.comInstagram: FilmpocalypsepodFacebook: FilmpocalypseshowTwitter: Filmpocalypse1Letterboxd: Filmpocalypse

The HEAL Podcast
The Healing Magic of Fungi with Fantastic Fungi Director Louie Schwartzberg

The HEAL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 52:25


Louie Schwartzberg is an award-winning cinematographer, director and producer who has spent his notable career providing breathtaking imagery using his time-lapse, high speed and macro cinematography techniques. Schwartzberg is a visual artist who breaks barriers, connects with audiences and tells stories that celebrate life and reveal the mysteries and wisdom of nature, people, and places. Today, I sit down with Louie to talk about his latest documentary, Fantastic Fungi which is a visual masterpiece, a top trending film on Netflix, and the holder of a remarkable 100% score on Rotten Tomatoes. We dive deep into the magical world of mushrooms, exploring their medicinal properties -including how they can assist in healing ailments from breast cancer to PTSD -and how they can even help with climate change. This episode is absolutely fascinating, so get ready for this magical journey into the fantastic world of fungi.   Visit https://fantasticfungi.com or on Instagram @fantasicfungi to find out more!   Produced by Dear Media

Walt's Apartment , A Disney Podcast
Season 2 Episode 8 - Fantastic Fun Fall Sing A Long With Jeremy Goff

Walt's Apartment , A Disney Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 70:24


Join us here in Walt's Apartment live  as we welcome musician Jeremy Goff. Sit back , relax, and enjoy Jeremys amazing renditions of some of your favorite Disney song and a stay for the awesome ending. Thank you all so much for all of your support  and as always , We hope you enjoy the view from Walt's Apartment.   Join Jeremy every Friday night for Goffstock  Goffstock: A Quarantine Music Experience | FacebookCheck us out  on our website : Walt's Apartment (waltsapt.com)Walt's Apartment Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/WaltsApartmentPodcastWalt's Apartment Instagram AccountsShow Page   @waltsapartmentpodcastAmber @amberatincosplayBreanna  @breanna_kae7Samantha @smantha_mlodeckiDavid  @blerdhulkTim @mrtiminycricketSean @seannybergEthan@thewolfofmainstusaJade @snips_jrShawn @bigpapadisneyJades Tattoo Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/Tattoos-by-Jade-Robles-101662645499779Be sure to get all your news from the Disney Universe from our friends at The Disinsider. They are your one-stop for all things Disney.Also if you are looking to book a Disney Vacation please use our friends at Getaway Today. Also if you call 855-GET-AWAY and mention Walt's Apartment you will get a special value just for mentioning us.Start your Getaway Today Vacation with the link belowhttps://www.getawaytoday.com?referrerid=8636Getaway  Today Awesome Disney Merchandisehttps://www.getawaytoday.com/merchandise?referrerid=8636Thanks for always supporting us here at Walt's Apartment.

A Quest for Well-Being
Healing Chronic Fatigue & Fibromyalgia

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:42


— “I find that most people have no idea who they really are or what they really want. They go through life doing what everybody else has told them to do, living up to others' expectations. Until I had the illness, I never even thought about what I wanted. My life was all about “shoulds”—what my parents, religion, school, government, and everyone else thought I should be and do. Talk about what a friend of mine called “getting should on!” I never even considered what it was that I wanted . . . until CFS and fibromyalgia left me homeless and sleeping in parks, my dreams shattered. But when I recovered, I realized that not all those things I had been carrying were my dreams. As I improved enough to go back to medical school, I chose to pick up the parts of my own life that felt good to me, that I was passionate about. And I left the rest behind. This created a space for joy and the power to create anything that I chose—including effective treatment for everybody with this illness. The power to be authentically me . . . which, if you think about it, is quite priceless.”  - Writes Dr. Teitelbaum Valeria Teles interviews Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum — the author of “From Fatigued to Fantastic! Fourth Edition: A Clinically Proven Program to Regain Vibrant Health and Overcome Chronic Fatigue.” Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., is one of the most frequently quoted integrative, pain and fibromyalgia medical authorities in the world. He is the author of couple of books from his latest book to, Pain Free, 1,2,3!, the Complete Guide to Beating Sugar Addiction, Real Cause Real Cure, The Fatigue and Fibromyalgia Solution, Diabetes Is Optional and the popular free Smart Phone app Cures A-Z. He is the lead author of 7 studies on effective treatment for fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, and a study on effective treatment of autism using NAET. Dr. Teitelbaum appears often as a guest on news and talk shows nationwide including Good Morning America, The Dr. Oz Show, Oprah & Friends, CNN, and FoxNewsHealth. To learn more about Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum and his work, please visit: vitality101.com and endfatigue.com     — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

The Kinda Nerdy Girls Podcast
It's like a Fricken Nerdy Weird Ridiculous Fantastic Explosion of Things We Were Not Expecting

The Kinda Nerdy Girls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:29


From Halloween favorites to Wiener Dog News, KJ and the Kinda Nerdy Girls give you updates on the latest Binges & Books recommendations, why Squid Game IS a must watch and why the Mario movie is going to be a disaster!

On A Dark, Cold Night
Episode 164: Fabulous, Fantastic

On A Dark, Cold Night

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 30:38


The Moon. I have a story. I think I have a story.

The Jungle Room
1: You're Not Dreaming: Priscilla Presley

The Jungle Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:51


It's the very first episode of two great podcasts merged together in what three people are calling, “Fantastic!”  (Spoiler Alert: it's the hosts who are saying it.)  In this episode, Jaime Kay introduces Jungle Room listeners to Johnny Sanchez, Elijiah Isreal and special guest host, Dr. Bil.  Special guest, Priscilla Presley joins Jaime Kay and Johnny for “5 Minute Drill” and answers questions we are sure she's never been asked!  Get ready to laugh and also love the very first episode of Life and Laughs In The Jungle Room!  #actress #priscillapresley #dallas #nakedgunmovies #dancingwiththestars #presley 

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
Fantastic emails and texts: How to pre-fill carts for SMS with Shopify and Season Three's frictionless sales pitch

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:57


“Mentioning free shipping and returns is something that can help to ease buyer concerns.” @jayde3sai #DTCPOD“Put together a link strategy for sending pre-filled carts via text using Shopify permalinks.” @jayde3sai #DTCPODWe Speak About:[00:46] Season Three email strategy to ease buyer concern[02:58] Shopify's SMS link strategyTry this email from Season Three and this SMS link strategy from ShopifyIn today's episode of fantastic emails and texts, we're looking at content from Season Three and a great SMS tip if you have Shopify.Season Three is a brand that creates contemporary apparel influenced by art culture and an outdoor ethos, while our Shopify tip comes from Brian Dickey at Postscript.Season Three sends out a great informative email, while this Shopify tip is awesome for an SMS strategy that utilizes url links.Stay tuned as we dive into an awesome email from Season Three and an easy access SMS strategy for Shopify stores. If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:Great email from Season Three: https://reallygoodemails.com/emails/free-shipping-and-returns-on-the-anselHow to send pre-filled carts via text with Shopify: https://twitter.com/BryanDickey_/status/1437910490374680581

HACK IT OUT GOLF
GOLF IN 2021 WAS FANTASTIC AND SCOTT MAKES US ALL SAD

HACK IT OUT GOLF

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 51:39


Mark and Scott review the 2021 golfing season with the last episode of season 1 of the HackItOutGolf podcast. Scott has an announcement at the end of the show. 

tbs eFM Men on Air
Q&A with Masters (자동차 전문가 이준석) / Joel's Fantastic, Elastic Charts

tbs eFM Men on Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 70:55


Football Daily
MNC: Fantastic Foden, super Salah and Ranieri returns

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 47:23


Mark Chapman, Micah Richards, Chris Sutton and Rory Smith analyse Liverpool and Manchester City's dramatic draw in the Premier League on our Monday Night Club edition of the pod. The panel discuss Phil Foden's impressive performance on the left wing for Man City and whether Pep Guardiola should keep him in that position in future. After his stunning goal, is Mo Salah the best player in the world right now and should Liverpool extend his contract? And The Athletic's Italian football expert James Horncastle joins the pod to give us an insight into Claudio Ranieri, as he's appointed Watford's new manager. TOPICS: 2'10” - Analysis of Manchester City's tactics in the first half 6'00” – Chat on Phil Foden's performance and on what his best position is 13'43” – Is Mo Salah the best player in the world right now? 21'24” – Is it a four horse title race? 23'40” – Are Manchester United's coaching staff getting the best out of the squad? 34'53” – Reaction to Claudio Ranieri being appointed Watford's new manager

Becoming The Lion Podcast
Andrew Coates - Making the gym a great experience & Becoming a FANTASTIC coach

Becoming The Lion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:40


Pride, in this EP I'm joined by a phenomenal coach in the fitness industry Andrew Coates. Andrew has been a coach for over 10 years, a writer for T-Nation, successful online coach, and just an overall cool guy! We dive into how grow your coaching business and spread your message, issues with the industry, and dealing with haters as you grow! I know you will all enjoy this EP and find some value in it. Enjoy and make sure to follow Andrew on his platforms.  @andrewcoatesfitness https://andrewcoatesfitness.com/ Support the show:  Programs: szatstrength.net  HD muscle: Code: "szatstrength" Apparel for your brand: Foreverfierce.com Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/szatstrength?fan_landing=true  

Finding The Fantastic
Communication and emotions pt1- finding the fantastic

Finding The Fantastic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 7:21


Finding The Fantastic
Communication and emotions part two – finding the fantastic

Finding The Fantastic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 6:52


The Athletic Baseball Show: A show about MLB
Ken's Mailbag | A Fantastic Finish

The Athletic Baseball Show: A show about MLB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 47:13


Ken and DVR discuss the fantastic final weekend of the 2021 regular season, two loaded Wild Card matchups on tap for this week, and several mailbag questions including a possible change to playoff seeding in the future, concerns about expansion depleting the talent pool, how to account for defensive value in MVP voting, and much more.  Follow Ken on Twitter: @Ken_Rosenthal Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Soul and Wit
85. Fantastic Fall

Soul and Wit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 33:16


We love this time of year and are sharing how we embrace fall. We'll tell you where we are going, what we are watching and most importantly what we are cooking, baking and eating! We hope this inspires you to put on a cozy sweater and relax into this beautiful time of year. P.S. If it's a different season where you are, we know you'll still find good recommendations for more joy and delight in this episode.   Favorite Things: Bailey: Seatback organizer Necessaire Body Oil   Courtney: Get Sleepy Pod Get Sleepy Pod (Tropical Spa episode) Nothing Much Happens Here PATREON:Support us on Patreon! Check out our Tall, Grande and Venti tiers.   Episode Notes and Resources: Necessaire SerumSaje Chai Essential OilPrimally Pure Autumn Collection Our Friend Terms of Endearment The Fault in Our Stars It's Complicated Legally Blonde Good Will Hunting October Sky When Harry Met Sally Dan in Real Life Mona Lisa Smile Gilmore Girls Virgin River Roasted Tomato and Bread Soup Dog Baking TikTok Thank you for supporting us on Patreon.   If you are interested in sponsoring an episode of Soul & Wit, contact us here: soulandwitpodcast@gmail.com   Where you can find us: Bailey: @beautifuldetour or www.beautifuldetour.com Courtney: @bemorewithless or www.bemorewithless.com

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast
229- The Animanicast Goes to Salt Lake FanX and Animaniacs in Concert!

The Animanicast- An Animaniacs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 69:09


It's time for the Animanicast! Featuring Reflections on going to Animaniacs in Concert and Salt Lake FanX Join your hosts Joey, Nathan and Kelly in the "Animanicast!" A podcast dedicated to Animaniacs and its sister shows.  Today Nathan and Joey reflect upon their recent adventures to seeing "Animaniacs in Concert" and going to Salt Lake FanX! Listen to some great clips of the concert and some highlights of their favorite panels at FanX. What did they enjoy about their experiences and what would they like to see improved in the future? Listen to today's episode to find out how the water tower ratings of these two FANtastic events!  Support The Animanicast The Animanicast now has a Patreon! Head over to Patreon.com/Animanicast for exclusive episode commentaries with Tom Ruegger as well as other awesome rewards! Join the party! Head on over to Discord.Animanicast.com today to join our RetroZap discussion group. You'll get to chat with the hosts of this show as well as the hosts of other RetroZap podcasts! If you'd like to support our show there's lots of ways to do it! First of all, you could go onto Apple Podcasts and leave us a five-star positive review. Also, don't forget to tell a friend about the show! Your retweets and post shares help others find us. By going to Amazon.Animanicast.com you can find some of the newest Animaniacs merchandise including clothing, toys, videos, and even books written by some of the original writers of the show. Get some great stuff and help support our show! You can even use Amazon.Animanicast.com as your portal to Amazon on your next shopping trip and you'll still be supporting our show with any purchase you make. You could also purchase some hand prepared decals from Joey at Decals.Animanicast.com Interested in getting some Animanicast MERCHANDISE? It's in stock now at TeePublic! Get yours at Teepublic.Animanicast.com

SpeakBeasty: A Fantastic Beasts Podcast by MuggleNet.com

It's the official return of SpookBeasty! Phoenix Register: IT'S ALL HAPPENING. We have a title! A new release date! Everyone asks “why is Aurelius?” but never “how is Aurelius?” We try to figure out WB's marketing game. Geoff is unimpressed by the summary. Even when he's the worst villain, he's still Mads Mikkelsen. Owl Post: Is Bunty going to sacrifice herself for Newt? We ship Aberforth/Bunty now too. Main Discussion: James Newton Howard Soundtracks tell their own story. Ann reveals her embarrassing James Newton Howard faves. There's a surprising parallel between Sisu and Newt. Is Tina musically underserved? No-Maj Movie Magic: the history of film scores Fantastic Film Scores and Where They Came From Geoff will fight you and everyone he knows about the Star Wars score.   Theme Music: “Swing Has Swung,” by Shane Ivers (https://www.silvermansound.com) Sound Effects: (https://www.FesliyanStudios.com)   Podcast Question: What do you think the ‘Secrets of Dumbledore' are, or which Dumbledore's secrets are they?

Finding Genius Podcast
Stress, Pain, and Mental Health Management Through the Fantastic Benefits of Acupuncture with Dr. Jannine Krause

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 30:19


Can acupuncture bring the relief you may seek? For pain, stress, mental health, and chronic issues, the vast array of benefits can bring an end to the struggles you face. Listen up to learn: How acupuncture can help the body The physical mechanisms behind acupuncture Why some folks may resist acupuncture treatment Dr. Jannine Krause, a naturopathic doctor, acupuncturist, and host of The Health Fix Podcast, shares her lifetime of work as an acupuncturist, helping to bring patients to the relief sought.  The modern world of medicine has failed many folks, who have turned to Eastern and traditional medicine for answers. Using acupuncture needles, blood flow and attention can be brought to specific parts of the body, assisting in body-to-brain signaling. Additionally, cupping, gua sha, and other techniques used in concert can bring additional relief for stubborn problems. Even if the initial issue has been solved, consistent treatments periodically can keep the body and mind healthy. Visit https://doctorjkrausend.com/about/ Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C  

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Hasty Treat - Desktop Apps + New Tech We Love

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 32:30


In this Hasty Treat, Scott and Wes talk about the hottest new tech they love! Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Show Notes 03:30 - Lucy Language https://lucylang.org/ A concise language for describing Finite State Machines 06:10 - MDSvex https://github.com/pngwn/MDsveX Mdx for Svelte Smartypants options transforms ASCII punctuation into fancy typographic punctuation HTML entities https://github.com/rehypejs/awesome-rehype 09:56 - RECut https://getrecut.com/ 12:26 - Fig https://fig.io/ It's an app you install on your computer, it adds autocomplete to your terminal Works with most popular terminals Autocompletes git commands NPM commands + tons more - npm install ___ works Adds descriptions of what each command does Mac only - again another reason why Mac is best! Themeable Why not use Fish/ZSH? This isn't a replacement for anything, it's just autocomplete on top These fish plugins are to vim, as Fig is to VS Code Better UI is KEY 15:56 - Warp https://www.warp.dev/ Rust-based termnial Very fast Extensions and themes Share commands and sessions Great for remote server dev Share terminal state - with share links 19:33 - Raycast https://www.raycast.com/ App launcher File Finder Workflow runner Everyone is asking why is it better than Alfred better UI Better outputs math Better defaults - currency conversion Fast as hell Better integrations More Flexible 21:26 - Table Plus https://tableplus.com/ Fantastic little DB tool 23:59 - Obsidian Update https://obsidian.md/ Wes: I haven't got into it - find myself still going back to VS Code 26:50 - Descript Update https://www.descript.com/ All-in-one audio and video editing, like a doc Links https://chriscoyier.net/ https://hyper.is/ https://www.alfredapp.com/ https://strapi.io/ https://studio3t.com/ https://www.mindnode.com/ https://remarkable.com/ https://www.notion.so/ https://joplinapp.org/ http://www.telestream.net/screenflow/overview.htm https://shinywhitebox.com/ Tweet us your tasty treats! Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Lights Camera Barstool
LCB 2.0 Ep. 003 - Super Mario Movie Cast Reveal, BD Wong & Billy Bob Thornton Interviews, and Dear Evan Hansen Review (with guest John Feitelberg)

Lights Camera Barstool

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 141:46


|| Movie Rankings/Streaming Database: MovieRankings.net || Subscribe to our YouTube channel: youtube.com/lightscamerabarstool || (0:00) – FOOTBALL! FOOTBALL! FOOD! || (15:31) – Chris Pratt is Mario… || (22:10) – Netflix's Stranger Things & The Rock shit || (39:01) – Ad Read #2 || (41:42) – First Kristen Stewart Princess Di trailer || (46:57) – Fantastic *fart noise* Beasts || (52:54) – Kurt Warner movie trailer, YEESH! || (1:01:08) – Ad Read #3 || (1:02:05) – BD WONG INTERVIEW || (1:25:54) – DEAR EVAN HANSEN REVIEW (SPOILERS) || (1:47:19) – BILLY BOB THORNTON INTERVIEW || (2:06:11) – Streaming Suggestions, vol. 002