Podcasts about Fantastic

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 6,148PODCASTS
  • 10,771EPISODES
  • 51mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 29, 2022LATEST
Fantastic

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about Fantastic

    Show all podcasts related to fantastic

    Latest podcast episodes about Fantastic

    Magesy® R-Evolution™
    Parallels WAV-FANTASTiC

    Magesy® R-Evolution™

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


    .:Parallels WAV:. FANTASTiC | 02 May 2022 | 65 MB Weaving spacious soundscapes, lucid leads, and Dubbed Chords, Parallels drives an entwining journey into Dubbed Techno. Pack contains two full […]

    Magesy® R-Evolution™
    Drum Machines: CR78 WAV-FANTASTiC

    Magesy® R-Evolution™

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


    Drum Machines: CR78 FANTASTiC | 31 May 2022 | 1 MB We sourced the most pristine CR78 we could find and then carefully sampled each and every sound from the […]

    Magesy® R-Evolution™
    Chillin On The Keys 2 WAV-FANTASTiC

    Magesy® R-Evolution™

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


    Chillin On The Keys 2 FANTASTiC | 31 May 2022 | 19 MB Chillin On The Keyz 2′ brings you 4 Kits that are filled with inspiring Hip Hop & […]

    Magesy® R-Evolution™
    Chillin On The Keys 5 WAV-FANTASTiC

    Magesy® R-Evolution™

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


    Chillin On The Keys 5 FANTASTiC | 31 May 2022 | 22 MB ‘Chillin On The Keys 5’ brings you 4 Kits that are filled with inspiring Hip Hop & […]

    The Reel Fan Review
    Mr. Fantastic & The Black Phone Review

    The Reel Fan Review

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 54:10


    This week, Jav and B talk about the MCU rumors that John Krasinski may not continue his role as Mr. Fantastic and our thoughts on that.  We also go into a non-spoiler and spoiler review of "The Black Phone".Support the show

    Magesy® R-Evolution™
    Zaytown Trap 8 WAV-FANTASTiC

    Magesy® R-Evolution™

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    Zaytown Trap 8 WAV FANTASTiC | 01 May 2022 | 70 MB ‘Zaytown Trap 8’ is a banging Trap sample pack inspired by the likes of Gucci Mane, Migos, Yung […]

    Andy Ward Mixes & Shows
    In Conversation with Harold Heath – Long Relationships

    Andy Ward Mixes & Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 72:35


    A FANTASTIC insight into a sometimes-described 'reluctant' career in the music game. An Incredible Journey from Unknown DJ to Small-Time DJ. The post In Conversation with Harold Heath – Long Relationships appeared first on DJ Andy Ward.

    Magesy® R-Evolution™
    We Rise WAV-FANTASTiC

    Magesy® R-Evolution™

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


    .: We Rise WAV :. FANTASTiC | 30 May 2022 | 36 MB “We Rise” is an inspired sample pack from all the tragedies that has been going on we […]

    Movie Chatter Podcast

    RRR Dave Don and Bill Review and gush over RRR! DOWNLOAD NOW!!! WE ARE NOW ON YOUTUBE! PLEASE FIND US AND SUBSCRIBE! Fantastic artwork this and every week is from elbycreative.com Send All questions to moviechatterpodcast@gmail.com #podcasting #movieaddict #cinemalovers #moviechatter #netflix #hometheater #podcasts #amazonprimevideo #netflix #hulu #hbomax #sex #2021films #moviechatterpodcast #HORROR #moviereviews #love #fun #followme #RRR --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/moviechatterpodcast/message

    Voices of Courage with Ken D Foster
    Voices of Courage, June 15, 2022

    Voices of Courage with Ken D Foster

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:58


    217: The Courage to Become Pain Free with Jacob Teitelbaum Chronic Pain: The Impact on the 50 Million Americans Who Have It. Researchers estimate that 50 million adults in the United States are dealing with chronic pain. What percentage of Americans live with pain? The majority of Americans — 58.9 percent of adults — are living with pain. Back pain is the most common type of pain, affecting nearly 2 out of 5 U.S. adults according to the findings from a report released by the National Center for Health Statistics Where does pain originate from? Show Summary: Learn how to get rid of chronic pain as Ken D Foster dedicates this show to living pain free. Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D. is Ken's guest. He is one of the most frequently quoted integrative, pain and fibromyalgia medical authorities in the world. Show Benefits: Learn the Latest Ways to Get Pain Free Let Go of Pain Medications that Don't Work Understand How To Heal Most Chronic Pain Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., is one of the most frequently quoted integrative, pain and fibromyalgia medical authorities in the world. He is the author of the best-selling From Fatigued to Fantastic!(Penguin/Avery 2021) , Pain Free, 1,2,3!, the Complete Guide to Beating Sugar Addiction, Real Cause Real Cure, The Fatigue and Fibromyalgia Solution, Diabetes Is Optional and the popular free Smart Phone app Cures A-Z. He is the lead author of 7 studies on effective treatment for fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, and a study on effective treatment of autism using NAET. Dr. Teitelbaum appears often as a guest on news and talk shows nationwide including Good Morning America, The Dr. Oz Show, Oprah & Friends, CNN, and FoxNewsHealth.  2018 : The Courage to Run Toward Your Goliaths with Dr. Eli Jones Barely out of their teenage years, Dr Eli Jones and his wife, Fern, overcame what seemed to be insurmountable challenges as they rose from poverty to positions of influence. Ken D Foster interviews Dr Jones on his new book, Run Toward Your Goliaths. Dr. Eli Jones is a Professor of Marketing, Lowry and Peggy Mays Eminent Scholar, and former Dean of Mays Business School at his alma mater, Texas A&M University Barely out of their teenage years, he and his wife, Fern, married and overcame what seemed to be insurmountable challenges as they rose from poverty to positions of influence. This is what his new book, Run Toward Your Goliaths, is inspired by.  In his marketing career, Jones has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Marketing Association's Sales Special Interest Group and is the co-author of Selling ASAP and Strategic Sales Leadership: Breakthrough Thinking for Breakthrough Results.

    The Playwriting Podcast
    Where is the Flow in your Writing Workflow?

    The Playwriting Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 14:27


    Ken Wolf, Artistic Director of Manhattan Repertory Theatre in New York City, presents the 311th episode of THE PLAYWRITING PODCAST. Episode Topic: "Where is the Flow in your Writing Workflow?"   My New Video Course - filmed and fully edited by Yours Truly How to Write a Fantastic 10 Minute Play in 2 Hours! https://www.howtowriteplays.com/fantastic-10play-2   My Editing and Formatting service: https://www.howtowriteplays.com/play-editing-formatting   And check out my other Podcast about FEAR at: https://www.manhattanrep.com/fear   Email: How2WritePlays@yahoo.com

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
    Opportunities in Self Storage

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 16:12


    For 12 years Andrew Leedom has been working successfully with his W2 job as a Structural Engineer, being a father, and finding he transitioned into commercial real estate specifically in self-storage.  Highlights: [00:00 - 04:19] Transitioning from a Structural Engineer to an Investor in Real Estate Andrew Leedom is a husband and father to four kids.  He transitioned from his structural engineering to investing in commercial real estate, focusing specifically on self-storage.   [04:19 - 08:33] Self Storage: A Hot Asset Class The self-storage market is hot and there are opportunities to invest in this sector. Self-storage is a good investment option because it is a hot asset class and the market is consolidating quickly. It is important to make deals that are profitable and have long-term potential.   [08:34 - 13:06] Trying to Focus on  Projects that are Already Available Conversion of a 60,000 square foot warehouse to indoor vehicle storage Looking at deals where the market isn't oversaturated and there's still some demand Underwriting for an indoor vehicle storage facility Andrew shares about doing a feasibility study specifically on boat and RV storage He expects  to start leasing within a month [13:06 - 16:11] Closing Segment Reach out to Andrew  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “Going to the dealership Just making sure they know what we are doing and that we're here, that could assist them in selling the vehicles.  If their customers know they've got a place to put them”  - Andrew Leedom ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Andrew Leedom on LinkedIn  or visit their website at: Self Storage Stewardship Connect with me:   Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Andrew Leedom: a lot of it will be word of mouth going to the dealerships and getting in touch with the folks that are selling the vehicles. Same thing with the RVs going to the RV dealers and just making sure they know that what we're doing and that we're here and, that could assist them in selling the vehicles. If their customers know they've got a place to put 'em.  [00:00:31 ] Sam Wilson: Andrew Leham is a husband and father to four kids. He transitioned from his structural engineering w two to invest in commercial real estate, focusing specifically on self-storage. Andrew, welcome to the show.  [00:00:41] Andrew Leedom: Thank you for having me, Sam. I'm glad to be here.  [00:00:45] Sam Wilson: Hey man, pleasure's mine. There's three questions.I ask every ghost. She comes in the show 90 seconds or less. Where did you start? Where are you now? How did you  [00:00:50] Andrew Leedom: get there? Well, where I started, I studied to be a structural engineer and did that for 12 years and transitioned to the commercial space about a year and a half ago. And currently investing in self storage and working with a. [00:01:05] Andrew Leedom: A group doing multi-family self storage, some hotel conversion stuff, but I'm focused on the self storage part of that.  [00:01:11] Sam Wilson: Interesting. So you were a structural engineer for 12 years? Yes. What were you doing as a structural  [00:01:18] Andrew Leedom: engineer? I got to see a little bit of everything. I did started my career off in the inspection world, doing some bridge inspections and transitioned to building design and then to waterfront design. [00:01:29] Andrew Leedom: So designing bridges, designing peers and waterfront structures doing some work for the shipyard port of Virginia doing some my, my latest job. I got to do some underwater inspecting, which was, A lot less glamorous than it sounds  [00:01:44] Sam Wilson: right. I mean, you're like decked out in scuba gear doing other water inspections. [00:01:48] Sam Wilson: Oh, my word. Yes. That's that's wild. When you look at the difficulties of the projects you were designing and building and inspecting, and then compare it to self storage. Do you feel like you, you now it's much easier or is it just different.  [00:02:05] Andrew Leedom: It's it's different, but you know, one thing that, that led me to pursue self storage when I was determining kind of between the various asset classes was the It's not an easy business, but it's a simple business. [00:02:19] Andrew Leedom: So the simplicity was very appealing. Both the structure as well as the business. I mean, the structure you're for drive up units, you've got a concrete slab and steel building. And not a lot of moving parts. So I appreciate that.  [00:02:34] Sam Wilson: I bet you do. Yeah, I would think from a construction perspective, you're like, okay, this is really easy compared to say a bridge over an enormous river. [00:02:46] Sam Wilson: Yeah. Yes. That That is really cool. So you made a point there where you said some of the effect of, when you were, assessing the various asset classes. Trying to figure out which one maybe you wanted to pursue. What was that process like  [00:02:58] Andrew Leedom: for you? I started off my investing career back in 2015 in the residential multifamily, a few duplexes Plex and through the years, saw that, real estate really is, there's nothing like it's it was doing. [00:03:12] Andrew Leedom: What I thought it would and growing but the time it was gonna take was gonna be a lot longer than I like. And so that was kind of what got me set on the commercial space. And I started just as a passive investor and some multi-family syndications and and then made the decision with my wife, that we were gonna make the commercial thing work. [00:03:31] Andrew Leedom: And so the start of that was just evaluating. Various various asset classes and really came down to three. It was multifamily mobile home parks and self storage. And so I just broke those down. I really like all three of those asset classes. I think they've all got a lot going for 'em recession resistant. [00:03:50] Andrew Leedom: Multifamily is the bread and butter it's, the everything's built on that. When I was looking at where I was with my W2 and just trying to figure out something that I could build and get my foot in while working a full-time job. I thought the multi-family space just with all the institutional money and the. [00:04:11] Andrew Leedom: How hot the space was gonna be a lot more difficult than the other ones and same thing with mobile home park, what led me, I, I really like that asset class. It really serves That affordable income and especially when you can own the ground and and lease the space. [00:04:29] Andrew Leedom: But really in that space, similarly, they're building and developing fewer and it's most municipalities aren't allowing 'em. And so. I just saw the competition growing and growing in that space as well. And so self storage was kind of where I landed, both what I mentioned earlier, just with the simplicity of the business model and the ability to really set up a business, to run remotely. [00:04:50] Andrew Leedom: So you're not as stuck in the location and with the self storage it's still several years behind multifamily in, in that the market is consolidating rather quickly. , it's definitely been the buzzword the past probably four to five years and is a hot market. [00:05:09] Andrew Leedom: But there's still a lot of potential right now, currently the market there, it's still over 50% mom and pop. And so there's that opportunity to have direct to owner contact conversations and really pick up opportunities direct from those mom and pop. Owners. And so that's where I felt like I could get my foot in the door and, focus more on the secondary tertiary markets and and get started. [00:05:34] Sam Wilson: Got it. That's that's really cool. Tell me at what point in time did you know you could transition from your W2 and what steps maybe would you recommend to somebody else thinking about that.  [00:05:44] Andrew Leedom: Yeah. I the the W2 transition was was actually a mix. I closed on my. My first two properties last year, and both of them were from, mom and pop operators and really kind of run into the ground. [00:05:57] Andrew Leedom: Very low occupancy needed a lot of capital improvements. So I knew purchasing those. It was gonna take a while before the cash flow caught up to where I would be able to step away from my W2 job. Right. And so the plan was just to, to run them until we hit. Hit that break even point and be able to step away and, try to scale. [00:06:18] Andrew Leedom: But fortunately com I mentioned earlier community investment group, who I had invested in as a passive investor and they're local to me. And I've really grown to be friends with a lot of the guys in that group. And they knew what I was doing and. Had kept them up to date. [00:06:34] Andrew Leedom: And and so once I got to that point they offered me a position with their team and just said, well, why don't you just come and join us and start our self storage division? So you don't have to wait until. Wait until your cash flow catches up to where you need it to be. So you can take the jump and start doing this stuff full time. [00:06:52] Sam Wilson: That's cool. So you went, you, I mean you, so you're still a w two or did you go in as a partner? How did you  [00:06:57] Andrew Leedom: arrange that? Yeah, it's right now I'm a 10 99, but also have some partnership on the deals. . Hi little girl. [00:07:05] Andrew Leedom: What are you talking about? I am talking about self storage. Can I come see you after I'm done? All right. Bye. Bye.  [00:07:11] Sam Wilson: You know, Andrew, I think we might leave that in. That's that one that's super cute. And two, the reality of, what it takes to business, right. I mean that's right. [00:07:23] Sam Wilson: A lot the stuff from home there's kids in the background, there is transition there's just everyday life. So that's really cool. I love that. Fantastic. That's right. So you went to work with them, 10 99 you said, Hey, , we're gonna start taking down properties. Talk to me like what opportunities are you seeing right now in the market? [00:07:43] Sam Wilson: Self storage, like you said, it's a hot asset class. How are you guys finding opportunity?  [00:07:47] Andrew Leedom: Yeah, really the market right now listed properties are just going for insane values and cap rates. [00:07:58] Andrew Leedom: And, , a few of the properties I've looked at recently are just these buildings, whether they're conversions or new development that go up and with where the market is, the developers are basically just listing these empty buildings and selling them for year three, year four performer numbers. [00:08:18] Andrew Leedom: Right. And so , when you're competing with that, it really takes making, creating deals. Either with trying to make those connections with owners directly we're still gearing up our acquisitions team and trying to accelerate. Build that out to focus just because we've been trying to focus on the projects we've already got in house. [00:08:39] Andrew Leedom: So, one of 'em that we're working on now is the conversion of about a 60,000 square foot warehouse to indoor vehicle storage and the back five acres doing a boat and RV enclosed covered, open storage trying to make that. Work with that. So, so yeah, as far as as far as the deals, we're, looking at some of those conversion type deals where you can get into markets where the market isn't oversaturated, there's still some some demand and trying to get in on that side where it's not, you're not purchasing an on market deal, but you're purchasing something where you can buy below replacement value do a conversion and and be up and running. [00:09:22] Sam Wilson: So how do you underwr. An indoor vehicle storage facility. I mean, it's not like you have all these, they're everywhere and you can go, oh, okay, cool. We'll just, we'll plug in the things that are normal. It's like, that's a pretty nuanced thing. How did you come up with idea and then how in the world do you underwrite that? [00:09:39] Andrew Leedom: Yeah it's been a process. Originally, being a self storage guy, the start was boat and RV and indoor climate control and maybe some indoor, just some indoor boat and RV storage. But the guys that I work with over at community investment group particularly the founder, Brad Newton, it's been a lifelong dream of his to have an indoor, like an exotic car. [00:10:02] Andrew Leedom: Storage, facility, club high end a place that has, like the executive lounge and just various amenities, detailing services attached to it. And so, it kind of morphed, I had, the underwriting started with, kind of splitting the space, but then we really came down to. [00:10:20] Andrew Leedom: We wanted the space to be dedicated to that and have the storage stuff in the back that we're developing, boat, RV some of the larger enclosed units. And so, we just did some research just throughout the country of other similar models and just looking at various various pricing models and and looking at the demand, we got a feasibility study done particularly more focused on the boat and RV side, but also just some of the other things in the area and knowing that, there really is nothing like it in our area and seeing seeing the success of other similar models in other areas. [00:10:57] Sam Wilson: Got it. So what's the timeline on that project? How what's the build out? What's the timeline? What's the cost? I mean, walk us through that side of the project. I'm really curious about this, cuz it's just not something we talk about a lot here on, on indoor vehicle storage, especially, exotic car storage going the higher end. [00:11:14] Sam Wilson: You're serving a very niche market, so yes. You hear kind of your thoughts around that and some of the parameters of the deal.  [00:11:20] Andrew Leedom: Yeah. So we're we're set to close in probably little over a month. We anticipate a. Three month window for the finalization of architect design drawings some of the the building permit side of things. [00:11:34] Andrew Leedom: The land is already approved as far as the zoning for what we're proposing And then we've got a nine month window for the construction and build out some aspects will be quicker than others. Some of the, once we can get the demo and the site work done, we'll be able to start on a lot of it. [00:11:51] Andrew Leedom: but you know, things like the enclosed units in the back and the canopies really that's. Primarily a lead time issue. , once the materials are delivered, those go up pretty quickly. Right. So we're anticipating, being able to start leasing, a lot of, especially the outdoor stuff. [00:12:11] Andrew Leedom: Sooner than later. And, , and even within the warehouse, being able to have some of the space, where it's not, , we've got it split into some nicer places where are more like a showroom type feel and then other spaces where it's more just , parking , glorified parking. [00:12:29] Andrew Leedom: And so once we open it up and clean it out, we'll be able to utilize some of that space. , and then same thing with the back, once we have the site cleared and graded, then we'll be able to start some of the open parking while we're developing the canopy and enclosed, and then start Leasing all that up and anticipate having a pretty aggressive marketing plan to try to get a lot of this preleased and, and going as we're doing the construction,  [00:12:55] I  [00:12:55] Sam Wilson: was gonna ask that, how will you market this property for, especially the higher end indoor vehicle storage, how do you reach out and find people that. [00:13:07] Sam Wilson: Those vehicles that want to be stored. I mean, again it's a nuance and niche market. So finding those clients, I would think would be a pretty specialized. Art.  [00:13:16] Andrew Leedom: Yes. Yeah. I'm not really in those circles, but we've got guys on the team that that run in those circles that have those cars. [00:13:23] Andrew Leedom: And so, I mean, a lot of it will be word of mouth going to the dealerships and getting in touch with the folks that are selling the vehicles. As well, same thing with the RVs going to the RV dealers and make, just making sure they know that what we're doing and that we're here and, that could assist them in selling the vehicles. [00:13:41] Andrew Leedom: If they. Their clients know that customers know they've got a place to put 'em. And so, so yeah, I mean, I think that's partnering with some of them doing some some online. Obviously, online marketing and Google ads, things like that where folks can find it. [00:13:58] Sam Wilson: Gotcha, man. That's great. I love that. If you were to rewind maybe five years and do one thing differently, what would it be? I [00:14:10] Andrew Leedom: would say Just to allow myself to dream bigger. It was one of those things. I mean, even just the idea of commercial real estate and multi-family syndications, self storage, all of these asset classes. For so long, It wasn't even in my realm of thinking, because that was just for those guys out there that are crushing it. [00:14:30] Andrew Leedom: And that's not something I could ever do. And so, I mean, it was the, that, Napoleon hill calls it the definitive purpose of really just making up your mind and making that decision to, we're gonna make it happen and whatever it takes, whatever training we need, you know, once my wife and I made that decision, Things just started falling into place. And I mean, you're still pushing through all those levels of fear and uncertainty and, I don't know what we're doing and trying to figure things out and just networking, meeting folks. [00:15:00] Andrew Leedom: But but I think just opening your mind to the possibility that if other people are doing it, then you can do it. Just as you take those steps and take action. The dominoes fall into place.  [00:15:11] Sam Wilson: Wonderful. Andrew, I've enjoyed it today. Thanks for coming on the show and sharing with us, your journey thus far, look forward to keeping track of you and seeing where where the next few years take you. [00:15:19] Sam Wilson: So this has been a blast. Thanks for sharing with us today. If our listeners wanna get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?  [00:15:26] Andrew Leedom: Yeah, they can find me on LinkedIn or go to our website. It's www dot self storage, stewardship.com. And you can shoot me an email or reach out. [00:15:37] Andrew Leedom: I'd love to connect to your listeners.  [00:15:39] Sam Wilson: Wonderful. We'll make sure to put that information in the show notes as well. Andrew, thanks again for your time today. I do appreciate  [00:15:45] Andrew Leedom: it. Yeah. Thanks Sam.  

    DIGITAL+
    Secret of Making a Fantastic and Impacted Training: From my 2,000 Classes Experience

    DIGITAL+

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:40


    Training kadang kadang dipandang sebelah mata karena merasa hanya menyampaikan pengetahuan kepada para peserta. Tetapi kalau Training bisa di rancang dengan baik, kita bisa mendapatkan banyak manfaat darinya. Saya berpengalaman membuat, merancang, menjalankan, melakukan coaching dan mentoring dan evaluasi di bidang Training ini. Paling tidak sudah ada 2,000 kelas yang telah saya rancang dan terlibat secara end to end. semoga pengalaman ini bermanfaat buat rekan rekan semua. Husin Wijaya Architect behind 2,000 Classes Instagram : @husinw Linkedin : Husin WIjaya

    NONFICTION BRAND™ w/DP Knudten
    E200 “My goal is to always make my guest sound fantastic.”

    NONFICTION BRAND™ w/DP Knudten

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 19:00


    In celebration of making it to 200 episodes, host DP Knudten looks back on some of the things he's learned, people he's met, and lessons he's earned over the 3.82 years since the podcast's debut in 2018. I++++++ The NONFICTION BRAND podcast is hosted by DP Knudten and a variety of special guests. While focused on the art and craft of personal branding, each episode ranges widely based on whatever happened to be on the minds of DP and his guest(s). Each episode is sponsored by DP's book "NONFICTION BRAND—Discover, craft and communicate the 'completely true / completely you' brand you already are.” now available on Amazon at www.bit.ly/nonfiction_brand  You can reach DP Knudten at: Email: dp@dpknudten.com Website: dpknudten.com | nonfictionbrand.com Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, et al: @dpknudten ©2022 DP Knudten LLC - all rights reserved Want to support DP and the NFB pod? Patreon makes it super easy here: https://www.patreon.com/nonfictionbrand Looking to add podcast guesting to your personal brand-boosting strategy? You should be. Check out Podmatch, a FREE podcast/guest matching service at https://podmatch.com/signup/dprecommends NONFICTION BRAND is hosted at Podbean. DP personally recommends this podcast hosting service for its quality, design, and ease of use. Check it our here: https://www.podbean.com/nonfictionbrand

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network
    How To Live A Fantastic Life - Wally Carmichael & Jason Zuk

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:06


    Wally Carmichael Jason Zuk

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network
    How To Live A Fantastic Life - Kristine Morris & Tyler Ornstein

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:04


    Kristine Morris Tyler Ornstein

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network
    How To Live A Fantastic Life - Brook Belden & Carrie-Lynn Hotson

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:06


    Brook Belden Carrie-Lynn Hotson

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network
    How To Live A Fantastic Life - Arjuna Ishaya & Brenden Kumarasamy

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:10


    Arjuna Ishaya Brenden Kumarasamy

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network
    How To Live A Fantastic Life - Rachelle Babler & Angelica Umali

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:05


    Rachelle Babler Angelica Umali

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network
    How To Live A Fantastic Life - Kristina Mand Lakhiani & Laura Browne

    AMFM247 Broadcasting Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:05


    Kristina Mand Lakhiani Laura Browne

    Nelson Film Society
    Nelson Film Society - Jun 25 2022 - A Fantastic Woman

    Nelson Film Society

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 16:28


    Eleanor CavE previews a Fantastic Woman, screening at the Pastorius Waller Theatre at the Suter on Tuesday Jun 28 at 6pm.

    Unrivaled Experts
    The Secret To Living A Fantastic Life With Dr. Allen Lycka

    Unrivaled Experts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 24:20


    Dr. Lycka was living the good life as a leading cosmetic dermatologist until his life changed one day while visiting Disneyland with his family.A medical condition was exposed on that trip that led to a sobering diagnosis and changed the course of Dr. Lycka's life.Now, Dr. Lycka is a Tedx Speaker, best-selling author, and transformational coach and mentor.Today, he is here to talk to us about how to live a Fantastic Life.Connect with Dr. Lycka:Website: https://drallenlycka.com/Website: coachingwithdrlycka.com

    ReddX Neckbeards and Nerd Cringe
    ReddX's Chadtopia: Chad ascension is achievable! Be unrepentant in all that you do! Enjoy life!!

    ReddX Neckbeards and Nerd Cringe

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 44:11


    In this episode of r/Chadtopia we take a look at some absolute chads that won't let anyone get them down. This is the kind of wholesome positivity that we need to see more of! Chad topia has been a revelation!YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/reddxyDiscord: https://discord.gg/Sju7YckUWuPayPal: https://www.paypal.me/daytondoesPatreon: http://patreon.com/daytondoesTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/daytondoesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/ReddXD/Teespring: https://teespring.com/stores/reddx

    Frightmares
    Episode 144! A Fantastic Fear Of Everything!

    Frightmares

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 75:20


    Join your hosts Austin and Gabby as they talk about A Fantastic Fear Of Everything! The conversation starts off with a few more movies they've seen for this year which include The Cursed, The Blackwell Ghost 6 and Crimes of the Future. After that, they move on to the film they've watched for this weeks episode. Listen as they go in depth with a bunch of info about the movie, favorite moments and more on A Fantastic Fear Of Everything! Sit back, relax and enjoy the conversation! Stay Spooky! https://www.facebook.com/FrightmaresPodcast https://www.instagram.com/frightmarespodcast/ stayspooky@outlook.com

    Presa românească
    Epocal. David Popovici a cucerit aseară aurul mondial și la 100 de metri, după o cursă cu un finiș fantastic (Gazeta Sporturilor)

    Presa românească

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022


    Campionul care vorbește cu apa / Drumul lung bătut cu brațele în 47, 58 de secunde (G4Media.ro) - Arena Națională de Înot, sabotată de Primăria Otopeni. Finalizată în urmă cu un an, construcția încă nu este inaugurată (Buletin de București... citiţi mai departe

    Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
    Gloria Romero: Former Senator, Author, and Feminist

    Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 55:58


    Gloria Romero is joining Guy Kawasaki on this week's Remarkable People podcast! Gloria is the author of Just Not That Likable: The Price All Women Pay for Gender Bias which shatters the glass ceiling in a sweeping takedown of gender bias at the workplace and the price women and society pay for the virulent, double standard of “the likability factor” that persists in the workplace. She exposes the link between success and likability that 21st-century women leaders face in politics and the workplace. Fantastic episode ahead!

    Skip the Queue
    Attraction partnerships and rivalries, with Dominic Jones

    Skip the Queue

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 47:55


    Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://maryrose.org/https://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/https://twitter.com/DominicJonesUKhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/dominicejones/ https://www.nmrn.org.uk/https://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/news/item/1152-buoyant-bounce-back-bodes-well-for-portsmouth-historic-dockyard Dominic Jones was recruited to the Mary Rose in 2019 ago as Chief Operating Officer, and became CEO in 2021.  He brings an excellent background in commercial visitor attractions (Disney, Merlin) and creative visitor experience development.During his time at the Mary Rose, he has already driven an excellent commercial and operational performance and worked closely with previous Chief Executive to create the new Portsmouth Historic Dockyard joint venture with the National Museum of the Royal Navy, which launched successfully in August 2020.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with Dominic Jones, CEO of the Mary Rose Museum and Director of Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Dominic shares the amazing impact of the joint venture between the Mary Rose Museum and the National Museum of the Royal Navy and his advice for any attractions looking to start and improve their partnership arrangements. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Dominic. Welcome to Skip the Queue. Thanks for coming on.Dominic Jones: Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it, I think.Kelly Molson: You are looking forward to it. You don't need to think about it. Can we just point out, I know, listeners, you can't see this, but if you're watching this on YouTube, can we just see, you've got a lovely little, "I love Skip the Queue" graphic in the background there. Look at that.Dominic Jones: Yeah, I think it's important to get across that I do love Skip the Queue and it's important to get that across before the icebreaker questions, I think, just in case you had a couple and you were thinking, "Oh, I'm going to be a bit tough." And then, so I did that and I tweeted this morning how excited I am about your forthcoming website attraction questionnaire, so that's a double. That's a double positive, right?Kelly Molson: Thank you. Thank you. Don't worry, listeners. I've got a special little recording so you understand what we're talking about that will be coming out in the next week or so, so you'll find out more about that soon.Dominic Jones: And I bought you a rubber for your rubber collection. Can you see that? Mary Rose rubber?Kelly Molson: Wow. Look at that.Dominic Jones: You may or may not get that depending on how the icebreakers go, so that's my third attempt.Kelly Molson: Gosh, I've never been bribed for a good icebreaker question.Dominic Jones: It's not bribery. It's a nice gift. It's a nice gift.Kelly Molson: Right, well, let's get cracking on the icebreaker questions, shall we? I think I've been quite kind to you. Tell us something that you are really great at cooking.Dominic Jones: I really like cooking. I actually find cooking really relaxing, so on a Friday or Saturday, I often cook at home, so it depends, really. I quite like making my own recipes, so just using what we've got in the house. So for example, scallops with chorizo, or if you're doing a steak, might do it with some sort of watercress and various cheese, or just sort of experimenting. I really like sort of seeing what we've got, putting it together and making it work. I think it's important, when you're cooking, to drink some wine as well.Kelly Molson: Oh, I agree.Dominic Jones: So cooking with wine is something I enjoy doing.Kelly Molson: We can be friends, Dominic.Dominic Jones: There we go.Kelly Molson: Absolutely, we can be friends. Also, really great choices of food there. I would definitely eat both of those. You'd be really good on Ready Steady Cook, then. That would've been your show.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Do you know what? I used to... So I once applied for a game show, which I didn't get on, I was very disappointed, but Ready Steady Cook was one I think I could have done. Because it's not hard, is it? Most things go with things, and it's also about having the confidence to carry it off and knowing... The only time it went wrong was I wanted to cook for my girlfriend, who's now my wife, a lemon pasta dish and it tasted awful and it had lemon rind in it and stuff, so... But apart from that, it's always worked out.Kelly Molson: Well, I mean, you must have done all right. She married you.Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: She married you in the end.Dominic Jones: True.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, our next one, I've gone topical for this. If you were the captain of a pirate ship...Dominic Jones: Yeah?Kelly Molson: What would be the name of your ship?Dominic Jones: That's a good one. Oh. I do like pirates. I think, because I'm Welsh and because I'd want to be a pirate who... A bit like sort of the Warrior in the Dockyard, which isn't a pirate ship, by the way, but when it came in, people normally surrendered, I want to be a scary pirate that people would think, "Oh, don't..." Maybe, like, Smoking Dragon or something like that. And then we'd light smoke as we came in so people are like, "Oh, here's the Smoking Dragon."Kelly Molson: Yeah, I like that. And there'd be a big dragon's head on the front with flame and smoke coming out of it.Dominic Jones: And people... Because a lot of pirates were Welsh. I don't know whether you know this, but a lot of pirates were Welsh.Kelly Molson: I didn't know that.Dominic Jones: Yeah, it's massive.Kelly Molson: Wow.Dominic Jones: Massive.Kelly Molson: Okay. All right. This is great. That's an excellent answer.Dominic Jones: I have to say, these are slightly biased questions because I was listening to a few of your podcasts recently and, like, you had someone from the zoo, "Oh, what's your favourite animal?" Or you had someone from IAAPA, "What's your favourite ride?" And I'm getting a "name a pirate ship"? Know what I mean?Kelly Molson: All right, what's your favourite boat?Dominic Jones: No, only joking. I'm not going to answer that. I'm not going to answer that.Kelly Molson: All right, but what is your favourite smell? That's my last question.Dominic Jones: Genuinely, we're looking at smell now for the museum, because smell is so important, it's something that can make a difference. When I was at Madame Tussauds Amsterdam, we used smell, as well, as part of the experience, because it just creates that emotive moment. I do like cookie dough and cookies and the smell of that sort of baking which you get pumped in in Disney parks. I quite like the smell of red wine.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yep.Dominic Jones: Yeah, so I think it's food or drink smells I like, but yeah. Good question.Kelly Molson: Good answer. We are at Unpopular Opinion Point. What have you got to share with us?Dominic Jones: This is a hard one because I've decided to go work on this and I did have some really cool ones about lager and N-Dubz and stuff, but I decided to go with work because one of the things that through my whole career, anyone who knows me will know is I get really frustrated when people blame the weather, so I think you shouldn't blame the weather for anything because what happens is when someone blames the weather, when the weather's... So I've worked in theme parks and in museums and aquariums, indoor and outdoor attractions, and you probably know that when it's bad weather, it's great for indoor attractions, when it's good weather, it's good for the theme parks, right?Dominic Jones: So you get people that, when it's good weather in theme parks or bad weather in museums, they say, "Oh, our marketing and our everything we're doing is brilliant because the visitors are coming." And as soon as it's the bad weather or the good weather, depending on what you are, then it's all about the weather. So, "Our visitors are down because the weather was good." If you're in an indoor attraction and it really, really irritates me, and it's one of those things, they're mutually exclusive, you can only blame the weather if you give the weather credit when it's good, and it's one of those things, if things are good, I always think you should look outside the window and think, "Right, what's the reason for that?" And then if things are bad, you should look inside your organisation. It's one of my pet hates, but probably doesn't work for the podcast, so I should probably go with the lager or N-Dubz one, but anyway, there we go. But it is important, right? I think it's a good one.Kelly Molson: It is important. No, I think, yeah, that is important. It's really interesting. I've never really thought about that before. We need to give the weather more credit.Dominic Jones: Well, you need to give the weather credit if you're going to use it to blame. For me, it's a constant. It's something... And these days, weather forecasts are 10, 14 days out, so you should be able to plan.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Okay. Good. All right.Dominic Jones: I'll get off my high horse now. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Listeners, let us know how you feel, so let us know if you want to know about that N-Dubz one as well. I'm intrigued. Right, Dominic, I want you to tell us about your background because we met up recently, didn't we, at the M+H exhibition? And you were very humble about coming on the podcast and you said, "Oh, I'm not going to have anything... You've had really interesting people on and I'm not that interesting." You are really interesting and you've had such an incredible background. Tell us a little bit about it and how you got to where you are now.Dominic Jones: Well, I'm not sure about that. I do like listening to your podcast and you have some amazing guests and 9 times out of 10, I normally think, after listening to them, "Right, I'm going to either do something that they've suggested." Or I follow them on LinkedIn or Twitter and think, "Right, let's learn from them." Because I think you should always learn from other people, but so my career is a lot of luck, a lot of opportunity and a lot of chats.Dominic Jones: When I was growing up, I wanted to be a leisure centre manager. You know? Like you probably won't remember The Brittas Empire, but that was my dream. That was my dream, much to my mum's disappointment. And so that was all I ever wanted, so I went to college and did a leisure studies course, a HND, and there was a placement in PGL Adventure, which is like an adventure park, and I was a Multi Activity Instructor. Absolutely loved it.Dominic Jones: But then I sort of realised, actually, there's a whole world out there and decided I wanted to work in theme parks, so I applied to work at Disney and didn't get it the first time. I was very cocky, I was the wrong sort of person for Disney, but I went back three times and eventually got it and I did a placement in Disney and it was the best thing I ever did and it changed my life. It's one of the few jobs that I've left and thought, "My life will never be the same again." So good. So I did that and I got my master's degree. I didn't get the doctorate because I went on spring break, but hey, I was young...Kelly Molson: Well, spring break, though.Dominic Jones: Exactly. I was young. And then sort of went to Thorpe Park and was a Ride Operator. I remember my friends and some of their family were saying, "That's a real waste of..." Because I went to, in between Disney, went to university in Swansea, and they said, "It's a real waste of university, operating a teacup for £3.50 an hour." Or whatever it was at the time. But I loved it and for me, it was... I thought, "If you want to become a manager or you want to become, eventually, a General Manager or a Director of a theme park, it's really important to know how these things work."Dominic Jones: So I loved it, and just in case you ever get to operate the teacups, it's not too complicated, there's a red and green button, the red is to stop and the green is to start. I mean, it was five hours of training, but I finally mastered it and you can't actually make it go faster, so when you're there on the microphone and say, "Do you want to go faster?" You can't, it goes faster anyway, but I loved it and then very quickly rose through the ranks, so I became a Ride Supervisor, Team Leader, Area Team Leader, Coordinator, went to Chessington, worked there just at the time when Tussauds had bought Thorpe Park, so it was a real great time for career opportunities.Dominic Jones: Then I went to Madame Tussauds, was the Customer Service Manager there and helped create the first contact centre, if you like, call centre, where we sold tickets for things like Rock Circus, which is no longer in existence, but Rock Circus, the London Eye, Madam Tussauds, the Planetarium and that became the Merlin Contact Centre in the future, and then I started applying for loads of jobs, more General Manager jobs, and didn't get them and realised that I needed to get some marketing and sales experience.Dominic Jones: So I left and went to work for Virgin and then I was there for nearly 10 years and absolutely loved it and instead of getting the sales and marketing, well, I got the sales experience, I ended up becoming Vice President of Europe, the Middle East and Africa for the logistics side of the business, and then also, so we opened up Kenya, had some amazing life experiences, we saw the whole world and then was Regional Vice President Sales in Hong Kong for Asia Pacific, so great time.Dominic Jones: And then my wife became pregnant, obviously, I was involved in that, and it made me realise that I probably couldn't do a job where I was traveling 24/7. I mean, for a while, I did literally consider, which makes me sound like a bad person, "I could call in from Skype and things like that." And my wife was like, "Come on." So we went back to Wales and it was really hard to find a job that would allow me to be at home and be around so I actually thought, "Well, originally, when I went to Virgin, I wanted to have marketing experience."Dominic Jones: So I actually went to Thorpe Park and the marketing team and looked after the partnerships and promotions, did some really cool things, the Ministry of Sound nightclub deal was there, did some stuff with Lionsgate. A really good time doing the "buy one, get one free" things, the partnerships and events, got some good bands together on the stage that hadn't been on stage with the Wideboys and the [inaudible 00:11:55] boys if you know your dance music, it was massive.Dominic Jones: Anyway, so I did that for a bit and then got an opportunity to go back to Wales, which is where my wife's family is from. I'm from North Wales, she's from South Wales, so I got a chance to run Oakwood Theme Park, which I absolutely loved and probably would've been there forever if an opportunity hadn't come up with Merlin and Merlin, it was to look after the rest of Europe and the rest of Europe was basically anything in their midway, so Madam Tussauds, Dungeons, Lego Discovery Centre, Sea Life, that wasn't in the UK or Germany, so it was like Istanbul, Helsinki, Paris Blankenberge in Belgium, Spain. I mean, it was brilliant and I did that for a few years.Dominic Jones: Then I went and ran Thorpe Park for a few years, which absolutely loved because that was where I started as a teacup operator and I remember, there was a guy there, good friend of mine, he said, "I remember, when you were on the teacups, you said, 'One day, I'm going to come back and run the place.'" And I did, so amazing. And then, in that time, I had three kids and really was commuting from Christchurch, so decided to change careers again and come into the heritage world and came as the COO of the Mary Rose, which I did for two years, and then, during the pandemic, became the CEO, so quick sort of... Yeah. But lots of luck and right place, right time, all those sort of things, but that's good, right? That's most people's career.Kelly Molson: Whoa. That is amazing. I mean, you've been to so many different places. I love that you went full-circle at Thorpe Park as well. What an incredible story, to have gone in there as an operator and then end up running the place. That is amazing.Dominic Jones: Yeah, I loved that. And actually, all the jobs I've had have really become part of our story. I was talking to someone yesterday about the Mary Rose and they were talking about what they were going to do next but how the Mary Rose had been a massive part of their story and I said, "That's the beautiful thing about work and careers and life. Whatever you do, it becomes part of your story and you're part of their story." So whether it's Thorpe Park, whether it's when I opened up, for Virgin Atlantic, the Nairobi route for logistics and the Hamlin, it was amazing and I've been to Kenya probably more times than I've been to Birmingham, you know? So that's part of my story, and when I leave the Mary Rose, I hope isn't any time soon, this will always be... It'll be my favourite Tudor warship. I mean, it's probably the only Tudor warship, but also my favourite one, so yeah.Kelly Molson: That was the answer to my question, as well. "What's your favourite ship?"Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow. I'm blown away by your career. I just think you've had such a phenomenal journey to get to where you are now. There's something that I want to talk to you about today and that's about your joint venture that you have with the Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy. I just want to read out a tweet that I saw because this is what sparked this conversation, so this is a tweet that went out on the Mary Rose Twitter account.Kelly Molson: It says, "We are very pleased to share that Portsmouth Historic Dockyard saw a 150% rise in visitor numbers in 2021, reported by ALVA today. The significant rise in visitors demonstrates the effectiveness of the joint venture between Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy in our first year."Kelly Molson: I am very intrigued by this because this has been kind of a constant throughout most of the podcast conversations that we have is about how collaborative the sector is, but this is really specific about two attractions collaborating together to bring more visitors in. I would love you to tell us about this.Dominic Jones: Well, yeah, the end result's fantastic. 150% increase in visitors. It really feels joined up. My son's school is coming in today so I was in the visitor centre and I was waiting to see what time he was coming in because he obviously wouldn't tell me the time he's actually in, so I was looking around the visitor centre and I couldn't be prouder, when you see the mixture of Victory and Warrior and Mary Rose, and how far we've come since we started, but if you go back in history, the Mary Rose used to be part of Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and there was one ticket and there was a separate company called Portsmouth Historic Dockyard that ran it, and lots of trusts, at that time, there were lots of trusts that fed into it, and then, for whatever reason, some of these trusts went independent.Dominic Jones: And so when I joined the Mary Rose, we were separate. We had a separate ticket, visitor centre, if you like, so imagine, I guess, like a... You know when you're on holiday and there's people trying to get you to go on boat rides or they're trying to get you to come into their restaurant? And literally, we were competing, so when a visitor was outside, there'd be the Mary Rose saying, "Hey, come and see Henry VIII's warship, the biggest Tudor collection in the world." I mean, it's amazing. And then the people next door, "Hey, come and see the Victory and the Warrior." And it just was really difficult for the customers, and for whatever reason, we weren't together and we had these two separate companies, so for quite a while, when I started, along with Helen, who was the CEO and Dominic and a gentleman called John in NMRN, we had meetings to see if we could get closer and to get a deal, and then I think Matthew joined, as well, from NMRN, and eventually we kind of got to an agreement.Dominic Jones: It was about, "What can we do together? What, collaboratively, can we do?" We came up with three things. We can sell tickets together, we could run a visitor centre together, so that's #1, the visitor side. We could market the destination together, and we could do strategic operations like events. So we then looked away and came across a deal, and for us, it was important that the two parties, so Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy had a 50/50 parity of decision so it wasn't a one-sided joint venture and it was really... There's lots of talent in both organisations, so I've always admired what the National Museum of the Royal Navy have done over the years and how they've told history and how they bring it to life, and obviously, I love the Mary Rose.Dominic Jones: And so when we put us together, it was just a real opportunity, that synergy. You know when people say "one and one and you get three", but it was exactly like that and it worked really well, so we share marketing, so marketing costs, we share, we share marketing resource, so Mary Rose marketing people work along with NMRN marketing people. We do some things independently so our trusts are independent, our conservation, our research and all that sort of stuff, that's just Mary Rose and NMRN is just that, although we are working on some projects together, but in terms of the visitor, we have one visitor centre, we have one ticket you can buy, lots of options, we could talk about that, some amazing pricing we did which allowed us to do that.Dominic Jones: Because when you're competing against each other, you almost are encouraged to discount more, so we had, at times, the National Museum of the Royal Navy who were saying Portsmouth Historic Dockyard then might have a deal on Groupon, we might have a deal on Wowcher and you'd just be discounting, discounting, discounting, and you wouldn't be really getting across the real value for the customer, so yeah, it was really hard, and I remember, we would really fight for every single visitor because, for us, 84% of our money comes from tickets, so I remember, we'd get Henry VIII down the front, out the front, we'd have him talking to the visitors, saying, "Oh", you know, and with people talking in French and he'd go up in French and say, "Well, I was the king of France. Why are you going to Victory? Come to Mary Rose." But he wouldn't be taking them away from Victory, because that would be bad, but he would be saying, "Go to both." And we'd always be positive about NMRN, but we'd also want people to come to Mary Rose because that was how we were going to survive.Kelly Molson: Just going back to those times, then, was it more like a rivalry than anything?Dominic Jones: Yeah, it was really hard.Kelly Molson: So it was really difficult?Dominic Jones: It was really hard. I mean, we all respected each other, but it was really hard. It was like one of those ferry terminals or restaurants on holiday. I mean, I remember, we would flyer, like circus marketing, bumping into the brand, resort domination, we called it. We would be literally, when it was sunny because you can't blame the weather, when it was sunny, we'd be on the beach with Mary Rose leaflets saying, "Hey, get out the cool, we're air-conditioned, come to the Mary Rose." We were literally in all the restaurants, we had colour-in sheets, "Come to...", it was all about getting everyone to come and actually, we quickly realized that the NMRN was spending so much money on getting people to Portsmouth that we needed to make sure when they're in Portsmouth, they came to the Mary Rose and we did.Dominic Jones: I mean, I look back on it now, we had adverts that had, because we'd been very lucky with Tripadvisor, five stars, I mean I would've dreamed of that at Thorpe Park, but five stars constantly so we'd have posters that say, "You've just missed the best thing to do in Portsmouth." And then another one. "Turn around." You know, like when you go to Camden Town and there's a McDonald's, a Burger King and then outside the Burger King, there's a sign. "Why are you going to Burger King? Go to McDonald's." It was like that, so it wasn't great.Kelly Molson: It's quite intense, as well, isn't it, for the visitor?Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: That's a lot of pressure.Dominic Jones: Well, it is and I would do it and I would literally go down and leave, because you've got to leave from the front, and I would put my Mary Rose coat, which I've still got here, and I'd be down the scenic and we'd be... And I remember coaches would turn up and one of the ladies who was fantastic with us, Sandra, she's now one of our Visitor Experience Managers, but she'd jump on the couch and say, "Have you booked your tickets? Where are you going? Can I tell you about the Mary Rose?" And she'd bring whole coaches in. It was hard and it was really... I went to sleep every night easy, because it was so tiring and it wasn't sustainable and we did need to get a deal, and actually, the National Museum of the Royal Navy and the Mary Rose always treated each other with respect, but it was like the Battle of Victory Gate and that's not the way to behave and that's not the long-term way to run a business.Dominic Jones: So what was really great was we've got a deal, we got the ability to sell tickets together and we got the ability to work together and there's some really super talented people in the National Museum of the Royal Navy and in Mary Rose and we did some great things, so when we reopened after COVID, we did this really cool video where we had Henry VIII and we had some of their characters from Warrior and some of their actors all visiting each other's attractions in the lift, wearing face masks, getting hand sanitiser, and it just feels joined up.Dominic Jones: I mean, I've done lots of partnerships in my career. At Merlin, we had a Sea Life in Helsinki, which was a joint venture with a theme park called Linnanmaki. If you ever get to interview this lady who ran Linnanmaki, or she might the CEO there, she was amazing, but we had this joint venture. See, it's really hard in a joint venture because, especially if it's a 50/50 parity decision one, you've got to get agreement and that means that you work really hard on doing the right thing, so what's quite nice is if we were on our own, we probably would've done marketing campaigns and other things which were okay, but because we end up working together and we've got to make sure we get that joint agreement, the results is always way better. It's brilliant. And the customers benefit, because it's one entrance, it's one ticket, there's a lot more value in it, so yeah, it's been really successful.Kelly Molson: I hadn't realised quite how intertwined the organisations were in terms of decision-making and marketing, like you say, and sharing all of those resources. You talked a little bit about the visitor centre. Did you have to change the infrastructure and stuff? Did you have to build new buildings and all of that and agree on that?Dominic Jones: Well, no, they had a big visitor centre because, I mean, they've got a lot more footprint, more attractions, they've got the Warrior, they've got M.33, they've got a Submarine Museum over in Victory and we've got the Mary Rose, which is amazing. And so we had a building called Porter's Lodge, which was here and then there's the gate, and then they had their visitor center and their visitor center was perfect, so we moved in there, but we agreed to make it look and feel like it was Mary Rose and National Museum of the Royal Navy, so we spent a bit of money on the look and feel of it, so that was good and same with the brand and the marketing and making it feel like it was something new, but yeah, so there was a bit of that.Dominic Jones: I mean, in terms of infrastructure, we went with their ticketing system because it made more sense because it would be a bigger cost for them to change. We went with some of the Mary Rose's media buying because, at the time, we were buying media cheaper and better. And actually, now, we're in the process of going to tenders together, so the digital agency, we've done together, the PR agency, we've done together and it's great because it's a bigger portfolio and you get different views, and I always think the best way to run any business, so, for example, the Mary Rose or Thorpe Park or wherever it is, to talk to your customers, to talk to your staff and then, obviously, to talk to the manage experts. And we get that in spades, because we've also got our staff and our customers and our volunteers, but we've got NMRN staff and customers and volunteers and together, we are getting some really cool ideas and things we can do, so it's working well. As you can see, 150% increase in the first year.Kelly Molson: I mean, I've read it with my own eyes.Dominic Jones: And I hope you saw, NMRN, they did a little nice fist bump reply, and it just is in the spirit of it. We are working together and I think that's so important.Kelly Molson: It is massively important. You mentioned something about pricing earlier, and we've spoken about this before, but you said that you did something interesting that you'd implemented that allowed you to grow the yield and the revenue as well. Was this something that you did jointly too?Dominic Jones: Yeah, it was. So we had to come up with a new pricing structure because we were doing something new, so they had, what was it called? Full Navy Ticket, which was for all of their attractions and we had an annual ticket, so when we merged, we had to come up with a new pricing structure and it's a good opportunity to change, and 84% of our business, our revenue comes from tickets, theirs is about, I think, 80% or so, I can't remember, so it's still important to them as well. So we had to get the pricing right and it allowed us to really think about what's the best value for the customer and what's the best thing to do that stops us having to discount heavily?Dominic Jones: So we created a... It's like a decoy pricing model, like supermarkets have been doing it for years, so if you buy one attraction, it's a really bad ticket. I mean, still, a few people buy them, it's a really bad ticket, so it was... I mean, it used to be £18. We put the price up to £24. It used to be, if you bought one ticket, you could visit that attraction all year. You can only visit it once. So we made it a really unattractive ticket, so that's your lower decoy, so the idea of that is you only buy that if all you really want to do is go to the Mary Rose or all you want to go is go to the Victory and if you've just come to see one of those things, that's the sort of money you would pay, it's very competitively priced with other things on the South Coast, so that's what we did.Dominic Jones: And then we created a Three-Attraction Ticket or Three-Ship Ticket, which was slightly more money, so that went up to £39, which was the biggest sort of sting, about a £15 increase, big, big jump. And that was an annual ticket. That was, you could pick your three attractions and visit them all year. And then we did, "But for £5 more, you could have an Ultimate Explorer and have everything including the..." And that sort of, so you've got the lower decoy, which is the single attraction, then you've got the medium decoy, which is three ships, but then you go, "Well, for £5 more, you could do everything."Dominic Jones: And 80% of people do the Ultimate Explorer and they do everything, and it's so good value. I mean, it's less than the price of a football game and football game, 50% of the time, you're disappointed, and you don't get long, do you? It is incredible value and you get to go to all the attractions, you get out on the water, it's brilliant. So we've got that. And then we were going to put in an upper decoy, now, an upper decoy is a premium, really expensive ticket, so for example, we might, "We have, at Mary Rose, you can go into the ship for £300 and have a private experience." And we were going to put that in, but actually, because the decoy system worked so well, we didn't need that so we've just kept it as Single Attraction Ticket, Three-Attraction Ticket and Ultimate Explorer and it's working really, really well.Dominic Jones: So yeah, that's our pricing. And because of that, we don't have to discount because we put all the value and loaded the value in, actually, we don't have to discount. And then, when we do discount, we want to reach the right people, so, for example, we do, between the months of November and February, we do a Loyal and Local campaign where we go out to Portsmouth and Southampton regions and we say, "Bring a bill in and you can get a considerable discount." All year round, we do a discount for people who've got a Portsmouth leisure card, so anyone who's on Universal Credit, so they get 50% off.Dominic Jones: And we do some other really cool community engagement stuff between us with schools and stuff like that, and then if we do do a discount, so discounts are still important, so there's some amazing partners out there, GetYourGuide, Picnic, lots of the providers that really support businesses, Virgin, Ticketdays, all that sort of stuff. But we do it at the right level, so we've got like a playground, so whereas before, we might have been competing against each other, thinking, "Oh, we need to discount by 40% or 50% and then give them extra commission so they push it." We now do it at a really fair level, so there is a bit of a discount, but it's not much.Dominic Jones: And then for the consumer, we want the cheapest, best-value ticket to always be on our website. And we used a couple companies, so we used a company called, they were called Brand Incrementum, they're now called Magic Little Giants, we use them, we use some insight into what previous businesses have done before, but we copied the American Six Flags website model. If you ever want a quick lesson in pricing, just go to Six Flags. Their website is that... I mean, you're into websites, right?Kelly Molson: I am.Dominic Jones: It's the best website for pricing. I love it and I check it nearly every month. It makes me laugh, how focused they are on decoy pricing and how in-your-face they are, but how you don't know it as a consumer unless you know. It's amazing. It drives my family mad. I love it. Anyway. Yeah.Kelly Molson: This decoy pricing, I've never heard that phrase, I've never heard that used in pricing before. This is all new to me.Dominic Jones: It's like supermarkets when you get... And I remember, we've got a local supermarket near us and the guy did, "buy one bottle of wine, get one wine free". And then he had, "or buy one wine for £7 or buy two for £7". We were always going to buy two for £7 or two for £8. It's all that sort of trying to encourage behaviour, but he didn't quite get it because recently, I went in, it was like, "buy one, pay for one" and I was like, "Isn't that... That's the same as normal, yeah?" "Yeah." But he's a nice guy so I bought one. Well, that's my problem.Dominic Jones: But no, it's the same way supermarkets have been doing, where they try with the club card to get you to purchase things, or they're trying to do that, and all we're trying to do is encourage everyone to go for that Ultimate Explorer, which is the best value. It's almost like you can imagine it on the website, it's got a sign saying, "Pick me." So even to the extent we still don't, this day, discount our Single Attraction Ticket on our website. We don't give any discount for it and then we give a £5 discount on the three attractions and £5 on Ultimate Explorer. But yeah, loving the pricing.Kelly Molson: Love this. This is such great insight. Thank you for sharing. This partnership is really intriguing to me because I think it seems like the perfect setup, right? Because you're literally neighbors in the same area, you could make this work really well. What advice would you give to other attractions that are thinking about partnering with other attractions? Like what would be your top tips for people to make this work well?Dominic Jones: I mean, it's really hard. You've got to think about, because often people see it as competitors, but you've got to think in terms of getting the customers or the guests or the consumers, whatever you call them, giving them the best value, and during lockdown, when we were being interviewed and stuff, we'd always say, "Come visit the Mary Rose or come visit..." Once we did the joint venture, "Come visit the Historic Dockyard. But also, if you can't come visit, go visit your local museum, go visit anyone." It's important to share that, and I think there are always benefits of working together, you're always stronger together.Dominic Jones: When I was at Oakwood Theme Park in Wales, amazing theme park, you're in West Wales and we were thinking, "Well, how do we reach further and advertise more?" And actually, we ended up working with a farm, which was a stunning farm that had rides and animals called Folly Farm down the road and we worked, then, with Manor House Wildlife Park and Heatherton, and you actually work together and you can work together and I'd always say, "Try it on something." So try it whether it's an event or try it whether it's a destination marketing campaign. I mean, we're working with the people of Portsmouth, so with... "The people of Portsmouth", that sounds a bit grand. We're working with attractions in Portsmouth on trying to get people into Portsmouth, so we do something with Portsmouth Council where the Spinnaker Tower and D-Day Museum and Mary Rose and National Museum of the Royal Navy and now Portsmouth Historical Dockyard, together, we advertise in London because actually, advertising in London individually is really expensive, but if you do it collaboratively.Dominic Jones: There's lots of ways to do stuff collaboratively and find another angle. So we've got other people on our site that we're not partners with at the moment, so the Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust, amazing people who run some of the small boats that we did the Gunboat Race with the D-Day veterans on the weekend. Fantastic. So yesterday, we had a really great Volunteers' Tea Party to celebrate the end of volunteer and we had the volunteers from the Property Trust, we had the volunteers from the NMRN, the volunteers from the Mary Rose, there's always some synergy and I would say, in any way, find it.Dominic Jones: Everywhere I've worked, I've tried to get partnerships with local businesses, with other theme parks, with other attractions, because, actually, it's your stronger together, and if you're going, especially, after a local market, because you've always got to love your locals, that's the most important thing. If they see that you actually are the sort of people that work with each other, it makes them almost more proud of you. You remember the Game Makers in the London Olympics in 2012 and how amazing they were and how they did that sort of course where everyone was recommending all this stuff to you, that's kind of what you want, but I would find some common ground, whatever it is.Dominic Jones: Whether it's lobbying, we found common ground at Thorpe Park with other attractions to lobby the government for things, for VAT to level... Or whether it's in Oakwood, trying to get some advertising to get people from Bristol to cross the bridge to come into Wales or whether it's, I'm trying to think, in Amsterdam, we worked, so Madame Tussauds Amsterdam and Dungeons, which I was responsible for, we worked with Heineken because they had this amazing experience and with Tours & Tickets, so we'd make sure that if anyone came to Amsterdam, they came to our attractions. It's those sort of partnerships, finding the common ground and making it work.Dominic Jones: And don't be scared of it, because you are always bigger and better together and customers have so much choice, so working together delivers amazing results. I would never want to go back to not being part of a partnership with the National Museum of the Royal Navy and I would love it if we could do more. We are keen to do more with other attractions in the South to get people to come to the South Coast, to come to Hampshire. But yeah, I would definitely do...Dominic Jones: And also, you get bigger buying power, so say, for example, Merlin are really strong, so they don't necessarily need those with other partners because they can do a campaign in the press, Sun, Days Go Out and you've got all the Merlin attractions, but if you're individual attractions, you can't, so if you do a partnership with your competitors, you can then suddenly say, "Right, well, we want to do a Days Out campaign in the press between all these independent attractions."Dominic Jones: I mean, it's brilliant. I love it and I love, also, this industry, how collaborative especially the heritage side is. You can say, "Oh, I was thinking about doing this. What do you think?" Or, "What do you think about that?" And everyone will share and everyone is almost willing you to be successful. It's crazy, right? It's one of the best industries in the world. If you were in, I don't know, the restaurant business, you wouldn't be doing that, would you? Or another... It's so good. Anyway, hopefully, that answers your question.Kelly Molson: Oh, absolutely.Dominic Jones: I get very passionate about it. I'm so sorry. I love it.Kelly Molson: I'm so glad that you do because it answered my question perfectly and I think you've given so much value to listeners today in terms of all of the things that you've done, I couldn't have asked for a better response. Thank you. It's a big year for the Mary Rose, isn't it? And I think it would be very right that we talk about that. So it's your 40th year celebration this year, isn't it?Dominic Jones: Yeah, 40 years since the raising, so 1982, October. I am obviously older than you so I remember watching it on Blue Peter as a child and it was the world's first underwater live broadcast. It was watched by over 60 million people worldwide. I mean, it was amazing of its time and so yeah, 40 years, and because of that, we've now got the world's biggest Tudor collection of everyday life, there's nowhere else in the world you can get closer to Tudor and we've got the biggest maritime salvation, so we've got a lot of plans to celebrate. Unfortunately, the pandemic got in the way. During the pandemic, I'm not going to lie, it was horrific. There were times when we were drawing a list of who we were going to give the keys to, got really, really bad and it got dark for everyone and every museum, every attraction, every business, I'm not trying to say, "Oh, poor us." Everyone had that tough time.Dominic Jones: But it meant that actually investing, we were going to do another building, we were going to do a whole museum dedicated to the raising and actually, probably one of the best things that came out of it is we didn't because we got the joint venture, which is brilliant, our trading improved, we had a fantastic summer and then we were like, "Right, we should really do something for the 40th anniversary, but we can't afford taking another lease of another building or building another building, so what can we do?" And we managed to come up with a few plans, so the first thing we're doing is we're doing a TV documentary, which is going to be brilliant, coming out in October. Honestly, I've seen, they started some of the filming and the pre [inaudible 00:37:39], it's going to be brilliant.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's so exciting.Dominic Jones: I can't give too much away because we've had to sign something, but it's going to be great. And actually, we even had, because we're responsible for the wreck site, so we had Chris and Alex who helped raise the Mary Rose, our Head of Interpretation, Head of Research, amazing people, they were out diving the other day because we're still responsible for the wreck site and it just gives you goosebumps. I saw the footage and oh, it's amazing. So we got that. We're also building a 4D experience.Dominic Jones: So when we reopened last summer, we opened with this thing called 1545, which was an immersive experience and we wanted to get across the Mary Rose didn't sink on its maiden voyage, it was Henry VIII's ship that he, when he came to the throne, he commissioned two ships, the Mary Rose was one of them, it fought in lots of battles, it had a long life and then sank defending Britain in a battle, by the way, the French who were invading was twice the size of the Spanish Armada, but because history's written by the winners, we don't hear that.Dominic Jones: But amazing, so we did this amazing, immersive experience. We got Dame Judi Dench to do the voice and you feel like you're going to get sunk. Well, the ship does sink and you go under and then you go into the museum and it's so good and we were like, "We want to do something for the end. We want to have a finale that says..." Because the thing about our museum, it's authentic. There's 19,700 artifacts. You can't get that anywhere else. I mean, it's just brilliant. Anyway, so we thought, "How are we going to end this?" And the thing we don't do justice to is the finding, the raising, the excavation, all the divers, there was 500 volunteer divers. From the 1960s, people were looking for it.Dominic Jones: I mean, Alexander McKee, who found it, was on the news and people would say... It was like an Indiana Jones movie, they were saying, "Oh, he's never going to find it." And other people were looking, the Navy were looking and there was a bit in Indiana Jones where they got the map the wrong way around and all of that. Brilliant. So they found the Mary Rose and then they got Margaret Rule who was this amazing lady who had, when she went to university, I think she didn't get a place at university at first because she was a woman and this is amazing, today's day story, and she didn't dive, she was an archeologist. And then she said, "I'm going to dive." Taught herself to dive and without her, this museum, the Mary Rose wouldn't be here, so Alexander McKee, Margaret Rule, two amazing people, both of them...Kelly Molson: What a woman.Dominic Jones: Yeah, what a woman, but both of them, both of them, without them, we wouldn't be here. So we want to tell their story, but also, we want to put the guests and the visitors to what it's like to dive, so with a mixture of real-life filming, footage from these 500 volunteer divers, outtakes from the Chronicle programs that are on the BBC, including, if we can get it to look right, even His Royal Highness, Prince Charles diving. It is stunning.Dominic Jones: So we're going to take the guests on a bit of a pre-show with the history, then they're going to get into the 4D theater and it'd be like you were boarding a red, going out to the wreck site, there'll be a dive briefing, you'll have the wind in your hair, the seats will be buzzing, but I'm hoping it's this good. I better ring the people after this [inaudible 00:40:38].Kelly Molson: You're really building it up, Dominic.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Well, it better deliver. No, they're brilliant. Figment are amazing. They're so good. So you get in there and then you dive and then you go down and you see what it's like to be under the water. The Royal Engineers were involved, the divers were involved and then you'll be there when the Mary Rose is raised, we're even going to recreate the moment where it... Oh, it'll be brilliant.Dominic Jones: So in answer to your question, we're doing a documentary and a 4D experience, and we've got anniversary lectures so if you're around in October, come and get involved. We've got a lot of people, from historians to divers to... Just talking about the relevance of the Mary Rose and the history of it, and also the diving, and we've got a new coffee table book coming out, so we've got lots and lots and lots going on.Kelly Molson: Oh, my goodness. It's all going on.Dominic Jones: And if we'd have done it the old way, if we'd have done it with a new museum and a new building, I don't think it would've been as good. I mean, I joined the Divers' Legacy group, so about 150 of the divers, on a Zoom call a few weeks ago and it's just, it takes you... These people, who, some of them are retired now or bear in mind this was 40, 50 years ago and hearing their stories and it's living history and it's so important that we tell these stories and capture them now, because in 50 years, they won't be here, and part of our responsibility, our charity objectives, if you like, is to tell the story and forever, and I think that bit of the story's missing, so if that's one thing that we do while I'm at the Mary Rose, I'll be really proud.Kelly Molson: Ah, that is wonderful. And it is [inaudible 00:42:12].Dominic Jones: You have to come, right? You're going to have to come.Kelly Molson: Well, this is the question. When do I need to come to experience everything that you've just sold to me? Because I am sold.Dominic Jones: Yeah. You probably want to come after our anniversary, because we're hoping to launch all this around that time, which is in October, which is, now, this is an interesting one because this was a good conversation with our trustees and our board. "Do you want to launch something in the off-peak period? Don't you want to launch it at Easter or the summer or..." And my view is we should launch it because it's the right thing to do and we're launching this in October because it's a legacy, we want the divers there, we want as many of them there as possible and it's going to be at the Mary Rose forever. This is the ending to the Mary Rose Museum. So it's not like we're launching something for Easter or summer, so we are going to launch it in October, so I'll let you know the details, come and get involved.Kelly Molson: All right, absolutely. I am there. If it's as good as what you've just described, then it's going to be one amazing day out.Dominic Jones: It'd be better. And then, and final thing, sorry, which we're not doing, but I wanted to do is we've still got some of the Mary Rose down in the ocean, so one day, I'd like to bring that back up. I don't think I'll be here to do that because it's probably be in 15 years' time or something because we need to raise a lot of money and do that, but we want to bring the rest of her back up or whatever's left down there back up, and that's quite exciting because our story continues. We still do research.Dominic Jones: We did this fantastic piece of research on skeletons, on human remains. It's a really cool diversity story. Out of the eight skeletons, one was Spanish, one was Venetian, two were North African, second generation, not slaves, a real diversity story in Tudor England. Amazing. Maybe the Victorians whitewashed history. Who knows? But what a great story. And we keep learning and we've got this amazing team of curatorial staff and all of our staff, from the maintenance to the visitor staff to the volunteers and every day, we learn something new, so [inaudible 00:44:03] we want to do. And then, at some point... Have you seen The Dig on Netflix?Kelly Molson: Yes. Yes.Dominic Jones: Great film.Kelly Molson: So good.Dominic Jones: Great film, but I want to write to Netflix to do The Dive. Can you imagine? This story about human endeavor with the Mary Rose? It'd be amazing, so we'd like to do that as well at some point, but we just don't have enough hours in the day, right?Kelly Molson: No. Just add it onto that long list of stuff.Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow. Thank you.Dominic Jones: So if you know anyone in Netflix, let us know, or if anyone from Netflix is listening, get in touch, we want to do that. It'd be cool.Kelly Molson: I would love it.Dominic Jones: I've already casted.Kelly Molson: If someone from Netflix was listening, that would be incredible. Who have you casted?Dominic Jones: Well, so local, because you've got to get local, so for Margaret Rule, I reckon Kate Winslet, she'd do a good job. Great actress. I mean, we've already got Dame Judi Dench, so the same sort of caliber in our 1545 experience, and then also another local who could bring the Alexander McKee, Kenneth Branagh, but to be honest with you, Netflix can do all of that, because let's be honest, I'm not going to make movies, am I? I'm running a museum. But I just think it'd be really cool. It'd be really cool.Kelly Molson: I don't think there's anything that you couldn't do, Dominic, to be honest, after this podcast, so who knows?Dominic Jones: It'd be really cool. Yeah, who knows?Kelly Molson: All right, last question for you, a book that you love that you'd recommend to our listeners?Dominic Jones: I love this question and I really struggled, so I went back and thought about a work example, because I think that's probably more useful, so in all of my career, I've come across lots of people who talk about strategy and I have my own view on what strategy is, but there are lots of books you can read about strategy and there's only one book, in my opinion, that is worth reading and it's this, Good Strategy/Bad Strategy. Hopefully, it's still in print. It is the only book to read on strategy. It's the best book I've... And without this book, I don't think I would've been able to do half the stuff that I've done, because it's all about how you formulate your decisions, how you make your decisions, what the outcome is, it's about execution, it's about everything that, for me, you need to be successful, so I recommend this book. Really good book.Kelly Molson: Good Strategy/Bad Strategy. I have not read that book, but I feel like that's going to go...Dominic Jones: You should read it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's going to go top of my pile. All right, listeners, if you want to win a copy of this book, as ever, if you just go over to our Twitter account and you retweet this podcast announcement with the words, "I want Dominic's book." And then you will be in with a chance of winning it. Oh, my goodness. I have had such a good time listening to you today. Thank you so much for coming on and sharing. It's been so valuable. Yeah, that's blown me away today. I'm very excited about coming to visit and thank you for sharing the insight into your partnerships.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Absolute pleasure. And thanks for being kind with the icebreakers, you're going to get the rubber, that's going to your collection.Kelly Molson: Oh, yay. A rubber rubber.Dominic Jones: Because I was really upset that you've got a rubber collection without the Mary Rose. That actually hurt my feelings. It hurt my feelings.Kelly Molson: Well, I'm sorry, I've never actually visited the Mary Rose.Dominic Jones: Well, we're going to put that right.Kelly Molson: We are going to change this, aren't we? So yeah, I'm sorry. I will come and get my rubber in-person, then. Don't post it to me. I'll come and get it in-person when I come and visit.Dominic Jones: Yeah, let's do that. Thank you. Keep it up.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five-star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

    RealAgriculture's Podcasts
    RealAg Radio, June 21: Carbon insets, monitoring yield, fantastic forages, and cereal company news

    RealAgriculture's Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 55:09


    It’s officially the first day of summer, the longest day and shortest night! To celebrate, occasional host Lyndsey Smith leads this episode of RealAg Radio. Tune in to hear about the difference between carbon offsets and carbon insets; how FarmTRX monitors yields; why forage fields need so much nutrient management; and, why Kelloggs is becoming... Read More

    RealAg Radio
    RealAg Radio, June 21: Carbon insets, monitoring yield, fantastic forages, and cereal company news

    RealAg Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 55:09


    It’s officially the first day of summer, the longest day and shortest night! To celebrate, occasional host Lyndsey Smith leads this episode of RealAg Radio. Tune in to hear about the difference between carbon offsets and carbon insets; how FarmTRX monitors yields; why forage fields need so much nutrient management; and, why Kelloggs is becoming... Read More

    Parenting Our Future
    Parents Against Child Sex Abuse Online | POF154

    Parenting Our Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:09


    Unfortunately, this is a topic we can't stop talking about. The online safety of our children is something that needs to be at the forefront of our parenting. It's one of the hardest topics to face in parenting because there are so many apps, and new ones all the time. It's like trying to hit a moving target. The world is so fortunate to have people like my guest Tania Haigh, who is advocating for our children's safety in the online space. What I love about her message is that she wants kids to have fun online AND keep them safe. In this episode, we talk about: The biggest challenges parents are facing Who the biggest offenders in the online space are The one thing you can do now to protect your children online How we need to show up as an authority figure for our kids with good information so they don't get it from unreliable sources Everything starts with communication between you and your child. We need to be talking to our kids about predators and how they try to contact you Please look at the PAXA site, there is a world of information that you will love! www.paxa.online They have a FANTASTIC resource for parents, “PAXA Pointers Resource Guide,” for $20 that helps fund their programs. It will help you, and all parents and kids online! **For all Parenting our Future listeners, they have given you their guide, “KIDS TOO Social Media Watch List for Parents” which can be found in the Parent Toolbox. www.parent-toolbox.com For the other episodes related to this topic from Parenting our Future, find the links below: Digital Distress: How our kids are impacted by social media with Dr lisa Strohman - https://www.parentingforconnection.com/parentingourfuture/episode/28af2ab4/digital-distress-how-our-kids-are-impacted-by-social-media-with-dr-lisa-strohman-or-pof125 Good Pictures, Bad Pictures; Porn-Proofing Kids - https://www.parentingforconnection.com/parentingourfuture/episode/2d7cbe0f/good-pictures-bad-pictures-porn-proofing-kids-or-pof54 Social Media Safety for Parents and Kids - https://www.parentingforconnection.com/parentingourfuture/episode/25b360da/social-media-safety-for-parents-and-kids-or-pof85 About Tania Haigh Tania Haigh is a passionate advocate for protecting children from harm. Through her work as co-founder of Parents Against Child Sex Abuse (PAXA), Tania identified a need to elevate parents' voices addressing child protection. After five years taking on one of the toughest epidemics impacting children, Tania has disrupted the child protection space launching the #KIDSTOO movement in November 2021. Beyond the hashtag, KIDS TOO builds on child sexual abuse, online safety and child poverty. Tania's commitment to this work reflects her tenacity in creating solutions for these areas. Contact information: Email: info@paxa.online info@kidstoo.org Social Media: Website: https://www.paxa.online/ https://www.kidstoo.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PAXAParents/ https://www.facebook.com/KIDSTOO_MVMT Instagram: http://instagram.com/p.a.x.a.__ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kidstoo/about/ https://jm.linkedin.com/company/p-a-x-a Twitter: https://twitter.com/KIDSTOOMVMT https://twitter.com/P_A_X_A YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBWl4y6_DkFRbO-6CDzuaZw https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgz25A6PzM0lCX_XMkZoDIQ Thanks for listening! It means so much to me that you listened to my podcast! If you resonate with my message and would like my personal help in your parenting journey, I'd love to talk to you. Please visit my website to book a call with me where we can talk about your parenting frustrations and I'll share how I can help you. www.parentingforconnection.com My intention with my show is to build a community of parents that can have open and honest conversations about parenting without judgement or criticism. We have too much of that!

    Longbox Review Comic Book Podcast
    Spotlighting Comic Book News, June 2022 Previews, and the Fantastic Comic Fan Podcast

    Longbox Review Comic Book Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:09


    Spotlighting comic book news (including Eisner Awards nominees), June 2022 Previews, and the Fantastic Comic Fan podcast -- https://fantasticcomicfan.podbean.com/. Please send your comments to longboxreview@gmail.com, call or text me (1-208-953-1841), chat with me @longboxreview on Twitter, or visit longboxreview.com. Leave a 5-star review! Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Thanks for listening! Links: https://twitter.com/comic_fantastic https://www.instagram.com/fantastic_comic_fan/ https://www.facebook.com/fantasticcomicfan

    Believe Big Podcast
    10 - IV C in the Cancer Arena with Dr. Lucas Tims

    Believe Big Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:52


    Wow!  Do NOT miss this episode with Dr. Lucas Tims.  He's got so much FANTASTIC information for patients from his experience with high-dose Vitamin C!Dr. Tims offers tips for patients with a new cancer diagnosis.  He shares how IV-C works in conjunction with standard of care therapies and mistletoe therapy; and he shares all of this information in a caring way that offers HOPE.Connect with Dr. Lucas Tims at the Riordan Clinic:https://riordanclinic.org/Suggested Resource Links:Riordan Clinic Test KitsBelieve Big Gratitude JournalIV-C Research Studies

    My Camino - the podcast
    Danish pilgrim Marianne Sommer has compiled a fantastic book "10 Paths to Santiago"....and it's a dream come true.

    My Camino - the podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 50:05


    Marianne Sommer quit her job back in 2019 to become a lifetime volunteer...and that decision led her to the Camino where she met dozens of pilgrims who inspired her with their stories of hope and transformation. Marianne decided to invite ten pilgrims to tell their stories, and so began Marianne's journey and her new book "10 Paths to Santiago". You can buy the book via Amazon or www.10pathstosantiago.com. You'll love our chat about Marianne's journey ....on the Camino....and in life. If you're interested in sponsoring me go to www.patreon.com/danmullins

    The Steve Warne Project
    778: The US Open Golf was Fantastic; Tampa in a Hole in the Cup Final

    The Steve Warne Project

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 32:52


    Matt Fitzpatrick wins the US Open. His bunker shot on 18 will go down as one of the most clutch shots in US Open history. Why is the PGA Tour Canada not catching on? Tampa in a big hole in the Cup Final. Can they pull themselves out of it.

    Good Risings
    57.1. The Rising Sign: Fantastic Energy Today! Make Your Dreams Real!

    Good Risings

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 3:32


    Good Risings is a mindset. Join Colin Bedell for a daily dose of Astrology. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.    Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Executive Producers: Colin Bedell, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com You can now search all of the Good Risings episodes on Fathom.fm/GoodRisings! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Big Picture Science
    Fantastic-er Voyage

    Big Picture Science

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 53:30


    Thinking small can sometimes achieve big things. A new generation of diminutive robots can enter our bodies and deal with medical problems such as intestinal blockages. But do we really want them swimming inside us, even if they're promising to help? You might change your mind when you hear what else is cruising through our bloodstream: microplastics!  We take a trip into the human body, beginning with the story of those who first dared to open it up for medical purposes. But were the first surgeons really cavemen? Guests: Ira Rutkow – Surgeon and writer, and author of “Empire of the Scalpel: The History of Surgery” Dick Vethaak – Emeritus professor of ecotoxicology, water quality and health at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Free University, Amsterdam) in The Netherlands Li Zhang – Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Michael LaBarbera – Professor in organismal biology, anatomy and geophysical sciences, University of Chicago This episode brought to you in part by DRAGON BALL Z: KAKAROT. Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!     Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Nirvanic Trance Podcast
    NE 632 - Soul Rupture

    Nirvanic Trance Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 112:16


    First show at new timeslot back at 10pm! Fantastic collaborative mix featuring Indie / Afro House / Breaks / Prog House / Electro / Tech House / Bigroom / Electronica / Techno / Funky House / Garage / Dubstep / Trance / DnB / Trap ! =0

    Eagle Community Church of Christ
    Fantastic Faithful Father Figures

    Eagle Community Church of Christ

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 27:29


    From the Eagle Community Church of Christ in Mont Belvieu, TX. This Father's Day sermon looks at the life of Abraham. How was Abraham influenced by his father? What is the impact of having a full faith in God? John Gunter talks about how much real faith can impact generations of people. Happy Father's Day!YouTube video of this sermonhttps://youtu.be/4dP_1A9PJ_8Church Websitehttps://www.eaglechurchofchrist.com Facebook Pagehttps://www.facebook.com/eaglecommunitychurchofchrist 

    Wine, Dine, and 69
    Episode 59: Fantastic Escapades with Denis and Jessie

    Wine, Dine, and 69

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 72:48


    Rachel talks new digs and follows up on last week’s intro before jumping into today’s interview with the beautiful couple, Denis and Jessie, founders of Fantastic Escapades! They talk keeping marriages healthy, prioritizing sex, and creating their own CBD bassed lube and massage oil. Episode Notes: Conversation with Denis and Jessie begins at 00:06:36. Follow Denis and Jessie: Website: https://fantasticescapade.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fantasticescapades/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fantasticescapades Twitter: https://twitter.com/FantazEscapades Try the products! Coupon Codes: WINEDINE6910 WINEDINE6920 Honeypot: https://fantasticescapades.com/honeypot/?AFFID=531023&SUBID=1234 Romantic Escapade: https://fantasticescapades.com/romantic-escapade/?AFFID=531023&SUBID=1234 Submit your Fantasy Escapade: https://fantasticescapades.com/escapades/ Discussed in the episode: Swiss Cheese Pervert: https://www.phillymag.com/news/2014/01/10/swiss-cheese-pervert-mayfair/ Satisfyer Pro 2: https://www.adameve.com/adult-sex-toys/vibrators/clit-vibrators/sp-satisfyer-pro-next-generation-104151.aspx Discussed in the intro: Archive of Mass Shootings: https://www.gunviolencearchive.org/reports/mass-shooting -------- Let’s keep talking! Have a question or idea for a topic? Email winedine@allportsopen.com! Podcast artwork by Yogesh Nankar (Design by Dreamers). Intro and Outro music by John Bartmann.

    The Jason Smith Show
    Hour 4 – Steph Curry Is Fantastic But Isn't Ready for Mount Rushmore

    The Jason Smith Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 31:59


    Jason Smith and Mike Harmon react to Steph Curry's legacy now that he's a 4-time NBA champion. Jason thinks Curry is definitely definitely climbing up the ladder, but was smart to stay in Golden State. Plus, the guys discuss the PGA Tour needing to act fast against the LIV Series. Get the biggest stars and pay the big bucks! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Fanboy Podcast
    ”JOKER Gets a Sequel, BLACK ADAM Universe?, Summer Game Fest, Big Director for FANTASTIC 4? & MORE!”

    The Fanboy Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 67:21


    Brett gives another solo performance this week on The Fanboy Podcast, as he covers: -Quick Thoughts on STRANGER THINGS 4, THE BOYS, TINY TINA'S WONDERLANDS -Big Directors Being Sought for FANTASTIC 4 (Spoilers for Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness!) -JOKER Getting a Sequel -Summer Game Fest - The Callisto Protocol, TMNT: Shredders Revenge, MARVEL's Midnight Suns, The Plucky Squire -BLACK ADAM Trailer Reaction -Dwayne Johnson All-In For BLACK ADAM Universe -OBI-WAN KENOBI Ep. 4 Reaction

    Horse Racing NW
    Indian Relay Weekend! - Episode #64

    Horse Racing NW

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 61:56


    Indian Relay racing and the Muckleshoot Gold Cup return to Emerald Downs this Friday-Saturday-Sunday, June 17-19! Fantastic horsemanship, athleticism and competition on display throughout the entire weekend. All former Gold Cup Champions are back, with 18 teams total from around the west and across the northern tier to the Dakotas. This Friday night has the first Pick 5 carryover of the meeting. That head start pool is $13,385. First race Friday at 7 pm, Pick 5 begins in 3rd race. Outstanding card on Sunday when the season's stakes schedule gets underway. The Seattle Stakes for three-year-old fillies and Auburn Stakes for three-year-old colts and geldings highlight weekend Thoroughbred activities. For a complete statistical recap, check out "news & notes" every week at emeralddowns.com.

    The Back of the Range Golf Podcast
    Misha Golod - Ukrainian Junior Golf Champion

    The Back of the Range Golf Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 42:33


    My guest on this episode is Misha Golod.  The four-time Ukrainian Junior Champion is now training full-time at the Leadbetter Academy in Orlando, Florida after his story was told by Golf Digest in March 2022.  David Leadbetter and Jim Nugent from Global Golf Post spearheaded the effort to change Misha's life and he is making the most of this opportunity.  Fantastic young man that everyone can root for as he starts his journey here in the United States.Misha Golod - InstagramMisha Golod Article in Golf Digest by Joel BeallSubscribe to The Back of the Range Subscribe in Apple Podcasts and SPOTIFY!Also Subscribe in YouTube,   Google Play , Overcast, Stitcher  Follow on Social Media! Email us:   ben@thebackoftherange.comWebsite: www.thebackoftherange.com  Voice Work by Mitch Phillips 

    Rock And Roll Confessional
    Lit's Ajay & Jeremy Popoff talk about the new album: "Tastes Like Gold" - they go back to their roots for this fantastic fun party album

    Rock And Roll Confessional

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 37:20


    Lit's founding members and brothers Ajay & Jeremy Popoff join us for this episode. Lit had one of the biggest mega hits in the 90's: "My Own Worst Enemy", along with many others. The band's last album was a shift to country music, but their lastest album: "Tastes Like Gold" is back to the bands original roots - great party music! The album will be released on June 17th and features the songs: "Yeah Yeah Yeah" and "Kicked Off The Plane". 

    The Bunker
    Painting By Numbers: How Do We Put a Price on Art? 

    The Bunker

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:47


    Who decides the value of a piece of art? And how do they come to their conclusions? In May, Andy Warhol's 'Shot Sage Blue Marilyn' sold at Christie's for a record £158 million, making it the most expensive painting of the 20th century – but it is merely the biggest wave in an international tsunami of art sales. Jelena Sofronijevic speaks to Mary-Alice Stack, Chief Executive at Creative United, and Erling Kagge, polar explorer, former politician, and author of A Poor Collector's Guide to Buying Great Art, to discuss placing a value on creativity.  “The price is reflective of the market, not the value of the artwork.” – Mary-Alice Stack “Now, we don't talk about art, we talk about the art market,” – Erling Kagge “Art fairs are the least best place to buy an artwork.” – Mary-Alice Stack “There was a time when galleries felt like the preserve of the moneyed classes.” – Mary-Alice Stack “There's a sense that if you need to ask the price, you can't afford it.” - Mary-Alice Stack  “Fantastic art is being made every day.” – Erling Kagge “The auction houses are competing against themselves.” – Mary-Alice Stack  “What matters to artists is the creation of the work in the first place.” – Mary-Alice Stack  https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast Written and presented by Jelena Sofronijevic. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Jade Bailey. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production https://uk.gestalten.com/products/erling-kagge-buying-great-art  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Remote Real Estate Investor
    Billy Keels on investing in real estate internationally

    The Remote Real Estate Investor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 34:31


    Before becoming a real estate entrepreneur, KeePon Cashflow's founder Billy Keels worked in the corporate world. In fact, he was one of the best “corporate soldiers” you'd ever want to meet. Billy says that he was happy enough in his J.O.B., but something was missing. An emptiness and longing for a different life chewed on him, pulling him to what he knew he wanted to do more than anything else. Billy wanted to be an entrepreneur who brought two worlds together. So he took steps and kept on the path to his goals. Today Billy is an international real estate entrepreneur, problem-solver, author, coach and mentor. He sees opportunities where others often don't in real estate. No “overnight success,” Billy continues to work toward his vision and goals. Topmost on his list? Building a bridge between investors and buyers in Europe with sellers in the U.S. Today, he talks about his transition story, how he became a real estate business owner, and how long-distance real estate business works for him.   Episode Link: https://www.firstgencp.com/ https://www.firstgencp.com/paylesstax https://www.linkedin.com/in/billykeels/?originalSubdomain=es --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by Billy Keels, who is an entrepreneur, Ninja remote investor who actually lives over in Europe, but invest here in the States among many other things. So let's hear from Billy the renaissance man about what it is he's doing in real estate today. Let's get into it.   Billy Keels what's going on, man, so good to see you again. Thanks for taking the time to hang out with me.   Billy: Michael, I am just like super excited about being able to spend more time with you have a conversation. Although I have to admit, man, there's like a lot of people going to be listening and watching us, so I'll be on my best behavior, don't worry.   Michael: I am, it makes two of us, alright good. Well, I obviously know who you are we we've become very fast friends over the short time we've known each other. But for anyone who might not be familiar with you, who are you, where do you come from and what is it you're doing in real estate today?   Billy: Yeah, so who am I, would you mind if I ask just one thing really quickly before I answer that?   Michael: Go for it!   Billy: So as a fellow podcaster, I just wanted to ask one thing. So I know just got here. But if you haven't had a chance already to leave an honest written review, as well as a rating. The guys do an amazing show here, Michael, I know you put a lot of time and energy into this and it will be great because that way ultimately, they're going to be able to help get you even better guests that are going to help you move forward faster. So with that as a background, Billy Keels I'll give you this fastest version as I can. Originally born in Columbus, Ohio. From there, probably by the time I was 12, I lived in three different states brother and sister were born in Colorado. I come from a family with two parents who were both working two jobs most of the time very blue collar, I watched them struggle a lot with money, making tough decisions, sometimes at the end of the month, do we buy this or do we pay this bill or do we pay the other bill, they had a lot of focus on education because they didn't think that they had formal education. So ended up being in a lot of different school districts, usually in the really good school districts and I saw I was exposed to a lot of things that my parents couldn't actually afford for me and my brother and sister. So that was kind of nice, but also kind of frustrating. But what it did is it taught me the work ethic, like you have to work really hard to get the things that you want. I wasn't A student, sometimes I still suffer from that A student and like today, I call myself a recovering perfectionist. Because the thing is Michael, like I used to do what I was told, because when I did what I was told, like study for the exam, I got really good grades, they came back and that was like the whole positive reinforcement, like I got good grades, study more, got good grades, got the dopamine hits, and all that kind of stuff. So ended up through college, I went to college, southwest of Ohio, then in a town or in a university called Miami of Ohio, got two degrees there was really set to get my dream job and got rejected not once but twice. But the thing is, is through that rejection and it was like really, really difficult for me because I like set my whole college career up to work as a project manager in marketing for Procter and Gamble, and I didn't work out for me. But through that, I learned that it's okay to be rejected, like you can be rejected and still things will be okay because after that the most amazing job I ever had was working for a company that allowed me to travel to five or two in five years, it allowed me to travel to 58 different countries, Michael and it just completely changed my entire view of the world because I'm from Columbus, Ohio, like I just thought I was gonna be in the Midwest most of my life. After that didn't see myself doing a normal nine to five I got accepted into university and Paris was going to do a one year sabbatical and just to kind of make things really fast, that one year sabbatical that started in September of 2001, has since turned into 20, additional 21 years, I left France, went to Italy, moved from Italy, back to France, and then from France, to Spain. So it was 21 years, three countries. I've learned four additional languages. I got married and we have two kids and up until recently like until last December, I was working in the corporate job so like still being a good student like doing the things I was supposed to do moving up the corporate ladder, and as of December of last year, which was December 2021. I'm no longer a part of the corporate world so kind of all that said, yeah, I kind of just joked it with everybody like I mentioned before like those one year sabbaticals you really have to be careful what happens because anything can anything could happen after that, man.   Michael: That's so good. Billy was so, so I mean, there's obviously a ton there that I want to dig into and unpack but getting back to last December. Did you fire yourself or did you get fired? I mean, what happened?   Billy: We separated.   Michael: It was amicable separated…   Billy: We separated, we separated now, but you know, it's one of those things like, I think corporate life is really, I took a lot of very positive things away from corporate life, I know that there are a lot of people like, don't do the corporate job, quit your job, do all that kind of stuff. I learned, I like I was surrounded by really smart people all the time, because I was working in enterprise software sales and so this is like very cutting edge and I was exposed to amazingly smart people got a chance to go deep industry knowledge on a number of different industries, got to work across Europe, Middle East, and Africa, managed 70 million euro budgets, plus, you know, learn languages learned different ways of thinking and doing things and I was also making a lot of money and so all of those different reasons, like I really enjoyed it, I probably kept going to my corporate job for about another four, four and a half, five years that I didn't need to but because I liked it so much and because I was in a top talent program, I was traveling to Hawaii, because I was part of the top achievers, like it was really good, but it just didn't fill my heart up and it took actually my dad getting really ill in the last part of last year and me being with him in the ICU, to really reflect on life and go, you know, what like, is this really what I want to keep doing and I know that I was very fortunate, I know that there are other stories that don't end so nicely, right because my dad is still alive today and we're able to enjoy him but that incident, what it made me really do, Michael was realize, like, hang on a second. Like, I want to really invest my time in the things that are going to give me the most emotional joy, rather than just going through the motions day after day, so.   Michael: Right. That's awesome, man. Well, I'm so glad to hear that your dad's doing better, that's exciting.   Billy: Thank you.   Michael: No, of course. So how did you get to the point where you were able to leave the corporate world because I think it's very easy to say like, oh, yeah, I'll quit my job because I get more joy, more emotional reward by doing this other thing over here but that's very well, that's nice, well, and good in theory, but I mean, we got to eat, we got to survive. We got to put a roof over our head, so what was it that you did, leading up to that point that allowed you to say, you know, I don't need this job.   Billy: I read a book and then I retired…. No, it's a joke!   Michael: Well I love it, it's so simple. I wish I had know that.   Billy: Exactly, I mean, everybody wish I yeah, exactly, everybody's doing it that way. No, you know, in yeah, I wish it was that simple. It took over nine and a half years, almost 10 years. But now the reality was, because I was such a happy employee, right. I mean, even people used to look at my moniker on LinkedIn and it was like happy corporate employee. The thing that happens when you are in a student is you do what you're told, you know, I mentioned earlier and so when you're in the corporate, it's the same thing, like you go in, you work the hours and then once you're working the hours, you want to move up the move up the chain and from there, you also want to make sure that you're maxing out your 401 K and your IRA. Well, I was doing that and then 2000, I'd been working for probably five, six years and bubble burst for the.com bubble that went down. And then a couple years later, the 2008 great financial crisis happened and so I didn't actually have any other kind of backup plan. It was like go to work all day, and then invest in the stock market and so I realized that I had to have my own plan and that is actually where real estate came in. Because I was like traveling between Barcelona and the states. I remember picking up Rich Dad, Poor Dad, and I started reading it, but I didn't actually finish it. So a couple years later, I assume Yeah, I know. Right? So I ended up picking it up again and then I read it and this time I read it and I loved it so much. I was like this cannot be true. This is unbelievable. This is not true. So then I went and read another one it was Cashflow Quadrant and then I read another one and another one another one and all of a sudden I'd read all the rich dad series, right, as most people binge, and then I found some podcasts and I watched some videos and eventually I was like a theoretical like theoretical ninja Michael, like I knew every single thing that you needed to know and then when you would ask me like how many like, okay, cool. So what's your portfolio look like?   You know what you can get to the NOI by taking the revenue minus the other operating expenses and so it took me a while, you know, to realize like, I've got to move from theory to action and unfortunately, or fortunately, the thing that took me that got me into action, once again, was like something that had nothing to do with real estate had nothing to do with money. It happened because as an A student, I was doing all the stuff that I was doing. But at this point, I was a really young father and one of the things that was really important to me early on was like I wanted to be present. At the same time because I don't come from money, I wanted to make sure that I kept winning at the office, like I was doing all the extra hours and all that kind of stuff and rising and getting the promotions. But one of the things that happened that I used to be really ashamed to even talk about Michael was the night before my son's third birthday, my oldest son, I didn't sleep very well that night. It was like not a good night's sleep for me because the next morning, I had to get up and take a flight to Frankfurt, Germany and I remember like not sleeping well that night got up really early the next morning, you know, woke my wife up, woke our one year old up, told them get ready. You know, I want to be able to sing Happy Birthday to our oldest, got in another shower and then like you can imagine, like 5:45 in the morning, everybody's half asleep, I go wake my three year old up, we sing happy birthday hug and kiss and then I'm out the door, like on my way to the airport, like just sick to my stomach, like what am I doing? Like this is completely incongruent, like I want to be present and like I said, I used to be ashamed of it. I didn't talk about it that much. But it's one of the things I finally realized, like, that's part of what happened to me, it took me from the theoretical ninja to actually getting into action because when I finally got to Frankfurt, and we spent all day in this business meeting that Michael, I don't even remember what the business meeting was about, like even to this day. What I can tell you though, that night, when I was at the dinner, and I walked out to go while everybody else was singing, and gave my young, my oldest son a hug and a kiss and blew out the candles like I was in Frankfurt, Germany, and I was like, I'm not doing this anymore and so that's the thing that took me from the theoretical ninja to actually going out and getting into action and starting to figure out, like, what do I want to invest in and all these other kinds of things and it took me from that point, it took me about eight months later, somewhere between six to eight months, I knew to make the very first purchase of the property I thought I wanted to buy here in Barcelona. But just one thing led to the next didn't work out, I was not in the type of market that would provide cash flow. I wasn't I didn't have enough education or network at the time to really understand the difference between cash flow markets and appreciation markets and all that stuff. But I finally took action and my wife and I were in Cairo, Egypt, I bought my very first duplex, which was in New Jersey and it was just a completely different, like different time, like didn't use leverage so much of the technology and stuff like that, that we do nowadays. But that's actually how I started getting into real estate wasn't really for money, it was just to start to get control because I didn't want to miss any more that really important stuff in my life.   Michael: And I love that story, thank you for sharing and I know that there's a lot of things. I think it's so hard because there is a lot of things that investors are often have a hard time talking about or ashamed or whatever the cause is and I think it's so important to highlight those and spotlight those because there's a couple of things in my opinion, A it humanizes you, you're someone that's accomplished a ton and it shows people like look, Billy is just a person like you or I or anybody else out there and two like it shows the struggle, like we always talk about on podcast and these sort of things like oh, look at the we've we've climbed the mountain, we're there, we're at the conclusion. But there's this whole build up that isn't spotlighted, so thank you for sharing it.   Billy: Hey, man, sure, no problem because like I said, I kind of jokingly earlier like just read a book. No, I didn't just read a book like you, you got started from there and then from there, you know, you get your first property, and then you get your next property and you make mistakes along the way. Like I said, I didn't have enough education. I didn't surround myself with people that were more knowledgeable than I did and it took me actually making a lot of money coming in the door, not having processes in place, things were broken, not necessarily the best experiences for the residents that we're living in our properties. I had to stop, I had to decide that it was time for me to pay to have a mentorship, like paid mentorship so that I could actually figure out like, what processes do I need, what systems need to be in place and things like that, and things got better. But definitely, I needed to take action. I took action, and I did a lot of things wrong, a lot.   Michael: Yeah, well, I mean, that's what kind of builds you up, right and that's what makes you figure out okay, this works, this doesn't work. But how great that you could also leverage your mentor to say, hey, what have you seen because I'm just one person with one set of eyes. What are all the things you've seen him go well, and not well, and I think that's what people often miss out on?   Yeah, yeah. So this is obviously the remote real estate investor people tell them all the time, Michael, there's no way I could invest remotely, but you're living fricking across the ocean across the pond, investing in the state. So what was that like, how did you wrap your head around, not physically being there never seeing the property, like you are different times But like, it couldn't be more different.   Billy: Yeah, so you know, and this is one of those things, right and this is, I guess, just paradigm shifting. You know, one of the things that I love when you came to join me on the going long podcast is that we start to normalize this, right because a lot of the books that I was the theoretical ninja and always either they said it directly, or maybe kind of insinuated that, like you have to be a landlord, you have to live in the exact same place right and so I guess in my mind, I was thinking that because I initially started looking Michael to purchase properties here in Barcelona, and all the books when they were saying how are you going to make $200 a door $300 a door. You know, I would go and I would because I was a theoretical ninja right, so I went through and I penciled the numbers out and I would go through and talk to Donna rinse minus the operating expenses, net operating income, like and get a decent loan and I was like, hey, second, this is minus 50 euros alright, let me try the next one. Okay, well, yeah, well hang on a second. This is minus 75 euros. I mean, no, no, this can be hang on a second, the books at two and three and conversion, nope, still negative and so negative 150 and I was like, wait a second, like, this doesn't work like none of these numbers were working for once again, I didn't have the education and I did not have the network to actually ask the questions and so what I realized is I got a little bit frustrated, because I wasn't going to be able to invest here in my backyard and thankfully, I have very good friends that challenged me many times and they're like, well, Billy, you're like, you know what, you're American, why don't you invest in us and I just looked it up. I remember going well, that's probably not that's one of the least smart things I've ever heard in my life. It was a little bit more colorful than that but the reality was, I thought, do you not see the Atlantic Ocean between me where I live in where the closest property could be and then I thought, you know, what, actually, let me find out and so then I started figuring out like, what, what, who would I need on my team, because I knew that I wouldn't be able to manage the properties, I wouldn't be able to buy the properties I wouldn't be able to go through plus, that wasn't my skill set and so one thing led to the next where eventually, I ended up making that first purchase, doing it remotely, I started here and Michael, hopefully you have a similar type of view, which is, like, I see it as it's like any relationship. I knew that I needed in one in something, so I started taking action towards that towards building, being able to build relationships and make purchases. That's what I was, in my mind and so I started writing people emails, calling talk to family members that were back in the States. Hey, listen, do you know anybody who could help me I don't know anything about getting a mortgage and getting a loan and so they would help connect me with people. I was on the phone, I was sending emails. Once we finally connected with the broker, a general contractor, they introduced me to an agent. Then we started going from email to surprise, surprise. Hey, Michael, big, big hint here. Zoom has been around since before the pandemic, most people didn't know that, right? So I've been using it for the last eight and a half, 10 years, right and so you would that progression started happening from the phone calls to jumping on Zoom, hey, how you doing, be able to talk to one another find out if we're aligning certain types of things and then from there, once I knew that, I wanted to go deep into a specific area, because my goals were that big. It made sense for me to actually continue the progression. So I then put my money where my mouth was, and I actually got on the plane, I flew to meet with the brokers with the property managers, because I wanted to go deep in that particular location and that's what made the most sense for me. So it was having that progression, recognizing that I wanted to go deep in a specific location and then I followed that natural progression, to get to the location, meet a number of the members of the team and then started to build the team. I didn't do it very well that time, because I started without really having a mentorship but then afterwards, once I really figured out how to do it, I actually replicated that model in a different location, much faster, much better and with a lot less pain, being able to do it in the next location.   Michael: Yeah, I love that. I think it's so important again, just to kind of stop and highlight this. So many people, I think, get into real estate and think I got to do all the things, I've got to become all the experts and like you don't, you can go and meet people and people know people and people talk and so once you find one good person, they probably know one other good person, if they don't, they might be able to tell you who you could go ask who might know somebody else. So I love that I love and I love that you took the like the system of setting up the team and you just like, did it another location and that's applicable anywhere, right.   Billy: But you know what it is and so here's the thing that I did wrong, right because I think I love that you said they're like because we usually talk about the things we do, right and everybody wants to say about those types of things and so one of the things that I recognize now that I did not do in the proper order the prepper sequences, I had money in the bank and I knew I wanted control because I was not going to let the stock market thing happen again and one of the ways of being able to do that was start to generate my own income so that I was not going to miss another one of my son's birthdays or anybody else that I love, right and so, as I started doing that, I just went and I bought the property. Like I knew that I wanted to buy a property so I was looking to buy the property. But then when things so I bought the property had a skeleton kind of team but then when things started happening, I didn't have a team in place. I was like, hang on a second, this is broken, and they're calling me and I've got a Spanish phone number and this is not convenient, like they called the realtor and the realtor then sent me an email. I mean, it was it was because I'm in a different on a different continent and so I then realized that oh, hang on a second after being there for like, over a year in the same location, I didn't really even understand anything about the location that I was in. I just bought it there because I knew family members could get there more or less than an hour but there was no not much more process than that the only thing that I was crystal clear on is that I needed that I wanted the benefit of cash flow, like that's what I really wanted and I understood that I could also get some tax benefits.   So I did it just the opposite of the way that I would say to people today, or that I do, say and teach to people today, which is, first get clear on the benefits that you are looking for what you're looking for, then get really, really clear on why you're looking for them. Because it's not if but when things get really, really hard and I know this sounds like probably an old record, but like you really are going to have to cling on to the why you aren't wanting to do this, because it's going to get hard and then afterwards, then you go to the location that gives you the highest probability of being able to achieve that benefit, tax benefits, cash flow, whatever and then you build the team and then once you build the team that understands the location that also understands the benefit that you're looking for, then it doesn't really even matter if you buy the single family house, it's on 123 Main Street, if you buy the multifamily building, if you buy a piece of energy equipment, if you buy whatever, because all of the four different steps are aligned, but starting with you and what it is that you want to do and why you want to do it like that's the way you're supposed to do it not don't do the way that I did in the beginning, because it's like you're gonna learn but it's just gonna be a lot more painful and costly.   Michael: Mic drop podcast over Billy exit stage left, like that was amazing. It's so good, it's so good and I think like, it sounds so it sounds so simple, right? Like, it's so basic, you just like break it down into these four steps, I love it. I think it's just the execution, you've actually then just got to go do it and I think the the why piece of it, and we talked about it all the time on the show, and with friends and colleagues like that's, I think one of the most important pieces of this because you're right, it does get hard, it will get hard and if that's what you have to kind of ground you. I think you're gonna be okay. Oh, that's awesome. All right, Billy, let's fast forward. What is it that you're doing today because you mentioned like energy equipment and this is a real estate investing podcast shows like, fill us and fill in the gaps, what's going on?   Billy: Yeah, so one of the things that I started realizing, right as an accredited investor, right and if you've not talked about that before, maybe if you want, we can talk about what that is. But I started realizing that I enjoyed real estate and I, I really, really, really like real estate, I enjoyed that asset, because it is an asset that you can have much more control over either doing it investing yourself or with a team and you're able to the control you can you can generate the income, you can force appreciation, you can control your expenses and things like that. So I really like that aspect of it and then when you look at the tax efficiency, because passive income is not the income that you're not working for, but the way that the IRS looks at in taxes, passive income, it's really extremely tax efficient, at the same time, because I was someone who is a high wage earner, and someone who was dedicated to working for someone else I understood really quickly, or actually, after a couple of years, that there's different types of ways that it does matter, actually how you earn your income and if you like the income, that is real estate related, which I like it a lot, I needed to figure out a way to stop paying 40 plus percent in taxes, right, and being able to find different vehicles that would allow me to do that. Now and let's say this is an overarching statement, not giving anybody any tax advice, just you asked me a question. So I'm sharing my experience in terms of why I even got into this other area because I believe, Michael, that as long as you know what it is that you want to do, why you want to do it and you have a general idea of the direction that you want to go just like big companies like what's your strategic five year plan, you know, you want to move towards these things. When you know the destination, then it's about figuring out which are the right vehicles in the right moment in time to help you get there and so real estate very much as an active part of my portfolio, I am also a passive investor and I got into the to the energy sector because there was a very specific energy opportunity so investing in carbon capture equipment, which allowed not only for the creation of consistent cash flow moving forward, but it also helped me on my W two income the taxes that I was paying on the W two income and so the way that I saw it was hey, listen, if I'm able to reduce the amount that I'm paying for my w two in terms of tax, then that's capital that I wouldn't be able to use input into other more tax efficient vehicles i.e. real estate and the likes so that I can actually move faster I can get into vehicles that get me to my destination much faster. So that's how that carbon capture equipment which is part of the energy sector got involved because it's that vehicle helps me speed up a bit if you will to get to the destination because it helps to reduce and relieve some of the tax obligation that I have on my w two income which is something that is very unique in my real estate investing because it's passive income was not doing so it's combining these different vehicles once again to get to the destination.   Michael: I love it and it sounds like we could probably do an entire episode on carbon capture equipment and the whole energy sector. But for people that aren't familiar with it, like, give us a quick and dirty, how does someone get involved in something like that and really like, what is it?   Billy: Yeah, sure. So the best way is we've been we've got a thing, and I'm sure you'll probably let me tell how people can get their head around that we have a special guide, it's a free guide, leaving your email, and we'll send it out to you. But in essence, basically, you are part of a company that owns a piece of equipment, that piece of equipment is used by a third party, and that third party, large companies that are using that piece of equipment, because of the because of their they're using this piece of equipment that you can take things like bonus depreciation, if you're familiar with bonus depreciation, if not, it's in the guide. So you can find out in that free guide that that that you can pick up and basically, for the use of this piece of equipment, we're able to use the tax code that's already in place, the IRS says, hey, listen, if you use this type of equipment, you find these types of you have this type of a working interest, then you have the option to or the ability to not the option the ability to take those losses against your active income and so basically, by being able to help, what the IRS is asking us to do, we are doing exactly that, putting it in the form of a company, and the company receives the benefits and the owners of the company are able to receive the benefits that they are proportionately involved in in terms of ownership of the company. I know it probably sound a little bit wordy, but it's only because it's probably easier just to read through the document and you can actually get the specifics on exactly what it is but just technically high level, that's what it is.   Michael: So good and it's a what's the company called and where can people go get that guide and we'll link to it here?   Billy: Yes, yeah sure. It's just go to first gen cp.com, forward slash pay less tax, it's: https://www.firstgencp.com/paylesstax and like I said, it's really for a lot of people, if you are a Mac like I was in software sales world, and I was working for a very large three letter German company called SAP and that company, you know, I was surrounded by lots of other people who are high wage earners. Also, today we're serving number of people that are in professional sports franchises or, and doctors, lawyers, and they enjoy investing in other assets like real estate and if they could do more real estate by having their tax bill, the right size, then, you know, they get to their destination much, much faster.   Michael: It makes so much sense, so let's just turn back the clock for a minute here and I'm curious to know, because you've done both active investing and passive investing and we've been having a lot of syndicators on the show recently talked about the passive side of things. How did you figure out that it was appropriate for you from a timing perspective and how should people be thinking about whether going the active route themselves getting their hands dirty doing it versus just giving their money to someone else and letting them do the hard stuff?   Billy: Yeah, so great, I love this question. I wish I would have known about passive investing earlier, because I would have done a lot more of it because the type of role that I was in as a high paid professional, if I just broke it down to the amount of money that I was earning per hour, based on the amount of time that I put in real estate versus my day job. passive investing would have made more sense for me at the time. One of the things I also say is there are some people like me, that really, really, really enjoy control, have to have control and so sometimes, well, I wouldn't even say sometimes, probably the right thing for that person that absolutely needs a lot of control is to be able to be the active investor, go out, find the property, do all the legwork, build your team, all that kind of stuff and I say that for two reasons, Michael. The first is you get the experience and people that have a need lots of control. If you don't do that, you're going to be unhappy, because you're going to be thinking to yourself, I could do it better, I do it faster. I could do it though, all this kind of stuff, right. So that's the first thing you need in will want that control. The second thing is when you do it, you are going to realize how much work it actually is and what it takes to actually make your, your, your residence happy, and your properties profitable and so you may decide after gaining the experience that maybe you can do it better than you shouldn't be doing it better and even if the dollar per hour euro per hour is less well at least you're in control, you're going to be right. For those people who are looking to get to the destination much faster. It's usually leveraging the efforts, the strengths of others and being able to be a passive investor. You can be involved you can learn what you need to learn so that you feel comfortable. Especially comfortable on the one thing that I think no one ever, ever talks about Michael, I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say normally when you're looking as a passive investor you're talking about, okay, great and you look through the business plan and you look and you say, okay the COC the cash on cash return is such and such, and the NPV is something else and the IRR is something else and that looks amazing and this is fantastic and you know what, what you're never looking at the ROS, right and that, to me is the one metric that that trumps all of the metrics, because it's the only one that really matters, right and so, like I said, if you're looking at IRR, well, great, perfect have to it's a 330% IRR. Fantastic, what your ROS, is you're always negative, is it positive, I don't know. Okay and you're probably thinking yourself, well, what is the ROI is Billy?   Michael: Yeah, I was like for all of our listeners asking for a friend, because I definitely know what it is.   Billy: Yeah, it's the most part, it's the most important metric of all, it is the return on sleep. So if your return on sleep is negative, even if the IRR is 380%, I'm gonna guess you probably wouldn't want to do that, because there's nothing that replaces the amount of nice, calm sleep that you receive in the evening and so that's, that's one of the other things that you want to look at, look at and think about it as an impassive as a passive investor. Excuse me, so those are the, I guess some of the things that I would think about as an active investor, if that's what you want to do some of the profiles of the people that probably need to try that or not probably, but you do need to try it, because you're going to understand, yes, you can do it better, faster, cheaper, or you should let somebody else do it better, faster, cheaper, better, maybe cheaper, or maybe exactly the same but you're not spending the same amount of time doing that because at the end of the day, Michael, the most important asset is time and how are you using your time? Are you using it to gain more education or insight, build a talent so that you can select the right team to do the same thing or do you are you using it so that you can actually build the skill to go out and find the properties and to be able to fix the properties and be able to do all that kind of stuff? So think it's a personal decision, but you need to sit down and look at the things do you need to control and look at, you know, what is your return on your hour of time and is that the best use of your time?   Michael: Yeah, no, I love it. I love it. Be like you this has been so much fun as expected you delivered as expected. Where can people learn more about you can learn about your company invest alongside, you, where should they go?   Billy: Yeah, sure. So are we done already, really? I can't believe it goes by. Yeah, well, you know, it's, it's, so here's the thing. So the best way and I appreciate you giving the opportunity earlier, but especially for those of you that are that you're in that accredited investor standpoint, and you want to understand more about what we're talking about for the energy you can go to first gen cpe.com forward slash pay less tax: https://www.firstgencp.com/paylesstax , the website is: https://www.firstgencp.com/ . You can go there just check out things and look get a better feel for who we are, who I am, who our company is and also to Michael, one of the places I love being able to also connect with people is through LinkedIn and so if you go to LinkedIn, I'm pretty sure I'm the only Billy Keels in Barcelona, Spain. So check out Billy Keels in Barcelona, send me just an personalized request. If you can just let me know that you heard Michael and I already having this conversation. It's just gonna let us keep the conversation going and be much, much easier for both of us. So those are the ways Michael man I really appreciate it and I mentioned before as well if you want to find out more complimentary to what you're doing the going long podcast with Billy Keels. We love talking about people who are remote investing long distance investing, if we can get build more momentum and get more people on board, it will be awesome.   Michael: It's an amazing podcast. Oh my god, Billy my pleasure. Thank you, man. Thanks again. I'm sure we'll be chatting soon.   Billy: Awesome, thank you, you too.   Michael: Okay, everyone, that was our show a big thank you to Billy for coming on super great knowledge bombs dropped throughout the episode. Definitely go back and give it another listen if you missed any of them. As always, if you've liked the episode, please feel free to leave us a rating or review, like Billy mentioned they are super helpful for us, and we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing…