Podcasts about early christians

Development and growth of the Christian religion

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Best podcasts about early christians

Latest podcast episodes about early christians

TonioTimeDaily
My complete freedom from religion!

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 98:57


“Early Christians agreed that Christianity offered "nothing different" from paganism. Arguing with pagans around 150 C.E., Justin Martyr said: "When we say that the Word [Jesus], who is the first born of God, was produced without sexual union, and that he, Jesus Christ, our teacher, was crucified and died, and rose again, and ascended into heaven; we propound nothing different from what you believe regarding those whom you esteem sons of Jupiter (Zeus)." Fourth-century Christian scholar Fermicus, in attempting to establish the uniqueness of Christianity, met at every turn by pagan precedents to the story of Jesus, in exasperation concluded: "The Devil has his Christs!" “The Associated Press chose to omit the fact that scholars have largely discounted the Josephus paragaph as a later interpolation. The passage, although widely quoted by believers today, did not show up in the writings of Josephus until centuries after his death, at the beginning of the fourth century. Thoroughly dishonest church historian Eusebius is credited as the real author. The passage is grossly out of context, a clear hint that it was inserted at a later time. All scholars agree that Josephus, a Jew who never converted to Christianity, would not have called Jesus "the Christ" or "the truth," so the passage must have been doctored by a later Christian--evidence, by the way, that some early believers were in the habit of altering texts to the advantage of their theological agenda. The phrase "to this day" reveals it was written at a later time. Everyone agrees there was no "tribe of Christians" during the time of Josephus--Christianity did not get off the ground until the second century. If Jesus were truly important to history, then Josephus should have told us something about him. Yet he is completely silent about the supposed miracles and deeds of Jesus. He nowhere quotes Jesus. He adds nothing to the Gospel narratives and tells us nothing that would not have been known by Christians in either the first or fourth centuries. In all of Josephus' voluminous writings, there is nothing about Jesus or Christianity anywhere outside the tiny paragraph cited so blithely by the Associated Press. This paragraph mentions that Jesus was foretold by the divine prophets, but Josephus does not tell us who those prophets were or what they said. This is religious propaganda, not history. If Jesus had truly been the fulfillment of Jewish prophecy, then Josephus would have been the exact person to confirm it. And this is the "most important" historical evidence for Jesus!” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Catholic Daily Brief
What Did The Early Christians Think About Mary? Part I

Catholic Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 12:02


Mary, the Mother of God

Hands on Apologetics
26 Sep 22 – Bruce Sullivan: How to Defend the Faith with Early Christian Beliefs

Hands on Apologetics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 51:13


Today's Topics: 1) Finding the Fallacy: Division Fallacy Meet the Early Church Fathers: Clement of Alexandria 2, 3, 4) Interview

Catholic Daily Brief
Did The Early Christians Baptize Infants?

Catholic Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 15:36


"Holy Baptism is the basis of the whole Christian life, the gateway to life in the Spirit and the door which gives access to the other sacraments." (CCC1213)

Catholic Daily Brief
Did The Early Christians Celebrate Mass?

Catholic Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 15:55


Prayer During the Day
Thursday 8th September 2022 Tabitha and Cornelius: two early Christians 'Full of Good Works'

Prayer During the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 9:39


Psalm 101; 1 Peter 2.9,10; Acts 9. 19. 36- 10.16 Cornelius' inclusion in the story highlights the inclusion of the outsider in the story of faith. But what of Tabitha? Women are never in this early narrative described as full of the Holy Spirit - the apostles are men of their time - and choose six men to wait at tables in the early church. Tabitha nevertheless spends all her time and resources for the benefit of others at the expense of her own health, rather like the StrongBlackWoman who is expected to be an example of stalwart faith in the most painful of circumstances. See Chanequa Walker-Barnes, Too Heavy a Yoke. Black Women and the Burden of Strength (Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2014), 16-17.

Fides et Ratio
The Price of Our Faith- What the Early Christians Paid

Fides et Ratio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 9:07


It is important to understand the quotes of our apostolic and patristic fathers within the realities of their day. Our forefathers and mothers paid a Continue reading The post The Price of Our Faith- What the Early Christians Paid appeared first on Fides et Ratio.

Malcolm Cox
S2 Ep273: Tuesday Teaching Tips | Episode 273 | “The Lord's Supper - Celebration or Soberness?”

Malcolm Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 8:43


Today a response to a message from a friend based on one of my recent Teaching Tips about communion. “Thank You” Govinda for your well considered thoughts and questions. I cannot address them all in today's post, but I will pick out one point for discussion. “It's been a long time as a church … that we have got onto our knees and focused on the cross… I feel the communion sometimes does not get the reverence it deserves.” My provocative question would be, “Is communion meant to be a time of reverence?” I have been re-reading and taking notes on this excellent book, “Early Christian worship: a basic introduction to ideas and practice” by Paul Bradshaw. He summarises the shifts and developments in practice and theology over the first four centuries. To answer my own question, I'll make a few points. 1. Irreverence is a problem. Paul makes that point loud and clear, “You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons too; you cannot have a part in both the Lord's table and the table of demons.” (1 Corinthians 10:21–22) 2. Remembering Christ means remembering his cross. “And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body given for you; do this in remembrance of me.”” (Luke 22:19 NIV11) 3. The New Testament gives us no direction about silence, mourning or reflecting on sins of the week. The warning to examine ourselves in 1 Corinthians 11:28 is something to be done before coming to the assembly, not during it. 4. The early church may have been influenced as much by the incident on the road to Emmaus as the upper room. Jesus told his followers to remember him, and the first two disciples to break bread with Jesus after his resurrection recognised (remembered) it was him “when he broke the bread” (Luke 24:35). As Bradshaw notes, ‘Sunday was not just the occasion for a commemoration of a past event – the resurrection – but the celebration of a present experience – communion with the risen Christ.' 77 5. The early church was eschatologically expectant. The Lord's Day was the eighth day – the day of the LORD, the Messianic age, the lead-up to the great banquet. The church came together in expectation of Jesus' return and the full establishment of the Kingdom. The Lord's Supper gathered the people of God around the table to celebrate that immanent reality and strengthen hearts in the time of waiting. For this reason kneeling and fasting were prohibited in the early church on Sundays. Celebration was the tone! When we gather as a Christian community it can, on the right occasion, be healthy to spend some time in reflection, soberness, mourning and lamenting. Whether that should be specifically tied to the communion is another question. The common practices around the idea of being sober at communion are tradition, not biblical command nor precedent. That does not in themselves make it wrong to practice such things, but they are a choice, not a matter or obedience or even ‘best practice'. Jesus instituted a new covenant in his blood, and a new covenant is not a cause for mourning, but a cause for rejoicing. Soberness is not ruled out, but if the Lord's Supper is not a time of celebration we are missing something vital to our spiritual health. The Lord's Supper is one of the most important practices in which we participate as a Christian community, but the number of specific Bible verses on the topic are few. What do you make of this? Please add your comments on this week's topic. We learn best when we learn in community. Do you have a question about teaching the Bible? Is it theological, technical, practical? Send me your questions or suggestions. Here's the email: [malcolm@malcolmcox.org](mailto:malcolm@malcolmcox.org). If you'd like a copy of my free eBook on spiritual disciplines, “How God grows His people”, sign up at my website: http://[www.malcolmcox.org](http://www.malcolmcox.org/). Please pass the link on, subscribe, leave a review. “Worship the LORD with gladness; come before him with joyful songs.” (Psalms 100:2 NIV11) Keep calm and carry on teaching God bless, Malcolm

Nickel City Chronicles - Young American Dialogue
Serpent Deity Venerated by Early Christians? | Agathos Daemon

Nickel City Chronicles - Young American Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 35:52


https://www.patreon.com/mdavidlitwa/postsPlease Consider joining the Patreon of M. David Litwa (Ph.D) He is a valuable resource for knowledge of Comparative Religion and early Christianity. Dr. Litwa also has a Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDmeuaHHwq9ssljFa4aN_Eg An agathodaemon was a spirit (daemon) of ancient Greek religion. They were personal or supernatural companion spirits, comparable to the Roman genii, who ensured good luck, fertility, health, protection and wisdom. Though little noted in Greek mythology he was prominent in Greek folk religion;[5] it was customary to drink or pour out a few drops of unmixed wine to honor him in every symposium or formal banquet. In Aristophanes' Peace, when War has trapped Peace in a deep pit, Hermes comes to give aid: "Now, oh Greeks! is the moment when, freed of quarrels and fighting, we should rescue sweet Eirene and draw her out of this pit... This is the moment to drain a cup in honor of the Agathos Daimon." A temple dedicated to them was situated on the road from Megalopolis to Maenalus in Arcadia. An Agathos Daimon was the spouse or companion of Tyche Agathe. "Tyche we know at Lebadeia as the wife of the Agathos Daimon, the Good or Rich Spirit". Their numinous presence could be represented in art as a serpent or more concretely as a young man bearing a cornucopia and a bowl in one hand, and a poppy and an ear of grain in the other. The agathodaemon was later adapted into a general daemon of fortuna, particularly of the continued abundance of a family's good food and drink.Later some other versions have described agathodaemons as psychopomp beings which takes the dead ones which are on their card to the afterlife (Underworld ) but he doesn't judges them Agathodaemons have been described as personal guardians, helpers or protectors of people.According to the ancient Greeks each person was born with each personalities, the agathodaemon and the cacodaemon. #mdavidlitwa #GnosticInformant #Agathodaemon --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gnosticinformant/message

GSMC Classics: Dr. Bob Jones, Word of Truth
GSMC Classics: Dr. Bob Jones, Word of Truth Episode 37: Character of Early Christians & Christ Fills Every Need

GSMC Classics: Dr. Bob Jones, Word of Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 32:21


Robert Reynolds Jones Sr. (October 30, 1883 – January 16, 1968) was an American evangelist, pioneer religious broadcaster, and the founder and first president of Bob Jones University. GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate, and give you a glimpse into the past.

The Thomistic Institute
Resurrection in Context: The Strangeness of Early Christian Claims | Prof. Matthew Thomas

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 82:38


This lecture was given on April 8, 2022 at the University of California, Berkeley. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Matthew J. Thomas is Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley, CA, and an Instructor in Theology at Regent College, Vancouver. He holds a D.Phil in New Testament and Patristics from the University of Oxford, and is the author of Paul's 'Works of the Law' in the Perspective of Second-Century Reception (Mohr Siebeck, 2018; IVP, 2020), which received the Jesus Creed "Book of the Year" award for 2018. Matthew and his wife Leeanne live in the Bay Area with their children Camille, Raphael, Michael and Agnes, who are also aspiring theologians.

Religion Today
2022-08-28 Religion Today - Jesus Earthly Appearance, Vocation and Family Make Up

Religion Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 20:01


Most depictions of Jesus appearance, his vocation and family life are inaccurate.  In this episode of Religion Today, host Martin Tanner explains that Jesus was clean shaven with short hair.  His robe was tan or wheat colored, made of undyed linen, to his knees and elbows, not to his ankles or wrists.  Jesus job was more than the mistranslation "carpenter."  Jesus and Joseph were "craftsmen."  To make it in their field they had to be skilled construction workers, able to make or repair buildings, gates, barrels, walls, furniture, roofs, wheels, carts - almost anything.  The New Testament tells us Jesus had brothers and sisters.  Early Christians, like Christians today, have a wide variety of ideas about whether Mary had any children other than Jesus, and what Jesus actual relationship was to these New Testament brothers and sisters.  Martin explains the ideas of early Christians on this.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Faith Matters
129. The Early Christian World — A Conversation with Laura Nasralla

Faith Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 27:31


In the past few decades, scholarship on the New Testament has opened up exciting new ways of understanding the context of the early followers of Jesus and has enabled new interpretations of the texts they wrote. One of the leading scholars advancing our knowledge of early Christianity is Laura Nasrallah, a professor at Yale who specializes in New Testament texts and archaeology. In this conversation, Zach Davis and Terryl Givens visited Laura in her New Haven office to discuss topics like the role of women in the early Christian church, how to discern God's hand in the messy complexity of history, and New Testament practices like speaking in tongues and baptism for the dead. Laura Nasrallah is a Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale University. Her research and teaching engage issues of gender, race, colonialism, status, and power and bring together New Testament and early Christian literature with the archaeological remains of the Mediterranean world. She is the author of the book Archaeology and the Letters of Paul.Register for Restore: A Faith Matters Gathering.

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Dr Deidre Brown: early Christian missions and taonga Maori

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 18:39


Dr Deidre Brown has a life-long interest in the relationship between Maori and early Christian missionaries.

Two Texts
2:42 Learning to Grow as Community | Disruptive Presence 12

Two Texts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 32:46 Transcription Available


In which John and David consider the implications of what the Holy Spirit did to life for the Early Christians. Acts 2:42 shows us how they had balanced and holistic view of what being in community meant for them. It might even be that they knew some things about Christian community that we have forgotten!Episode 65 of the Two Texts Podcast | Disruptive Presence 12If you want to get in touch about something in the podcast you can reach out on podcast@twotexts.com or by liking and following the Two Texts podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. If you enjoy the podcast, we'd love it if you left a review or comment where you're listening from – and if you really enjoyed it, why not share it with a friend?Music by Woodford Music (c) 2021We'd love to invite you to consider supporting Two TextsSupport the show

The BreakPoint Podcast
Thanks to the Church, Religious Liberty Was Founded

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 1:06


Christians are often accused of “forcing our faith on others.” But the idea that we shouldn't do that comes from the Church.  Early Christians were persecuted because they refused to cater their faith to imperial power. Across Rome, people could worship whatever god(s) they wished, as long as their worship did not preclude the empire, the emperor, and the Roman gods.   When Constantine the Great granted toleration with the Edict of Milan in 313, a new level of freedom extended not only to Christians but, with a few restrictions for public order, to others as well. Even when Christianity became the “official” faith of the empire, pagan worship remained legal.  Of course, Christians have not always recognized religious freedom for others, but the fact remains, it came from the Church. This month, for a gift of any amount, join a Breakpoint online course called The Essential Church: Why the World (and Christians) Still Need the Body of Christ, featuring Drs. Timothy Padgett, Glenn Sunshine, and Peter Leithart as well as Collin Hansen. Go to colsoncenter.org/August 

Postmodern Realities Podcast - Christian Research Journal
Postmodern Realities Episode 301: Moving by Staying Put: Christian Pilgrimage in Marilynne Robinson's Gilead

Postmodern Realities Podcast - Christian Research Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 59:07


In the medieval Christian tradition, one form of travel—pilgrimage—functioned as a spiritual discipline in which the act of walking prefigured the soul's movement from spiritual death to life with God. Indeed, at the roots of Christian story is the pilgrimage of Abraham, who leaves his country to wander in search of another. Today, pilgrimage functions primarily as a metaphor, reminding us that we are incomplete, that our homes and our selves are, in their fullest form, still to be found. As St. Augustine contends, the true pilgrimage is one of inner transformation: “[we do] not approach God by moving across intervals of place, but by likeness or similarity, and [we move] away from him by dissimilarity or unlikeness.” If, therefore, our goal is inner transformation, we are as likely to reach it by remaining physically in place as by moving about.       Outward movement may even thwart interior growth--when we seek to change our circumstances rather than adjust ourselves to the realities set before us. Early Christian monks known as the Desert Fathers counseled their spiritual followers to remain in their specific monastic communities, even in their own small cells, insisting that “A tree cannot bear fruit if it is often transplanted. So it is with the monk.”       Marilynne Robinson's Pulitzer Prize winning novel Gilead is the story of a man whose faith trains him to love both a place and its people. He is a man whose pilgrimage--an inner journey--takes place almost entirely within the confines of Gilead, Iowa, a small town on the American prairie. Precisely because his life develops within narrow geographic boundaries, he achieves growth by attentiveness: to books, scripture, self, place, and people--who reveal themselves to be not thin but deep, rooted in a spiritual reality that causes the world to flash with light and beauty.      Our world does not usually know itself to be threadbare and pierced by divine light. And a life of frenetic movement is unlikely to see this light. So the Christian faith trains us to stillness, allowing us to see who and what stands before us--each person one of the great, good glimpses of God given to this world.This Postmodern Realities episode is a conversation with Journal author Stephen Mitchell about his article, “Moving by Staying Put: Christian Pilgrimage in Marilynne Robinson's Gilead” in the forthcoming 45:2-3 (Fall 2022) edition of the Christian Research Journal. To subscribe and make sure you get this issue when released, please click here. https://www.equip.org/product/crj-subscription/When you to subscribe to the Journal, you join the team of print subscribers whose paid subscriptions help provide the resources at equip.org that minister to people worldwide. These resources include our ever growing database of over 1,500 articles, as well as our free Postmodern Realities podcast.Another way you can support our online articles is by leaving us a tip. A tip is just a small amount, like $3, $5, or $10 which is the cost for some of a latte, lunch out, or coffee drink. To leave a tip, click here https://www.equip.org/product/pmr-jnl-tip/Other articles podcasts featuring this author:Episode 248 Myself Am Hell: Rebellion and Gratitude in Milton's Paradise LostMyself Am Hell: Rebellion and Gratitude in Milton's Paradise LostEpisode 201 Albert Camus and the Fight for LifeThe Sting of Death: Albert Camus and the Fight for LifeEpisode 189 Second-Rate Musician: Vocation and Performance in T. S. Eliot's The Confidential Clerk“Second-Rate Musician: Vocation and Performance in T. S. Eliot's The Confidential Clerk “.Episode 135-Questing for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy's The RoadQuesting for Divine Love-Cormac McCarthy's The RoadEpisode 111 Humanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionHumanity Crucified: Hemingway and the Human ConditionEpisode 092 Literary Apologetics: Flannery O'ConnorFlannery O'Connor and the Problem of FreedomEpisode 045: Alexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand InquisitorAlexander Solzhenitsyn Confronts the Grand Inquisitor

Danny Houlihan‘s Irish Experience
High Crosses of Ireland Tonaknock Cross County Kerry

Danny Houlihan‘s Irish Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 11:15


In this episode Danny Houlihan travels out onto the landscape of North Kerry to a famous High Cross a part of North Kerrys Heritage in Killahan, once a site of an ancient Early Christian settlement. The cross can be seen on the side of the main road which draws visitors each year to this special iconic feature of our Irish Past. This is the first visit to the cross and more will follow during the year, a short history of high crosses is covered in the episode just a taste is what in store in the episodes to follow.

New Books in Ancient History
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Christian Studies
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books in Religion
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Sound Studies
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Sound Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sound-studies

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here. 

NBN Book of the Day
Kim Haines-Eitzen, "Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us" (Princeton UP, 2022)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:16


For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught Early Christian Monks—and What It Can Teach Us (Princeton UP, 2022) shares the stories and sayings of these ancient spiritual seekers, tracing how the ambient sounds of wind, thunder, water, and animals shaped the emergence and development of early Christian monasticism. Kim Haines-Eitzen draws on ancient monastic texts from Egypt, Sinai, and Palestine to explore how noise offered desert monks an opportunity to cultivate inner quietude, and shows how the desert quests of ancient monastics offer profound lessons for us about what it means to search for silence. Drawing on her own experiences making field recordings in the deserts of North America and Israel, she reveals how mountains, canyons, caves, rocky escarpments, and lush oases are deeply resonant places. Haines-Eitzen discusses how the desert is a place of paradoxes, both silent and noisy, pulling us toward contemplative isolation yet giving rise to vibrant collectives of fellow seekers. Accompanied by Haines-Eitzen's evocative audio recordings of desert environments, Sonorous Desert reveals how desert sounds taught ancient monks about solitude, silence, and the life of community, and how they can help us understand ourselves if we slow down and listen. You can listen to a series of recordings that go with each chapter of the book here.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

Head to Heart
Were Psychedelics in early Christian Eucharist? With Brian Muraresku

Head to Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 56:29


If you come from any kind of Judeo-Christian roots, the truth is important because it sets us free.  The hard evidence is in, & our convesation with Brian Muraresku & his NYTimes Best Seller book The Immortality Key sheds light on the substances in some of the early Christian Eucharist--& it might surprise you. Brian shares history of the early Christian underground cult in its early form, women's role in leadership, his journey spelunking beneath the Vatican, & how this secret might have gone underground. Find Brian at www.brianmuraresku.com, follow him at @brian@muraresku, & buy his book The Immortality Key to further your curiousity in this new avenue of thinking.  (@christablackgifford @iamlukegifford @womanscircle)

Douglas Jacoby Podcast
A Tour Through John, Lesson 7

Douglas Jacoby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 19:39


For additional notes and resources check out Douglas' website.3:1 Now there was a Pharisee named Nicodemus, a leader of the Jews. 2 He came to Jesus by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher who has come from God; for no one can do these signs that you do apart from the presence of God.” The nocturnal visit of Nicodemus is well known (v.1ff).Nicodemus was a Pharisee, the sect of the Jews deeply concerned that people follow the scriptures. While generally speaking they did not "walk the walk" (Matthew 23), they were correct about the need to obey God´s word.Nicodemus was one of their better representatives, and approaches Jesus in a positive and apparently sincere way. He accepts his miracles and even -- unlike some Pharisees -- his divine authority.The visit takes place at night. Perhaps this was because of fear or discretion, but it may also have been in order for Nicodemus to have uninterrupted conversation with Jesus.3 Jesus answered him, “Very truly, I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God without being born from above.” 4 Nicodemus said to him, “How can anyone be born after having grown old? Can one enter a second time into the mother's womb and be born?” 5 Jesus answered, “Very truly, I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit. 6 What is born of the flesh is flesh, and what is born of the Spirit is spirit. 7 Do not be astonished that I said to you, ‘You must be born from above.' 8 The wind blows where it chooses, and you hear the sound of it, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.” Jesus does not mince words, but directly tells Nicodemus that he must be born again -- make a new start (vv.3,5,7).The Greek ánōthen has a double meaning: again or from above. That is, the new birth is not something man can accomplish; it comes only from heaven.The notion of new birth in the new covenant is an O.T. concept, found in Isaiah, Ezekiel, and other books. Thus it should have been familiar to someone who knew his Bible well.Therefore Nicodemus should not have stood aloof from the baptism of John.9 Nicodemus said to him, “How can these things be?” 10 Jesus answered him, “Are you a teacher of Israel, and yet you do not understand these things?Yet Nicodemus seems not to understand (v.9). Jesus attempts to explain this spiritual truth to Nicodemus, using several illustrations:Water and Spirit (v.5). The new birth comes in baptism. See the parallel verse in Titus 3:5. This was the unanimous interpretation of the early church fathers.The water of verse 5 refers to baptism, as virtually every N.T. scholar agrees. Attempts to make it refer to amniotic fluid are far-fetched. For example, British Baptist scholar George Beasley-Murray (see Baptism in the New Testament) rejects the notion as unconvincing, insisting rather than baptism and salvation were always directly connected in the N.T.Water and Spirit are conjoined in a number of ancient Jewish texts. See, for example, the O.T. passage Ezekiel 36:25-27. Among the apocalyptic and sectarian writings, see Jub. 1:23; Pss. Sol. 18:6; Test. Jud. 24:3; 1QS 3:6-9; 1QH 11:12-14.The wind (v.8), the point is not that the motions of Spirit-led people are weird and erratic, but rather that the wind, though invisible, still has definite effects. In other words, something unseen may still be quite real and tangible.The bronze serpent (next section)Jesus rebukes Nicodemus for not knowing these important spiritual precepts (v.10).Those who teach and lead need to know the Bible, and there is no excuse for ignorance.If he does not accept these truths, Nicodemus (v.11) is illustrating the resistance of the Jews to the light (1:11). If he does accept them, he can be born again (1:12-13).11 “Very truly, I tell you, we speak of what we know and testify to what we have seen; yet you do not receive our testimony. 12 If I have told you about earthly things and you do not believe, how can you believe if I tell you about heavenly things? 13 No one has ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man. 14 And just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, 15 that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.16 “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.Nicodemus appears again in chapters 7 and 20. The trajectory of his faith is clear: from the night visit to defending Jesus before the Jewish leaders to approaching Pilate for the body of Jesus...If he continued on this path (and here we can only speculate) then he would have become a strong Christian.Listen to the podcast on Nicodemus in the NT Character Studies series (login required).The serpent (v.14). Referring to a well-known event recounted in Numbers, once again Jesus tries to draw Nicodemus' spiritual gaze upwards.An amazing analogy: Jesus' crucifixion is compared to Moses´ raising of the snake on a pole! This image is directly connected with verse 16 – a fact seldom noticed by Bible readers.In John, the lifting up of Jesus (v.14 and 12:32) encompasses the death, resurrection, and ascension of Christ -- not just the crucifixion.Early Christians saw this as a sign of the Tau Cross (in the shape of a T, a capital tau in Greek).In Hezekiah's time the object had become venerated as an idol and had to be destroyed (2 Kings 18:4).Notice that in all three passages we are drawn upwards. The snake was lifted up; the wind comes from above, the source of the new birth also is heavenly.It´s hard to know where words of Jesus end and where the words of the evangelist begin.Does Jesus stop speaking in verse 12? 16? 21?One difficulty is that in ancient Greek there were no quotation marks.Theologically, nothing is affected whether these words are Jesus' or those of the gospel writer, since it is the Spirit speaking either way.Wrap-upJohn's gospel is carefully constructed, and there are many connections that we might miss on first reading it.Jesus' conversation with Nicodemus is best understood in connection with the miracle of his changing water into wine (chapter 2). Both are about transformation and the new life.Similarly, his conversation with the Samaritan woman in chapter 4 is connected with this cleansing of the Temple. Both concern returning to God in truth, and not putting our trust in holy places or institutions.Some questions:In my outreach, am I more direct and to the point with religious people than I am with those unfamiliar with God´s word?Do I follow Jesus´ lead in calling to commitment those with greater knowledge, responsibility, and influence?Am I using the whole arsenal of the Bible, the OT included?Tomorrow we will continue from 3:16.

Keys of the Kingdom
7/30/22: Tribalism

Keys of the Kingdom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 60:00


Consequences of not doing what Christ said; Non-Christian Christians; Living by violence; vs Charity; Showing up for neighbors; Societal virtues; Tribalism; Abraham's tribes; Ur and Haran; City-states; Belonging to a king; Roman republics (tribes); Strengthening society; Altars of clay and stones; Sophistry; Taxes vs tithes; Inflation; Community defined; Sons of God?; The real solution; "The Beast"; And "The Harlot"; Seeking the kingdom; Culture = values/virtues to pass down; Voting for benefits; Sabbath; Welfare snares; Early Christian tribes; Local and traveling aid; Being a doer; Love is sacrifice; Knowing Moses and Jesus; Fathers of the Earth; Substitute Holy Spirit; Pontius Pilate; Historical nonsense; Join the Living Network.

The BreakPoint Podcast
What “Not of This World” Doesn't Mean (Why Christians Are Called to Politics)

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 5:27 Very Popular


“Christians should stop seeking political control and power and just focus on winning the lost.”   “Jesus said, ‘My kingdom is not of this world' so Christians should stay out of government.”  “Neither Jesus nor the early Christians tried to take over Rome. He built His kingdom in people's hearts and minds.”   Many variations of this argument can be found in Christian Twitterverse, usually, in response to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade. The idea seems to be that real Christian spirituality neither seeks nor celebrates political or judicial victories. Christians should only be concerned with the things of God, not the things of this world. In other words, God isn't concerned with government, and Christians shouldn't be either.   Though this line of thinking sounds quite Christian, it isn't. Rather, it is an inaccurate portrayal of the relationship between God's justice and earthly justice. Just as importantly, it misunderstands what our salvation is for and why God calls us to live in this world, instead of just whisking Christians to heaven the moment we're saved.  Recently, my colleague Shane Morris tackled this bad theology on Twitter, and the thread was republished by the Babylon Bee news offshoot, Not the Bee. I'll paraphrase his points:    First, for most of the Church's history, Christians have agreed that civil laws should in some way reflect biblical morality. Neither Catholics, Orthodox, nor most Protestants believed that being apolitical was a good or godly thing. While there were occasions over the centuries when Christians shunned political involvement for a variety of reasons, often because they were prohibited from any involvement, it wasn't until the Radical Reformation and movements like the Anabaptists in the 1500s that swearing off politics gained traction as a principle for following Christ. Even then, it was a minority opinion. On the contrary, for most Christians, being a civil magistrate has always been seen as a high and noble calling.    This, of course, makes a lot of sense since there is really no such thing as not legislating morality. No matter who writes the laws of a land, those laws always reflect someone's moral beliefs. Protecting innocent lives from deadly violence, something that occurs in abortion and other forms of murder, is the central function of good government. God created government to serve that purpose.  Second, Shane pointed out something many theologians have noted over the years: that when Jesus said, “my kingdom is not of this world” in John 18:36, He did not mean “my kingdom has nothing to do with this world.” Rather, He meant that His kingdom is not from this world, does not use this world's methods (such as violent revolution), and does not aim at the world's ends.  Still, as Abraham Kuyper pointed out, Jesus' kingdom absolutely does affect this world, over which He has declared total sovereignty, and in which He holds individuals and governments accountable for administering justice and punishing violence against the innocent (see Genesis 9:6).   As for the part that neither Christ nor the first Christians tried to take over Rome, anyone who says this should read further in their history books. In A.D. 325, the Emperor Constantine ended the official persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. Just decades later, in the year 380, Emperor Theodosius declared Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire. As a matter of simple historical fact, Christians did take over Rome!  Setting aside questions about the legitimacy of established religion and how good such an arrangement is for the Church, it's simply not true that early Christianity did not seek to impact earthly governments. Early Christians showed intense interest in impacting governments in everything from the outlawing of infant exposure to ending persecution to the ending of the gladiatorial games.  The assault of the Church against the gates of Hell progresses, of course, through the preaching of the Gospel and the conversion of souls—what the Apostle Paul called “spiritual weapons.” But by advocating for good and just governments—especially when it comes to protecting innocent lives—Christians are loving their neighbors and fulfilling the other half of our calling in this world: to pray and obediently work so that God's kingdom will come and His will be done “on earth as it is in Heaven.”  We are saved for a purpose. Along with evangelism and worship, we are to be good citizens and to love our neighbors. This will involve supporting righteous laws and opposing wicked ones. No law in this nation's history has been more wicked than Roe v. Wade. Therefore, Christians are right to celebrate its downfall and to work to undo its bloody legacy. And Christians are right to oppose other wicked legislative efforts, such as the misleadingly named “Respect for Marriage Act.”  The idea that Christians have a calling so high that it keeps us from politics may sound spiritual, but it's something almost no Christian in history would recognize. Nor would Jesus, who in the same conversation with Pilate where He said, “my kingdom is not of this world,” also reminded this government official where his power came from.  

The BreakPoint Podcast
The Christian History of Abolition v. The Christian History of Abortion

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 5:02


In most of the world today, slavery is unthinkable. Is it possible that we could ever reach that same place with abortion in America?  Just as there were once states where it was legal to own slaves and other states where it wasn't, we are now a nation deeply divided on the issue of abortion on a state-by-state level. In certain states, abortion is allowed, encouraged, and even subsidized abortion. In others, abortion is all but illegal. The history of the Church's stance on both issues, abolition and abortion, is instructive as we seek to obey Christ in a post-Roe world.  Clearly, the early Church did not like slavery. The New Testament condemns behaviors that were endemic to the slave trade. In his letter to Philemon, Paul gave broad hints that masters should free their Christian slaves. Early Christians often purchased slaves specifically to set them free.   Even so, neither the New Testament nor the early Church pushed for full abolition of slavery, for at least two reasons.  First, taking a public stand would have brought even more unwanted attention to an already targeted group. Second, the ancient world offered no model to Christians for a society without slaves, so few could envision what that would look like. Though Christians saw slavery as a curse, they could not conceive of being rid of it entirely (any more than they could imagine a world rid of disease or poverty). This failure of moral imagination meant that it would be centuries before the implications of the Gospel would lead Christian rulers to take definitive steps toward abolishing slavery.  By the Middle Ages, overt slavery was rare in Europe, and Church leaders spoke out against it. Thomas Aquinas claimed that slavery might be part of the “law of nations” but was against the law of nature and therefore a sin. When, centuries later, the infamous Atlantic slave trade began, Portugal and Spain defied the decrees of four different popes to spread it in their colonies. In the English-speaking world, the rampant practice of slavery found opposition among Quakers and a rising evangelicalism that eventually ended first the slave trade, then slavery altogether.  All this means that the American theologians who defended slavery were following the culture's lead, not Church teaching. Though it took far too long for the implications of the Gospel to become clear, the teaching of both Jesus and Paul of the spiritual and moral equality of all persons meant that slavery was incompatible with Christianity, and its abolition in Christian states was only a matter of time. Eventually, because of the commitment to the worth and dignity of every human being as created in the image of God, Christians fought to end the abuse of slavery.  In contrast, the Christian position on abortion has been clear from day one. In the Didache, the earliest non-New Testament Christian work to survive, Christians are instructed “you shall not murder a child by abortion nor kill that which is born.” Similarly, the late first or early second century Epistle of Barnabas, a manual of ethics in this early period, says “you shall not murder a child by abortion, nor again kill it when it is born.” In “A Plea for Christians,” written in 177, Athenagoras of Athens wrote, “[w]e say that those women who use drugs to bring on abortion commit murder …”  Similar teaching can be found in the writings of Clement of Alexandria, the pseudonymous Apocalypse of Peter, Tertullian, Hippolytus, Cyprian, and Lactantius, which takes us up to the de-criminalization of Christianity by Constantine. The teaching of the Church on abortion has been clear from the start and continued to be clear well into the 20th century.   Only recently have some claiming the name of Christ accepted abortion as morally licit, or worse, have celebrated it. Christian opposition to abortion is based on precisely the same reasoning as Christian opposition to slavery. Every human being is made in the image of God and is crowned with glory and honor, a dignity we dare not ignore. The same dehumanizing and depersonalizing claim that undergirded the idea that slaves were less worthy as human beings, and further undergirded the horrific treatment of African Americans in the Jim Crow South, is also at work in pro-abortion thinking. And yet, the same liberating power of the imago dei that broke the chains of slavery demands that we see the dignity of preborn children and work to protect them.   Slavery and the subsequent dehumanizing treatment of African Americans was evil, and that the crusade to end both was (and is) God's work. May we also recognize that dehumanizing and killing the unborn is at least as evil, and rightly abhorred.   

New Books Network
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Ancient History
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Christian Studies
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books in Biblical Studies
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Biblical Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biblical-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Religion
Travis W. Proctor, "Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 43:01


Drawing insights from gender studies and the environmental humanities, Demonic Bodies and the Dark Ecologies of Early Christian Culture (Oxford UP, 2022) analyze how ancient Christians constructed the Christian body through its relations to demonic adversaries. Through case studies of New Testament texts, Gnostic treatises, and early Christian church fathers, Travis W. Proctor notes that early followers of Jesus construed the demonic body in diverse and sometimes contradictory ways, as both embodied and bodiless, “fattened” and ethereal, heavenly and earthbound. Across this diversity of portrayals, however, demons consistently functioned as personifications of “deviant” bodily practices such as “magical” rituals, immoral sexual acts, gluttony, and pagan religious practices. This demonization served an exclusionary function whereby Christian writers marginalized fringe Christian groups by linking their ritual activities to demonic modes of (dis)embodiment. The tandem construction of demonic and human corporeality demonstrates how Christian authors constructed the bodies that inhabited their cosmos - human, demon, and otherwise as part of overlapping networks or “ecosystems” of humanity and nonhumanity. Through this approach, Proctor provides new resources for reimagining the enlivened ecosystems that surround and intersect with our modern ideas of “self.” Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

The 401st Prophet with Dr. Phil Mitchell
An Early Christian on Why Christianity Will Win

The 401st Prophet with Dr. Phil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 5:09


An anonymous Christian writing over 1800 year ago tells what Christianity is and what Christians are like. As you read his letter you realize why Christianity has emerged as the most powerful religious for in the history of mankind. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/phil-mitchell7/message

The Simple Truth
Testimony Tuesday (Mike Aquilina)

The Simple Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 51:48


6/28/22 - Mike Aquilina is the author or editor of more than fifty books, including The Fathers of the Church, The Mass of the Early Christians, and Angels of God. Since 2002 he has collaborated closely with the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology, for which he has served as an executive and trustee. He is a contributing editor to Angelus News, and he podcasts twice monthly for CatholicCulture.org. He and his wife, Terri, have been married since 1985. Their six children are the subject of his book Love in the Little Things. Their growing number of grandchildren are much loved.

Religion Today
2022-06-26 Religion Today - Polycarp - Early Christian Bishop and Martyr - and 2022 IANDS Conference in Utah over Labor Day Weekend

Religion Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 20:00


Many have not heard of Polycarp, who was born in 70 AD and was taught Christianity by the Apostle John.  In this episode of Religion Today, host Martin Tanner gives a brief sketch of Polycarp's life, that he was Bishop of the Church is Smyrna for decades, where he had a tremendous influence for good in pointing out false ideas and doctrine during the early days of the Great Apostasy.  Polycarp was burned at the stake at age 86, in 155 AD, when he refused to deny Jesus and proclaim the Roman Emperor God.  Polycarp was revered by all of the Early Christians who knew him and by those who knew his story of faith. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Biblical Mind
How the Early Church Engaged with Scripture (Brian J. Wright)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 37:31


When we think of the early church, some of us might imagine groups of illiterate believers guided by one or two trained readers or teachers. In fact, the historical reality was very different. Brian J. Wright describes an ancient world obsessed with reading—especially public, communal reading of significant texts, including lots of questioning and dialogue. In this episode, Dru Johnson and Brian Wright examine literacy levels in the Roman Empire, the early church's engagement with Paul's letters, and historical evidence about reading in the first and second centuries. They also discuss the modern church's Bible engagement, and how we can take a more dialogical and active approach to reading Scripture. Brian J. Wright is an associate pastor at Denia Community Church, an adjunct professor, and author of Communal Reading in the Time of Jesus: A Window into Early Christian Reading Practices. He studies communal reading in the scholarly context, challenging long-held views about literary culture, and also encourages contemporary communal reading practices. Show notes: 0:00 The "public reading mania" of the early Christian era 3:20 Transformative, communal texts 5:53 Literacy levels in the Roman Empire 9:40 Defining "communal" 12:23 Jewish practices for reading and debating Scripture 14:18 A culture of collective correction 17:27 Early Christian dialogue 21:11 Dialogue in the modern church 26:47 Reading entire epistles 32:40 Reading "as long as time permits" 35:28 Augustine about Ambrose reading Tweetable Quote "There's wisdom in us doing it [reading and teaching] together. Everything about the community is really at the heart of the conversation." Show notes by Micah Long Credits for the music used in TBM podcast can be found at: hebraicthought.org/credits.

Sunday Musings
Which Way Should We Follow?

Sunday Musings

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 16:53


Early Christians weren't known by that label until later. They were simply followings of "the Way" — disciples of Christ who had told them personally that he was the way to follow. What does that mean for us? 

In Our Time
Early Christian Martyrdom

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 53:03 Very Popular


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the accounts by Eusebius of Caesarea (c260-339 AD) and others of the killings of Christians in the first three centuries after the crucifixion of Jesus. Eusebius was writing in a time of peace, after The Great Persecution that had started with Emperor Diocletian in 303 AD and lasted around eight years. Many died under Diocletian, and their names are not preserved, but those whose deaths are told by Eusebius became especially celebrated and their stories became influential. Through his writings, Eusebius shaped perceptions of what it meant to be a martyr in those years, and what it meant to be a Christian. The image above is of The Martyrdom of Saint Blandina (1886) at the Church of Saint-Blandine de Lyon, France With: Candida Moss Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology at the University of Birmingham Kate Cooper Professor of History at Royal Holloway, University of London And James Corke-Webster Senior Lecturer in Classics, History and Liberal Arts at King's College London Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Religion
Early Christian Martyrdom

In Our Time: Religion

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 53:03


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the accounts by Eusebius of Caesarea (c260-339 AD) and others of the killings of Christians in the first three centuries after the crucifixion of Jesus. Eusebius was writing in a time of peace, after The Great Persecution that had started with Emperor Diocletian in 303 AD and lasted around eight years. Many died under Diocletian, and their names are not preserved, but those whose deaths are told by Eusebius became especially celebrated and their stories became influential. Through his writings, Eusebius shaped perceptions of what it meant to be a martyr in those years, and what it meant to be a Christian. The image above is of The Martyrdom of Saint Blandina (1886) at the Church of Saint-Blandine de Lyon, France With: Candida Moss Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology at the University of Birmingham Kate Cooper Professor of History at Royal Holloway, University of London And James Corke-Webster Senior Lecturer in Classics, History and Liberal Arts at King's College London Producer: Simon Tillotson

Bible Studies - St. John Wheaton
5/20/2022–A Life of Devotion and Mission: Living Like the Early Christians: Pastor Marcus Nelson

Bible Studies - St. John Wheaton

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


Reason and Theology Show – Reason and Theology
Holier Than the Early Christians? Communion and the Council of Trullo

Reason and Theology Show – Reason and Theology

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022


Holier Than the Early Christians? Communion and the Council of Trullo Michael Lofton reviews a video by Taylor Marshall saying that he would refuse the Eucharist if it was only available to be received by the hand. The original video may be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTkrdd5Y9PA&t=52s 00:00 Introduction. 01:00 Michael’s opinion about communion on the hand […]

Bible Studies - St. John Wheaton
5/13/2022–A Life of Devotion and Mission: Living Like the Early Christians: Pastor Chad Kendall

Bible Studies - St. John Wheaton

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Doing Theology. Thinking Mission.
Ep 21: Travel in the New Testament World with Jason Borges

Doing Theology. Thinking Mission.

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 63:42


In This Episode, We Talk About: Travel in the ancient world; what it looked like, the perils and dangers early Christian faced, and its ties to the spread of Christianity. Honor-shame dynamics in relation to travel. The impact of travel to Paul, Philemon, and Onesimus. How travel & hospitality shaped Early Christian social networks and community. The relationship between travel and Christian identity. Resources & Links: Paul and First-Century Letter Writing by E. Richards   Saved by Faith and Hospitality by Joshua Jipp   Follow Mission ONE on Instagram | @partnerwithmissionone   Learn more on mission1.org    About Jason Borges: Jason Borges works at the Asia Minor Research Center in Antalya, Turkey, where he does biblical research and training. He is a PhD candidate under John Barclay at Durham University, studying early Christian travel. Show Notes: Have you ever wondered what travel looked like in the New Testament? In this episode, we have Jason Borges, currently working at the Asia Minor Research Center where he does Biblical research and training! He is a PhD candidate at Durham University studying early Christian travel. Today, he'll be sharing his knowledge of travel in the ancient world, as we take a deep dive into how travel relates to Christian identity, connections, and social networks of the era.   We also explore honor-shame in relation to travel, the concept of travel in the New Testament, as well as travel's function in both ministry and theology. Then, we take a closer look at the significance of hospitality and how it helped to shape a collective identity in Christ for early Christians. What were the dangers early travelers faced? How can travel help us understand the text in a better perspective? Why was travel key to the spread of faith and community? We're answering all these questions and more! Join us as we take a journey into the past and walk the roads forged by our early Christian predecessors! 0:00:00 Meet Biblical researcher Jason Borges, working at the Asia Minor Research Center in Antalya, Turkey! 0:01:50 What made you want to study under John Barclay? 0:02:55 How did you start studying travel in the ancient world? 0:05:00 What has been written on the topic so far by Chrstian scholars? 0:08:35 How did the Roman Empire's infrastructure help spread Christianity? 0:11:30 What did travel look like in the ancient world? 0:14:30 The dangers of traveling. 0:15:15 How was travel viewed back then? 0:17:35 What precautions were taken when people would carry money? 0:19:05 What are some major Roman roads that still remain today? 0:21:25 Were there any forms of identification? 0:23:15 How does honor-shame relate to travel? 0:25:45 New Testament hospitality. 0:28:00 What were the benefits of this hospitality to travelers? 0:30:15 How does travel impact Philemon? 0:33:55 How did travel connect Paul and Philemon? 0:38:40 Why does Paul need to welcome Onesimus back? 0:41:25 What was the hierarchical shift between Onesimus and Philemon? 0:43:10 Where is travel significant to help understand the text? 0:47:25 What were unique challenges women faced when traveling? 0:48:15 What did patronage mean in a Biblical sense? 0:49:50 How does travel function in ministry and theology? 0:53:10 What should contemporary Christians be more aware of concerning travel? 0:56:10 The relationship between travel and early Christian identity. 0:58:35 What do missions need to learn from theology, and what does theology need to learn from missions? 1:00:15 What resources do you recommend?