Podcasts about British Isles

Group of islands in northwest Europe

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Latest podcast episodes about British Isles

Case and a Couch
102 - Bad Kings

Case and a Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 70:50


Welcome to the BPEU (Bad Popes Extended Universe). This week, we dive into the worst monarchs to ever rule the British Isles. 

The New Monastics
Earth, A Palace of Deities: Re-Wilding Ourselves with Amelia Hall

The New Monastics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 61:34


Dr. Amelia Hall is a British-born scholar-practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism and professor in the Department of Wisdom Traditions at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. In this episode, we discuss the issues of taking on a religious tradition that comes from another culture, cyclical and linear orientations, cultural ‘exotification,' the evolution of Buddhism outside of India, investigations of human relations with non-human beings, sacred landscapes and the health of the planet, personal and place-oriented re-indigenization and re-wilding, accepting the ‘magical' in the academy, outer-inner and secret understandings, violence against the Earth and its beings, primeval relational consciousness versus the modern utility mind, commodity culture and the reclamation of the indigenous traditions of the British Isles, the modern interest in magick, and the nature of truth and reality around our experiences.Charis FoundationGolden Turtle SoundSupport the show

This Week in Virology
TWiV 960: Getting funky with Dan Wilson

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 129:45


Dan Wilson of Debunk the Funk joins TWiV to explain why he decided to take on science misinformation and how he critiques people who promulgate incorrect information. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Guest: Dan Wilson Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Support MicrobeTV with a Spike t-shirt (Vaccinated.us) with promo code MicrobeTV International Scientific Coordinator Position (agajewski at icsnicaragua.org for more info) Debunk the Funk (YouTube) Letters read on TWiV 960 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson – Jazz Project:  InstrumentalTrumpet: Clifford Brown/Miles Davis/Winton Marsalis. Clifford Brown: Signature album: Study In Brown, Signature song: Sandu; Miles Davis: Signature albums: Kind Of Blue; Sketches Of Spain; Porgy And Bess; Miles. Signature song: Time After Time. Wynton Marsalis: Signature album: Standard Time. Signature song: Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans Brianne – Physicists Create a Wormhole Rich – Dec 1 APOD: Artemis 1 Flight Day 13 Vincent – An Ancient Language, Once on the Brink, Is a British Isle's Talk of the Town Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

Travel Royally Podcast
Ep. 47 - Garrett and Jay - Royal Links Most Recent Clients - Scotland

Travel Royally Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 74:37


Garrett and Jay took an 18 day trip to 3 parts of Scotland with the company of their wives. This was their first trip and it was one to remember. Hear all about the planning of their trip and the adventures they took on it. This will definitely not be the last trip they take to the British Isles. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/travelroyally/support

Radio Lewes
The Rock Show Brit Rock 1st December 2022

Radio Lewes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 61:10


My youngest guest makes a welcome return to the rock show. This one is Brit Rock. All the bands hail from the British Isles.

Thinking in English
189. Why is Scotland in the UK? (English Vocabulary Lesson)

Thinking in English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 25:24


Support the Podcast and Join my Patreon HERE -- https://www.patreon.com/thinkinginenglish Check Out the NEW YOUTUBE Channel!!! - https://www.youtube.com/@thinkinginenglishpodcast TRANSCRIPT - https://thinkinginenglish.blog/2022/11/30/why-is-scotland-in-the-uk/ What is the difference between the UK, Great Britain, the British Isles, and England? What is the United Kingdom? And why did Scotland join the UK? Let's discuss these topics, and practice some vocabulary, on today's episode of Thinking in English! You may also like... I Moved Country (Again)!! 188. Should We Boycott the Qatar World Cup? (English Vocabulary Lesson) 187. Who is Elon Musk? (English Vocabulary Lesson) 186. What is Thanksgiving?: The REAL Story Behind America's Most Famous Holiday (English Vocabulary Lesson) INSTAGRAM - thinkinginenglishpodcast (https://www.instagram.com/thinkinginenglishpodcast/) Blog - thinkinginenglish.blog YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/@thinkinginenglishpodcast Vocabulary List Interchangeably (adv) - in a way that can be exchanged without making any difference or without being noticed Figs can be used interchangeably with dates in this recipe Kingdom (n) - a country ruled by a king or queen They visited many kingdoms while travelling Union (n) - a political unit made up of two or more separate units such as states The United Kingdom is a union of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland To conquer (v) - to take control or possession of foreign land, or a group of people, by force The English were conquered by the Normans in 1066 Sovereign (adj) - having the highest power or being completely independent We must respect the rights of sovereign states/nations to conduct their own affairs. Bankrupt (informal adj) - having no money I'll go bankrupt if you keep asking me for money! Devolution (n) - the moving of power or responsibility from a main organization to a lower level, or from a central government to a local government The majority of people in the region are in favour of devolution. Referendum (n) - a vote in which all the people in a country or an area are asked to give their opinion about or decide an important political or social question We will hold a referendum on independence next year --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thinking-english/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thinking-english/support

The Brand Called You
Beating the Third-Generation Curse in a Family Business | Binoy R V Meghraj, Vice Chairman & Managing Director, Meghraj Group

The Brand Called You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 25:59


You might assume that family businesses are more fragile than other forms of enterprise. Indeed, that's the conventional wisdom: Many articles or speeches about family businesses today include a reference to the “three-generation rule,” which says that most don't survive beyond three generations. But that perception could not be further from the truth. On average, the data suggest that family businesses last far longer than typical companies do. In fact, today we have Binoy R. V. Meghraj, Vice Chairman & Managing Director of Meghraj Group who is the third generation of the family in the business. About Binoy RV Meghraj Binoy R. V. Meghraj is the Vice Chairman & Managing Director of Meghraj Group, an international investment banking advisory and fiduciary services business founded in Kenya in 1922. The Group is now headquartered in the British Isles and operates from offices in 5 countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe directly, and a further 13 countries through its affiliate fiduciary business. The fiduciary business looks after more than USD 150 billion of client assets. He is the third generation of the family in the business. Binoy is the Chairman and founder of Meghraj Capital, the Group's investment banking advisory business, which has offices in Kenya, Japan, India, and Dubai. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tbcy/support

That JORVIK Viking Thing Podcast
54 - A Look at the Western Kingdom: Vikings in Cornwall

That JORVIK Viking Thing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 43:47


The Viking Age, especially in the British Isles, is often associated with a few key places; such as Lindisfarne, London, Dublin, and of course York. However, the Viking world was a wide and varied place, and we plan to take a closer look at more of it with a particular focus on  places not commonly associated with the Vikings. In this episode Lucas speaks to John Fletcher, author of the recently released The Western Kingdom: The Birth of Cornwall. Lucas and John discuss the very interesting, but lesser known Viking History of Cornwall.  For more information on the topics mentioned in the episode, please check out:Trewhiddle HoardScourgeCardinham CrossHogback GravesThe dates for the annual JORVIK Viking Festival have been announced! For more information or to purchase tickets, check out the website. For more information, or if you have an idea for a future episode, you can email us at: podcast@yorkat.co.uk

The BreakPoint Podcast
In the British Isles, Priests Shock the Public With the Truth

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 1:09


Culture is most powerful in what it normalizes, and when lies are normalized, the truth becomes shocking. Thank God for Christian ministers willing to “shock” and speak truth.

Rumicast
North Sea Hijack/ffolkes

Rumicast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 56:51


This week the boys discuss 'North Sea Hijack', in which a bearded, beanie-wearing, alcoholic, cat-loving, woman-hating character named Rufus Excalibur ffolkes, played by the dearly departed Roger Moore, takes on a group of oil rig hijackers led by Anthony Perkins and Michael Parks (possibly lovers). It's Under Siege by way of the British Isles!  next week: Glass Onion  

Historium
#73 Once in a Lifetime

Historium

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 24:47


The story of Halley's Comet—the only reoccurring comet visible to the naked eye that shows up every 75 years or so. Throughout history its appearance has marked profound change, from the conquest of the British Isles to the fall of the Qing Dynasty.For more bonus episodes: patreon.com/historium Music:Hello! by David Wingo & Explosions in the SkyTime's Blur by Lord HuronOpening (arr. for marimba) by Philip Glass & Nathaniel BartlettKatrina Outtake by Matthew Robert CooperCeiling Gazing by Mark KozelekExpectation by Matthew Robert CooperNever Ever by Lord HuronSupport the show

Wars of The World
The Battle Of Britain: Britain's Finest Hour

Wars of The World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 69:14


Fuelled by the euphoria of his successes thus far, Hitler was certain that the recently appointed British Prime Minister Winston Churchill would have no choice but to sue for peace. He was wrong. Churchill made it abundantly clear that Great Britain would never surrender to the Nazi tyranny. That Hitler's troops were going to have to fight for every square inch of the British Isles for in Churchill's mind and the free world itself, surrender was simply not an option. In this, the first of a two-part special we are going to examine the story of the Battle of Britain.

Fabulous Folklore with Icy
Folklore of Tunnels: Hidden Networks and Lost Pipers

Fabulous Folklore with Icy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 22:59


Tunnels seem to accrue more folklore than most. Perhaps it's because we can't see where they go when we can only see the entrance. Or perhaps we've been so primed by fiction to believe tunnels must lead somewhere that we love the idea of a secret world beneath our feet. Some tunnel legends are common and appear all over the British Isles, with people attempting to explore them and vanishing during the effort. Others are mere rumours, snaking beneath city centres to connect churches with other buildings. But is there any truth to these stories? And why do we seem so attracted to legends of tunnels? Let's examine some examples of these stories to see how they work in this week's episode of Fabulous Folklore! Find the images and references on the blog post: https://www.icysedgwick.com/folklore-of-tunnels/ Weather folklore talk with Creswell Crags: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/red-sky-at-night-the-fascinating-world-of-weather-folklore-tickets-467289885627 Get your free guide to home protection the folklore way here: https://www.icysedgwick.com/fab-folklore/ Become a member of the Fabulous Folklore Family for bonus episodes and articles at https://patreon.com/bePatron?u=2380595 Enjoyed this episode and want to show your appreciation? Buy Icy a coffee to say 'thanks' at: https://ko-fi.com/icysedgwick Request an episode: https://forms.gle/gqG7xQNLfbMg1mDv7 Tweet Icy at https://twitter.com/IcySedgwick Find Icy on Mastodon: @IcySedgwick@mastodonapp.uk Get extra snippets of folklore on Instagram at https://instagram.com/icysedgwick 'Like' Fabulous Folklore on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fabulousfolklore/

What People Do
S4, E1: Joel Schlosser on how Herodotus can help us today (and other lessons from the ancient Greek historian)

What People Do

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 60:03


I have started reading a new set of old excerpted classics, this one gathering writers' bits and baubles into generally geographic volumes: Greece, Rome, the British Isles, etc. I also write about them. (I write about another set here.) The first selection in the first volume comes from the ancient Greek historian Herodotus. (You can read my thoughts here.)  Much sharper than my own thoughts, however, are the thoughts of political theorist and Bryn Mawr professor Joel Schlosser, writer of Herodotus in the Anthropocene (The University of Chicago Press, 2020). Schlosser explores exactly what I felt reading Herodotus and what I hope anyone exploring the ancients today wants: something relevant to them now.  In our chat, Joel answers burning questions I had about Herodotus, his own personal experience discovering the ancient historian, and, most important, what we can learn right now about how we think about the world and our place in it.  Herodotus tried to figure out how the ancient Egyptians dug canals, built great buildings, and won and lost wars. And, most of all, why his Greek world was the way it was after the great battles between Persians and Greeks. Be just as curious as Herodotus! Listen ...  P.S. If you're taken by Schlosser's observations, buy his book and enjoy, also, a few of his blog posts from the past few years as he worked on it:  “While I imagined myself in conversation with Herodotus, wondering what he'd make of the anarchists' message of radical equality – was it an update of Herodotean isêgoria, the equal voice he viewed as central to Athens' flourishing? – I gazed upon the Acropolis with humbled amazement.” (link)  “Herodotus writes for an audience. He wants us to lose ourselves in the story and then to its comedy.” (link)  “Herodotus talks of the phoenix, which immolates itself only to be reborn from its ashes, as well as crocodiles and the special burials Egyptians give to their victims.” (link)  “Herodotus exemplified a form of inquiry that was broad-minded and imaginative in ways Thucydides simply wasn't.” (link) 

Read Between the Lines
Connie Berry discusses her book, "The Shadow of Memory (A Kate Hamilton Mystery- Book 4)"

Read Between the Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 29:37


Molly talks with author Connie Berry about her book, "The Shadow of Memory (A Kate Hamilton Mystery- Book 4)".   Order "The Shadow of Memory" from an independent bookseller at this link: https://bookshop.org/a/10588/9781643859088 or at Amazon right here https://amzn.to/3ULSl8O   ABOUT THE SHADOW OF MEMORY As Kate Hamilton plans her upcoming wedding to Detective Inspector Tom Mallory, she is also assisting her colleague Ivor Tweedy with a project at the Netherfield Sanatorium, which is being converted into luxury townhouses. Kate and Ivor must appraise a fifteenth-century paintingand verify that its provenance is the Dutch master Jan Van Eyck. But when retired criminal inspector Will Parker is found dead, Kate learns that the halls of the sanatorium housed much more than priceless art.   Kate is surprised to learn that Will had been the first boyfriend of her friend Vivian Bunn, who hasn't seen him in fifty-eight years. At a seaside holiday camp over sixty years ago, Will, Vivian, and three other teens broke into an abandoned house where a doctor and his wife had died under bizarre circumstances two years earlier. Now, when a second member of the childhood gang dies unexpectedly—and then a third—it becomes clear that the teens had discovered more in the house than they had realized.   Had Will returned to warn his old love? When Kate makes a shocking connection between a sixty-year-old murder and the long-buried secrets of the sanatorium, she suddenly understands that time is running out for Vivian—and anyone connected to her. ABOUT CONNIE BERRY Connie Berry is the author of the Kate Hamilton Mysteries, set in the UK and featuring an American antiques dealer with a gift for solving crimes. Like her protagonist, Connie was raised by antiques dealers who instilled in her a passion for history, fine art, and travel. During college she studied at the University of Freiburg in Germany and St. Clare's College, Oxford, where she fell under the spell of the British Isles. In 2019 Connie won the IPPY Gold Medal for Mystery and was a finalist for the Agatha Award's Best Debut. She's a member of Mystery Writers of America and is on the board of the Guppies and her local Sisters in Crime chapter. Besides reading and writing mysteries, Connie loves history, foreign travel, cute animals, and all things British. She lives in Ohio with her husband and adorable Shih Tzu, Emmie.

Appalachian Murder, Mystery & Legend
The Peasenhall Murder

Appalachian Murder, Mystery & Legend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 19:26


Let's jump the big pond again for another mystery from our cousins in the British Isles as seen through the eyes of an Appalachian. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/larry-bentley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/larry-bentley/support

Appalachian Murder, Mystery & Legend
The Peasenhall Murder

Appalachian Murder, Mystery & Legend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 19:26


Let's jump the big pond again for another mystery from our cousins in the British Isles as seen through the eyes of an Appalachian. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/larry-bentley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/larry-bentley/support

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Crown: A Short History of British Monarchy

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 22:29


For at least 1,500 years, since the mists swirling around the Dark Ages began to clear, the British Isles have had monarchical rulers. For hundreds of years, they were the central figures of the nation: the focus of its politics and society, consecrated by God, endorsed (or not) by the nobility, the arbiters of its arts and culture, the makers of its laws, the directors of its government and the leaders in its wars.Stephen Bates is an award-winning author and journalist, most recently, the Royalty and Religious Affairs correspondent for the Guardian from 2000-2012. Stephen joins Dan to explore how and why the monarchy in these islands has endured and evolved, and what will become of its survival in the future.This episode was produced by Hannah Ward and James Hickmann and edited by Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bethesda Shalom
A Battle Lost, but a War Won – Paul M. Williams

Bethesda Shalom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 52:08


Luke 22:31-34 On 3 September 1939, France declared war on Germany following the German invasion of Poland.  Between 10 May and 22 June 1940, in a six-week lightning campaign, Germany's armed forces overran Holland, Belgium, and Luxemburg, humiliating the British and defeating the French.  During the fighting, the British, French, and Belgium forces had been pushed back to the French Port of Dunkirk.  Hundreds of thousands of allied troops were left stranded on the beaches of Dunkirk, surrounded by massive German armies consisting of many more troops and tanks — it seemed an almost foregone conclusion.  Knowing the peril of the moment, on May 24th, 1940, King George VI addressed the British nation, calling for a national day of prayer!  On that self-same day, for reasons still unknown, Hitler suddenly and unexpectedly commanded the advancing Panzer tanks to halt, giving the allied forces 3 invaluable days of reprieve.  On May 26th, 1940 the nation of Britain went to prayer committing their cause to Almighty God, imploring Him for divine intervention!  Millions across the British Isles filed into Churches, and in some quarters, chapels were filled to overflowing.  Now what happened next cannot be humanly explained.  For the next nine days, some 338,000 troops were evacuated from the port and beaches of Dunkirk right in the face of the Germans!  The allied forces may have lost the battle at Dunkirk but they went on to win the war!! This sermon is an encouragement to those who may have lost battles in this Christian fight.  You may have lost a battle, but you have not lost the war!  There's a work that God has for you to do. The time for licking your wounds is over and it's time again to join the fight. 

The Cookie Jar Golf Podcast
159 - Clyde Johnson: When Shaping meets Architecture

The Cookie Jar Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 73:13


After getting an absolute 'hosing on' at Moortown Golf Club in the morning we took refuge in the Billiard Room to dry off, play some snooker and record a podcast with Clyde Johnson. Clyde works independently in the UK helping to restore the original character of many of the famous courses in the British Isles including Moortown, Alwoodley and Denham, as well as working for Tom Doak's firm 'Renaissance Golf Design' on all sorts of other exciting projects. In here we talk about his career path, his love for the game, his work at some notable new build projects like Tara Iti, St Patrick's Links and the most recent Te Arai. Clyde is extremely knowledgable and we could have sat there all afternoon if we didn't have a long drive ahead of us! For more on Clyde head over to http://www.cunningolfdesign.com/aboutIf you've enjoyed this episode, please consider leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify!You can follow us along below @cookiejargolf Instagram / Facebook / ...

Wandering DMs
Haunted Houses | Dreadful Dwellings in D&D | Wandering DMs S04 E42

Wandering DMs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 62:58


Paul & Dan look back at their favorite "Haunted House" adventures for D&D games. From Tegel Manor to Saltmarsh to Castle Amber and Ravenloft, we'll assess what works best and what doesn't for a truly terrifying D&D game! Legends about haunted houses have long appeared in literature. The earliest surviving report of a haunted house comes from a letter written by Pliny the Younger (61 – c. 112 CE) to his patron Lucias Sura, in which he describes a haunted villa in Athens.[50] Nobody would live in the house until the philosopher Athenodorus (c. 74 BCE – 7 CE) arrived in the city. He was tempted by the low rent and undeterred by the house's reputation so he moved in. The ghost, an old man bound with chains, appeared to Athenodorus during the first night and beckoned to him. The apparition vanished once it reached the courtyard, and Athenodorus carefully marked the spot. The following morning he requested the magistrate to have the spot dug up, where the skeleton of an old man bound with chains was discovered. The ghost never appeared again after the skeleton was given a proper burial. According to Owen Davies, a paranormal historian, hauntings in the British Isles were usually attributed to fairies, but today hauntings are usually associated with ghostly or supernatural encounters. In other cultures around the world, various spirits are said to haunt vacant homes and locations. In Middle Eastern countries, for example, jinn are said to haunt such areas. Historically, since most people died in their homes, whether they were mansions or hovels, these homes became natural places for ghosts to haunt, with bedrooms being the most common rooms to be haunted. Many houses gained a reputation for being haunted after they were empty or derelict. Davies explains that "if people were to fail to occupy a human space, then external forces would move in." Wandering DMs Paul Siegel and Dan “Delta” Collins host thoughtful discussions on D&D and other TTRPGs every week. Comparing the pros and cons of every edition from the 1974 Original D&D little brown books to cutting-edge releases for 5E D&D today, we broadcast live on YouTube and Twitch so we can take viewer questions and comments on the topic of the day. Live every Sunday at 1 PM Eastern time.

Mysteries and Monsters
Mysteries and Monsters: Episode 207 The Road Map of British Ghosts Volume Two with Ruth Roper Wylde

Mysteries and Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 100:45


We head out on to the haunted highways and byways of Britain in the company of the delightful Ruth Roper Wylde as she guides us through her latest book, The Road Map Of British Ghosts Volume II. Ruth takes us on the hunt for more modern sightings reported to from all over the British Isles and her paranormal detective skills always come in handy when dealing with cases that seem to be more urban myth or tall tales. From the sightings of the Peak Districts famous ghost planes, phantom cars, strange reports from bridges, ghosts seen in the road and spectral monks, it seems that Britain's road are home to more supernatural entities than we realise. A big thank you to Ruth for joining me once again The book can be found here: Our Patreon is now live, with bonus content, early release of the regular show, articles and more. Join here now for the flat fee of $4 a month which is a bargain!    Don't forget, you can now show your support with our Merchandise shop on Redbubble! Check it out here! You can join us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as well.    You can also subscribe to our YouTube channel! Email us at mysteriesandmonsters@gmail.com with any feedback, guest suggestions or if you'd like to appear.    All artwork by Dean Bestall and the show was produced by Brennan Storr of the Ghost Story Guys.    Mysteries and Monsters is a part of the Straight Up Strange Network #RuthRoperWylde #Ghosts #Spirits #Phantoms #Haunting #Haunted #Spirit #GhostPlanes #PeakDistrict #Scotland #Wales #Highwaymen #Monks #Weirdness #RoadMapOfBritishGhostsVolumeTwo #Buckinghamshire #Assizes 

New Books in British Studies
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in Geography
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

New Books in Economic and Business History
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in European Studies
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Irish Studies
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in Irish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Diplomatic History
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in Diplomatic History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Ian Morris, "Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History" (FSG, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 62:57


In Geography Is Destiny: Britain and the World--A 10,000-Year History (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2022), Ian Morris chronicles the eight-thousand-year history of Britain's relationship to Europe as it has changed in the context of a globalizing world. When Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the 48 percent who wanted to stay and the 52 percent who wanted to go each accused the other of stupidity, fraud, and treason.  In reality, the Brexit debate merely reran a script written eight thousand years earlier, when the rising seas physically separated the British Isles from the European continent. Ever since, geography has been destiny—yet it is humans who get to decide what that destiny means. Ian Morris, the critically acclaimed author of Why the West Rules—for Now, describes how technology and organization have steadily enlarged Britain's arena, and how its people have tried to turn this to their advantage. For the first seventy-five hundred years, the British were never more than bit players at the western edge of a European stage, struggling to find a role among bigger, richer, and more sophisticated continental rivals. By 1500 CE, however, new kinds of ships and governments had turned the European stage into an Atlantic one; with the English Channel now functioning as a barrier, England transformed the British Isles into a United Kingdom that created a worldwide empire. Since 1900, however, thanks to rapid globalization, Britain has been overshadowed by American, European, and—increasingly—Chinese actors. But in trying to find its place in a global economy, Britain has been looking in all the wrong places. The eight-thousand-year story bracingly chronicled by Geography Is Destiny shows that the great question for the coming century is not what to do about Brussels; it's what to do about Beijing. Javier Mejia is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Political Science Department at Stanford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

British Culture: Albion Never Dies
BONUS Episode: The British Origins of Halloween

British Culture: Albion Never Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 63:41


Did you know that Halloween has its roots in the British Isles, especially from an ancient festival called 'Samhain'? Welcome back to our special returning guest, Caine, who gives us all the details. He previously gave us: the 'Deep Dive Into Tea'; the 'Deep Dive Into British Men's Wardrobes'; the 'A Deep Dive Into Ink: British Tattoo Culture'; the 'Deep Dive Into Christmas'; a 'Shallow Dive' into St. George's Day; and many more!  Check out his video on a similarly themed topic to Halloween, The Hungry Ghost Festival, celebrated in China. Caine's Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/VideosByCaineThe Hungry Ghost Festival video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GFS_kFGnuA ***You can e-mail me: AlbionNeverDies@Gmail.comYou can find me on Instagram: @FlemingNeverDies***Subscribe to my newsletter: https://youtube.us9.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=b3afdae99897eebbf8ca022c8&id=5165536616Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/britishcultureCheck out my online shop: https://www.redbubble.com/people/British-culture/shopSupport the show

This Day in History Class
The Royal Charter Storm sinks 133 ships in the Irish Sea - October 26th, 1859

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 11:25


On this day in 1859, one of the worst storms in history struck the British Isles, sinking 133 ships and badly damaging 90 others. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Culturally Speaking
S5 E4 A Journey Through British Food History

Culturally Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 54:19


On this week's episode we dive into British culinary history which only seems fitting given our love of food and cooking. From Regency breakfasts to more dubious Victorian meats, tune in to learn to get to know a negus from a broxy. The Ministry of Food was established during World War II to control the production and rationing of certain foods, like meat and dairy. This led to new products such as powdered milk and eggs, ‘national' bread and flour and pig and chicken clubs. As a YouGov survey of the nation's favourite foods shows:  (check the episode Instagram for the results); Britain's food history has been and continues to be influenced by other countries they conquered and cultures that have been brought to the British Isles. In an homage to one of our favourite podcasts - Table Manners - we couldn't end the episode without sharing our death row/desert island meals!Get in touch with us at theculturallyspeaking@gmail.com and follow us on Instagram @culturallyspeakingpodcast!

The Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica
Audio News for September 25th through October 1st, 2022

The Archaeology Channel - Audio News from Archaeologica

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 14:40


News items read by Laura Kennedy include: Crimson color paint in Maya cities exposed them to toxic mercury (details) Ancient plant DNA shows how people in ancient British Isles built and used artificial islands (details) New sarcophagus from Saqqara held high-ranking statesman who served Ramses II (details) Baltic warship wreck reveals impressive artillery and structural design (details)

Cory Talks Podcast
CT0919 International Podcast Day Special

Cory Talks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 19:08


Today: Friday 30 September 2022 CT0919 Today is International Podcast Day and I have a special guest in good friend and fellow podcaster Ellie from Behind The Music with Ellie D. The Day began as a National one in the US in 2014 but a year later changed to the International Podcast Day which was founded by Steve and Dave Lee. You'll hear more about IPD before my chat with Ellie. Check out the schedule for live streams at https://internationalpodcastday.com and more about this celebration of all things podcasting. This is a list of the podcasts that Ellie and I listen to... * 7am from Schwartz Media - news and analysis * History Daily from Airship and Noiser - this day in history * American Scandal from Wondery and Airship - stories of memorable scandals * British Scandal from Wondery - stories of memorable scandals on the British Isles. * Blood Ties from Wondery - scripted audio drama * Breaking Bread with Adam Moran (Beard Meats Food) and Josh Gudgeon * Criminal from Vox Media - focusing on true crime and often a little quirky * Mumbai Crime from Radiotopia - audio fiction * The Minds of Madness from Wondery - stories of crime told by Tyler Allen * The Rise of King Asilas from New Kingdom Radio Theatre - serialised drama * Oz-9 from Shannon K Perry - funny and kooky space drama * Behind The Music with Ellie D - interviews with Aussie music artists * The Amelia Project from Fable and Folly Network - scripted drama Resources in the podcast can include, The Daily Aus (https://thedailyaus.com.au), ABC News Australia (https://abc.net.au/news), The Guardian Australia (https://www.theguardian.com/au) Subscribe and turn notifications on so you can be alerted when new editions become available. The “Cory Talks Podcast” feed can be found on - on Anchor, Apple, Google, Spotify and other platforms. Thanks for listening! CORY O'CONNOR anchor.fm/corytalkspodcast bio.link/corymedia --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/corytalkspodcast/message

KnotWork Storytelling
The Fenland Lanterns: An Autumn Story from East Anglia by Robyn Watt | S 2 Ep 10

KnotWork Storytelling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 47:22


Our Story This is a story of a cheerful, fearless farmhand named Fred who lived in the Fens, the marshy, bogs of East Anglia. He was at home in himself and on the land, and that attracted the jealousy of the other young men on the farm. This story, inspired by a tale called "The Syleham Lamps," collected in https://amzn.to/3RQ34xs (Kirsty Hartsiotis's Suffolk Folk Tales), features the mysterious will-o'-the-wisps, the mysterious marsh lights that appear over the bogs of the Fens in eastern England. Our Guest Robyn Watt  is an animist teacher and practitioner in the traditions of the British Isles. She offers programs for somatic nature connection, and soul and ancestor-tending in the field of the animist healing arts. After moving to Canada from the UK, Robyn navigated the experience of grieving for her homeland by reclaiming the ancient animist cosmologies of her ancestry. Through this, she came into the work of guiding others who also long to reconnect to their ancestral wisdom traditions from far away.  Find Robyn at sacredearthgrove.com, in her online community oursacredcircles.com & on Instagram @sacred.earth.grove Our Conversation Robyn begins with an invocation of the ancestors and the land as she tells a story inspired by the counties of Suffolk and Norfolk, where  she grew up and where her family has lived for centuries. What it means to live in North America and feel the call back to ancestral homelands. Robyn describes it as a wounding but also considers the gift of reconnection that follows the pain of disconnection. Animism upholds the sentience and aliveness of the world. It is rooted in the ancient understanding that the world can and wants to communicate with us is something that many modern people know in their bones, even before they know the word. Animism is a powerful way to cope with environmental crisis and climate anxiety. The perennial struggle of nature versus civilization, as embodied by Fred and his struggle with the other stable boys  Disney brought the will o' the wisps to popular consciousness in the movie Brave. As imperfect as Disney is, there's magic in the way modern retellings give us access to the ancient in a vital way The Fens were also home to Queen Boudicca's Iceni tribe  Resources and sources of inspiration: artist and author Katie Holton's work with the Ardee Bog in County Louth;  Francis Pryor's book https://amzn.to/3ra8Kqb (The Fens: Discovering England's Ancient Depths); Philip Pullman's novel https://amzn.to/3Syz74Y (The Secret Commonwealth.) The scientific explanation for the marshlights or “ignis fatuus”: they are created by the oxidation of gasses produced by organic decay that cause photon emissions. But also… it's magic! Our Music Music at the start of the show is by Beth Sweeney and Billy Hardy, a Celtic Fiddle and multi-instrumental duo based on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The traditional Irish reel we play at the start of the show is called "The College Groves." https://www.knotworkstorytelling.com/episode/billyandbeth.com (billyandbeth.com) Work with MarisaMarisa offers 1:1 coaching for Personal and Professional growth with her https://www.marisagoudy.com/healing-for-heroines (Healing for Heroines) packages. She also offers https://www.marisagoudy.com/story-weaver-book-coaching (Story Weaver Book Coaching )for memoirists, thought leaders, and creative entrepreneurs at the beginning of their writing journey. Find more of Marisa's writing and get a copy of her book, The Sovereignty Knot https://www.knotworkstorytelling.com/episode/www.marisagoudy.com (www.marisagoudy.com) Follow the show on https://www.instagram.com/knotworkpodcast/ (Instagram), https://www.facebook.com/knotworkstorytelling (Facebook), and https://www.facebook.com/groups/4429930243750952 (join our vibrant listeners' community).

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Gaea Star Crystal Radio Hour with Mariam Massaro

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 56:39


Gaea Star Crystal Radio Hour #501 is an hour of compelling, visionary acoustic improvisational music brought to you by the Gaea Star Band with Mariam Massaro on vocals, Native flutes, dulcimer, acoustic 6- and 12-string guitars and Celtic harp, Bob Sherwood on piano and percussion and Craig Harris on Native drums and congas.  Joining us today is flautist and percussionist Jafar Erguenes who provides beautiful flute passages and percussion work throughout today's episode.  Recorded live at Singing Brook Studio in Worthington, Massachusetts in mid-September 2022, today's show begins with the gorgeous, slowly-unfolding “Flower Of Life”, a stately, lyrical ballad featuring a soulful vocal from Mariam over a lush, unhurried backing.  “Manifestation” features the first of several flute duets between Mariam and Jafar and features Mariam on her chiming Celtic harp as Craig provides a deep and driving Native drum pulse.  “To The Places In Need” is a mystical raga, a bittersweet farewell to summer, underpinned by fine percussion work from Craig and Bob and sparse, rich open-tuned 12-string from Mariam and “Just Wispy Pillows In The Boundless Beauty” is a simple, pretty folk song with a fine vocal from Mariam and flowing flute work from Jafar.  “All Aboard” is based around Mariam's driving dulcimer and is a fine, British Isles-favored reel with driving drums from Craig and lush, modal piano from Bob.  Next up is an energized take of Mariam's “I'm The Full Moon” from the Gaea Star Goddesses album featuring fine acoustic guitar from Mariam and piano from Bob on this classic Goddess rock song and we finish the show today with the richly mystical and hallucinogenic raga “Salinah”, a journey built around Mariam's beautiful sitar drones and percolation percussion. Learn more about Mariam here: http://www.mariammassaro.com

Wrong Side of the Pond Podcast
#Pondcast: Now or never

Wrong Side of the Pond Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 74:08


Thanks to unexpected truncation of the Premier League schedule due to the death of Queen Elizabeth II, D.J. and Jeremy took last week’s show off. But this week — even with a few games still being postponed due to the period of mourning in the British Isles — there was more than enough to go […]

New Books in History
Brian D. Bunk, "From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the United States" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 53:40


Across North America, native peoples and colonists alike played a variety of kicking games long before soccer's emergence in the late 1800s. Brian D. Bunk examines the development and social impact of these sports through the rise of professional soccer after World War I. As he shows, the various games called football gave women an outlet as athletes and encouraged men to form social bonds based on educational experience, occupation, ethnic identity, or military service. Football also followed young people to college as higher education expanded in the nineteenth century. University play, along with the arrival of immigrants from the British Isles, helped spark the creation of organized soccer in the United States—and the beautiful game's transformation into a truly international sport. A multilayered look at one game's place in American life, From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the United States (University of Illinois Press, 2021) refutes the notion of the U.S. as a land outside of football history. Bennett Koerber is an instructor of history at Carnegie Mellon University. He can be reached at bkoerber@andrew.cmu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Sports
Brian D. Bunk, "From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the United States" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 53:40


Across North America, native peoples and colonists alike played a variety of kicking games long before soccer's emergence in the late 1800s. Brian D. Bunk examines the development and social impact of these sports through the rise of professional soccer after World War I. As he shows, the various games called football gave women an outlet as athletes and encouraged men to form social bonds based on educational experience, occupation, ethnic identity, or military service. Football also followed young people to college as higher education expanded in the nineteenth century. University play, along with the arrival of immigrants from the British Isles, helped spark the creation of organized soccer in the United States—and the beautiful game's transformation into a truly international sport. A multilayered look at one game's place in American life, From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the United States (University of Illinois Press, 2021) refutes the notion of the U.S. as a land outside of football history. Bennett Koerber is an instructor of history at Carnegie Mellon University. He can be reached at bkoerber@andrew.cmu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

New Books Network
Brian D. Bunk, "From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the United States" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 53:40


Across North America, native peoples and colonists alike played a variety of kicking games long before soccer's emergence in the late 1800s. Brian D. Bunk examines the development and social impact of these sports through the rise of professional soccer after World War I. As he shows, the various games called football gave women an outlet as athletes and encouraged men to form social bonds based on educational experience, occupation, ethnic identity, or military service. Football also followed young people to college as higher education expanded in the nineteenth century. University play, along with the arrival of immigrants from the British Isles, helped spark the creation of organized soccer in the United States—and the beautiful game's transformation into a truly international sport. A multilayered look at one game's place in American life, From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the United States (University of Illinois Press, 2021) refutes the notion of the U.S. as a land outside of football history. Bennett Koerber is an instructor of history at Carnegie Mellon University. He can be reached at bkoerber@andrew.cmu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Fabulous Folklore with Icy
Lighthouse Legends : Missing Keepers, Storms and Ghosts

Fabulous Folklore with Icy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 19:23


Lighthouse legends cling to these odd buildings around the British Isles. And lighthouses ARE odd places. Learn the tales associated with lighthouses in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales in this week's episode of Fabulous Folklore! Find the images and references on the blog post: https://www.icysedgwick.com/lighthouse-legends/  Get your free guide to home protection the folklore way here: https://www.icysedgwick.com/fab-folklore/ Become a member of the Fabulous Folklore Family for bonus episodes and articles at https://patreon.com/bePatron?u=2380595 Enjoyed this episode and want to show your appreciation? Buy Icy a coffee to say 'thanks' at: https://ko-fi.com/icysedgwick Request an episode: https://forms.gle/gqG7xQNLfbMg1mDv7 Tweet Icy at https://twitter.com/IcySedgwick Get extra snippets of folklore on Instagram at https://instagram.com/icysedgwick 'Like' Fabulous Folklore on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fabulousfolklore/

New Books in Military History
Levi Roach, "Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia" (Pegasus Books, 2022)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 56:47


Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia (Pegasus, 2022) by Dr. Levi Roach is a tale of ambitious adventures and fierce freebooters, of fortunes made and fortunes lost. The Normans made their influence felt across all of western Europe and the Mediterranean, from the British Isles to North Africa, and Lisbon to the Holy Land. In Empires of the Normans we discover how they combined military might and political savvy with deeply held religious beliefs and a profound sense of their own destiny. For a century and a half, they remade Europe in their own image, and yet their heritage was quickly forgotten - until now. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
Levi Roach, "Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia" (Pegasus Books, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 56:47


Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia (Pegasus, 2022) by Dr. Levi Roach is a tale of ambitious adventures and fierce freebooters, of fortunes made and fortunes lost. The Normans made their influence felt across all of western Europe and the Mediterranean, from the British Isles to North Africa, and Lisbon to the Holy Land. In Empires of the Normans we discover how they combined military might and political savvy with deeply held religious beliefs and a profound sense of their own destiny. For a century and a half, they remade Europe in their own image, and yet their heritage was quickly forgotten - until now. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Levi Roach, "Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia" (Pegasus Books, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 56:47


Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia (Pegasus, 2022) by Dr. Levi Roach is a tale of ambitious adventures and fierce freebooters, of fortunes made and fortunes lost. The Normans made their influence felt across all of western Europe and the Mediterranean, from the British Isles to North Africa, and Lisbon to the Holy Land. In Empires of the Normans we discover how they combined military might and political savvy with deeply held religious beliefs and a profound sense of their own destiny. For a century and a half, they remade Europe in their own image, and yet their heritage was quickly forgotten - until now. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Mysteries and Monsters
Mysteries and Monsters: Episode 198 Bigfoot and Black Shapes with Stu Neville

Mysteries and Monsters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 96:34 Very Popular


The UK has had a long history of strange encounters with black, hulking shapes that leave the witnesses or experiencers shaken to the core. To some, these encounters are being manipulated to fit an agenda of promoting their stance that Bigfoot has crossed the Atlantic to take up residency here in the British Isles, yet for many others, these interactions are simply a continuation of the centuries old sightings of ghostly monks. Yet even this doesn't quite cover all the experiences. Could these encounters be down to the Fae, Boggarts, the Universal Trickster or something else entirely? Fortean Times contributor Stu Neville returns to join me as we try to unpick this unholy mess of high strangeness. A big thank you as always to Stu for joining me. Our Patreon is now live, with bonus content, early release of the regular show, articles and more. Join here now for the flat fee of $4 a month which is a bargain! Don't forget, you can now show your support with our Merchandise shop on Redbubble! Check it out here! We are also now on Vburl - check us out here: You can join us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as well. You can also subscribe to our YouTube channel! Email us at mysteriesandmonsters@gmail.com with any feedback, guest suggestions or if you'd like to appear. All artwork by Dean Bestall and the show was produced by Brennan Storr of the Ghost Story Guys.     Mysteries and Monsters is a part of the Straight Up Strange Network. #StuNeville #ForteanTimes #Bigfoot #BlackShadows #ShadowMan #Ghosts #Spirits #BlackShuck #Fae #Boggarts #Trickster #Dogman #PaulSinclair #Hauntings #Encounters 

Making
In the studio with Founders, Ashley Yousling & Carrie Hoge

Making

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 28:15 Transcription Available


I'm your host Ashley Yousling. I started this podcast back in 2014 in the laundry room/closet of my San Francisco studio apartment. At the time I was working full time leading product at tech companies and while fulfilling, I was looking for a way to connect with makers and creatives outside of my tech life. I've always loved stories and could easily sit for hours listening to others share their creative journey's. That is where this podcast all began, a way to story tell, a way to come together and connect with others just like ourselves. The podcast aired regular weekly episodes for a few years until I became a mom of two. Still working in tech, I found it nearly impossible to keep up and the podcast went on hiatus. Over the past few years it's been an intention to relaunch the podcast in a consistent weekly format, to bring back the stories and some fresh new content. So here we are, back and better than ever. We've made a lot of changes to Making over the past year and Carrie my co-founder and I thought it would be fun to sit down and share a bit more about these changes, our lives, and what's to come. So grab your project or go on walk with us as we dive in.Immerse yourself in crafting culture. Making is a first-of-its-kind social marketplace app for makers, crafters, and artists where you can track projects, post to the feed, discover new makers, take classes and more! The marketplace will launch Fall 2022 and is an opportunity for sellers to increase their discoverability and audience, generate revenue, and build community. Making also just launched BRIGHT Collective—a crafty content experience delivered monthly to your inbox and the Making app! Think patterns, recipes, special discounts, monthly member events and more! We have a special 10% discount on BRIGHT Collective yearly memberships for podcast listeners! Use discount code makingconvo10 during checkout. To download the app, join the community, and become a BRIGHT Collective member, visit makingco.com today!SUPPORTERSWe're so grateful for our BRIGHT Collective supporters and wanted to give a shout out to two of them today. Quilt Chic is a modern fabric boutique specializing in quilting cotton, notions, and supplies. They actively support women, BIPOC, & LGBTQIA+ designers. Visit their online shop at quiltchic.com and find their beautiful physical store in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Fine Fettle Fibres is a small, independent shop obsessed with all things woolly. From their delightful shop in the beautiful village of Felton, Northumberland, they source and sell some of the loveliest yarns, in natural fibres, from the British Isles and beyond, teach workshops and host a knitting group. Visit their online shop at finefettlefibres.uk and their local yarn shop in Felton. 

War And Conquest
{13.2} Anglo-Saxons: Knock Knock...It's Catholicism

War And Conquest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 33:44


597-700 AD: Pope Gregory sends the first Roman Missionaries to the British Isles since the collapse of Roman authority to reestablish the faith Song: Twilight of the Thunder God- Amon Armath- Twilight of the Thunder God www.warandconquest.comwarandconquestpcast@gmail.comhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdUOD52RBg1BBm_zndE-DdAhttps://www.patreon.com/warandconquesthttps://www.facebook.com/warandconquestpcast https://www.instagram.com/warandconquestpcast/https://twitter.com/warandconquest1Venmo: @Warand Conquesthttps://www.twitch.tv/theproslayer7

Medicine Stories
94. Our Trip to Britain: Ancestral Pilgrimage to Sacred Sites

Medicine Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 68:41


A cathedral to nature, ancient standing stones, highlands & islands, our lost luggage saga, and the only city in the world I'd want to live in… Our two new medicines! Kinship Woven in Deep Time Earth Essence & Cosmic Convergence: St. John's Wort & Mugwort Herbal Body Oil Take my survey for podcast listeners (just 5 quick questions!) Photos from our trip can be found on my Instagram For more on the ancient history of Britain check out the Love Letter to the British Isles podcast by Neil Oliver and his book A History of Ancient Britain

PRI's The World
Fears of catastrophe growing at Ukrainian nuclear power plant

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 46:45


Workers inside Ukraine's Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant are living through days and nights of constant stress. Outgoing Russian fire from the plant and fears of a nuclear catastrophe are growing. Also, Sri Lanka used to be a country on the rise. Now, even families who were once financially secure are struggling. The World looks at the impacts on two families that are being forced to make some serious changes to their lives. And, William Ruto has won Kenya's presidential election. But legal battles are soon expected following his narrow victory. Plus, after thousands of years, bison have returned to the British Isles.