Podcasts about Salt Lake City

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State capital city in Utah, United States

  • 4,295PODCASTS
  • 15,622EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 18, 2022LATEST
Salt Lake City

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Best podcasts about Salt Lake City

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Latest podcast episodes about Salt Lake City

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion
Pac-12 moves quickly to eliminate divisions for championship game purposes

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 85:41


In this edition of the Peristyle Podcast hosts Ryan Abraham and Chris Trevino return to the studio to discuss the breaking news that the Pac-12 will no longer send the two division winners to the conference championship game and will now select the teams with the top-2 winning percentages to play for the title, regardless of which division they play in. That ruling could have a significant impact on Lincoln Riley and the Trojans considering Utah, a division rival with USC, returns most everyone from their Pac-12 championship team in 2022 and the Trojans face the Utes in Salt Lake City this season. Couple that with the North being much more wide open with half of the teams (Oregon, Washington and Washington State) having new head coaches and there is a very probable scenario that has Utah and USC processing the two best records in the Pac-12, allowing them to rematch in Las Vegas with the conference championship on the line. The guys also talk about the new CBS/247Sports poll that ranked the top college football coaches at the Power Five level, with USC's Lincoln Riley coming in at No. 4 behind Nick Saban, Kirby Smart and Dabo Swinney. They talk about the top-10 coaches and Chris tests Ryan to see how many of them he could name (he got 9 out of the 10 right) with Utah's Kyle Whittingham being the only other Pac-12 coach to make the top-10. The USC roster continues to get reworked with a couple more additions from the NCAA Transfer Portal, JUCO offensive lineman Cooper Lovelace and Washington defensive back Jacboe Covington. The guys talk about what those two players bring to the table and where they can fit in on the Trojans roster. They also discuss the biggest name yet to decide where he will transfer, former Pittsburgh wide receiver Jordan Addison. Will Addison head west and finish his college career at USC or head to Texas or Alabama? The guys debate it on the show. Ryan and Chris will be doing regular podcasts together going forward, so make sure you send in your questions addressed to them at podcast@uscfootball.com. Please review, rate and subscribe to the Peristyle Podcast on Apple Podcasts! Thanks to Trader Joe's for sponsoring the Peristyle Podcast! Make sure you check out USCFootball.com for complete coverage of this USC Trojan football team.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mormon Stories - LDS
1596: Maven's Mormon Story - Pt. 1

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 238:19


Tune in today at 1pm MST to join John, Jenn and Maven, from Mormonism Live, for part one of Maven's Mormon Story. Her story begins in rural Utah, next door to Fundamental Mormons, and later serving an LDS mission. In part 2, join John, Jenn and Maven as we explore the Making of Maven. She takes us through her faith crisis and reconstruction with touching stories, beautiful insight and hope. ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord   Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Mormon Stories - LDS
1595: Mormon Church Defends Minnesota Leader of Sexual Assault

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 147:27


What would you think if your Church Leaders were on the defendant's witness list of your child's sex abuser? In this episode, we will discuss a disturbing Mormon sex abuse case in which the Branch and Stake presidents submitted affidavits that would have aided the dismissal of new charges brought against Elders Quorum President and registered sex offender Michael Adam Davis. Join us this Tuesday evening as LDS Member Michael Benjamin walks us through the details of this alarming case in which The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, once again, chooses to protect the institution over sexually abused children. ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord   Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Mormon Stories - LDS
1594: DNA and the Book of Mormon w/ LDS Discussions

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 120:08


Join John, Mike, and Gerardo, as they break down DNA and the Book of Mormon, and how these tell two different stories. Show Notes: LDS Discussions Website Simon Southerton DNA and the Book of Mormon Mormon Stories Podcast Three geneticist talk about the DNA evidence MS podcast Jamie Hanis Handy MS Episode DNA and the essays Gospel Topic Essay on Lamanites Losing a Lost Tribe - Simon Southerton The sacred curse - Simon Southerton Adam/Even and Garden of Eden Noah and the Flood ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord   Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Mormon Stories - LDS
1593: Mormon Faith Crisis Journey TEDx w/ Anthony Miller

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 73:33


Join John and Anthony Miller as he shares about his Mormon Faith Crisis TEDx talk with us LIVE this coming Monday, May 16th, at 2:30 PM MST. Show Notes: Anthony's TEDx Talk: Anthony Miller MS Episode:  Sunstone Thrive Beyond Religion Billings Mormon Spectrum group:  Mormon Discussions Kyle Ashworth MS Podcast Recovering Agency (Book) by Luna Lindsey Corben: Brene Brown books:  Mormon Faith Crisis Podcast/YouTube channel:  Mormon Faith Crisis Retreat:  Mormon Stories Discord Server:  ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord   Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Courageous Church
Church in the Wild - Unloose Your Bonds

Courageous Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 38:38


Weekly Messages from Courageous Church in Salt Lake City, Utah

Breaking Down Patriarchy
Breaking Down Patriarchy and the Institution of Motherhood – with Lane Anderson and an Anonymous Guest

Breaking Down Patriarchy

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 29:13


In her landmark book, Of Woman Born, Adrienne Rich writes that “At certain points in history, and in certain cultures, the idea of woman-as-mother has worked to endow all women with respect, even with awe, and to give women some say in the life of a people or a clan. But for most of what we know was the “mainstream' of recorded history, motherhood as institution has ghettoized and degraded female potentialities.” In this quote, Rich highlights the stark difference between the way our cultural thinks it respects women and the way it actually regards them. It can be a wonderful thing to praise mothers — to celebrate the women around us who channel their love, energy, and resources into the art and the work of raising children — but too often we forget that our cultural ideal of a ‘mother' is not always accessible nor is it the ideal motherhood for all women. So what happens when a mother doesn't match up to our institutional expectations? And what happens when a woman decides she doesn't want to be a mother at all? On today's episode, we're digging into these questions as we're joined by two spectacular guests each trusting us with her own story of how motherhood as an institution has haunted their lives: an Anonymous Contributor who speaks about the realities of unwed motherhood, and returning friend of the podcast, Lane Anderson, who shares her own experiences of having the mantle of motherhood assumed and foisted upon her. Lane Anderson (she/her) was raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. She has an undergraduate degree from BYU, and a graduate degree from Columbia University. She has spent much of her career as a full-time journalist, publishing hundreds of articles on inequality, human rights, gender, and social and family issues. She has received several Society of Professional Journalists Awards, and a fellowship from the USC Annenberg School of Journalism for her writing on human trafficking. She lives in New York City with her partner and young daughter, and she is full-time faculty at New York University where she is a Clinical Associate Professor teaching writing. She co-writes Matriarchy Report, a newsletter about family issues from a feminist perspective on Substack, and on Instagram @matriarchyreport

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Chewing Glass - T.J. Littlejohn

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:39


Chewing glass is what Solana developers do. Introducing the fifth episode in a new series on the Solana Podcast, Chewing Glass. Chase Barker (Developer Relations Lead at Solana Labs) talks shop with the most interesting builders in the Solana ecosystem. It's for devs, by devs.Today's guest is T.J. Littlejohn, the founder of MtnPay, which won 1st Prize in the Payments Track of the recent Riptide Hackathon. 01:30 - Origin Story and Background05:12 - MntDAO08:42 - Building with Solana12:04 - MntPay13:25 - The APIs15:43 - Winning at Riptide17:37 - From starting in Solana to winning 20:41 - Starting to build in Solana23:38 - Improving onboarding on Solana25:26 - The Developer ecosystem27:07 - Missing Tooling29:30 - Advice for newcomers DISCLAIMERThe information on this podcast is provided for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only, without any express or implied warranty of any kind, including warranties of accuracy, completeness, or fitness for any particular purpose.The information contained in or provided from or through this podcast is not intended to be and does not constitute financial advice, investment advice, trading advice, or any other advice.The information on this podcast is general in nature and is not specific to you, the user or anyone else. You should not make any decision, financial, investment, trading or otherwise, based on any of the information presented on this podcast without undertaking independent due diligence and consultation with a professional broker or financial advisor. Chase (00:29):Hey everybody and welcome to Chewing Glass, the show where we talk to developers building in the Solana Ecosystem. Today we have with us, TJ LittleJohn. He is the founder of mtnPay, winner of the most recent Solana Hackathon Payments Track for Riptide. TJ, how's it going, man?TJ (00:55):Dude, it's going good. We're stoked to be here. Thanks for having me on.Chase (01:00):Yeah, man. You and I basically met, I feel like a few months ago when you were building some stuff for iOS. Basically some IDL stuff with Anchor and we were talking about potentially getting you some work going on and then next thing you know, a couple of things happen and here we are. But before we dive too much into that, let's hear a little introduction. I know a lot of people probably don't know a ton about you. Where'd you start your journey and how'd you end up here, building in the Solana Ecosystem?TJ (01:31):Yeah. Wow. For sure. Abridged version. So, I'm from Florida originally born and raised. Grew up in South Florida, went to school in Tallahassee, Florida State Granoles. Originally I was a big Math guy. Always wanted to do pure Math and trying to see how I could make a career out of that. Finance was an option. And so I was exploring that and someone told me I should learn to code. So, I started learning to code, from that found Hackathons, from that found iOS development. And just down the rabbit hole there. At a hackathon, I ended up securing an internship at Apple, which turned into a job. And then I spent four years there doing research and development and experience prototyping. And then about a year ago I decided I was done with that and I wanted to be in startups. And so I left, joined a startup. Five months after that I found Solana through some friends and I just noticed the point in time we were at. And I was just stoked. And so I quit and I just immediately started building.Chase (02:36):Wow. So you don't have a CS degree, you're self-taught programmer and landed an internship at Apple dealing on the development side of things?TJ (02:44):No, I do have a CS degree.Chase (02:46):Oh, you do?TJ (02:46):So, I did both. I did Math and CS, but the CS portion to me was the less interesting one. I loved pure Math. I thought it was so cool. CS was more of the necessity one. And then I thought it was cool when I started doing it. But I think I learned a lot more through just the apps I built outside of class. So, partially self-taught. Because that was the more important part, but my education was super important too.Chase (03:13):You have a CS degree, you ended up interning for Apple. You did that for how long was it again?TJ (03:20):It was four years.Chase (03:22):Four years. And you said research, were you actually doing development while you were there?TJ (03:26):Yeah, so we did data collection for new products. So think how face ID was trained on millions of images. We built the software to facilitate those user studies that captured the data to train the models, to enable face ID. So we were brought in super early product.Chase (03:44):Oh, so I mean, I guess that's a little more interesting, like somebody who's into Math, you're dealing with lots of data and information, or opposed to just writing a high level code or something like that.TJ (03:55):Not exactly. The Math thing, it's like pure Math. I don't do with data and numbers and processing. I just think pure Math is fucking cool. And when I have an itch about something, I just want to dive. And so, that was the Math thing for me. That was just pure. I love it and I think it taught me how to understand stuff, which I think I still, every now and then, I'll see, I have the power to do that, which is really cool. The thing with Apple was that it let me just hack on shit. I had month long projects and software efforts that, because I get bored really quick, which is a blessing and a curse. Historically. Apple just let me work on a project and then a month later I was working on something else.Chase (04:41):Yeah, we've had some conversations, like you said, you get bored really quick, it comes through a little bit in your personality. You get super excited about things and bounce around and that's why I like your energy, it's super crazy and incredible. So it's nice to have people so excited about these things and especially considering the fact of some of the more recent, great things that have happened. I want to really start this whole conversation outside of your past on where it all truly, truly began, which from what I understand was really mtnDAO. That's like, lit this whole fire off. I don't know if everybody knows about it and if they do, maybe not how great of a thing that it turned out to be. Maybe about Barrett and Edgar and what they set up and how it was and then how that whole month went for you, that led to this moment.TJ (05:31):So yeah, mtnDAO, for people that don't know was a month long hacker house in Salt Lake City, Utah, where people from all over just congregated and we spent a month working on whatever it is you want to work on, in this co-working space called The Shop. And like you said, Edgar and Barrett, they're actually the ones that got me into Solana. They were the first people to introduce me and they just threw this hack house to grow the ecosystem out of the kindness of their own hearts and love for co-working and developing and hacking. And so yeah, a bunch of us came through and we just were chilling in Utah. We'd go snowboarding on the weekends. We'd throw parties on Fridays and bring in people from around the City and just strips, just get after it.And that was the best part. We'd be working from like 10:00, 11:00 AM was when I would roll in till like 1:00, 2:00 in the morning, most days. And a good crew of people were always there doing that too. Maybe if you wanted to go grab dinner, you could and people would come back. But yeah, it was just a lot of incredibly focused work and a nice little crew formed out of that. And so I've seen a lot of the same mtnDAO folks at the next hacker houses and stuff, and that's always fun. And you just become friends with these people.Chase (06:51):Yeah, it seems like there was a lot of building going on. I'm not going to lie, I saw that notion that Edgar and Barrett, or I think it might have been Edgar, correct me if I'm wrong, put together this notion. And I was like, a Dev did this? Just because it was so organized and well put together. And then, those guys pretty much put this thing, from start to finish, got this thing going.TJ (07:09):Yeah. There was a lot of people that participated in the setup of it. I know Sam had a big part, Edgar and Barrett had a big part. A lot of those core Salt Lake City people were doing this stuff. But yeah. I mean, they took out the trash. There was, under the tables the first day, taping extension cords. So they, I mean, yeah, they did the stuff.Chase (07:28):Yeah. I talked to him in Miami and he was like, yeah, I have a room and an office that's filled with about a hundred monitors. I can't remember what it is at some point, but it looked like there was tons of building going on there. Whenever I see the community, they didn't really ask for permission. And a lot of people would say, why don't you bring a hacker house to our city or this or that? And the reality is, you don't need that. You have an idea, you execute, you make it known. And people are going to come there and you're probably going to likely get some sponsors to help you put it on because this is like an incubator. And obviously mtnPay came out of this, which is incredible. Let's talk a little bit about that. I'm pretty sure, maybe I'm wrong, is that Solana Pay, was it announced before you got to mtnDAO? Or was it announced while you were there?TJ (08:13):It was actually the same day. February 1st is when I rolled through.Chase (08:19):I was on a phone call with you actually, whenever you showed up, you remember that?TJ (08:22):Really?Chase (08:23):Yeah, you were like, I just got to mtnDAO. Yeah. We were...TJ (08:27):I probably called you from the airport. Yeah. I've been like--Chase (08:29):You did.TJ (08:30):Probably over-committing myself. And I remember we were talking about doing a possible grant or something for that IDL stuff. And I was like, just trying to not lose that. Not doing my end of it. You were like, TJ, if you just write a notion page on your idea, I can move it through. And I was like, ah, I don't know. I'm building. And yeah. So we never got through there, but yeah.Chase (08:55):Well, I think it worked out pretty well. So, you got there, Solana Pay's announced, and you were just like, okay, well I'm just going to build something with this.TJ (09:04):No, not at all.Chase (09:06):Okay.TJ (09:07):There was two funny touch points with Solana Pay that got me rolling. The first one was, I hopped out of mtnDAO to go to the LA hacker house for a two day stint, because I was working with these people. And then as I was about to leave, I remember my friend Greg from Solana News was like, I missed the news cycle on Solana Pay. They must have had insider information, that was a couple of days after it was announced. And I was like, what do you mean, dude? It's been going on. He's like, what? I'm like, yeah. Are you not on Twitter? Do you not see this stuff? So, that was funny.And so, that had top of mind a little bit, but the idea for mtnPay, it was Friday night, it was the night of the first party we were having, we had parties every Friday or Saturday. And I was grabbing a Red Bull from, they had this self-service checkout kiosk, as I do. I just consume just stupid amounts of Red Bull. And I was buying another one and you pay through square, tap your phone. I don't know. I just had a random idea that it was like, yo, wouldn't it be hilarious if we rebuilt this self checkout experience and then just added the Solana Pay stuff, because we're all Solana people here for a month, this the first week and that would just be funny.And I told him, I was like, I'm just going to do it. And they're like, that's hilarious. Do it. And then so on Sunday, my boy Scott was in town and we were at the hacker house just trying to think of things to work on for Riptide. And we were skating through all these different ideas on creator tokens or I don't remember all the different things. And it was like, what if we do that Point of Sale thing? That'd be cool. And whatever, we could probably build this in a two day stint. Not a big deal and yeah, that's why we built it.Chase (11:00):Yeah, I remember starting to see a couple of days after Solana Pay launched, I started to see all these videos of people filming themselves and you guys paying with Solana Pay. I was like, this is crazy. This just came out. I can't believe, well, I could believe that you had put that together already. And then from there, Solana Pay's really gained a ton of traction, but you were really the first person to come out and be like, look, hey guys, I did it. And it's actually live in this place right now. And it's still there to this day? They keep that?TJ (11:32):Yeah. As far as I know. Our customer success could use some work. And so I haven't followed up with them in a couple weeks. But we got them set up on our new version, which was a more self-service thing. So as far as I know, it's still running there. There's even a week where it wasn't working and Barrett was texting me nonstop. Like, bro, you need to get this working again because I need this. And so, that's that classic, build something, people would be upset if it goes away. And so we did that.Chase (12:01):Yeah. So you did this in a short amount of time and since then, there was a lot left in the hackathon to go. So, since that first day or that you got that live, I guess you've been doing a ton of work up until the point where you made your final submission, tell us a little bit about mtnPay and what work was involved and what are the features and maybe what's the future of mtnPay.TJ (12:30):Yeah, for sure. So the first half the gate was just, it's an iOS Point of Sale app that enables users to use Solana Pay to pay. And then the second thing is a square integration. So, we use the square APIs to tie it into your current Point of Sale System. So the transactions show up in line. Chase bought a Red Bull here for $3 with his MasterCard and then he bought a cookie for a dollar using Solana Pay. And so that was the core thing. And we had built it specifically for The Shop. We got a bunch of inbound of like, how can I set this up? How can I do it? So we had to take a step back and use a couple weeks to make it more robust and actually usable in self-service. Which was our base for what we wanted to submit to the hackathon, was just like a usable Point of Sale by everyone, it's still in test flight.And then Solana Pay evolved to a new spec while we were there. And then immediately became gas on that. And ever since the wheels have been turning there and then that initial spec change is what led us to where we are today, which is honestly, and not a lot of people know this, but we're more of an API company now. We're more like SaaS APIs and stuff like that.Chase (13:43):I guess, doing the API side makes it a little more versatile so that anybody can use it and they don't have to use a specific device or framework or anything like that.TJ (13:55):Yeah. I think the APIs, to be honest, they came more out of this idea of defensibility, because with a lot of the attention we got, it was like, what's the opportunity here? Is there something worth building out? And in that, there's a lot of things that could make you super existential, like just square adding Solana pay themselves. And so how do we actually build a moat in this industry or something. And so we were like, this transaction request thing came up, which enables you to use APIs in Solana Pay, what if we open that up to people and then let that be our defensibility and our moat. And so we spent a lot of time thinking about what that API suite would look like and then realize that, that's the bigger opportunity from our point of view, but probably more importantly, it's what we want to build in this space.I think there's a lot of opportunities for a lot of people to participate and building out the client that people would use. There's also a lot of stuff that we weren't interested in building. Like inventory management and tax reporting and accounting. Like, nah. I want to do the Solana stuff. And the APIs is the Solana stuff. And so that's where we're at now.Chase (15:08):Now. Yeah. I mean, it makes sense. Here's the thing, you build a project and you don't want to start taking on things that you don't enjoy because then you probably stop enjoying your job. So you do what excites you and then you offload or allow connection points for other people to build that stuff who see that opportunity. But it makes a lot of sense. I've talked to people who have created businesses and then they pull in, maybe not this specifically, but like the tax stuff and all these different sort of inventory management. And then it becomes like, I don't really like this anymore. This is not what I signed up for.TJ (15:42):That's what was happening. And so it was like, really I had to focus on something specifically in there and that's, we picked the APIs and it's been cool. We've been working with different protocols to add their functionality to our APIs. And yeah, it's been fun since we started focusing there.Chase (16:04):So obviously it was the right move because you, just to circle back to this is, you won the Payments Track of the Riptide Hackathon. There was a lot of competition. There was a lot of good stuff in there. So I'm just curious, how did that feel when you saw that?TJ (16:18):I'm dumb competitive. And so it was so funny because it was like, it started off as people are, oh, you going to submit this to Riptide? And it was like, yeah, probably, but we're not really focused on that. And the closer we got to Riptide, we're like, we want to win. And then so we had been paying a lot of attention to other people that were building in this space, seeing where people's attention was. The whole time we were like, I don't know, fairly confident we would do well to some extent, but then I think it was up to, what did the judges value? You don't know. But we were super proud of what we built and we're hoping other people saw what we saw and seeing that we won the Payments Track, it was just like a pat on the back. It was like, we agree.Chase (17:07):We agree.TJ (17:09):Yeah. That's what it was. And there was some chest pounding, there was something like, yes. But I also think the part I was more stoked on was just the attention that would follow and knowing that we could leverage that to build something. Because I think the attention is just like, it's fuel. And you can't do it with only attention you have to follow it up. But we knew it would empower a lot of the things that we wanted to do.Chase (17:37):Yeah, for sure. And I think these aren't necessarily your classic typical hackathon, where you hack on some little thing for a week or a month. These sorts of events are actually catalysts to build real businesses. And this is meant to be inspirational to developers that are watching this, that may or may not have dipped their toes into Solana. Maybe they have, but they haven't gotten anywhere. These stories are super inspirational. So I want to put it in context. What is the timeframe from the day that TJ wrote his first piece or read his first Solana doc to winning Riptide Payments Track? What's that timeframe?TJ (18:13):September, August. I was reading, I was staying up late. I was still working at the startup and I was staying up till like 3:00, 4:00 in the morning, reading that classic, Paul article on doing an escrow. It was partly that it was partly that Packy podcast.Chase (18:30):Oh yeah.TJ (18:30):On Solana Summer. That was super dope. I remember I was at the gym and I was listening to him talk about the DJ Apes Mint and two weeks prior I was at Miami hack week, it was like, I remember I was chilling with Barrett, I met him for the first time, we had met through our friend Eve, shoutout Eve. And it was just me, Barrett, Edgar and Eve in this apartment and they were just talking about crypto and I knew nothing. So I wanted to fit in and I was like, oh, I bought some Ethereum lately.I thought I would impress him. And he is like, nah, and he's looking at me, he's like, fuck Ethereum. And I was like, what? And just turns around and he goes, Solana. And I was like, what is Solana? I thought it was like some shit coin. And that was just when it got on my map. And then I saw the Packy thing. I did that. And then all these NFT things were popping up and I'm like, all right, what's going on? And then Candy Machine pops up. So I'm like reading that contract and I'm reading the Levi's thing and trying to set one up for myself and it feels like explosions all around me. And I'm like, what is this world? And people are just shipping and I can't keep up. And it was like overwhelming. And then I quit.Chase (19:41):So it's been about, from zero to hero in seven months, basically. Is what I'm hearing right here. Seven or eight months.TJ (19:49):Yeah. Something like that. Yeah. I feel like I got onboarded fairly quick. I feel like I was doing stuff to me that felt like mattered, immediately. All that iOS stuff that I was doing, to me felt groundbreaking.Chase (20:04):Yeah.TJ (20:05):And I felt like a hero then, honestly. That stuff made me feel more of a hero than what I felt like with Riptide.Chase (20:11):Really?TJ (20:12):To be totally honest.Chase (20:12):So it was more so just that you win Riptide, like, wow, I got this thing, but the more part for you was the personal win of actually just starting on this new journey and figuring out how to build on Solana.TJ (20:26):Like I said, I'm dummy competitive. So winning Riptide was great. It was a good job power, but with mtnPay, I don't feel like I've done anything yet. I think there's opportunities too. And we're on a path to actually really contribute to the Solana Ecosystem. But I don't feel like I've had a major accomplishment there yet. But with the iOS stuff, I totally did. I, from native iOS code, minted an NFT through Candy Machine. I figured out how to talk to Anchor programs from native iOS code. And that to me was like, that gave me so much energy.Chase (21:05):So tell me about that. You started building on Solana, did you start messing around with Rust? Did you start messing around with Anchor? Or did you go straight to those SWIFT SDKs that existed? What was your process for getting rolling on Solana?TJ (21:18):Totally. Yeah. That's a great thing to preface here is, I've done barely any Rust. I haven't shipped a smart contract to Mainnet. Mostly client work. So there's massive opportunities in this space to really participate and have impact just doing client work. That being said, the way I really learned it was just wanting to write an iOS app that would work with Solana. And so I found a couple of open source SWIFT packages that was doing iOS transaction stuff. And so, that's how I learned what a transaction object looked like and where you serialize it and how you add accounts to that. And what's an account. And what's [inaudible 00:22:02] coding. All of that stuff I just learned because I had to, to make an iOS app that talked to Anchor. And so me and my friend, Michael, we went to college together, and so we were up till like 4:00 in the morning for weeks just printing out transaction objects in JavaScript, on the Anchor thing and figuring out how do we bridge that to iOS? And that was the coolest.Chase (22:30):And then this is exactly the point we've talked about a couple times on this show. And I say it on my Twitter all the time. You just won Riptide Payments Track and you'd never shipped a smart contract. How? Well it's because not everybody needs to be this guy who writes the smart contracts. You just need to know how to talk to them, using these different APIs, SWIFT, JavaScript. There's a C# SDK, there's a Unity One built on top of that. There's a [inaudible 00:22:57] one, they're all out there and you can learn Solana, and in a way you're comfortable, which is in your native language. And you're talking about just doing print lines and printing out and just reading, what is this object? And now I get it.TJ (23:10):Yeah. That was the process. And it was great. And I think we have a long way to go before developers can step in and build incredibly easily and efficiently, but the process is still fun. And there's a lot of toys you get to use when building this up, a lot of exposure, you feel super low level. And yet, they encourage everyone to just dig in and start building shit.Chase (23:38):In your opinion, what are some of those things that need to improve to make this easier for the new guys or the old guys? It doesn't really matter. What needs to happen? And what do we need?TJ (23:47):Error messages.Chase (23:49):Error messages.TJ (23:52):It is like, you will get like, Error A4, and there's nowhere to go. And you're digging around. I'm like, dude, you literally got to clone the repo and go line by line and figure out what's that error? What are we doing? It's fun. And from when I got into it to like what Armani's done with Anchor now and the Anchor books, that's there, the Solana Cookbook, that's all there now. So it's easier to do it now. And even when I try to do more on-chain stuff or build out stuff that I'm not comfortable with, I'm able to go reference those materials, but they weren't there in September.Chase (24:30):Yeah.TJ (24:31):And that was kind of fun though. It was like a point in time. And I was always envious of people that got to code in machine code, because they had to and what a point in time that must have been to get to be a part of that. And that's why I started building in Solana, I saw that point in time again, I thought Solana was going to pop and I was like, I'm not missing it.Chase (24:53):You were basically like, I see Solana, I see that not everything's been created and there's massive opportunities and I'm going to carve myself out a slice of that and just do it. So it's pretty crazy to be talking about this now.TJ (25:05):Yeah, it's been a journey.Chase (25:07):Yeah. And a lot of this was all Discord Support. It was a huge pain in the ass. You answer the same questions 5,000 times a day. Shoutout to the [inaudible 00:25:16] team at Solana labs that really just spent way too much time in Discord and the core engineers that shouldn't be there all.TJ (25:22):Shoutout Alan.Chase (25:23):Yeah. Alan has actually been obviously incredible.TJ (25:26):Fun story, in that with Alan, we were working on that iOS stuff till dumb hours at night, I think it might have been 2:00 in the morning. And we were having these errors we could not figure out. And so we posted in Discord and Alan answered and we're going back and forth with this guy. Didn't know him at all. This is our first thing. He's like, I'm happy to hop on a call with you to help you sort it out. And we were on that call for three hours. But that to me is such a story of people in Solana. There is so many people that just are cool with just helping you. And they're in the weeds with you and it's that developer ecosystem that attracted me and I think is going to attract so many people after me.):Which to your credit, I think you've set up a lot of it. Being the dev relations at Solana, just creating the environment for those developers to thrive and giving them the resources. I think that's where this has come from, but yeah, that was just a monster classic Solana moment for me that I wanted to highlight.Chase (26:31):Yeah, for sure. And there's a lot of people. It started with Toly and Raj and then that attitude and welcomeness humor came down to me and Armani and so many different people that feels like you can approach anybody in the ecosystem. And I agree, I think this side of tone and vibe is what will attract a lot of younger developers.TJ (26:56):Yeah.Chase (26:57):There's lots of different complaints out there. One of the biggest ones we've been hearing a lot is about tooling. If you agree with that, what web tooling or blockchain tooling are we missing right now at Solana? Do you have anything personally that you would like to see?TJ (27:12):No, I don't have the most robust engineering background. When I was at Apple, we used Apple internal tools. So that was all I really knew. And so, even now, I'll be coding on something with someone at a hackathon and they're like, wait, you're not using this plugin. You're not using the Anchor plugin for VS code. I'm like, no, what is that?Chase (27:34):Here's the old-school.TJ (27:36):Yeah. They're like, baby come here. They would set me up with some stuff. So, that's so cool. I think examples are going to be great. I think just like getting examples out there for people so that they could learn that they can do it too is going to be really cool.Chase (27:48):And self-onboard.TJ (27:48):Yeah. Self-onboarding's massive. And that's one of the ways we want to go with mtnPay, because we're just like a set of APIs. I think we can open up these APIs to iOS native developers to be able to build apps, they don't need to do the exact transaction building. We can have just a normal API that lets them build the transaction themselves. So that's one of the directions we definitely want to go into and we feel like can bring native developers to Solana, hopefully.Chase (28:16):Yeah. It's about giving the tools, the education to onboard people like mtnPay and the rest of the ecosystem who then drives in the users and then that it just spreads outwardly from there. So it's pretty incredible to watch right now, I'm not going to say, like I started last May about, next month will be my one year. And the difference in one year has made, like you said, even in September, you didn't have half the things that are available now. It's happening at the speed of light and it's, who knows? In one year from now it's going to be, again, unrecognizable. So I mean, it'll be unrecognizable in like six months, most likely or less. We'll see.TJ (28:57):Yeah. Just being along for the journey, I feel grateful.Chase (29:00):Yeah.TJ (29:01):Just what a point in time that we're in. I was talking with Edgar the other day, I was like, we got to remember, we're in the good old days right now.Chase (29:08):I guess, to round this off and you kind of already touched on this and I always do this at the end of every single episode of the show is, to just give some advice to whoever you want to give to advice to, maybe it's the new devs looking to come into blockchain that might be scared or intimidated by just the name, blockchain, scares some people.TJ (29:30):I mean, just start. Just start and just build. There's so many opportunities within yourself to push things off and it's so easy to complain or give yourself reasons to not build stuff. Even within myself every day I'd catch myself either complaining or giving excuses or whatever. But reality is, just build because when you just start building, you'll figure it out. You can ask the questions, you'll get there. And then that building really gives you momentum to keep going.Chase (30:09):Yeah man.TJ (30:10):Yeah. And it attracts people to you and then those people are going to give you energy and it just, it all cycles. But you have to be the one to start.Chase (30:21):Yeah. I mean, I don't think anybody's really given that advice and it is, like, we're all engineers, we've all just put things off. We all have 200 projects that we started one night and then never got back to. So it's really just getting started and just following through.TJ (30:35):Yeah. And don't be afraid to chase the energy. There's so many things I've tried doing in Solana that I would work on for a week and then stop. But even now I go back to them and they're just tools in the belt. And you'll be able to leverage learnings later on.Chase (30:51):Yeah. For sure. Well, TJ, congratulations for winning the Riptide Payments Track with mtnPay. Glad to get you on the show. Glad to have a conversation. Love the energy. Just keep it up, man. And thanks again for doing what you do. And thanks for being here.TJ (31:09):Yeah, no, I appreciate the opportunity. I feel there's definitely the longest we've been able to chat for how long we've known each other. It's funny. I feel like we kept missing each other in Miami. So, I'm glad we got this opportunity and hopefully I'll see you in The Bahamas.Chase (31:23):Thanks for coming on. 

Morbidology
152: Mackenzie Lueck

Morbidology

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 45:44


It was June of 2019 when a young woman vanished after getting off a flight from Los Angeles, California, to Salt Lake City, Utah. Investigation would uncovered that she had ordered a Lyft from the airport, but it didn't take her back home. Instead, she was driven to a local park in the dead of the night.SPONSORS -Truebill: Thank you to Truebill for sponsoring this episode! It's time to fight back against scammy subscriptions with Truebill. On average, people save $750. Save today at: https://truebill.com/morbidologyGymondo: Thank you to Gymondo for sponsoring this episode! Gymondo is an online fitness & well-being platform. Start a 14 day free trial & get 50% off your annual membership with the promo code "morbidology" at: https://bit.ly/gymondo-morbidology Best Fiends: Thank you to Best Fiends for sponsoring this episode! Engage your brain with this fun puzzle and collect cute monsters along the way. Best Fiends is a free to download app game available on the app store and Google Play.SHOW NOTES - https://morbidology.com/morbidology-the-podcast-152-mackenzie-lueckPATREON - https://www.patreon.com/morbidologyAudio Credit:Evening of Chaos - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Empty Reflections - ErikMMusic - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgq4SPKHlyIA Mothers Sacrifice - OurMusicBox - https://ourmusicbox.com/Dark Tranquility - Anno Domini Beats - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mBav72Ak

I am Salt Lake
Bijan Sakaki, Owner of Beehive Farmacy & Medical Cannabis Patient - #547

I am Salt Lake

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 53:48


On this episode of the podcast we got to sit down and chat with Bijan Sakaki, owner of Beehive Farmacy. We get to find out his story. We talk about medical cannabis here in Utah, we talk about the motivation behind applying for a cannabis pharmacy in Utah, we talk about the obstacles he has faced with Beehive Farmacy, and we talk about his thoughts on recreational adult use cannabis. We also talk about what Bijan loves about living in Utah, favorite local eating spots, and everything else in between. Connect more with I am Salt Lake:Email chris@iamsaltlake.com Connect With Our Facebook https://www.facebook.com/IAmSaltLake/ (https://www.facebook.com/IAmSaltLake/) Connect With Our Twitter https://twitter.com/iamsaltlake (https://twitter.com/iamsaltlake) Connect With Our Instagram https://www.instagram.com/iamsaltlake/ (https://www.instagram.com/iamsaltlake/) Join The Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/iamsaltlake/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/iamsaltlake/) Support our Patreon https://www.patreon.com/iamsaltlake (https://www.patreon.com/iamsaltlake) Sign up for our email list https://iamsaltlake.com/email (https://iamsaltlake.com/email) Thank you for listening to this episode of I am Salt Lake podcast. We showcase local talent, businesses, and everyday people making Salt Lake City what it is today. Please consider making a one time donation through PayPal to help with the expenses of keeping this podcast running smoothly https://www.paypal.me/iamsaltlake (https://www.paypal.me/iamsaltlake)

Rattlecast
ep. 144 - Mike White

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 117:43


Mike White has published two poetry collections, How to Make a Bird with Two Hands (Word Works, 2012) and Addendum to a Miracle (Waywiser, 2017). His work can be found in magazines including Ploughshares, Poetry, The New Republic, The Threepenny Review, and The Yale Review. His is winner of the Anthony Hecht Prize, the Washington Prize, and Rattle's 2010 Neil Postman Award for Metaphor. Originally from Canada, he now lives in Salt Lake City and teaches at the University of Utah. Find his most recent book here: https://waywiser-press.com/product/addendum-to-a-miracle/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: On the elevator, a stranger says something unexpected. Next Week's Prompt: Your earliest childhood memory. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

The Knife Junkie Podcast
Blade Show 2022 Director Alicia Newton - The Knife Junkie Podcast (Episode 316)

The Knife Junkie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022


Alicia Newton, show director for Blade Show, joins Bob "The Knife Junkie" DeMarco on episode 316 of The Knife Junkie Podcast. Find show notes and links for this episode at https://theknifejunkie.com/316.Newton has over 20 year experience in managing and executing successful events with targeted audiences. She also has been the Director of Blade Show since 2010 and has steered it through rough waters the past few years.With over 900 exhibitors from 26 countries, Blade Show (Atlanta) is the world's largest knife show. The show is 40 years old and is produced by Blade Magazine and Caribou Media Group. Globally-recognized manufacturers and legendary makers gather under one roof brining the largest selection of blades, knives and outdoor gear in the world.Blade Show also features seminars, services and Blade University classes. There are also Blade Sports cutting competition, Balisong Flipping Championships, knife sharpening, collecting seminars, self-defense classes and more.You can find Blade Show 2022 online at https://bladeshow.com. In addition to the original Blade Show (Atlanta, June 3-5), knife enthusiasts can enjoy Blade Show West in Salt Lake City, Oct. 7-8, 2022, and Blade Show Texas in Ft. Worth, March 17-18, 2023.Be sure to support The Knife Junkie and get in on the perks of being a Patron -- including early access to the podcast and exclusive bonus content. Visit https://www.theknifejunkie.com/patreon for details.Let us know what you thought about this episode. Please leave a rating and/or a review in whatever podcast player app you're listening on. Your feedback is much appreciated.Also, call the listener line at 724-466-4487 or email bob@theknifejunkie.com with any comments, feedback or suggestions on the show, and let us know who you'd like to hear interviewed on an upcoming edition of The Knife Junkie Podcast.To listen to past episodes of the podcast, visit https://theknifejunkie.com/listen.

Queens of the Mines
Bridget “Biddy” Mason The Grandmother of Los Angeles

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 31:06


 Today we are going to talk about Bridget “Biddy” Mason, the grandmother of Los Angeles, one of the most influential Black women in California. She overcame unimaginable prejudice and inequity and was one of the first prominent landowning citizens of Los Angeles. Briget was born into slavery in Georgia on August 15 of 1818. Her parents were of mixed African American and Native American descent. She wasn't given a last name. Because of this common practice with slaves, many African Americans can only go back so far in their ancestry. Stolen. One of her several slaveholders in Georgia and South Carolina started calling her Biddy. Biddy spent much of her childhood enslaved on John Smithson's plantation in South Carolina, performing tasks in the cotton fields, the South's most important crop. Biddy was forbidden to learn to read or write but she learned about herbs and midwifery from the older enslaved women. Smithson gave her, two other female house servants, and a blacksmith as a wedding gift to his cousins, Robert and Rebecca Smith. The Smiths were successful landowners in Logtown, Mississippi. Biddy was 18. Smith was Mormon convert who cultivated cotton and traded slaves. Although, Mormons were better known as opponents of slavery.  For the Smith family, Biddy did domestic work, toiled hard in the cotton fields and performed farm labor. At other times, she worked as a midwife and house nurse — a job she liked. Biddy took care of Rebecca Smith, who was often ill and helped her during the birth of her six children.  During her years in Mississippi, Biddy gave birth to Ellen, Ann and Harriet, aged ten, four, and a newborn. It's likely that Smith himself fathered these children. Like countless other enslaved women, Biddy was almost certainly the victim of sexual violence. In 1848, Smith decided to follow the call of the church with his fellow Mississippi Saints in the great Mormon Exodus to Utah. He moved his family and his 14 slaves west to the Salt Lake Valley where Joseph Smith established a new Mormon community seventeen years prior. The area was still part of Mexico at the time but would soon become Utah.   Smith, his wife and children sat in the wagon on the journey while  Biddy, her daughters and the other slaves walked barefoot behind the 300 wagon caravan. Biddy was in charge of herding the animals for the 1,700 mile trek.   While they walked from Mississippi through Illinois and Colorado towards Salt Lake City, Biddy had a ton of responsibilities, including herding the cattle, preparing and serving the campfire meals and setting up and breaking down camp. All this while acting as the midwife and herbalist for the party, and still tending to her three young daughters. The trail must have been disturbing, frightening and strange. There were moments when surely there was a chance to escape, and for this reason, Biddy's value increased on the trail. With young children, she didn't have the option to leave. They lived in Utah for three years until Governor Brigham Young authorized another Mormon community, this time in San Bernardino. Brigham Young warned Smith that California, had been admitted to the Union as a free, non-slave state the year prior. Smith ignored his warnings and set out with his family and slaves and a 150-wagon caravan in 1851, to establish the Mormon settlement and extend the reach of his Church.  When Smith arrived in San Bernardino, he became one of the counselors to the bishop and owned a very large property. He was among the wealthiest settlers in San Bernardino. Held in bondage in the Mormon colony were dozens of African Americans as well as an untold number of local Native Americans, as well as an untold number of local Native Americans. San Bernardino was built, in part, by enslaved laborers like Biddy. Even though California was technically a free state, it was a land made up of unfree laborers of various kinds. Many indigenous people weer being forced to work in the Los Angeles "slave mart." This "slave mart" was the second most important source of municipal revenue in Los Angeles after the sale of licenses for saloons and gambling venues. On the weekends, local authorities would seek out and arrest intoxicated natives on dubious vagrancy charges. The Native Americans were thrown in a pen, and their labor for the coming week was auctioned off. If they were paid at the end of that week at all, they were usually paid in alcohol so they could get drunk, be arrested and continue the cycle.  In California, Biddy met two sets of couples who were free blacks. Charles and Elizabeth Flake Rowan and Robert and Minnie Owens. They urged her to legally contest her slave status in California. But she did not. Biddy remained enslaved in a “free” state for five more years as Smith maintained his southern way of life in California. He found himself increasingly at odds with fellow colonists and his own church who favorably disposed toward the practice of slavery. In 1855, the leaders of the Mormon colony in San Bernardino thought they were paying top dollar for 80,000 acres of land but had purchased only 35,000 acres. Fine print fuck up. When the colony sued the people who had sold them the land, they lost. The court allowed them to choose up to 35,000 acres anywhere in the larger area. The church chose Smith's ranch. It was turned over to them without any compensation and Smith was pissed. Without his property in California and in fear of losing his slaves, he sold off his cattle and conspired a plan to quietly leave the colony and move to Texas. Biddy and her fellow slaves did not trust Smith and they feared they were going to be sold and separated from their children. Smith lied to Biddy, promising her and her family's freedom in Texas. He needed her cooperation to get there and considered her valuable property. Without his land, he needed a place for them to all stay as he secured provisions for the ride east. He chose a camp of settlers originally from the American South in the Santa Monica Hills. Surely a more hospitable place for a slaveholder than Mormn san Bernardino.  One of Biddy's daughters was romantically involved with the Owens son. In December, Robert Owens and Elizabeth Rowan tipped off the local authorities. There was a group of Black Americans that were being illegally held in Santa Monica Canyon and they were about to be taken across state lines to the slave state of Texas. The sheriffs from San Bernardino and Los Angeles approached Judge Benjamin Hayes. Hayes issued a writ of habeas corpus, widely used against slaveholders in free states. Late on the night of New Year's Eve 1855, as Los Angeles residents celebrated the new year, sheriffs raided Smith's camp in the Santa Monica mountains.  Biddy's children were taken into protective custody at the city jail at the corner of Spring and Franklin Streets in downtown L.A. They let Biddy stay with the Owens family. Judge Hayes ordered Smith to bear all costs associated with the case and caring for those placed in guardianship of the sheriffs as they prepared for trial.  Los Angeles was then still a small town and the three day court hearing, starting on January 19, 1856 was a huge event.   Smith argued that Biddy and the rest of his slaves wished to go to Texas with him. Under state law, Black Americans could not testify against white Americans. Judge Hayes brought Biddy  and her eldest daughters into his chambers along with two trustworthy local gentlemen who acted as observers. Hayes asked Biddy if she was willingly leaving for Texas and Biddy told him, “I always do what I have been told, but I have always been afraid of this trip to Texas.”  Biddy also told the judge about the kind of treatment they had been subjected to over the years. Hannah, who was one of the women enslaved by Smith, gave an unbelievably damaging testimony in the courtroom. She reluctantly said that she wanted to go to Texas. There were long silences. Hannah had given birth to a baby boy only two weeks earlier and was terrified of what Smith would do to her if she refused to go with him to Texas. Hayes sent the San Bernardino sheriff up to talk with her and she said, I promised I would say in court that I wanted to go but I don't want to go. If you bring me back to court, I'll say I want to go but I don't want to go. The sheriff returned with an affidavit saying that, in fact, she did not want to go. Smith's behavior before and during the course of the hearing made it clear she had good reason to be afraid. It was awful. He threatened the Owens family, a neighborhood grocer and a doctor in the courtroom yelling “If this case isn't resolved on Southern principles, all people of color will pay the price.” A gang of Smith's sons and workers went to the jail and tried to intimidate the jailer and lure Biddy's daughters away from the jail with alcohol. Biddy's lawyer abruptly withdrew from the case after being  threatened and offered a bribe of $200.  Judge Hayes was furious with Smith, and clearly rattled by what he had heard. His family was behaving like thugs. Robert Smith was lying about trying to take them out of California and this disturbed Hayes. Smith, who was not being held, was a no-show on the last day of the trial, Monday, January 21. He ran off to Texas. He knew his reputation was ruined and was unwilling to pay court costs. Judge Hayes stated "all the said persons of color are entitled to their freedom and are free and cannot be held in slavery or involuntary servitude, unless for the punishment of crimes, shall ever be tolerated in this State. It is therefore argued that they are entitled to their freedom and are free forever."    Amasa Mason Lyman was the mayor of San Bernardino and a Mormon Apostle. Biddy was a friend of Lyman and was fond of the Lyman family. Biddy took the surname Mason. It was her first last name.  With Smith gone, her daughters were released from protective custody and Mason moved her family into the Owens family home. They were now citizens in rough-and-tumble Los Angeles, where only around 80 of its 4,000 residents were Black. Her oldest daughter, Ellen, married the Owens' son, Charles. Owing to her experience and quality of work, she became one of the most popular midwives of that state, using the skills she learned as a slave.  Judge Hayes had a brother-in-law famous for being one of the first formally trained doctors in Southern California. Dr. John Strother Griffin, the “Father of East Los Angeles”. Griffin was impressed with her nursing skills and hired her as a nurse and midwife. She made $2.50 per day. That would be about $85 dollars in 2022. About 10 bucks a day for an 8 hour day. Griffin's office was on Main Street in the same county building as the jail in which she'd taken refuge with the 13 other enslaved people fighting for freedom. She offered her services to the prisoners free of charge. Biddy delivered hundreds of babies in Los Angeles and braved a smallpox epidemic, risking her life to tend to the sick. In her big black medicine bag, she carried the tools of her trade, and the papers Judge Hays had given her affirming that she was free. Biddy Mason worked as a midwife for ten years, saving her earnings carefully. When she was 48, she purchased her own property on the outskirts of Los Angeles where there were more gardens and vineyards than paved streets. She was the first African American woman to buy property in Los Angeles. It had a water ditch, and a willow fence running around the plot. Two lots for $250. Mason initially used the land for gardening and lived with the Owens. This purchase made her one of the first pioneers of Los Angeles. A remarkable feat for a woman who had spent the first 37 years of her life enslaved.  In her home, she established the city's first child care center for working parents. The First African Methodist Episcopal Church is the oldest African American church in the city. It was established on her Spring Street property. The initial meetings were held in Mason's home in 1872. She paid taxes and all expenses on church property to hold it for her people. The permanent church was eventually erected on land she donated at Eighth and Towne. Mason was quickly beloved and “known by every citizen” as “Aunt Biddy.”   She was also well received in the Los Angeles Spanish-speaking community. She could not read or write, but had become a fluent Spanish-speaker. She befriended Pio Pico, Mexico's last governor in California. Pico, Owens and Griffin were involved in real estate and all encouraged her to invest her money wisely and purchase property. Biddy invested in real estate in what is now the heart of downtown L.A. Finally, in 1884 Mason finally moved to her own land at 311 Spring Street and what is now Broadway. On one of the two lots, she built a two-story brick building which she rented the first floor to commercial interests and lived in an apartment on the second. Los Angeles was booming, and rural Spring Street was becoming crowded with shops and boarding houses. She sold the north lot for $1,500. A gain of nearly $13,000 today. She sold a property she had purchased on Olive Street for $375 in 1868, for $2,800. $82,000 today. Basically, in 1884, Biddy had over a 100,000 year in today's numbers. There were dirt streets and unpaved sidewalks, with curbs and gutters. The drainage system was primitive. Water was still channeled through the city through open ditches and bricklaid channels. Only fifteen streets had sewers running below their surface via riveted iron pipes. Three hundred foot tall poles holding electric lights had recently been erected on the major streets, illuminating with 3,000 candle power. Early that year, storms in February of 1884 caused the Los Angeles River to swell and cut new channels and the city's streets began to flood. The Aliso Street Bridge broke in two, part of the bridge was pushed down the river with half a dozen homes and they all lodged against the First Street Bridge,  creating a dam. The water rose, the river overflowed its banks and flooded the streets. Finally, the pressure from the rising water and the piled up homes and portion of bridge was too much for the First Street Bridge.  The west bank eroded when the First Street Bridge collapsed and thirty-five more houses were carried away. Along the riverbed, people sifted through the debris. Cradles, baby wagons, doors, cupboards, fences, pigs. Looking for something. Someone. Brooms, chickens, orange trees, beds. It was a dreadful sight. People were killed. Obviously, city lighting could not slow fooding, but it would aid in the recovery from the storm that had put a third of the city under water for hours. After the flood, Biddy arranged a deal with a grocer on Fourth and Spring. All of the families who lost their home were able to sign off for all of their groceries. Biddy Mason would pay the tab. Biddy owned land on San Pedro Street in Little Tokyo and was renting to over twenty tenants on three large plots near the now Grand Central Market. For the next three decades, she continued her real estate venture,  participating in the frontier town's transformation into an emerging metropolis. She used her wealth, a fortune of $300,000, the equivalent to $9.5 million in 2022 to feed and shelter the poor. She would visit the jail to leave a token and a prayerful hope with every prisoner. She opened a foster home, an elementary school for black children and a traveler's aid center. She was charming, effective and was deeply appreciated. In so many ways, she became the backbone of society. She helped her family buy properties around the city. She deeded a portion of her remaining Spring Street property to her grandsons “for the sum of love and affection and ten dollars.” She signed the deed with her customary fancy “X.” Still, never learning to read or write. Too busy making that cash.  Her success enabled her to support her extended family for generations.  Los Angeles had become a bustling city with 50,000 residents in the late 1880's. She was so well-known, at dawn each morning, a line would form in front of Mason's gate. Swarming with people in need of assistance. Her neighborhood developed quickly around her homestead and by the early 1890s, the main financial district of Los Angeles was one block from Mason's property. As she grew old and became too ill to see visitors, her grandson Robert was forced to turn people away each morning.  On January 15, 1891 Bridget “Biddy” Mason died at her beloved homestead in Los Angeles. She was 73 years old, one of the wealthiest Black women in the country. When she was buried at the Evergreen Cemetery in Boyle Heights, her grave was left unmarked. The family held onto Mason's cherished “first homestead” until the Depression. Today the Broadway Spring Center Parking garage stands on the site.  Ninety-Seven years after her death, L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley, and members of the church she founded held a ceremony, during which her grave was finally marked with a tombstone. Biddy Mason Memorial Park in downtown Los Angeles was erected one year later in her honor. Behind the Bradbury Building near Third and Spring, a memorial on an 80-foot-long poured concrete wall shows the timeline of Biddy Mason's life. November 16 was declared “Biddy Mason Day” in Los Angeles. Jackie Broxton said this, "She showed people what could happen when they were free and could set their own destiny". Jackie Broxton is the CEO & President of the Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation. The Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation was established in 2013 and began as an outreach ministry of the church Biddy founded. The Foundation caters to current and former foster youth in the local community. It should also be noted that Biddy's success story was the exception and not the rule. I believe that she attained so much, because she gave so much. As she navigated multiple levels of oppression, Biddy advocated for her community. When it comes to movements advancing our communities, culture, and policies in more equitable directions, it seems that women have always been at the forefront. Biddy Mason once said, “If you hold your hand closed, nothing good can come in. The open hand is blessed, for it gives in abundance, even as it receives.” She is an inspiration that when given the support and opportunity, it is possible to overcome even the toughest of circumstances. Her story is one of resilience, compassion, and triumph. The fight continues today against the inherited systemic racism, sexism, and each and every intersection.  Sources: Los Angeles Almanac  Free Forever: The Contentious Hearing That Made Biddy Mason A Legend By  Hadley Meares The Life of Biddy Mason: From Slave to a Master by Fareeha Arshad Biddy Mason Collaborative National Park Service Biddy Mason: One of LA's first black real estate moguls By Hadley Meares Los Angeles Western Corral Honoring the legacy and 200th birthday of slave-turned-entrepreneur Biddy Mason by Michael Livingston Negro Trail-Blazers of California by Delilah Beasley  The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History by Dolores Hayden https://kentakepage.com/bridget-biddy-mason/ Bridget "Biddy" Mason: From Bondage to Wealth - Kentake Page Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation  

Science Friday
Second Black Hole Image, Last Days Of The Dinosaurs, Rising COVID Cases. May 13, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 47:21


As COVID Cases Rises, Effectiveness Of Vaccines Lessens In Kids As parts of the country continue to see waves of infection from the omicron variant of COVID-19, parents of children over age five have taken heart at the availability of vaccines—while parents of kids five and under have continued to wait for an approved dose. But even as the case numbers continue to climb, the vaccines are less effective against the more-virulent omicron variants—and, for some reason, dramatically less effective in kids. Koerth joins Ira to discuss the story, and why experts say it's still worthwhile getting vaccinated even if the vaccines don't have the dramatic performance seen at the beginning of the vaccination phase of the pandemic. They also talk about a bird flu outbreak troubling poultry farms around the world, the odd immune system of the sleepy lizard, and how scientists are trying to catch a whiff of the odors of ancient Egypt.   Meet The ‘Gentle Giant,' Your Friendly Neighborhood Black Hole It wasn't long ago that the idea of capturing an image of a black hole sounded like a joke, or an oxymoron. How do you take a picture of something so dense that it absorbs the very light around it? But three years ago, we got our first good look with help from the Event Horizon Telescope, which is actually multiple radio telescopes all linked together. That picture was a slightly blurry, red-and-orange doughnut—the best picture to date of the supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy called Messier 87, which is called Messier 87* or M87*. (Black holes are given an asterisk after the name of their location). Today, it's possible to buy jewelry and t-shirts with that picture, drink out of a M87*-adorned coffee cup, or just make it your phone background. Now that the first picture of a black hole is practically a pop culture meme, how do you one-up that? In the past weeks, the Event Horizon Telescope team alluded to a new ‘breakthrough' hiding in the Milky Way. On Thursday, the team unveiled that breakthrough: the first image of our nearest black hole neighbor in the heart of our galaxy. Sagittarius A* is a “gentle giant,” says Feryal Ozel, a member of the global collaboration that created this image. It consumes far less of the gas swirling nearby than M87*, and is far fainter as a result. The Milky Way's black hole also lacks the galaxy-spanning jets of M87* and, due to its smaller size, the gas around it moves so fast that it took years longer to capture a clear picture. Ira talks with Ozel about what it takes to obtain such a picture, and what it can tell us about the extreme, high-temperature physics of black holes throughout the universe.   What Was It Like To Witness The End Of The Dinosaurs? 66 million years ago, a massive asteroid hit what we know today as the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Many people have a general idea of what happened next: The age of the dinosaurs was brought to a close, making room for mammals like us to thrive. But fewer people know what happened in the days, weeks, and years after impact. Increased research on fossils and geological remains from this time period have helped scientists paint a picture of this era. For large, non-avian dinosaurs like Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus rex, extinction was swift following the asteroid impact. But for creatures that were able to stay underwater and underground, their post-impact stories are more complicated. Joining Ira to discuss her book The Last Days of the Dinosaurs is Riley Black, science writer based in Salt Lake City, Utah.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast
269| Grim Reaper, St. Mark's Hospital Shadow Figure & An Angelic Messenger | Paranormal Mysteries

Paranormal Mysteries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 27:39


In tonight's episode of Paranormal Mysteries, I'll be taking a look at two very different entities in a Salt Lake City hospital, the extremely active Murray City Cemetery, an encounter with The Grim Reaper, and a possible messenger from heaven. All coming up on this Friday the 13th edition of Paranormal Mysteries. TELL YOUR STORY Email: paranormalmysteriespodcast@gmail.com Voicemail: https://www.speakpipe.com/paranormalmysteries Website: https://www.paranormalmysteriespodcast.com/ Forum: https://www.paranormalmysteriespodcast.com/forum SUPPORT THE SHOW Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/paranormalmysteries? BuyMeACoffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/paranormal PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=MG24QCZBAWRRN Merchandise: https://www.zazzle.com/store/paranormalmysteries SOCIAL MEDIA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paranormalmysteriespodcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/ParaMysteryPod PODCAST SOURCE: https://www.spreaker.com/show/paranormal-mysteries-podcast Music & Media Featured On The Paranormal Mysteries Podcast Is Provided By These Artists: https://www.paranormalmysteriespodcast.com/stock-music-media © 2022 Paranormal Mysteries Podcast. All Rights Reserved.

DjSteveC
Episode 10: DjSteveC - Weekend Mix Ep.10 Season 3 (Reggaeton)

DjSteveC

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 27:02


Question of the week!What was your first Reggaeton Track?Welcome to season 3 of The Weekend Mix! Showcasing talent worldwide. Open Format music with a hint of Latin. Catch DjSteveC at the hottest nightclubs in Salt Lake City and all over the United States! Also be on the lookout for his edits on DjCity, ClubKillers, & Remixmp4! Catch DjSteveC On Ritmo Latino X on Latino106.3 FM in Salt Lake City! Friday & Saturday 9-10 Make sure to subscribe to our mixcloud select! Tune in and Enjoy!Make sure to check out my Website.You can also purchase my apparelLinks Down BelowLinkTree: https://linktr.ee/djstevec_DjSteveC. Website: https://djstevecisneros.com/Merch Store: https://djstevec.secure-decoration.com/Ritmo Latino X: https://www.ritmolatinox.com/The Weekend Mix is available on :MixCloud Apple PodcastIHeartRadioGoogle PodcastPlayer FMAmazon Music & Audible DeezerBoomplayGaanaAudacy

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Salt Lake City Mayor discusses plan to create a park in old Raging Waters lot

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 4:22


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mormon Stories - LDS
1592: Leaving the LDS Church as a Youth in The Netherlands

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 186:13


Join our new European Producer Nemo the Mormon as he interviews Christina, who left the Mormon Church as a Youth in The Netherlands. Christina will share with us how an encounter with Dieter F. Uchtdorf planted the seed of her faith transition, what the state of the LDS church in The Netherlands is, and share the LDS experience from a Dutch perspective! ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord   Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Dave McMenamin talks NBA Playoffs, Jazz/Lakers offseason + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 24:32


ESPN's Dave McMenamin joins The Drive to discuss NBA Playoffs, Warriors struggling to close out Memphis, Mike Brown as a HC, Lakers offseason plans, food in Salt Lake City + more

KZMU News
Thursday May 12, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 8:49


The Grand County Sheriff's Office identified Adam Pinkusiewicz as a suspect in the double homicide of Kylen Schulte and Crystal Turner. This major development comes nearly nine months after the Moab couple's remains were found at a campsite in the La Sal Mountains. Authorities are still looking for information about Pinkusiewicz, who died by suicide in September 2021. Plus, a new report by the US Interior Department is sharply critical of the Indian boarding school system. And, a group of Indigenous runners is currently traveling over 360 miles from Bears Ears National Monument to Warm Springs Park in Salt Lake City. Two runners speak about their connection to running as medicine. // Show Notes // Authorities are still looking for information about Adam Pinkusiewicz and his vehicle, a 2007 Toyota Yaris. If you might have information please call the Grand County Sheriff's Office at 435- 259-8115. // Seekhaven Family Crisis and Resource Center says trauma is a shared experience for many community members at this time. If you need support, counseling or other resources call their helpline at 435-259-2229. // Photo: A cross marks the turnoff for the campsite where Kylen Schulte and Crystal Turner were camping in August 2021. Nearly nine months since their bodies were found, law enforcement released the name of a suspect. // 5-11-22 GCSO Press Release (Includes Suspect and Vehicle Photos) https://www.kzmu.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/5-11-22-GCSO-Press-Release-1.pdf // KSJD: New report investigates traumatic legacy of federal Indian boarding schools https://www.ksjd.org/podcast/ksjd-local-newscasts/2022-05-11/new-report-investigates-traumatic-legacy-of-of-federal-indian-boarding-schools // Running As Medicine Indigenous Prayer Run https://www.facebook.com/runningasmedicine

Ripple Effect
92: Conjunctive Management – Idaho

Ripple Effect

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:23


TJ Budge, Attorney with Racine Olson discusses conjunctive management of the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer and the Snake River. A very informative discussion about what Idaho has done to be out in front of the conjunctive management issue. This podcast is brought to you by the law firm of Clyde Snow and Sessions, based in Salt Lake City with offices in Oregon and California. For over 65 years Clyde Snow has represented clients throughout the West. Clyde Snow - Serious About Solutions. Nothing said in this podcast should be taken as providing legal advice or as establishing an attorney-client relationship with you or anyone else. Thank you for listening!

Am I Dying?!
What do medical TV shows get wrong?

Am I Dying?!

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 40:18


Hospital romances and dramatic defibrillator saves are good for television ratings but they can be cringe worthy for real doctors. JL & Mark have fun debunking medical show myths and misuse of props. The details matter! But don't look too closely at our logo. Our stethoscope is apparently a dead giveaway that we might be amateurs! (It was the only stethoscope in stock footage in the shape of a question mark. This is how media decisions get made.)Tweet us your questions @jeanlucneptune or @marklewismd or email us at isitserious@offscrip.com or call us at 855-283-4666.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rod Arquette Show
Rod Arquette Show: Crime Problems in Salt Lake City's "Ballpark Neighborhood"

Rod Arquette Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 102:43


Rod Arquette Show Daily Rundown –Wednesday, May 11, 20224:05 pm: Patrick Wiggins, local NASA Ambassador and a pilot, joins the program to discuss the strange story of an airplane landed by a passenger in Florida after the plane's pilot passed out mid-flight.4:38 pm: Salt Lake City Councilman Darin Mano joins the program to discuss the growing concerns about crime and homelessness in the “Ballpark Neighborhood” of the city6:05 pm: Former Utah Speaker of the House Greg Hughes joins the show for his weekly conversation with Rod about the wacky world of politics6:38 pm: Senator Jerry Stevenson joins the program for a conversation about his plans to attempt to bring back the so-called “photocop” program to help deal with excessing speeding by some Utah drivers

Flight89
iSo20POD - "MOM CHEERS"

Flight89

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:56


Celebrating mothers all over the world but especially my life partner and the mother of my children.  We talk a little bit about Radio life, my weight loss journey music and of course sports!

Big Tex Cornhole Talk
Big Tex Talk Episode 36

Big Tex Cornhole Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 66:06


Big Tex Talk episode 36, we review the ACL bag brawl in Salt Lake City this past weekend and we also review the winners from TCL Signature #4 in DentonTX.

Ensign College Devotionals
President & Sister Kusch: Precious Prophetic Patterns and Promises For Our Day

Ensign College Devotionals

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 31:37


A devotional address by President & Sister Kusch, delivered April 19, 2022, in the Assembly Hall on Temple Square in Salt Lake City.

Operant Innovations
University Series 051 | Utah Valley University

Operant Innovations

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 42:59


Today we are joined by Dr. Jane Carlson, Dr. Caleb Stanley, and two graduate students from Utah Valley University. This on-campus program is nestled in the valley of Orem, UT between the mountains and Utah Lake. Close enough to Salt Lake City, but still remote enough to enjoy the outdoors, you will get a mix of school and nature. Listen as the faculty and students talk about what is needed to succeed in this practitioner-based program and the outcomes that they have achieved. Contact Information: Dr. Jane Carlson - Jane.Carlson@uvu.edu Dr. Caleb Stanley - Caleb.Stanley@uvu.edu - Additional Links: Program - https://www.uvu.edu/med/aba.html

Scared To Death
"Shhhh..."

Scared To Death

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 80:08


SCARED TO DEATH IS EXPLICIT IN EVERY WAY. PLEASE TAKE CARE WHILE LISTENING First, we head back to one of America's favorite haunted places, Savannah, Georgia. Today we visit the Olde Harbour Inn, where a creepy, seemingly male ghost, likes to crawl into bed with female guests. A very disturbing modern encounter story to accompany some lore. Then, we head to one of America's oldest city, St Augustine, Florida, to share legends and encounters that accompany it's supposedly haunted lighthouse. Third, the tale of Mrs. Rigby, a heart warming ghost who loves to make herself known by whistling. Lastly, an archeologist exploring an abandoned root cellar in Texas is in for a real surprise!New Merch: Brand new matching Crystal Mom and Crystal Baby tees are now available in the bad magic store. Awesome design featuring 25 precious and semi precious gems. There's Amethyst, Citrine, Amber! Go to badmagicmerch.com and scoop up your new t-shirt! Standup: Also - if you want to see a very different side of Dan than you see here, his Symphony of Insanity standup tour is back and running. Go to dancummins.tv for ticket links to shows in Chicago, Salt Lake City, Missouri, Milwaukee and Davenport this spring.Bad Magic Productions Monthly Patreon Donation:  So excited to announce this months charity, The HALO Dental Network. Our donation amount to HALO is $14,300 with another $1600 being set aside for the Cummins Family Scholarship. More info coming on the scholarship in a few months! HALO was founded by Dr. Brady Smith. The HALO Dental Network is a coalition of dental professionals who donate their services to the dental under served. Services include dental implants, veneers, fillings and crowns. If you want to learn more, please visit halodentalnetwork.org. Not only can donate you can also nominate someone you know who is in need. Thank you for continuing to send in your stories, Creeps and Peepers! Please keep doing so. Send them to mystory@scaredtodeathpodcast.com  Send everything else to info@scaredtodeathpodcast.comWant to be a Patron? Get episodes AD-FREE, listen and watch before they are released to anyone else, bonus episodes, a 20% merch discount, additional content, and more! Learn more by visiting: https://www.patreon.com/scaredtodeathpodcastPlease rate, review, and subscribe anywhere you listen. Thank you for listening! Follow the show on social media: @scaredtodeathpodcast on Facebook and IGWatch this episode on Youtube: https://youtu.be/g8jpXsSI4l0Website: https://scaredtodeathpodcast.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scaredtodeathpodcast/Instagram: https://bit.ly/2miPLf5Mailing Address:Scared to Deathc/o Timesuck PodcastPO Box 3891Coeur d'Alene, ID 83816Video/Audio by Bad Magic ProductionsAdditional music production by Jeffrey MontoyaAdditional music production by Zach CohenVarious free audio provided by http://freesound.orgOpening Sumerian protection spell (adapted): "Whether thou art a ghost that hath come from the earth, or a phantom of night that hath no home… or one that lieth dead in the desert… or a ghost unburied… or a demon or a ghoul… Whatever thou be until thou art removed… thou shalt find here no water to drink… Thou shalt not stretch forth thy hand to our own… Into our house enter thou not. Through our fence, breakthrough thou not… we are protected though we may be frightened.  Our life you may not steal, though we may feel SCARED TO DEATH."

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
When is the temperature going to heat up in Salt Lake City?

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 4:35


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Swapmoto Live Podcast
Salt Lake. City Supercross Recap on the Pro Taper Kickstart Podcast

Swapmoto Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 67:53


Presented by Pro Taper The 2022 Monster Energy Supercross Series is done and dusted, and the series finale at Salt Lake City's Rice-Eccles Stadium was certainly a good one! There was lots to talk about concerning the final round, from the dusty press day and Yamaha LCQ Challenge Privateer Race, to the new West Coast Champ and the Malcolm Stewart/Justin Barcia drame. Click play for a good time!

Mormon Stories - LDS
1590: Lost 116 Pages w/ LDS Discussions

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 146:27


Join us for another fascinating conversation with LDS discussions on the lost 116 pages of the Book of Mormon. ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord   Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Mormon Stories - LDS
1589: What to Offer Your Children After a Faith Shift - Jon Ogden's THRIVE Story

Mormon Stories - LDS

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 124:48


Join Margi and John for our next episode of Thrive Stories this coming Tuesday at noon (MST).   One of the most pressing questions parents ask after a faith shift is, “What do I do about my kids?” Without orthodoxy, the way forward feels disorienting. In this interview, Jon Ogden, co-founder of UpliftKids.org, suggests that a strong foundation already exists in the form of science and wisdom. With this foundation, we don't have to feel like we're starting with nothing. Thrive Stories is a new podcast series where Margi (alongside John or Jenn) will be interviewing a member of the community twice per month.  The interviews will be shorter (1-2 hours), story-based, but will be focused on a particular aspect of healing and growth AFTER a Mormon faith crisis (thus the THRIVE name).  They will happen on Tuesdays at noon (MST). Some examples of areas of thriving include:  Family Relationships, Healthy Boundaries, Finding Community, Finding Meaning/Purpose, Dealing with Grief/Death, Religion after Mormonism, Health Sexuality, Parenting, Improving Physical Health, Identity, Health Marriage/Relationships, Secular Spirituality, Word of Wisdom 2.0, and Women Finding Their Own Voice after Mormonism. If you would like to nominate someone you know who would be a great candidate for a THRIVE interview, please nominate them (or yourself) here. ————— We are 100% donor funded! Please click HERE to donate and keep this content coming! Click here to donate monthly: $10 $25 $50 ————— MSP on Spotify MSP on Apple Podcasts MSP Blog Instagram Patreon TikTok Discord Contact Us! *MormonStories@gmail.com *PO Box 171085 Salt Lake City, UT 84117

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Keeping Yourself and Your Business Cyber Secure

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:16


How do businesses and regular people protect themselves from a cyber attack? Codefresh co-founder and cyber security expert Dan Garfield talks about what we can do now and what to do when hackers strike. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Senator Tim Scott on President Biden's Economic Vision

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 9:28


Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Crypto Needs More Guidance Before SEC Enforcement

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:34


The Security and Exchange Commission is gearing up to crack down on crypto. But is the agency getting ahead of itself? James Czerniawski with Americans for Prosperity says the industry is complaining that there isn't any guidance for them, which makes it difficult to strike a balance between innovation and regulations. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Twitter Isn't a Threat to Democracy

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 9:16


Will Twitter become a better place for regular people to have more open and honest discussions online once Elon Musk takes over? Some people worry about what changes the billionaire will make to the site if he follows through with his plan to buy it, Mark Jamison from the American Enterprise Institute has a piece in The Hill outlining the benefits of Musk's purchase for regular people and the downsides for Facebook. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.