Podcasts about Princeton University Press

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Latest podcast episodes about Princeton University Press

The Daily Stoic
How To Be Content - The Search For The Good Life pt. 2

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 24:51


Nobody wrote about the “good life” more beautifully than Horace (65-8 BCE). In numerous writings, the Roman poet shared his wisdom on how to use virtue as a key to unlocking contentment and, therefore, happiness in our daily lives. Today, Ryan presents a selection of Horace's ideas in the second half of the “The Search For the Good Life” chapter in the How to Be Content installment of Princeton University Press's Ancient Wisdom for Modern Readers series, translated by Stephen Harrison.✉️ Sign up for the Daily Stoic email: https://dailystoic.com/dailyemailCheck out the Daily Stoic Store for Stoic inspired products, signed books, and more.

The Modern Scholar Podcast
Navigating the Academic Publishing Process

The Modern Scholar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 42:43


Dr. Laura Portwood-Stacer is a publishing consultant and developmental editor who helps academic authors at all career stages navigate the book publishing process. Her company Manuscript Works offers regular workshops and online programs to assist writers in drafting book proposals and connecting with scholarly publishers. She is the author of The Book Proposal Book: A Guide for Scholarly Authors, published by Princeton University Press in 2021, which is the subject of our conversation today!

Let's Talk Religion
Who were the Ebionites

Let's Talk Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 16:12


In this episode, we explore what little we know of the mysterious group of Jewish Christians known as the Ebionites.Sources/Suggested Reading:Brakke, David (2012). "Gnostics: Myth, Ritual, and Diversity in Early Christianity". Harvard University Press.Chilton, Bruce & Craig A. Evans (ed.) (1998). Studying the historical Jesus: Evaluations of the state of Current Research. Brill.Ehrman, Bart (2005). "Lost Christianities: The Battles for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew". OUP USA.Holmén, Tom & Stanley E. Porter (ed.) (2011). Handbook for the study of the historical Jesus. Volume 1. Brill.Levine, Amy-Jill; Dale C. Allison Jr. & John Dominic Crossan (2006). The Historical Jesus in Context. Princeton University Press.#Ebionites #Jesus #Christianity Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nature's Archive
#58: Dr. Sarah Rose - Astounding Spiders!

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 74:01 Transcription Available


Today we're going to discuss an animal that can make wind sails, cast nets, produce its own antifreeze, and is an A-list impersonator. Well, it's not one animal, but a category of animals - spiders!And my guest today, Dr. Sarah Rose, is here to tell us all about it. Dr. Rose is the author of a spectacular new field guide, Spiders of North America from Princeton University Press, is chair of the American Arachnological Society's Common Names Committee, and has a PhD in Restoration Ecology from The Ohio State University.Today we discuss Sarah's journey to spiders, including her research into how spiders function as indicator species for habitats and ecosystems. Sarah tells us about the varied lifestyles of spiders, ranging from orb web weavers to sensing web weavers to ambush hunters, and more. We talk about different types of webs, spider guilds, profile some particularly interesting species such as the trash-line orb weaver, bolus spiders, and ant mimicking spiders, and much more.There is so much more that we could have discussed, so please let me know what else you'd like to hear, and perhaps we can have a part two!And be sure to check the full show notes on podcast.naturesarchive.com for links to what we discussed as well as Sarah's YouTube channel, which has lots of fun spider videos.FULL SHOW NOTESLinksAll Bugs Go To Kevin - Facebook groupAmerican Arachnological SocietyJack Pine ForestsLucas the Spider - a YouTube channel with a cute animated jumping spider. 3.5 Million subscribers!Spider Guilds - Cardoso et alSpiders of North America, An Identification Manual, by Darrell Ubick (Editor), Pierre Paquin (Editor), Paula Cushing (Editor), Nadine Dupérré (Illustrator)Spiders of North America, by Dr. Sarah Rose [Princeton University Press | Amazon] Note: links to books are affiliate linksThe following music was used for this media project:Music: Spellbound by Brian Holtz MusicFree download: https://filmmusic.io/song/9616-spellboundLicense (CC BY 4.0): https://filmmusic.io/standard-licenseArtist website: https://brianholtzmusic.com Support the show

The Sunday Show
You Are Not Expected to Understand This

The Sunday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 31:34


Today we're going to hear from the editor of-- and two authors included in-- a book of essays about how particular bits of software have changed the world in different ways, the just-published "You Are Not Expected to Understand This": How 26 Lines of Code Changed the World from Princeton University Press. The book is at once delightful and enlightening, revealing how technology interacts with people and society in both good and bad ways, and how important and long lasting the decisions we take when designing software and systems can be on the world. This episode features:Torie Bosch, the editor of Future Tense, a collaborative project of Slate magazine, New America, and Arizona State University, and the editor of the book;Meredith Broussard, an associate professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and research director at the NYU Alliance for Public Interest TechnologyCharlton McIlwain, Vice Provost for Faculty Engagement and Development at New York University and Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Let's Talk Religion
What is Shia Islam? - Twelverism

Let's Talk Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 42:50


In this episode, I attempt to give you an overview of the vast and complex Twelver school of Shi'ism across history.Sources/Suggested Reading:Abdulsater, Hussein Ali (2017). "Shi'i Doctrine, Mu'tazili Theology: Al-Sharif al-Murtada and Imami Discourse". Edinburgh University Press.Amir-Moezzi, Mohammad Ali (1994). "The Divine Guide in Early Shi'ism: The Sources of Esotericism in Islam". Translated by David Streight. State University of New York Press.Amir-Moezzi, Mohammad Ali (2011). "The Spirituality of Shi'i Islam: Beliefs and Practices". I.B. Tauris.Bayhoum-Daou, Tamima (2005). "Shaykh Mufid". Makers of the Muslim World Series. Oneworld Academic.Daftary, Farhad (2007). "The Isma'ilis: Their history and doctrines". Cambridge University Press.Knysh, Alexander (2017). "Sufism: A New History of Islamic Mysticism". Princeton University Press.Meisami, Sayeh (2013). "Mulla Sadra". Makers of the Muslim World Series. Oneworld Academic.Tabataba'i, Hossein Modarressi (1984). "An Introduction to Shi'i Law: a bibliographical study". Ithaca Press London.#Shia #Islam #Religion Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Let's Talk Religion
What is Tantra?

Let's Talk Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 26:00


WARNING: This episode contains depictions of violence, references to sexual acts and mild nudity.In this episode, we explore the often misunderstood tradition of Tantra or Tantrism.Sources/Suggested Reading:Bharati, Agehananda (1965). "The Tantric Tradition". B.I. Publications.Bhattacharyya, N.N. (2005). "History of the Tantric Religion". Second Revised Edition. Manohar.Dyczkowski, Mark S.G. (1987). "The Doctrine of Vibration: An Analysis of the Doctrines and Practices of Kashmir Shaivism". State University of New York Press.Einoo, Shingo (ed.) (2009). "Genesis and Development of Tantrism". University of Tokyo.Harper, Katherine Anne & Robert L. Brown (2002). "The Roots of Tantra". State University of New York Press.Muller-Ortega, Paul Eduardo (1989). "The Triadic Heart of Siva: Kaula Tantricism of Abhinavagupta in the Non-Dual Shaivism of Kashmir". State University of New York Press.Wallis, Christopher D. (2013). "Tantra Illuminated: The Philosophy, History and Practice of a Timeless Tradition". Mattamayura.White, David Gordon (2000). "Tantra in Practice". Princeton University Press.#Tantra #Shaivism #Buddhism Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Let's Talk Religion
Organized Daoism & Internal Alchemy (Neidan)

Let's Talk Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 25:58


In this episode, we continue our explorations of Daoism by studying its later developments into organized movements and the fascinating practice of Neidan, or "Internal Alchemy".Sources/Suggested Reading:Graham, A.C. (1999). "Disputers of the Tao: Philosophical Argument in Ancient China". Open Court.Kohn, Livia (1991). "Early Chinese Mysticism: Philosophy and Soteriology in the Taoist Tradition". Princeton University Press.Kohn, Livia (1993). "The Taoist Experience: An Anthology". State University of New York Press.Komjathy, Louis (2013). "The Daoist Tradition: An Introduction". Bloombury academic.Komjathy, Louis (2016). "Comtemplative Literature: A Comparative Sourcebook on Meditation and Contemplative Prayer". State University of New York Press.Ziporyn, Brook (Translated by) (2020). Zhuangzi: The Complete Writings". Hackett Publishing Company.#Daoism #China #Alchemy Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Franciska Show
How Halachik Innovation Works - with Chaim Saiman

The Franciska Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 46:36


Join the WA Group with this temporary link: https://chat.whatsapp.com/LcHQQDGFxvA7y8EALUkaLU This Episode is a personal story about the struggle with addiction, finding Judaism and creating a new fulfilling life. Volunteer to share your personal story on the Franciska Show - email: franciskakay@gmail.com        About Our Guest: Chaim Saiman is a scholar of Jewish law, insurance law and private law and Chair in Jewish law Villanova University's Law School. He is also a fellow at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at U. Penn. Chaim has been the Gruss Visiting Professor of Talmudic Law at both Harvard Law School and the U. Penn Law School's, a visiting fellow at Princeton University. Chaim serves as dayyan on the Beth Din of America, and as an expert witness in insurance law and Jewish law in federal court and has recently published Halakhah: The Rabbinic Idea of Law with Princeton University Press. Chaim learned for several years at Yeshivat Har-Etzion (Gush) and Kerem B'Yavneh. Prior to joining the faculty at Villanova, he was a law clerk on the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals and an associate with the firm Cleary Gottlieb in New York.   Buy the Book: Halackha - The Rabbinic idea of Law - https://www.amazon.in/Halakhah-Rabbinic-Library-Jewish-Ideas/dp/069115211X/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1667230985&refinements=p_27%3AChaim+N.+Saiman&s=books&sr=1-1 The Podcast DIY Launch Course: https://www.franciskakosman.com/courselaunch If you'd like to book a consult session with Franciska, click here:  https://checkout.square.site/merchant/5BECR8D49NYV3/checkout/FVSNPB7HVW36LOYAR3L7SJMU If you'd like to sponsor an episode, click here: https://checkout.square.site/merchant/5BECR8D49NYV3/checkout/6KYMG7OGFR4Y63C43RREZ5MV

Project Narrative
Episode 13: Jim Phelan & Sarah Iles Johnston — The Myth of Arachne and Athena

Project Narrative

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 41:16


In this episode of the Project Narrative Podcast, Jim sits down with Sarah Iles Johnston to read and discuss her own retelling of the myth of Arachne and Athena from her new book to be published later this year by Princeton University Press, Gods and Mortals: Ancient Greek Myths for Modern Readers. In Gods and… Continue reading Episode 13: Jim Phelan & Sarah Iles Johnston — The Myth of Arachne and Athena

Podsongs
Heba Gowayed discusses the world's refugee crisis (guest musician Scott Johnson of Juniper)

Podsongs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 95:04


What happens when a young Boston musician interviews a Professor of Sociology at Boston University about the refugee crisis happening worldwide? The answer is a great song for Social Change. Stream the song: https://ffm.to/juniperborderline Heba Gowayed is the Moorman-Simon Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University, and it's her job to make sense of it all. Her research, which is global and comparative, examines how low-income people traverse social services, immigration laws, and their associated bureaucracies, while grappling with gender and racial inequalities. Heba's writing has appeared in Gender & Society, Ethnic & Racial Studies, Sociological Forum and in public outlets including Slate and Teen Vogue. Her new book, Refuge, out now with Princeton University Press, explores how states shape the potential of people pursuing refuge within their borders. She is currently working on her second book, The Cost of Borders, which theorizes borders as a costly, and often deadly, transaction. JUNIPER After meeting in college, Scott Johnson, Ahren Shreeve, and Alejandro Marín formed Juniper. The group has formed their unique sound from diverse influences of alternative rock, folk, R&B, and bedroom pop. With various vocalists throughout their early discography, one thing has remained constant: their songwriting is tangibly honest, ranging from upbeat and high energy to delicate and introspective. With roots in local venues and basement gigs, their music found a loyal fan base early on, which has since only grown. At just 21 years old, the band has emerged as one of the new faces of the Boston music scene, and with this encouragement, they've consolidated and are now working on their debut album, coming soon. On the borderline Ordinary people Are intertwined On the borderline If you think it's equal Then you're colorblind Can't you see it'll never be the same Even if you're from the same place Disproportionate, longevity Based on things you wouldn't believe… Who's complicit in creating (generating) lies A never-ending staircase With freedom at the top in disguise Protected by Countries with money And no sense of pain The pain, of dropping everything And moving away At the borderline Hope is used To build the lie// That it's a better life It takes a criminal mind For death and sacrifice To find a compromise To find a compromise But can't u see it'll never be the same Even if you're from the same place People seek refuge But don't you go calling them refugees… Who's complicit in creating (generating) lies A never-ending staircase With freedom at the top in disguise Protected by Countries with money And no sense of pain The pain, of dropping everything And moving away --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podsongs/message

Black Coffee and Theology Podcast
Storied Witness: The Theology of Black Women Preachers in 19th Century America with Dr. Kate Hanch

Black Coffee and Theology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 44:49


In this episode I sit down with friend Dr Hanch and talk about her new book Storied Witness that highlights the works and lives of three phenomenal Black women. Please go and buy/support this book! Enjoy. Resources: Allen, Richard. The Life, Experience, and Gospel Labours of the Rt. Rev. Richard Allen. Philadelphia: Martin & Boden, Printers, 1833. Documents of the South. University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. First Published in 2000. . Andrews, William L., Lee, Jarena, Elaw, Zilpha, and Foote, Julia A. J. Sisters of the Spirit: Three Black Women's Autobiographies of the Nineteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986. Bassard, Katherine Clay. Spiritual Interrogations: Culture, Gender, and Community in Early African American Women's Writing. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999. Bostic, Joy R. African American Female Mysticism: Nineteenth-Century Religious Activism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. Campbell, Charles L., Cilliers, Johan. Preaching Fools: The Gospel as a Rhetoric of Folly. Waco, Tex.: Baylor University Press, 2012. Elaw, Zilpha. Memoirs of the Life, Religious Experience, Ministerial Travels, and Labours of Mrs. Elaw. Kimberly Blockett, ed. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press, 2021.

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
How Diverse Was The Ancient Mediterranean? with Professors Sarah Derbew and Nandini Pandey

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 66:50


This week, we're traveling back to one of our favorite sites for curiosity: the ancient Mediterranean. Professors Sarah Derbew and Nandini Pandey join Jonathan to discuss how people across the region experienced cultural diversity; how they related to—and set themselves apart from—their neighbors; and what it looks like to approach the ancient past on its own terms rather than filtered through contemporary assumptions.Sarah Derbew is an assistant professor of Classics at Stanford University. She writes, teaches, and speaks widely about ancient Greece's literary and visual heritage, considering its representations of black people that nimbly provoke - and cut through - modern hierarchies. You can follow her on Twitter @BlackAntiquity, and at www.sarahderbew.com. Her new book Untangling Blackness in Greek Antiquity is out now, and you can purchase it using the coupon code UBGA2022.  Nandini Pandey is an associate professor of classics at Johns Hopkins University working to diversify our study of the ancient world and advocate for historically underrepresented students and scholars. She writes, teaches, and speaks on Roman culture, Latin literature, ancient race and identity, and the ways that all of these have shaped and can continue to speak to modern societies across the world. Her first book was about The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome; she's currently writing a second book on Roman diversity for Princeton University Press and a third, for Yale, on how classics can enrich our modern lives. You can follow her on Twitter @global_classics.Want to learn more about race in classical antiquity? Professor Pandey recommends Rebecca Futo Kennedy's writing.  Follow us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN to join the conversation. Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook. Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com. Our executive producer is Erica Getto. Our associate producer is Zahra Crim. Our editor is Andrew Carson. Our theme music is “Freak” by QUIÑ; for more, head to TheQuinCat.com.

The Daily Stoic
How To Be Content: The Search For The Good Life Pt. 1

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 22:33 Very Popular


Today's episode is an excerpt from Stephen Harrison's How To Be Content: An Ancient Poet's Guide for an Age of Excess published by Princeton University Press. In this chapter Horace talks about being content with what you have, the different philosophical ideas that lead us to living “the good life.” and more.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
The Only Police Reform That Matters

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 4:41


https://youtu.be/laVg3gyfitA The Moral Parity Thesis The conditions under which a person may, in self-defense or the defense of others, deceive, lie to, sabotage, attack, or kill a fellow civilian, or destroy private property, are also conditions under which a civilian may do the same to a government agent (acting ex officio) or government property. The moral parity thesis holds that justifying self-defense or the defense of others against government agents is on par with justifying self-defense or the defense of others against civilians.   – Jason Brennan, Ph.D., When All Else Fails: The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice (2019, Princeton University Press), p. 11. Jason Brennan is the Robert J. and Elizabeth Flanagan Family Term Professor and Director, Georgetown Institute for the Study of Markets and Ethics.  

New Books in World Affairs
Rahul Sagar, "To Raise a Fallen People: The Nineteenth-Century Origins of Indian Views on International Politics" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 44:44


Most people tend to mark the beginning of Indian international relations thought to Nehru, and his self-proclaimed attempt to build a true non-aligned movement and more enlightened international system. But Indian thought didn't emerge sui generis after Indian independence, as Rahul Sagar notes in his edited anthology, To Raise a Fallen People: The Nineteenth-Century Origins of Indian Views on International Politics (Juggernaut / Columbia University Press: 2022). Rahul collects writings from Indian thinkers on a variety of topics: the threat posed by Russia, the value of free trade, discrimination faced by Indians at home and overseas, showing the diversity of views present in Indian political debate long before 1945. In this interview, Rahul and I talk about these collected writings, and what they tell us about India then and, perhaps India today. Rahul Sagar is Global Network Associate Professor of Political Science at New York University Abu Dhabi. His other books include Secrets and Leaks: The Dilemma of State Secrecy (Princeton University Press: 2013) and The Progressive Maharaja: Sir Madhava Rao's Hints on the Art and Science of Government (Oxford University Press: 2022). He can be followed on Twitter at @rahulsagar. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of To Raise A Fallen People. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
Rahul Sagar, "To Raise a Fallen People: The Nineteenth-Century Origins of Indian Views on International Politics" (Columbia UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 44:44


Most people tend to mark the beginning of Indian international relations thought to Nehru, and his self-proclaimed attempt to build a true non-aligned movement and more enlightened international system. But Indian thought didn't emerge sui generis after Indian independence, as Rahul Sagar notes in his edited anthology, To Raise a Fallen People: The Nineteenth-Century Origins of Indian Views on International Politics (Juggernaut / Columbia University Press: 2022). Rahul collects writings from Indian thinkers on a variety of topics: the threat posed by Russia, the value of free trade, discrimination faced by Indians at home and overseas, showing the diversity of views present in Indian political debate long before 1945. In this interview, Rahul and I talk about these collected writings, and what they tell us about India then and, perhaps India today. Rahul Sagar is Global Network Associate Professor of Political Science at New York University Abu Dhabi. His other books include Secrets and Leaks: The Dilemma of State Secrecy (Princeton University Press: 2013) and The Progressive Maharaja: Sir Madhava Rao's Hints on the Art and Science of Government (Oxford University Press: 2022). He can be followed on Twitter at @rahulsagar. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of To Raise A Fallen People. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it
Episode 282: Griffins, Greek Fire, and Ancient Poisons

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 50:39


For thousands of years humans have in war and peace attempted to poison one another—or, perhaps for variety,  burn each other to death. We might think of poison gas, biological weapons, or the use of unwitting victims to spread epidemics as being modern innovations, but such horrors have been employed since the earliest recorded history.  Moreover, for nearly that entire time humans have debated the morality of employing those weapons.  My guest Adrienne Mayor describes this history in Greek Fire, Poison Arrows, and Scorpion Bombs: Unconventional Warfare in the Ancient World, now being issued in a revised and updated edition by Princeton University Press, along with her collection of essays entitled Flying Snakes and Griffin Claws. As she does in all of her books, in both of these she travels through that complicated landscape where the borders of history, science, archaeology, anthropology, and popular knowledge all adjoin each other, and seeks there the realities and insights embedded in myth, legend, and folklore.  Adrienne Mayor's other books include The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy, a finalist for the National Book Award. She was previously on the podcast in Episode 107 discussing her book Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology.

Breaking Battlegrounds
Dr. Aaron Friedberg on China

Breaking Battlegrounds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 65:29


This week on Breaking Battlegrounds, we are joined by Dr. Aaron Friedberg, a nonresident senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and an expert on China. Later in the show, Kerry Picket of the Washington Times calls in to discuss some of the week's biggest headlines. -Aaron L. Friedberg is a nonresident senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, where he focuses on China and US-China relations, great-power competition, and US foreign and defense policy. Concurrently, he is a professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University, where he is codirector of the Center for International Security Studies.Dr. Friedberg serves on the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission. In addition, he is a counselor of the National Bureau of Asian Research, nonresident senior fellow at the German Marshall Fund, and president and founding board member of the Alexander Hamilton Society. From 2003 to 2005, Dr. Friedberg served as deputy assistant for national security affairs in the Office of the Vice President of the United States. After leaving government, he was appointed to the Defense Policy Board and the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on Democracy Promotion.Dr. Friedberg is the author, coauthor, or editor of several books, monographs, and book chapters. His books include Getting China Wrong (Polity Books, June 2022); Beyond Air-Sea Battle: The Debate over US Military Strategy in Asia(Routledge, 2014); A Contest for Supremacy: China, America, and the Struggle for Mastery in Asia (W. W. Norton & Company, 2011); In the Shadow of the Garrison State: America's Anti-Statism and Its Cold War Grand Strategy(Princeton University Press, 2000); and The Weary Titan: Britain and the Experience of Relative Decline, 1895–1905(Princeton University Press, 1988).Dr. Friedberg has been widely published in policy journals, academic publications, and the popular press, including in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Commentary, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, War on the Rocks, the American Political Science Review, Asia Policy, China Economic Quarterly International, Daedalus, Harvard International Review, and Washington Quarterly.Dr. Friedberg has a PhD and AB in government from Harvard University.-Kerry Picket is a senior congressional reporter for The Washington Times and fill-in radio host at SiriusXM Patriot 125. She previously covered the hill at other DC-based outlets including the Daily Caller and the Washington Examiner. Before that, she produced news for Robin Quivers of The Howard Stern Show on SiriusXM, wrote entertainment news for MTV Radio, and worked as a production assistant at MTV.com. She appears frequently as a guest commentator on cable news programs and syndicated radio shows.-Connect with us:www.breakingbattlegrounds.voteTwitter: www.twitter.com/Breaking_BattleFacebook: www.facebook.com/breakingbattlegroundsInstagram: www.instagram.com/breakingbattlegroundsLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/breakingbattlegrounds This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit breakingbattlegrounds.substack.com

New Books in Early Modern History
James Belich, "The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 70:39


In 1346, a catastrophic plague beset Europe and its neighbours. The Black Death was a human tragedy that abruptly halved entire populations and caused untold suffering, but it also brought about a cultural and economic renewal on a scale never before witnessed. The World the Plague Made is a panoramic history of how the bubonic plague revolutionized labour, trade, and technology and set the stage for Europe's global expansion. In The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe (Princeton University Press, 2022) Dr. James Belich takes readers across centuries and continents to shed new light on one of history's greatest paradoxes. Why did Europe's dramatic rise begin in the wake of the Black Death? Belich shows how the plague doubled the per capita endowment of everything even as it decimated the population. Many more people had disposable incomes. Demand grew for silks, sugar, spices, furs, gold, and slaves. Europe expanded to satisfy that demand—and the plague provided the means. Labour scarcity drove more use of waterpower, wind power, and gunpowder. Technologies like water-powered blast furnaces, heavily gunned galleons, and musketry were fast-tracked by plague. A new “crew culture” of “disposable males” emerged to man the guns and galleons. Setting the rise of Western Europe in a global context, Belich demonstrates how the mighty empires of the Middle East and Russia also flourished after the plague, and how European expansion was deeply entangled with the Chinese and other peoples throughout the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Medieval History
James Belich, "The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Medieval History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 70:39


In 1346, a catastrophic plague beset Europe and its neighbours. The Black Death was a human tragedy that abruptly halved entire populations and caused untold suffering, but it also brought about a cultural and economic renewal on a scale never before witnessed. The World the Plague Made is a panoramic history of how the bubonic plague revolutionized labour, trade, and technology and set the stage for Europe's global expansion. In The World the Plague Made: The Black Death and the Rise of Europe (Princeton University Press, 2022) Dr. James Belich takes readers across centuries and continents to shed new light on one of history's greatest paradoxes. Why did Europe's dramatic rise begin in the wake of the Black Death? Belich shows how the plague doubled the per capita endowment of everything even as it decimated the population. Many more people had disposable incomes. Demand grew for silks, sugar, spices, furs, gold, and slaves. Europe expanded to satisfy that demand—and the plague provided the means. Labour scarcity drove more use of waterpower, wind power, and gunpowder. Technologies like water-powered blast furnaces, heavily gunned galleons, and musketry were fast-tracked by plague. A new “crew culture” of “disposable males” emerged to man the guns and galleons. Setting the rise of Western Europe in a global context, Belich demonstrates how the mighty empires of the Middle East and Russia also flourished after the plague, and how European expansion was deeply entangled with the Chinese and other peoples throughout the world. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

HistoryBoiz
The Silesian Uprisings

HistoryBoiz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 91:40


Join us for the complicated and rarely discussed, (in the west of course) but fan requested, Silesian Uprisings!Sources:Jurado, Carlos Caballero, and Ramiro Bujeiro. The German Freikorps: 1918-23. Osprey, 2008. Liulevicius, Vejas Gabriel. History of Eastern Europe: A Captivating Guide to a Shortened History of Russia, Ukraine, Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Moldova, Belarus, and Romania. Captivating History, 2021. Michener, James A. Poland. 1990. “Silesian Uprisings.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., https://www.britannica.com/event/Silesian-Uprisings. Weitz, Eric D. Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy. Princeton University Press, 2018.  ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Daily Stoic
Aristotle on How to Tell a Story Pt. 2

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 23:38 Very Popular


Today's episode features an excerpt from How to Tell a Story: An Ancient Guide to the Art of Storytelling for Writers and Readers translated by Philip Freeman as part of Princeton University Press's Anient Wisdom For Modern Readers series.✉️ Sign up for the Daily Stoic email: https://dailystoic.com/dailyemail

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Democracy Forum 9/16/22: Checks and Balances: What are They? Are They Working?

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 58:52


Host: Ann Luther, League of Women Voters of Maine The mostly volunteer team at the League of Women Voters – Downeast who plan and coordinate this series includes: Martha Dickinson, Starr Gilmartin, Maggie Harling, Ann Luther, Judith Lyles, Wendilee O'Brien, Maryann Ogonowski, Pam Person, Lane Sturtevant, Leah Taylor, Linda Washburn Democracy Forum: Participatory Democracy, encouraging citizens to take an active role in government and politics This month: Checks and Balances: What are They? Are They Working? How the three branches of government check each other: executive, judicial, legislative. Why did it matter to the Framers, and why does it matter to us? Of what importance is mutual and self-regard among the branches: each branch protecting its own institution and backing up the other branches? Is the public one of the checks — with political consequences creating a limit on extremism? Does it seem to be working right now? Why or why not? Guest/s: Andrew Rudalevige, Chair of the Department of Government and Legal Studies, Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government, Bowdoin College Kim Lane Scheppele, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values To learn more about this topic: Post-ROE, the Supreme Court is on a collision course with Democracy | Vanity Fair August 25, 2022 Opinion | The Supreme Court Has Too Much Power and Liberals Are to Blame – POLITICO, July 27, 2022 Most in new poll say US government needs major reforms, complete overhaul | The Hill, July 13, 2022 The Supreme Court's Role in the Degradation of U.S. Democracy | CLC, July 13, 2022 Opinion | How the Founders Intended to Check the Supreme Court's Power – POLITICO, July 3, 2022 How Viktor Orbán Wins | Journal of Democracy, July 2022 Abuses of executive privilege reveal our system of checks and balances is on life support | The Hill October 24, 2021 Executive privilege is killing checks and balances | MichaelLeppert.com October 15, 2021 Checks and balances on war powers — Defense Priorities, April 2, 2021 By Executive Order | Princeton University Press, April 2021 Checks and Balances in a Trump-Era Supreme Court | Brennan Center for Justice, July 10, 2020 Congress Has Lost Its Power Over Trump | The Atlantic, February 4, 2020 The Unconstrained Presidency: Checks and Balances Eroded Long Before Trump | Council on Foreign Relations, August 14, 2018 Congress's Power over Courts: Jurisdiction Stripping and the Rule of Klein | CSR, August 9, 2018 About the host: Ann currently serves as Treasurer of the League of Women Voters of Maine and leads the LWVME Advocacy Team. She served as President of LWVME from 2003 to 2007 and as co-president from 2007-2009. In her work for the League, Ann has worked for greater public understanding of public policy issues and for the League's priority issues in Clean Elections & Campaign Finance Reform, Voting Rights, Ethics in Government, Ranked Choice Voting, and Repeal of Term Limits. Representing LWVME at Maine Citizens for Clean Elections, she served that coalition as co-president from 2006 to 2011. She remains on the board of MCCE and serves as Treasurer. She is active in the LWV-Downeast and hosts their monthly radio show, The Democracy Forum, on WERU FM Community Radio -which started out in 2004 as an recurring special, and became a regular monthly program in 2012. She was the 2013 recipient of the Baldwin Award from the ACLU of Maine for her work on voting rights and elections. She joined the League in 1998 when she retired as Senior Vice President at SEI Investments. Ann was a founder of the MDI Restorative Justice Program, 1999 – 2000, and served on its Executive Board. The post Democracy Forum 9/16/22: Checks and Balances: What are They? Are They Working? first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

New Books in American Studies
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in the History of Science
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in the History of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Road to Now
The Great Exception: The Rise and Fall of the New Deal w/ Jefferson Cowie

The Road to Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:26


The New Deal policies of the 1930s never brought an end to the Great Depression, but by establishing Social Security, ending child labor, and establishing a federal minimum wage, Franklin Roosevelt's administration and their allies in Congress laid the framework for the widespread prosperity of the post-World War II-era. As the gap between the richest and poorest Americans continues to widen at remarkable speed, politicians on the left have called for a return to the New Deal. But it might be better to look elsewhere. In this episode we speak with Jefferson Cowie about his books Capital Moves: RCA's Seventy-Year Quest for Cheap Labor, (Cornell University Press, 1999) & The Great Exception: The New Deal & The Limits of American Politics, (Princeton University Press, 2016). Dr. Jefferson Cowie is James G. Stahlman Professor of History at Vanderbilt University. You can learn more about him and his work at his website, jeffersoncowie.info. This episode originally aired on October 17, 2016 as RTN #24 The New Deal and It's Legacy w/ Jefferson Cowie. This reair was edited by Ben Sawyer.

New Books Network
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Science
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science

New Books in Mathematics
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Mathematics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/mathematics

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Karen Hunger Parshall, "The New Era in American Mathematics, 1920–1950" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 70:22


In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncovers the key players in American mathematics who worked together to effect change. She highlights the educational, professional, philanthropic, and governmental entities that bolstered progress and uncovers the strategies implemented by American mathematicians in their quest for the advancement of knowledge. Through an examination of how the American Mathematical community asserted itself on the international state, The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 shows the way one nation became the focal point for the field. Karen Hunger Parshall is the Commonwealth Professor of History and Mathematics at the University of Virginia. She is the author of James Joseph Sylvester: Jewish Mathematician in a Victorian World and the coauthor of Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century. Marc Goulet is Professor in mathematics and Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

Mixtape: The Podcast
S1E28: Interview with Leah Boustan, Professor at Princeton, Economic Historian

Mixtape: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 69:16


Who is Leah Boustan?Leah Boustan is a professor of economics at Princeton University and this week's guest on The Mixtape with Scott. Her research has to date largely focused on two of the largest demographic events in US history: the Great Migration of African-Americans from the rural South to industrial cities in the North and West in the mid-twentieth century, and a period of mass migration from Europe to the US from 1850-1920. She is author of two books related to both topics:  Competition in the Promised Land (Princeton University Press, 2017) and Streets of Gold: America's Untold Story of Immigrant Success (PublicAffairs, 2022) with Ran Abramitzy. Leah's work with Ran on immigration to the US takes advantage of large digitized records from the Census which they linked together so that they could follow individuals over decades. This allowed them to trace out the fortunes of migrants across multiple waves of the Census to ask and attempt to answer several fundamental questions like:Did immigrants of the past pull themselves up “by their bootstraps” as the stories are often told to us and remembered?Did the children of immigrants move up America's economic ladder as fast as their “peers” — children, in other words, of established residents?Does assimilation today by immigrants happen at a similar or different speed as those in the past?The conversation was enriching for me, as all of my interviews with Leah are. In Leah you see, also a unique story of entrance into economics — through high school debate, not mathematics, where she grew to love studying the nuances of public policy from an objective yet passionate research-oriented point of view. The roads we take through our lives look like a straight line in hindsight but as we've seen with other guests are anything but at the time. Leah became an economist the way she became an economist, but I think it is a story nonetheless that many can identify with. And an article in economics that she thinks about a lot? Goldin and Katz 2002 JPE, “The Power of the Pill: Oral Contraceptives and Women's Career and Marriage Decisions”. Get full access to Scott's Substack at causalinf.substack.com/subscribe

Field & Garden
#172: Bug Talk: Native Bees with Dr. Barb Abraham

Field & Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 33:38 Very Popular


For this edition of "Bug Talk" Lisa and Rhonda are joined by special guest Dr. Barb Abraham, an ecology professor, bee researcher and Chair of the Bee City USA - Hampton steering committee. Today they're talking about native bees. Did you know that you can have an average of 100 different bee species in your yard? And that native bees typically are not aggressive and do not sting? You may have seen some that look like gnats, flies or wasps and not even realized they were actually bees! Learn how you can support your native bee populations by avoiding pesticides, offering a consistent water source, a providing nesting habitat. Recommended Bee Books: All of these are profusely illustrated with stunning photographs... Holm, Heather. 2017. Bees. An identification and native plant forage guide. Pollination Press, LLC. Minnesota. Holm, Heather. 2014. Pollinators of native plants. Pollination Press, LLC. Minnesota Embry, Paige. 2018. Our native bees. Timber Press. Portland, OR. Frey, Kate and Gretchen LeBuhn. 2016. The bee-friendly garden. Ten Speed Press. Berkeley. Wilson, JS and OM Carrill. 2016. The bees in your backyard. Princeton University Press. Princeton and Oxford. Xerces Society. 2016.100 plants to feed the bees. Storey Publishing. North Adams, MA. Xerces Society.2011. Attracting native pollinators. Storey Publishing. North Adams, MA. This one is heavy reading for the avid apiphile, few colored illustrations... Danforth, BN, Minckley, RL, and JL Neff. The solitary bees. Biology, evolution, conservation. Princeton University Press. Princeton and Oxford. Other Links & Mentions Bee City USA - Hampton, VA: Website Facebook The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation Sign up to receive our weekly Farm News! The Field and Garden Podcast is produced by Lisa Mason Ziegler, award-winning author of Vegetables Love Flowers and Cool Flowers, owner of The Gardener's Workshop, Flower Farming School Online, and the publisher of Farmer-Florist School Online and Florist School Online. Watch Lisa's Story and connect with Lisa on social!

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 134: Life in Amber - 50-Million-Year-Old Cordyceps & Other Fossilized Fungi (feat. George Poinar Jr. PhD)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 62:06 Very Popular


Today on Mushroom Hour we are joined by the distinguished and prolific George Poinar, Jr. PhD. George received his Ph.D. in biology from Cornell University and spent most of his career in the Department of Entomology at the University of California at Berkeley before moving to Oregon State University, where he is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology. His interest in the tropics, along with a passion for paleontology, culminated in the book The Amber Forest, co-authored with his wife, Roberta, and published by Princeton University Press. He is also the author of other books, including Life in Amber. In addition, he is a founder of The Amber Institute. He is a pioneer when it comes to studying associations between invertebrates and other organisms in amber. One of his projects was recently all over the news as he discovered a new genus and species of fungal entomoparasite growing out of a fossilized ant – the older mushroom growing from an ant that has ever been found!   TOPICS COVERED:   Young Naturalist Inspired by Walden and Thoreau   Entering Entomology   Research Tours through Southeast AsiaInsect Vectors of Disease-Carrying Parasites in Africa   Insect Diseases in Russia   Pivoting to Vertebrate Parasites in France, Germany & Holland   Ancient History of Insect Pathogens and Their Parasites   The Basics of Amber Preservation   Preparing and Cutting Amber for Examination   Determining the Age of Specimens in Amber   Phylogeny and Ancestry in Family CordycipitaceaeExtracting Genetic Information from Amber Specimens   Meeting Michael Creighton and Jurassic Park Inspirations   Evolutionary Insights from Ancient to Modern Fungi   EPISODE RESOURCES:George Poinar Jr PhD: https://science.oregonstate.edu/directory/george-o-poinar-jr   Family Cordycipitaceae: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordycipitaceae   Richard Korf (Inspiration): https://ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/28593   Rhinoceros Beetles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynastinae   "Laboratory Guide to Insect Pathogens and Parasites": https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4288060-laboratory-guide-to-insect-pathogens-and-parasites   Hermitage Museum (Russia): https://www.hermitagemuseum.org/wps/portal/hermitage/   Hymenaea (Tree Genus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hymenaea   Paleoclaviceps parasiticus (fungus): https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=310964   Allocordyceps baltica (fungus): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1878614621000799   

New Books in Jewish Studies
Emily Michelson, "Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 47:00 Very Popular


Starting in the sixteenth century, Jews in Rome were forced, every Saturday, to attend a hostile sermon aimed at their conversion. Harshly policed, they were made to march en masse toward the sermon and sit through it, all the while scrutinized by local Christians, foreign visitors, and potential converts. In Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance (Princeton University Press, 2022), Dr. Emily Michelson demonstrates how this display was vital to the development of early modern Catholicism. Drawing from a trove of overlooked manuscripts, Dr. Michelson reconstructs the dynamics of weekly forced preaching in Rome. As the Catholic Church began to embark on worldwide missions, sermons to Jews offered a unique opportunity to define and defend its new triumphalist, global outlook. They became a point of prestige in Rome. The city's most important organizations invested in maintaining these spectacles, and foreign tourists eagerly attended them. The title of “Preacher to the Jews” could make a man's career. The presence of Christian spectators, Roman and foreign, was integral to these sermons, and preachers played to the gallery. Conversionary sermons also provided an intellectual veneer to mask ongoing anti-Jewish aggressions. In response, Jews mounted a campaign of resistance, using any means available. Examining the history and content of sermons to Jews over two and a half centuries, Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews argues that conversionary preaching to Jews played a fundamental role in forming early modern Catholic identity. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in History
Emily Michelson, "Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 47:00


Starting in the sixteenth century, Jews in Rome were forced, every Saturday, to attend a hostile sermon aimed at their conversion. Harshly policed, they were made to march en masse toward the sermon and sit through it, all the while scrutinized by local Christians, foreign visitors, and potential converts. In Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance (Princeton University Press, 2022), Dr. Emily Michelson demonstrates how this display was vital to the development of early modern Catholicism. Drawing from a trove of overlooked manuscripts, Dr. Michelson reconstructs the dynamics of weekly forced preaching in Rome. As the Catholic Church began to embark on worldwide missions, sermons to Jews offered a unique opportunity to define and defend its new triumphalist, global outlook. They became a point of prestige in Rome. The city's most important organizations invested in maintaining these spectacles, and foreign tourists eagerly attended them. The title of “Preacher to the Jews” could make a man's career. The presence of Christian spectators, Roman and foreign, was integral to these sermons, and preachers played to the gallery. Conversionary sermons also provided an intellectual veneer to mask ongoing anti-Jewish aggressions. In response, Jews mounted a campaign of resistance, using any means available. Examining the history and content of sermons to Jews over two and a half centuries, Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews argues that conversionary preaching to Jews played a fundamental role in forming early modern Catholic identity. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Emily Michelson, "Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 47:00


Starting in the sixteenth century, Jews in Rome were forced, every Saturday, to attend a hostile sermon aimed at their conversion. Harshly policed, they were made to march en masse toward the sermon and sit through it, all the while scrutinized by local Christians, foreign visitors, and potential converts. In Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance (Princeton University Press, 2022), Dr. Emily Michelson demonstrates how this display was vital to the development of early modern Catholicism. Drawing from a trove of overlooked manuscripts, Dr. Michelson reconstructs the dynamics of weekly forced preaching in Rome. As the Catholic Church began to embark on worldwide missions, sermons to Jews offered a unique opportunity to define and defend its new triumphalist, global outlook. They became a point of prestige in Rome. The city's most important organizations invested in maintaining these spectacles, and foreign tourists eagerly attended them. The title of “Preacher to the Jews” could make a man's career. The presence of Christian spectators, Roman and foreign, was integral to these sermons, and preachers played to the gallery. Conversionary sermons also provided an intellectual veneer to mask ongoing anti-Jewish aggressions. In response, Jews mounted a campaign of resistance, using any means available. Examining the history and content of sermons to Jews over two and a half centuries, Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews argues that conversionary preaching to Jews played a fundamental role in forming early modern Catholic identity. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
Emily Michelson, "Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance" (Princeton UP, 2022)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 47:00


Starting in the sixteenth century, Jews in Rome were forced, every Saturday, to attend a hostile sermon aimed at their conversion. Harshly policed, they were made to march en masse toward the sermon and sit through it, all the while scrutinized by local Christians, foreign visitors, and potential converts. In Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Early Modern Conversion and Resistance (Princeton University Press, 2022), Dr. Emily Michelson demonstrates how this display was vital to the development of early modern Catholicism. Drawing from a trove of overlooked manuscripts, Dr. Michelson reconstructs the dynamics of weekly forced preaching in Rome. As the Catholic Church began to embark on worldwide missions, sermons to Jews offered a unique opportunity to define and defend its new triumphalist, global outlook. They became a point of prestige in Rome. The city's most important organizations invested in maintaining these spectacles, and foreign tourists eagerly attended them. The title of “Preacher to the Jews” could make a man's career. The presence of Christian spectators, Roman and foreign, was integral to these sermons, and preachers played to the gallery. Conversionary sermons also provided an intellectual veneer to mask ongoing anti-Jewish aggressions. In response, Jews mounted a campaign of resistance, using any means available. Examining the history and content of sermons to Jews over two and a half centuries, Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews argues that conversionary preaching to Jews played a fundamental role in forming early modern Catholic identity. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

RADIKAAL
70. Christophe Jaffrelot on Modi's India

RADIKAAL

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 33:06


My guest today is Christophe Jaffrelot, a CERI-CNRS Senior Research Fellow who teaches in three different schools at Sciences Po in Paris. He is a world-leading scholar of Indian politics, from its foreign policy to its political sociology. In 2020, he was elected president of the French Association of Political Science (AFSP), and last year, he published the incredibly detailed but still very readable book Modi's India: Hindu Nationalism and the Rise of Ethnic Democracy with Princeton University Press. Today, we will speak about this terrifying study of contemporary India. You can follow Christophe Jaffrelot on Twitter at @jaffrelotc.

New Books in History
Adrienne Edgar, "Intermarriage and the Friendship of Peoples: Ethnic Mixing in Soviet Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 29:43


Adrienne Edgar's Intermarriage and the Friendship of Peoples—Ethnic Mixing in Soviet Central Asia (Cornell University Press, 2021) is an outstanding study of the evolution of intermarriage practices in Kazakhstan and Tajikistan across the Soviet era and beyond. Based on substantive oral history research work, plus extensive engagement with published and unpublished Soviet sources, the book tells an intriguing story, one that delves into the ever intriguing process of ethnic mixing. As a phenomenon that transcended revolution, war, de-Stalinisation, and independence in a remote part of the Soviet Union, intermarriage becomes a vehicle for a wider argument focusing on the racialization of identities. Edgar's engaging prose engage with wider process, including the inexorable involution of Soviet internationalism and the rise of primordialism, top describe how mixed couples and families in Kazakhstan and Tajikistan were painfully affected by the growth of ethnic primordialism and by the tensions between the national and supranational projects in the Soviet Union. Adrienne Edgar is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she works on the history of the Soviet Union, especially the history of Central Asia in the Soviet period. She is the author of Tribal Nation: The Making of Soviet Turkmenistan (Princeton University Press, 2006). Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Adrienne Edgar, "Intermarriage and the Friendship of Peoples: Ethnic Mixing in Soviet Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 29:43


Adrienne Edgar's Intermarriage and the Friendship of Peoples—Ethnic Mixing in Soviet Central Asia (Cornell University Press, 2021) is an outstanding study of the evolution of intermarriage practices in Kazakhstan and Tajikistan across the Soviet era and beyond. Based on substantive oral history research work, plus extensive engagement with published and unpublished Soviet sources, the book tells an intriguing story, one that delves into the ever intriguing process of ethnic mixing. As a phenomenon that transcended revolution, war, de-Stalinisation, and independence in a remote part of the Soviet Union, intermarriage becomes a vehicle for a wider argument focusing on the racialization of identities. Edgar's engaging prose engage with wider process, including the inexorable involution of Soviet internationalism and the rise of primordialism, top describe how mixed couples and families in Kazakhstan and Tajikistan were painfully affected by the growth of ethnic primordialism and by the tensions between the national and supranational projects in the Soviet Union. Adrienne Edgar is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she works on the history of the Soviet Union, especially the history of Central Asia in the Soviet period. She is the author of Tribal Nation: The Making of Soviet Turkmenistan (Princeton University Press, 2006). Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network