Podcasts about humanistic

Philosophical school of thought emphasizing the value of human beings and focusing on rationalism and empiricism

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Best podcasts about humanistic

Latest podcast episodes about humanistic

Kol Hadash Humanistic Congregation Podcasts
Season 12: Episode 2 Safety and Fear

Kol Hadash Humanistic Congregation Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 17:25


High Holidays 2022What do we do when it feels like the world is falling apart? Can Jewish culture and Humanistic values be relevant, even inspirational, in moments of crisis? And how can we find shared purpose and action in our personal diversity?[iTunes] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in iTunes.[RSS MP3] Add the Kol Hadash Podcast feed (in MP3 format)Listen (MP3)

Kol Hadash Humanistic Congregation Podcasts
Season 12: Episode 1 Genesis 4

Kol Hadash Humanistic Congregation Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 6:35


High Holidays 2022What do we do when it feels like the world is falling apart? Can Jewish culture and Humanistic values be relevant, even inspirational, in moments of crisis? And how can we find shared purpose and action in our personal diversity?[iTunes] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in iTunes.[RSS MP3] Add the Kol Hadash Podcast feed (in MP3 format)Listen (MP3)

Pauza de Bine
106: Cum creezi sens și armonie în cariera ta, cu Mihai Zânt

Pauza de Bine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 44:16


Azi te invit să îți pui sub semnul întrebării convingerile legate de carieră. Partenerul meu de conversație este Mihai Zânt - Executive Coach, Trainer & Partener Co-Fondator în Careershift.ro și Humanistic. Vorbim despre credințe limitative, blocaje, sabotori, blândețe, pauze și sens în carieră și demontăm împreună și mituri, inclusiv pe cel de work-life balance. Explorând ideea de work from anywhere, Mihai s-a conectat tocmai din Bali pentru conversația noastră, una care a fost ca o pauză de bine pentru mine și care vreau să cred că va fi un timp valoros pentru tine. Mulțumim că ne ajuți cu distribuirea acestui episod! Cartea menționată de Mihai în episod: ”Four Thousand Weeks” - Oliver Burkeman Pe Mihai îl poți găsi ușor aici: - https://mihaizant.com - https://careershift.ro/

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
The Backlash Against ESG With Jerry Bowyer

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 25:16


You may not know it, but there's a political and ideological war raging inside your investment portfolio. In recent years, a tiny but very vocal minority has sought to bully financial institutions into adopting their views of culture and politics. But it seems they've gone too far. We'll talk about that with economist Jerry Bowyer today. WHAT IS ESG? ESG is an acronym for Environmental, Social, and Governance investing, ESG, and it's being exploited by the minority you mentioned. The Wall Street Journal recently ran a story about a letter addressed to the money management giant Blackrock by the Attorney General of Arizona and 18 of his counterparts in other states. This comes after a series of actions taken by state-level financial officers questioning Blackrock and other asset managers as well as rating agencies for their heavy-handed imposition of ESG. They were imposing their views of ESG on state investment assets and even on the states themselves. Add to that the world's richest man, and former ESG darling, Elon Musk, calling the whole thing a scam, and pushback from Republican senators, governors, and other hopefuls against the politicization of the world of finance, and it adds up to a powerful reaction to a movement which had been seen as the inevitable future of the industry. BACKLASH AGAINST ESG MOVEMENT Bowyer says the backlash against the ESG movement is important because that sense of inevitability was a key source of ESG's power. The message was fall in line with the inevitable march of history or get left behind. When investors questioned the prudence of imposing political criteria on financial decisions, they were assured that it was, indeed, prudent because this was where the world was going. Eventually, the governments of the world would wake up to the reality of climate change and outlaw fossil fuels, leaving them as stranded assets sitting on company balance sheets. As social consciousness inevitably rose, anti-social behavior would be punished in the form of reputational risk and eventually the loss of the company's social license to do business. So don't take a risk, do the safe thing, and fall into line now. But a populist revolt stubbornly held on, not just to God and guns, but also to fossil fuels, color-blindness, viewpoint diversity, parental rights in education, and the sanctity of life. Facts are stubborn things, but our ruling class now has to learn that stubborn people are also a fact. Those who stubbornly hold fast to things which the anointed can't believe still exist are aware, angry, and registered to vote (and have the IDs to prove it) know it. And dozens of attorneys general, treasurers, senators, and governors know it. This means that the chief selling point, risk management, has suddenly become the chief objection. ESG is now a controversial political risk. How is the ESG crowd reacting to this backlash? The controversy is now so undeniable, Bowyer says, that the ESG industry is lashing back at the backlash, the denial of which is essential to the premise of that industry. As You Sow, one of the non-profit clearinghouses for the industry, posted a quote on social media acknowledging that the acronym ESG as a construct may have lost some of its luster and has been explaining to the shrinking faithful that the reason why there's been such a backlash against ESG is that it It's extremely effective! So, the new party line is basically, We're losing so much because we win so much. The unspun version is that ideology pushed the movement beyond the investing public's tolerance point and the shareholders and the voters are correcting the imbalance. Things have gotten so bad that they haven't just alienated the populist right, they've alienated some pretty close former allies, for example Tesla Inc. The green giant of industry had been an ESG colossus until Elon Musk failed to keep pace with the inevitable march of history and came out of the closet as a free speech absolutist and Twitter-prisoner public defender. At the recent Tesla Annual meeting, the shareholder base of an electric car and solar panel company jeered as activists presented ideologically charged public statements, cheered when the moderator stepped in to cut the speeches short and then went on to vote down the slate of ideological ballot proposals. Did I mention that this was Tesla? If they've lost Tesla, they've lost. THE WAR ISN'T OVER But the war isn't over. Even if the whole ESG movement goes down in flames, the people behind it are always looking for something and they never give up. Let me explain it like this: Humanistic philosophy can deny, but not ignore, the reality of human sin. This means the people who espouse it need it to find other ways to purge their own feelings of guilt. Social justice investing stepped in as their form of atonement for the sin of being a capitalist. But the thing is, and it's critical to understand this: Whatever form of atonement they come up with in the future will never be complete because the demands for purity keep escalating. Americans should revolt against this new form of authoritarianism, but only a Christian worldview can truly replace it. (RW) Economist Jerry Bowyer is the author of The Maker Versus the Takers: What Jesus Really Said About Social Justice and Economics and you can read Jerry's weekly insights on the economy at Vident.com. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● What is the best way to manage an IRA at age 64? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

The New Mind Creator
Ep #248 Dr. Alison Horstmeyer Is A Globally Recognized Leadership Development Consultant & Humanistic Reseacher Talks Emotional Intelligence, Core Values & The Importance Of Curiousity

The New Mind Creator

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 27:54


Dr. Alison Horstmeyer is a globally recognized leadership development consultant, executive coach, and humanistic researcher. Her research focuses on curiosity and associated mental, emotional, and motivational attributes. Alison is considered one of the pioneering practitioners in workplace curiosity. You can find her work in various business publications including Forbes, Chief Learning Officer and CEOWORLD Magazine, in Harvard Business Review Press, and in peer-reviewed journals including The Journal of Humanistic Psychology, The Journal of Organizational Change Management, and An International Journal: Development and Learning in Organizations publications. Through her consulting practice, Alison regularly works with clients focused on multifaceted leadership, healthy team dynamics, and continuous innovation. Examples of organizations Alison has worked with include Hulu, Yahoo!, Google, Marvell Technology, TransDigm Group, Vanguard, Stanford Health Care, among others. Alison also serves as adjunct faculty for USC Marshall School of Business Executive Education and has the unique distinction of serving as the inaugural Research Fellow appointed to the USC Annenberg Center for Third Space Thinking, the innovative educational center of the #1 communications university in the United States. She believes we each are innately curious, we just tend to stifle it away. www.dralisonh.com Alison Horstmeyer, PhD, MBA ALISON HORSTMEYER PhD, MBA CONTACT Email: alison@intrinsicuriosity.com Website: www.dralisonh.com LinkedIn: in/dralisonhorstmeyer --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/new-mind-creator/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/new-mind-creator/support

Learn Polish Podcast
#271 Nowy rok szkolny - New school year

Learn Polish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 8:50


Learn Polish in a fun way with short Episodes. On this episode we talk about  Nowy rok szkolny - New school year.     Find all Graphics to freely Download https://www.facebook.com/learnpolishpodcast     Start Your Own Podcast + Social Media & Donations https://bio.link/podcaster     All other Social Media & Donations https://linktr.ee/learnpolish   Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0ZOzgwHvZzEfQ8iRBfbIAp   Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/learn-polish-podcast/id1462326275   To listen to all Episodes + The Speaking Podcast + The Meditation Podcast + Business Opportunities please visit http://roycoughlan.com/ ===================================== 1st Episodes https://learnpolish.podbean.com/page/34/ ===================================== Now also on   Bitchute https://www.bitchute.com/channel/pxb8OvSYf4w9/   Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9SeBSyrxEMtEUlQNjG3vTA   To get Skype lessons from Kamila or her team please visits http://polonuslodz.com/  -------------------------------------------------- In this Episode we discuss:   Nowy rok szkolny - New school year   We wrześniu dzieci wracają do szkoły - In September children go back to school   Koniec wakacji - End of summer   Lubiłeś chodzić do szkoły? - Did you like going to school?   Przedmioty szkolne - School subjects   Język polski, angielski, matematyka, historia - Polish, English, mathematics, history   Jaki był Twój ulubiony przedmiot szkolny? - What was your favorite school subject?   Lubiłem biologię, matematykę - I liked biology, math   Umysł humanistyczny - Humanistic mind   Umysł ścisły - Strict mind   Co jest w tornistrze? - What's in the schoolbag?   Książki, zeszyty, piórnik - Books, notebooks, pencil case   Co jest w piórniku? - What's in the pencil case?   Długopisy, kredki, ołówek, gumka, flamastry, drugie śniadanie - Pens, crayons, pencil, eraser, felt-tip pens, lunch   Ocena - Mark   Byłem dobrą uczennicą - I was a good student --------------------------------------------------------------- If you would like Skype lessons from kamila or her team please visit http://polonuslodz.com/   All Polish Episodes / Speaking Podcast / Meditation Podcast / Awakening Podcast/ Polish Property & business Offers - http://roycoughlan.com/   All Social Media + Donations https://linktr.ee/learnpolish   Start your own Podcast    https://bio.link/podcaster   Please Share with your friends / Subscribe / Comment and give a 5* Review  - Thank You (Dziekuje Bardzo :) )   #learnpolish #polishpodcast #learnpolishpodcast

B The Change Georgia with Nathan Stuck
A Path To Empathy And Humanistic Problem Solving

B The Change Georgia with Nathan Stuck

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 24:41


Looking for a path to empathy and being a more purpose-driven leader who is using their business as a force for good? Listen to this conversation with Jared Simmons, guided by Nathan Stuck. RESOURCES RELATED TO THIS EPISODE Follow Jared on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaredsimmons Visit https://outlastllc.com Follow Outlast on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/outlastconsulting/  CREDITS Theme Music

TonioTimeDaily
I'm a Secular Buddhist, a Humanistic Buddhist, and I am a Buddhist Humanist

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 50:47


"A Brief History of Secular Buddhism For 2,500 years: Buddhist meditation was practiced by monks—these practices are older than Christianity and Islam. Meditation was not generally taught to lay people. 19th century: Buddhism came to the attention of Western intellectuals 1890's-1950's: Buddhist meditation was first taught to laypeople en-mass: Burmese monks: Ledi Sayadaw, Webu Sayadaw and Saya Thetgyi taught meditation to lay meditation teachers such as Sayaguyi U Ba Khin. 1960's: Sayagyi U Ba Khin teaches S.N. Goenka and after 1976 Goenka creates hundreds of secular meditation centers that teach Vipassana a form of mindfulness meditation and proto-Secular Buddhism. 1979: Jon Kabat-Zin founded the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program at the University of Massachusetts to treat the chronically ill. 2011: Stephen Batchelor published the book “Buddhist Atheist.” Small local and online Secular Buddhist groups form around the world 2015: Mark W. Gura co-founded the Association of Mindfulness Meditation and Secular Buddhism (AMMSB.org), the first national nonprofit dedicated to Secular Buddhism in the U.S. and he published “Atheist Meditation.” 2016: The Atheist Alliance of America started to inform the atheist community about Secular Buddhism. 2016: With the help of Peter Boghossian and Anthony Magnabosco, the AMMSB adopted the use of Street Epistemology to introduce Secular Buddhism to traditional Buddhists. 2017: With the help of Rebecca Hale and Roy Speckhardt the American Humanist Association and the AMMSB collaborated to further inform the secular humanist and atheist community about Secular Buddhism." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Chat with Leaders Podcast
A Path To Empathy And Humanistic Problem Solving

Chat with Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 24:41


Looking for a path to empathy and being a more purpose-driven leader who is using their business as a force for good? Listen to this conversation with Jared Simmons, guided by Nathan Stuck. RESOURCES RELATED TO THIS EPISODE Follow Jared on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaredsimmons Visit https://outlastllc.com Follow Outlast on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/outlastconsulting/  CREDITS Theme Music

Douglas Jacoby Podcast
A Tour Through John, Lesson 14

Douglas Jacoby Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 21:25


For additional notes and resources check out Douglas' website.6:37 Everything that the Father gives me will come to me, and anyone who comes to me I will never drive away; 38 for I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of him who sent me. 39 And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day. 40 This is indeed the will of my Father, that all who see the Son and believe in him may have eternal life; and I will raise them up on the last day.”41 Then the Jews began to complain about him because he said, “I am the bread that came down from heaven.” 42 They were saying, “Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How can he now say, ‘I have come down from heaven'?” 43 Jesus answered them, “Do not complain among yourselves. 44 No one can come to me unless drawn by the Father who sent me; and I will raise that person up on the last day. 45 It is written in the prophets, ‘And they shall all be taught by God.' Everyone who has heard and learned from the Father comes to me.The Jews could not conceive how Jesus could be both man and God (v.42). This classic question in theology was the focus of debate for two centuries in the early church!This concept was hard for fleshly man to accept.For most people, on "channel 2," spiritual bread (a "channel 1" concept) was hard to comprehend.The notion of eating flesh and (especially) drinking blood would have been shocking to an orthodox Jew.The grumbling is like that of the Jews in the desert (e.g. Exodus 16-17; Numbers 14; 16).Jesus tells them to stop grumbling (v.43), and adds several vital truths.We must be drawn to God (v.44). This does not necessarily support Calvinism.  12:32 shows that this takes place through the power of the Cross.God will force no one, though the force of the Holy Spirit will transform anyone open to the truth. (See also 7:17.) I compare it to waterskiing. The boat "draws" you, although never without your permission.2 Thessalonians 2:13-15 is helpful in explaining the biblical doctrine of election, as is Luke 5:31-32.31 Jesus answered, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick; 32 I have come to call not the righteous but sinners to repentance.”13 But we must always give thanks to God for you, brothers and sisters beloved by the Lord, because God chose you as the first fruits for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and through belief in the truth. 14 For this purpose he called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. 15 So then, brothers and sisters, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by our letter.For a critique of Calvinistic predestination, click here.We will be taught by God (v.45), as Isaiah 54:13 had prophesied. (The implication is that Jesus is God.)Faith is essential for everlasting life (v.47).46 Not that anyone has seen the Father except the one who is from God; he has seen the Father. 47 Very truly, I tell you, whoever believes has eternal life. 48 I am the bread of life. 49 Your ancestors ate the manna in the wilderness, and they died. 50 This is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. 51 I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.”52 The Jews then disputed among themselves, saying, “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?” 53 So Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. 54 Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; 55 for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. 56 Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them. 57 Just as the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me. 58 This is the bread that came down from heaven, not like that which your ancestors ate, and they died. But the one who eats this bread will live forever.” 59 He said these things while he was teaching in the synagogue at Capernaum.This message was taught by Jesus in the synagogue of Capernaum.The capacity of the structure would have limited the crowd to the hundreds -- not the thousands, as in Luke 12:1.Note: The early church ruled that Christians must not ingest blood (Council of Jerusalem, Acts 15).60 When many of his disciples heard it, they said, “This teaching is difficult; who can accept it?” 61 But Jesus, being aware that his disciples were complaining about it, said to them, “Does this offend you? 62 Then what if you were to see the Son of Man ascending to where he was before? 63 It is the spirit that gives life; the flesh is useless. The words that I have spoken to you are spirit and life. 64 But among you there are some who do not believe.” For Jesus knew from the first who were the ones that did not believe, and who was the one that would betray him. 65 And he said, “For this reason I have told you that no one can come to me unless it is granted by the Father.”"This is a hard teaching" (v.60) refers to everything from verse 35 onward. This is the very response of men and women even today who find undiluted Christianity too inconvenient for their lifestyles.Jesus knew this message was offensive to some (v.61), yet never waters it down. Rather, he asks us whether we are willing to keep following him.Jesus' ascension (40 days after Pentecost) would prove that he spoke the truth, and that these words must not be compromised.People tend to serve their own interests, attempting to work their way to God on their own terms. This is the flesh. Yet without openness to the Spirit, we gain nothing. Humanistic religion is ultimately worthless.Jesus' words bring life (v.63).Those who did not believe were known to Jesus from the beginning (v.64).They were not enabled by the Father (v.65) because they did not accept Jesus and his message.God's sovereignty does not override free will, and yet he knows all our thoughts and actions -- past, present, and future..66 Because of this many of his disciples turned back and no longer went about with him. 67 So Jesus asked the twelve, “Do you also wish to go away?” 68 Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom can we go? You have the words of eternal life. 69 We have come to believe and know that you are the Holy One of God." 70 Jesus answered them, “Did I not choose you, the twelve? Yet one of you is a devil.” 71 He was speaking of Judas son of Simon Iscariot, for he, though one of the twelve, was going to betray him.Then comes the mass defection.When the majority of the crowd finally reject the demands of discipleship and depart (v.66) -- unless this is describing a different occasion -- hundreds were walking away from Jesus.The crowds who wanted to make Jesus king by force (6:15) vanish when he shows that his kingdom is not of this world.And he did nothing to try to bring them back! (No P.R. expert was brought in to make the gospel message more appealing.)Those who have heard Jesus' voice know that there is nowhere else to go!And yet Judas left (vv.70-71). Every generation of the church is called to keep the faith of the apostles, and not join the error of Judas.Peter's response (v.68) are words many of us have felt when following the Lord has been difficult: "To whom shall we go?..."Judas is described as "a devil" (vv.70-71). While there was still (theoretically) hope for him at this point, in time he would cross the point of no return; Satan would "enter" him (Luke 22:3)Have I ever been tempted to walk away from the Lord? If yes, what prevented me? Am I regularly feeding my faith so that when the going gets tough, I am able to resist unproductive and irrational thoughts.

The Word Alive
Not Ashamed

The Word Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022


Today Pastor Mark continues our sermon series in Romans focusing on the single verse, 1:16. Consider with us the implications of the gospel and how it might make us ashamed because we don't want to offend; don't want to invite opposition; don't want to taint our images; or don't really believe it. Let us rest on the gospel being the power of God for salvation.

the Emotional Clearing Process
Self-Therapy, Taking Responsibility, Overcoming Compulsiveness

the Emotional Clearing Process

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 24:00


Suppressed feelings are the main factor that prevent us from moving forward into greater fulfillment. What is a suppressed feeling? How do suppressed feelings become projected? Feelings are where the power is; thoughts have little power. Releasing suppressed feelings is the main focus in Humanistic (pre-CBT) psychology. Equating the emotional suppressed subconscious to the Eastern concept of Karma. The importance of and how to drop blame and take responsibility for your experience. Learning to recognize compulsive behavior.  A mini-emotional clearing process session.

Healing for Healers
45 - Guest Episode - Vulnerability, self-acceptance and forgiveness - with Marie Byrne

Healing for Healers

Play Episode Play 43 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 69:47


Marie Byrne is one of the strongest people I know. It takes guts to leave a corporate job in the city and move to a farmhouse in the middle of the country and set up a holistic centre. Marie has done this, and so much more. We talk about her journey to creating Glosna House, and from there go deep into the process of self-care, how to listen to ourselves at that deeper level, and how to be with the disappointment and grief from the past (more than) two years. We are all works in progress, the more we accept all of the parts of ourselves, the better we can accept and understand others. I truly hope you find something in our conversation that touches you.About Marie: Marie is a qualified Humanistic & Integrative Psychotherapist & also is the Glosna House Founder. She is a fully accredited member of The Irish Association of Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapists. Marie creates & facilitates weekly support groups, meditation classes & workshops encouraging personal growth, self acceptance and letting go.Before qualifying as a psychotherapist, Marie spent a large proportion of her career within the communication industry, in sales management and training positions. She worked for AIB, 2020 Logistics, Vodafone, Irish Broadband & The Sitel Corporation to name a few.Marie works in an integrative, humanistic and trans-personal way with clients, honouring all parts of the person, emotionally, physically, mentally and spiritually. She incorporates creative expression into her work and believes that each person has the ability to heal themselves and that self acceptance is key to bringing about positive change.Website: https://glosnahouse.com/Social Media: https://www.instagram.com/glosnahouse/

Philosophy for our times
Is nature the new god? | Peter Sjöstedt-Hughes, Tim Palmer and Melanie Challenger

Philosophy for our times

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 42:41 Very Popular


Should we see nature as a divine source, or will doing so lead to self-annihilation? Looking for a link we mentioned? It's here: https://linktr.ee/philosophyforourtimesFrom Greece's Gaia to the Hindu Prithvi, many cultures have seen the Earth as a divine being. Christianity and Western culture however removed god from nature deriding such outlooks as 'pagan'. The earth was recast as a resource for humans, to be conquered, settled and tamed. Now it seems the tides may be changing again. Rivers and rainforests are being given legal rights and some philosophers go further arguing that the planets of the solar system should too. Nature it would seem is the new god.Might re-embracing Mother Earth be just what we need to prevent environmental catastrophe and destruction of society? Or is the return to the gods of nature a dangerous step that undermines human goals and values and threatens a return to superstition and fate?Psychedelic philosopher Peter Sjöstedt-Hughes, internationally-renowned climate scientist Tim Palmer, and author-broadcaster-podcaster Melanie Challenger test each other's beliefs about nature and god. Hosted by philosopher Hilary LawsonThere are thousands of big ideas to discover at IAI.tv – videos, articles, and courses waiting for you to explore. Find out more: https://iai.tv/podcast-offers?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=shownotes&utm_campaign=the-oldest-godsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU206: ARTIST, ACTIVIST, ART THERAPIST MELISSA DIAZ ON COMMUNITY BUILDING OPEN HOUSE BK

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 71:45


Episode 206 of Rendering Unconscious Podcast. Melissa Diaz is an artist, activist and a licensed, registered, board-certified art therapist. She holds a BFA in Painting from The University of Central Florida, an MPS in Art Therapy & Creativity Development from Pratt Institute and a certificate in Integrated Mental Health/Addiction Treatment. Melissa has 10 years of experience as a Creative Arts Therapist, working as a primary therapist, group therapist and program assistant director. She has utilized art therapy in a variety of settings, including inpatient and outpatient mental health, family shelters, schools and museums. Through these experiences, Melissa has had the opportunity to support, individuals experiencing difficulties with depression, anxiety, trauma, mental illness, developmental disorders, addiction, familial issues, life transitions, and stigmatization. Melissa practices an eclectic art therapy approach, utilizing Humanistic, Attachment, and Behavioral frameworks, tailoring each therapeutic experience to meet the client or group where they are at. Throughout all her work, she weaves in mindfulness practice and self-compassion. In addition to her therapeutic practice, Melissa founded Open House BK (est. 2010), a Brooklyn-based, community arts initiative that provides affordable pop-up events, emerging artist exhibitions, and therapeutic workshops. Open House strives to shed light on the arts and community as integral for social justice, personal healing and progress. https://www.instagram.com/openhousebk/ https://www.instagram.com/m_diaz_art/ Donate to Open House BK to help them become a New York State continuing education provider. https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=NKUW798V4LA8S&fbclid=IwAR3Db3_Ok0x_70Uk11Uc5TEN4qWWij0Zy07cJuChQr-OUdjZkJSH0-zw72o This discussion available to view at YouTube: https://youtu.be/xpVUd74vHdU Rendering Unconscious Podcast is hosted by psychoanalyst Dr. Vanessa Sinclair who interviews psychoanalysts, psychologists, scholars, creative arts therapists, writers, poets, philosophers, artists & other intellectuals about their process, work, world events, the current state of mental health care, politics, culture, the arts & more. Vanessa Sinclair, Psy.D. is a psychoanalyst based in Sweden, who works internationally. If you enjoy what we're doing, please support the podcast at www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl For more info visit: www.drvanessasinclair.net www.trapart.net www.renderingunconscious.org The song at the end of the episode is “Let Her In” from the album “Night of the Hunter” by Vanessa Sinclair and Pete Murphy available from Highbrow Lowlife: https://vanessasinclairpetemurphy.bandcamp.com Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson for the intro and outro music for RU Podcast. https://www.carlabrahamsson.com Image: Art by Melissa Diaz https://www.melissadiazart.com

Energetically You
Inviting Growth and Healing Through the Creative Arts and Self Expression with Michalla Bohon

Energetically You

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 40:24


Michalla Bohon is a Humanistic and Existential Registered Clinical Mental Health Counseling Intern, Expressive Arts Therapy Intern, Certified Life Purpose Coach, & Past Life Regression Coach, Meditation Practitioner, Energy Healer, and HeartMath Therapist located in sunny Florida.    Michalla is an author, inspirational speaker, the founder and former CEO of A Home 4 Art , and the creator of The Healing Arts, LLC and Barrie Patch Books. She is an online course creator, and a game designer for youth. She is a former Disney entertainer, robot handler, voice-over actress, commercial model, party planner, professional singer, and foster care worker.    Michalla has been featured in Inspiring Lives Magazine, on the Kind Army Podcast, on The Fierce Women Project, on Episode 2 of The CoLab Series with Kristen Kish, in the May 2022 issue of Transformation Coaching Magazine, and various local news and radio sources for her current work and aspirations.   Michalla holds a bachelor's degree in both Human Developmental Psychology and Creative Writing from Eckerd College, as well as a master's in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from the University of the Cumberlands. Michalla is currently working on completing her second master's in Creative Literature from Harvard University and hopes to obtain a PhD in Expressive Therapies in the future. Connect with Michalla @Michalla.Brianna Instagram and @michallabrianna on TikTok   www.thehealingarts.life https://www.udemy.com/course/transformation-through-creative-expression-meditation/ https://manifestinginspiration.teachable.com/p/transformation-through-creative-expression-meditation Connect with Megan  Instagram LinkedIn Work with Megan Swan https://www.meganswanwellness.com

Healing to Happy
Ep. 22. Overcoming Social Anxiety Post Pandemic And Creative Expression For Trauma With Michalla Bohon

Healing to Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 51:08


Michalla Bohon (@michalla.brianna) is a Humanistic and Existential Registered Clinical Mental Health Counseling Intern, Expressive Arts Therapy Intern, Certified Life Purpose Coach, & Past Life Regression Coach, Meditation Practitioner, Energy Healer, and HeartMath Therapist (and one of the coolest people I've interviewed thus far). I am so excited for ya'll. Let us know what you think over on Instagram @healingtohappy or @itslaurapatriciamartin If you're feeling the pull to jump into our Summer of Bold Love Bundle, you can find that here.

The Coaching Podcast
#103: Dr Pat Williams: I Call Coaching Snorkeling

The Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 51:44


Dr Pat Williams is the Guru of emotional nakedness! Psychologist, turned professional Coach and founder of The Institute for Life Coach Training, Dr Pat waxes lyrical on the familiar questions posed by Emma, and delivers some 'edgy questions' of his own in return. Prepare yourself for memorable metaphors; I call coaching snorkeling, the coach as explorer, I'm like a sheep in wolves' clothing and getting naked; be your authentic self, just don't get naked with everybody! Dr Pat's brother (lawyer) said to him once:"This coaching profession is interesting. You get paid for asking questions, that neither you, nor your client, know the answer to, and I get paid for asking questions that I already know the answer to as a lawyer." Discover why Dr Pat is willing to be comfortable not knowing all the answers!! What's next, in this rapid-fire episode; Vegemite; What's your take? 1:18 Great Coaching Moment: Here to ask the questions that others don't 2:00 Coaching Moment on the flipside: hired because of my laugh! 3:45 Sliding Doors: I'm no longer a psychologist - I'm a coach! 6:25 Metaphor of life: Explorers 8:10 What makes a great coach? 9:40 Expert Witness: A willingness to be comfortable not knowing. 10:54 We're not a guru! What did the inspirational student say to the guru? 11:55 What's that one question that sparks your curiosity? 12:25 Work Life Balance Myth: We are in a constant state of motion - balance is only a fleeting moment. 16:35 Concept of Adaptability 17:40 What would be a question, that I could ask you now, that would make a difference? 18:22 What's next? 18:50 Normalise Living: Exploring the moment 20:00 Experiences that Inform 21:20 Think out loud with a committed listener. 23:19 I Call Coaching Snorkeling - just under the surface, there's a different perspective 24:30 Getting Naked - Be your authentic self, just don't get naked with everybody! 25:14 What's something you don't share with people? 29:35 Edgy Questions 31:07 The Power of Eight - Attention to Intention 34:53(Note: learn more here about Lynne McTaggart) How do you set an intention? 38:00 We had to go there: Golf – your brain doesn't understand “don't hit it in the lake!” 38:00 “Learn what you're learning, while you're learning it.” Timothy Gallwey 46:00 Have a self-reflecting practice. 50:00 https://www.lifecoachtraining.com/ Dr Patrick Williams, Ed.D., MCC, is founder of The Institute for Life Coach Training, the first-of-its-kind training institute that specializes in training psychotherapists, psychologists, counselors and helping professionals in building a successful coaching practice. He is a licensed psychologist who began executive coaching in 1990 with Hewlett Packard, IBM and Kodak. He joined Coach U and was an International Coach Federation founding member. Dr. Pat is a past ICF board member and past president of ACTO, (Association of Coach Training Organizations) and honorary VP of the International Society for Coaching Psychology He co-authored Therapist as Coach: Transforming Your Practice and Total Life Coaching: 50+ Life Lessons, Skills, and Techniques to Enhance your Practice and Your life. His best-selling book (with Diane Menendez), is Becoming a Professional Life Coach: Lessons from the Institute for Life Coach Training, and he co-edited Law and Ethics of Coaching, used at many academic institutions and training schools. Pat's background education is in Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology, with specialized training in Psychosynthesis. He has been a leader in the field of professional coaching and speaks worldwide. His newest book, Getting Naked: On Emotional Transparency at the Right Time, the Right Place and with the Right Person is available on Amazon and audiobooks.

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
Humanistic Marketing & Brand Activism -- Justin Foster & Emily Soccorsy // Root + River

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 17:09


In our first episode with Justin and Emily of Root + River, we discussed how businesses execute spirituality in their branding efforts, differentiation around category design, and the impact of getting the language right first in your brand narrative. We also talked about the process of spiritual enlightenment from a business perspective and its connection with building confidence which is the ultimate attractor in branding. Show NotesConnect With:Justin Foster: Website // LinkedInEmily Soccorsy: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // Newsletter // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MILLENIALS SEEKING WISDOM
Walking away from Family Business to Build Your Empire with Angela Santi

MILLENIALS SEEKING WISDOM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:49


Apply For Be Uncommon If You Can Mastermind: https://www.christiandevans.com/mastermind-now55153817 ------------------------------------------------- Italian by birth and cosmopolitan by vocation, Angela is the one-of-a-kind Dolce Vita Leadership and Lifestyle Designer for ultra-high performers and global business leaders. She is fiercely protective of her craft - the art that is the science behind the good life. As such, she has pioneered the Four Pillars of Dolce Vita life mastery model. Working privately with a select group of elite business owners and executives, her Mediterranean-infused methodology ascends today's high flyers to unprecedented levels of success while living Le Dolce Vita (the signature Italian lifestyle), through her bespoke best-life blueprint, a transformational implementation of daily business and personal routines and habits falls effortlessly into place.Humanistic by nature, Angela's love for people initially led her to 20+ years in HR and Organizational Development. Angela believes that even those who have achieved what others have defined for them as the highest levels of success deserve to truly, deeply, love - and live - their one life to its fullest.She believes in a world where successful and lighthearted entrepreneurs create a top-down revolution, empowering every single person that works with them to do the same, and create a new culture of the workplace. Connect with Angela Santi: https://www.linkedin.com/in/angelasanti/ https://angelasanti.it/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What is Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast and Why is Everyone Talking About it? __________ Get Mentored by Christian D Evans: www.christiandevans.com __________ You've probably heard about Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast by now. It seems like everyone is talking about it. So what exactly is Christian D Evans Podcast? And is it even worth the hype? Well friends, I'm answering all of your questions in this Podcast Section. I'm going to tell you everything you need to know about Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast, so be sure to check it out! __________ RESOURCES & LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS VIDEO: Personally Coached by Christian D Evans - APPLY HERE: https://www.christiandevans.com/ninja-marketer46592986 __________ BUSINESS/SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS: FREE $10 Million Dollar Training from $10M/yr CEO: https://www.christiandevans.com/10-million-ceo-explains53321492 “How to impact the world as a Missionary? Ben & Colette Interview”: https://youtu.be/glfpJpL2oaA “Are Your Limiting Beliefs Stopping You from Achieving Your Goals?”: https://youtu.be/ZnNiZGU5YoA “How To Unleash your Potential with Carol Edwards”: https://youtu.be/ZfrIySHr2jA __________ CONNECT WITH ME: TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZTdujUXWv/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/evansandfamily/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christian_d_evans/?hl=en Journey with Christian Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/5BecmOVFSTLB1J08P3INSB?si=rUDkdD4EQ4yGyi9baaKwbQ #Master your life #Taking charge #Christiandevans #journeywithchristiandevans #destiny #meaningfulrelationship #bestlives #badhabits

The Psychology Podcast
Alexi Robichaux || The Future of Coaching

The Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 48:07 Very Popular


Today we welcome Alexi Robichaux who is the co-founder and CEO of BetterUp, a mobile platform that brings together world-class coaching, AI technology, and behavioral science to deliver sustainable positive change. Alexi is also the Chairman of Youth Leadership America (YLA). They have collaborated with leading companies including Disney, Google, and Hilton Hotels to coach and mentor future leaders. Alexi holds a B.A. in political science and non-profit management with summa cum laude distinction from the University of Southern California.In this episode, I talk to Alexi Robichaux about the future of coaching. There are countless ways to practice coaching, but Alexi believes coaching must be rooted in science-backed techniques for reliable outcomes—which is precisely what they do at BetterUp. Coaching is not a replacement for therapy, but it can help individuals become more resilient and purposeful in their daily lives. We also touch on the topics of self-actualization, flow, languishing, imagination, and Alexi's vision for the future of coaching.Website: www.betterup.comTwitter: @arobichaux Topics04:06 What is coaching?07:30 Better Up's coaching model10:26 Coaching vs therapy 14:37 What good coaching looks like 19:40 Peak experiences and dichotomy transcendence25:22 Research and innovation as a for-profit business30:39 Humanistic coaching philosophy32:45 How to overcome languishing37:10 Better Up Labs41:40 Alexi's current coaching practice44:30 The future of coaching

My Therapist's A Witch
3: Practices for PMDD - Tracking Your Cycle, Holistic Approaches, and Removing the Taboo

My Therapist's A Witch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 53:25


In this episode I'm sharing some of the key practices I've use to manage my PMDD. One that's been particularly useful for me is consistently tracking my movement through different phases of my cycle, and I give a detailed explanation of how I do that. I also talk a bit about my personal story, and how we can change our relationship with our challenges - which then allows us to change our experience of them. Topics: 0:00: Welcome2:30: What my PMDD looks like 8:00: What's PMDD? 16:00: Depression and suicidality 21:00: Holistic and spiritual approaches 24:30: Practices 30:00: Separating thoughts from who you are 35:00: Ritualizing 40:00: Framing the phases 51:15: The hero's journey About Elizabeth: Elizabeth Ferreira is a somatic psychotherapist in training. Her approach to mental health is holistic, non-judgmental, and centered in the belief that all beings have the capacity to heal, grow, and reduce suffering.Follow Me On:YouTubeInstagram

How to Survive Society
How To Survive Society with Simone Jennifer Smith

How to Survive Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 43:41


Simone Jennifer aspires to influence future generations while supporting and enriching current ones. As Project Manager at Brother's Who Care, she works alongside professionals in the financial and mental health sectors assisting in projects such as: Mental Health Hour, Financial Literacy, Full Steam Ahead, and the I AM Campaign.As a testament to her desire for change, Simone is also Vice-Chair at Emmanuel Life Management Centre, a non-profit organization with a focus on holistic community building and youth empowerment. Tuning in the skills she obtained from being a Social Media Coordinator at INPM, Simone has also become a Content Creator for Parents for Black Children, Chonilla Network, and Dark Nubia Naturals.Simone holds a M.A. in Humanistic and Clinical Psychology from The Michigan School of Professional Psychology. She expresses her love for fashion and self-expression through her work for Fiati Fashions, and passes on her knowledge and wisdom through her role as a Mentor at the CHEERS Program.Through her work, Simone strives to empower, enrich and embody the youth and families of her community.Simone Jennifer Smith Founder, Hear 2 HelpThe Kingdom Investor | PodcastTake your generosity to the next level, impact more lives and build a godly legacy! Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Healthy Lifestyle Solutions with Maya AcostaAre you ready to upgrade your health to a new level and do so by learning from experts...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

My Therapist's A Witch
2: Polyvagal Theory, and Finding What Works for You

My Therapist's A Witch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 46:45


Learning how to resource and regulate yourself, particularly if you have any form of neurodivergence, can be really challenging. On today's episode I share lessons from Polyvagal Theory that have been very helpful for me and those I've worked with. We then transition into an exploration focused on finding and claiming what works for YOU, allowing those practices to be natural sources of joy and ease without getting caught up in the views and judgements of other people.Timestamps:0:00: Welcome and grounding practice3:40: Polyvagal theory, and how to use it15:50: Finding what actually regulates you23:30: Reminders and intentions29:20: Claiming your weird33:30: "What would you do if everything were a blank slate?"41:30: Closing practiceAbout Elizabeth: Elizabeth Ferreira is a somatic psychotherapist in training. Her approach to mental health is holistic, non-judgmental, and centered in the belief that all beings have the capacity to heal, grow, and reduce suffering.Follow Me On:YouTubeInstagram

Ready. Aim. Empire.
521: Best of Ready.Aim.Empire: If You're Not Speaking to These Four Personality Types, You Haven't Maximized Your Marketing

Ready. Aim. Empire.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 32:31


Here's what we're talking about in Episode 521: The four different personality types to market to, and their unique buying characteristics How knowing who you're selling to will make your marketing easier Spontaneous types base decisions on emotion, but it doesn't mean that it's not thought out How do you “seed the experience” to get spontaneous buyers excited? Methodical buyers will go to any length to ensure due diligence when buying What professions tend to attract methodical people? The two things you need to make sure of if you're doing a one-day sale Humanistic types are swayed by the story Case studies, whether by email, Facebook ad or live stream, are effective ways to tell stories The most important thing you can do with a competitive buyer aka “a deadline dancer”

My Therapist's A Witch
1: Working with Your Inner Critic

My Therapist's A Witch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 34:58


I'm so excited for this! On the first episode of the podcast I shared practices that have helped me work with and calm a harsh inner critic. This is particularly important for people who struggle with depressive disorders like PMDD. I also explored how cultivating a spiritual practice can provide you a space of calm and relief, feeding the inner nurturer and allowing you to push back against the inner critic. Click here if you'd prefer to watch on YouTube!Timestamps0:00: Welcome2:50: PMDD and self-criticism7:00: Finding freedom in practice11:00: Inner wisdom16:00: Relating to our experiences20:30: Reframing your relationship with your inner content27:00: Your warm and caring parts33:55: EndingAbout Elizabeth: Elizabeth Ferreira is a somatic psychotherapist in training. Her approach to mental health is holistic, non-judgmental, and centered in the belief that all beings have the capacity to heal, grow, and reduce suffering.Follow Me On:YouTubeInstagram

My Therapist's A Witch
0: Welcome to My Therapist's a Witch

My Therapist's A Witch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 2:11


Welcome to "My Therapist's a Witch!" On this podcast we'll be bringing together the best lessons from psychology with holistic approaches to mental health and healing. By bridging the gap between mental health and spirituality, and focusing on what works for YOU rather than what works for "most people," we can find new opportunities to heal from trauma, live in loving relationship, and reduce our suffering.My name's Elizabeth Ferreira, and I'm a somatic psychotherapist in training currently earning hours toward my license, and I often find my perspective at the intersection of the traditional and the alternative. In addition to everything I've learned training as a therapist, I've developed a personal practice that's been an enormous support to my own growth and change. My hope is that, through what I offer here, you'll be able to add more color to the palette of your healing.About Me: Elizabeth Ferreira is a somatic psychotherapist in training. Her approach to mental health is holistic, non-judgmental, and centered in the belief that all beings have the capacity to heal, grow, and reduce suffering.Follow Me On:YouTubeInstagram

The Rebooting Show
Humanistic media

The Rebooting Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


Algorithms reward conformity; humans are different by default.

Some of This Some of That
Some of This Some of That Podcast | Episode 42 | "Humanistic Mistake"

Some of This Some of That

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 85:33


We're back with another weekly rundown! This week goes a little something like this...Issa heatwave (0:00), Tise's new name (2:36), Game 5 recap (3:56), Steve Kerr's legacy (15:39), Martin reunion (20:20), Gigi makes an appearance (40:00), Russ Wilson staying squared up (41:34), Cam Newtons mistake (54:50), celebrating fathers (1:10:10), Juneteenth (1:12:43), TV Dads (1:17:57) and much more! *** SUBSCRIBE*** Follow us on social media: IG: https://www.instagram.com/sotsotpod/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotsotpod $$$ Click here if you want to support our Podcast - https://anchor.fm/sotsotpod/support #podcast #chicago #sotsotpod #martinlawrence #nba #nbafinals #camnewton #russelwilson #heatwave #summer #stevekerr #fathersday #juneteenth --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sotsotpod/support

Chicago Psychology Podcast
Living a Meaningful Life through Logotherapy with Alex Vesely, MA

Chicago Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 67:36


Alex Vesely, MA is the grandson of Viktor Frankl. He is a producer and award-winning documentary film director at Noetic Films in Los Angeles, California. He is also a licensed psychotherapist and head of the Viktor Frankl Media Archives in Vienna. He is the director of the documentary films: “Viktor and I” and “Wizard of the Desert.”Alex discusses:•His work with the Viktor Frankl Media Archive•The theory of personality embedded in Logotherapy; the psychotherapy developed by Viktor Frankl•His filmmaking career and films•His work as a founding member of the Viktor E. Frankl Institute of America•The need for meaning making in the world The Viktor E. Frankl Institute of America:https://viktorfranklamerica.comFilms:Viktor & Ihttps://www.imdb.com/title/tt1739261/Wizard of the Desert https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3546398/The Psychology Talk Podcast is a unique conversation about psychology around the globe. Your host Dr. Scott Hoye discuss psychology with mental health practitioners and experts to keep you informed about issues and trends in the industry. https://psych-talk.comhttps://www.instagram.com/psychtalkpodcast/

Chicago Psychology Podcast
The Allure of Suicide with Stanley Krippner, Ph.D.

Chicago Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 65:42


On the episode of the Psychology Talk Podcast, Dr. Hoye is joined by Dr. Stanley Krippner. Dr. Stanley Krippner, PhD, has held faculty appointments at Akamai University, Fordham University, Kent State University, New York University, Saybrook University, Sofia University, and the California Institute for Integral Studies, where he holds the position of Affiliated Distinguished Faculty. He is a Fellow in five divisions of the American Psychological Association, and the past-president of two divisions (the Society of Psychological Hypnosis and the Society of Humanistic Psychology). Formerly, he was director of the Maimonides Medical Center Dream Research Laboratory, in Brooklyn, New York, and (earlier) the director of the Kent State University Child Center in Kent, Ohio.Dr. Krippner discusses with a new book he has co-authored, "Understanding Suicide's Alure: Steps to Save Lives by Healing Psychological Scars." Topics in this deep dive include: • What makes suicide “Alluring” in your estimation?• Dreams that may indicate the possibility someone being suicidal.• The role of trauma in suicide • The role of attachment in childhood• Cultural and Diversity issues (African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, LGBTQ populations)The Book:https://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Suicides-Allure-Healing-Psychological/dp/1440862540Dr. Krippner's Website:https://stanleykrippner.weebly.comThe Psychology Talk Podcast is a unique conversation about psychology around the globe. Your host Dr. Scott Hoye discuss psychology with mental health practitioners and experts to keep you informed about issues and trends in the industry. They also tackle mental health trends and issues in their home: Chicago.https://psych-talk.comhttps://www.instagram.com/psychtalkpodcast/

The Voice of Counseling
Current Events from a Humanistic Counseling Perspective

The Voice of Counseling

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 52:04


Our guest, Dr. Linwood Vereen, joins us to talk about humanistic perspectives in counseling and how that foundational theory can be a guide for counselors as we navigate today's challenges.

Creating a New Healthcare
Episode #135: Contextualizing Care – a divergent, humanistic deployment of healthcare delivery – with Saul J. Weiner MD, Alan Schwartz PhD, Alan Spiro MD & Yoni Shtein, CEO of Laguna Health

Creating a New Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 51:10


Friends, I've listened to this podcast multiple times, in preparation for this write-up.  Each time I listen, I learn something new and continue to be blown away by what the ...

Blossom Your Awesome
Blossom Your Awesome Episode #46 - Striving Towards Growth With Elvira Maria Medus

Blossom Your Awesome

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later May 16, 2022 43:25


Blossom Your Awesome Episode #46 - Striving Towards Growth With Elvira MedusOn this latest episode of the Blossom Your Awesome Podcast I'm talking to psychotherapist Elvira Medus. Medus is trained under the Rogerian model. She uses the Person-Centered Approach  originated by Carl Rogers, arguably the most influential American mental health practitioner of the 20th Century. The Person-Centered Approach can be understood as a branch of the Humanistic School of Psychology. The Humanistic School of Psychology is also known as the 3rd force, meaning it grew out of a reaction to the opposing schools of Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). In contrast to Psychoanalysis, which attempts to understand and work with unconscious motives, and Behaviorism, which attempts to generate change through learned behavior, Humanistic Psychology attempts to help individuals increase their innate healing capacities and thereby allow self-directed growth to occur.Humanistic practitioners, believe in something called the "actualizing tendency". The actualizing tendency can be understood as the innate force within all living things that strives towards growth. In other words, if you are alive, you are growing. Unlike the psychoanalysts, your growth does not need to be interpreted and, unlike the behaviorists, your growth does not need to be directed. Humanists, believe it is their job to aid in the process of strengthening this innate force. The natural growth process of the individual is promoted when the therapist can embody certain attitudinal qualities: the therapist strives to be congruent and experiences unconditional positive regard and empathic understanding toward the client. In other words, the therapist embodies the PCA "core conditions."To get in touch with Elvira you can go to her website Elviramedus.comTo see more of my work go to Blossom Your Awesome. Or you can see some of my other work at suesblues.com Or follow me on instagram where I post fairly regularly and ask an inquisitive question or two weekly in hopes of getting you thinking about your life and going deeper with it. My Instagram - i_go_by_skd

Så kan det gå
139. Aftab Omer - Thinking for the greater good (in eng)

Så kan det gå

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 79:38


Today's episode is a tribute to the first-ever Inner Development Goals Summit that took place at the end of April. The Inner Development Goals is a nonprofit initiative with 23 skills that we all as individuals need to develop in order for us as humanities to reach UN's Global Sustainability Goals to save the living conditions here on earth.  I was amazed of how inspiring the summit was and therefore I feel privileged to be able to share this further with you all.  If you missed it you can get your ticket at innerdevelopmentgoals.org and watch it for 3 more months. Since this is a global initiative this episode will be in English so that we all can take part in it. With me today I have one of the speakers and co-creators, the transformal educator Aftab Omer who is a living example of a man who shows some of the IDG thinking skills like complexity awareness, perspective-taking, and deeper sense-making throughout this conversation.   About Aftab Aftab Omer, Ph.D. is a sociologist, psychologist, futurist and the president of Meridian University. Raised in Pakistan, India, Hawaii, and Turkey, he was educated at the universities of M.I.T, Harvard and Brandeis. His publications have addressed the topics of transformative learning, cultural leadership, generative entrepreneurship and the power of imagination. His work includes assisting organizations in tapping the creative potentials of conflict, diversity, and complexity. Formerly the president of the Council for Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychologies, he is a Fellow of the International Futures Forum and the World Academy of Arts and Sciences. Aftab's work at Meridian University over the last 30 years has emphasized the development of partnership capability. In an influential article entitled "The Spacious Center: Leadership and the Creative Transformation of Culture" published in 2006, he introduced a new framework for understanding culture's transformation through cultural leadership. This podcast is hosted by Elin Ribjer in collaboration with the value-based relationship app Relate. Find likeminded and get to know your own values via: Android: bit.ly/relatepod-android Apple: bit.ly/relatepod-iOS

The Self-Connection Podcast
The Self-Connection Podcast S2 E2 In the Here and Now with Victor Yalom

The Self-Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 72:26


Victor Yalom, PhD, is the Founder, Director of Content and Resident Cartoonist of Psychotherapy.net. He maintained a full-time practice psychology practice in San Francisco for over 25 years, and currently continues to see a small handful of clients, as well as leading psychotherapy and consultation groups. He has conducted workshops in existential-humanistic and group therapy in the US, Mexico, and China. He has produced over 100 training videos in the field of psychotherapy and continues to be inspired the many master therapists he has been privileged to work with, including existential-humanistic psychologist James Bugental, and his father Irvin Yalom. In his spare time he paints, creates metal sculptures, and tries to improve his table tennis game. More information on Victor and his artwork is at sfpsychologist.com.Please visit www.psychotherapy.net to view the wonderful resources they have there which include over 300 videos of the prominent psychotherapist of the past and present. Think Netflix but for psychotherapist. You can save $100 dollars off an annual memberships at psychotherapy.net with the discount code : connection100Rather than having a set agenda for the podcast, Victor offered to have an open ended conversation with me and to explore and learn together, which was very exciting for me. Since the podcast is about connection it was fitting for us to explore topics related to psychotherapy as the content that served as the context for learning about and with each other. We start the discussion with me sharing my here and now experience of feeling nervous to speak with him, which is very unusual. I decide to share this straight away and Victor compassionately invites me to explore my experience together. 2:00 Victor shares the common expectation that a therapist will take away or reduce the experience they are having. Instead he points out that we can be with our experience and learn from it. 3:00 Tim express gratitude for Victor's work in making Virginia Satir's work available on video and subsequent work with other master therapists. 8:10 Victor reflects that he notices so much in what he's hearing and noticing with what Tim's shared that in therapeutic context would be available. He feels that psychotherapy can be a creative artful process.10:30 Tim poses the question of what aspects of therapeutic skills are relevant for day to day intimate and connective conversations to Victor. 12:27 Victor reflects that he often asks clients to reflect on what's happening for them at the head level and heart level. He suggests slowing down and tuning into ourselves and the other person. Attending to the words , and facial expressions of the other person as well as one's own body and feelings. 18:40 We talk about what ‘here and now' means in context of group and individual therapy. Victor shares that he is feeling engaged, and in flow and aware of some vulnerability and a desire to share something of use to the audience. 21:45 Tim asks about Victor's connection to James Bugental who was a Humanistic existential psychologist. Victor shares about his meeting and experiences of training with James. . 27:30 Victor reflects on his learnings with James Bugental. He demonstrates and differentiates some of the ideas and techniques from James Bugental's work such as searching that make it different from normal day to day conversations.32:20 One of the most powerful words he would say was , “And...” rather than letting the conversation be a ping pong match. It reinforces and introduces the idea that there's always more. This is one of things James used to say, “There's always more.” Each person is an arena of endless exploration.34:00 Victor experiential explores his emotions that come up upon his reflects on his relationships with James Bugental. 37:50 Tim shares a quote from James Bugental “ But early on l wanted to change her implicit sense of her task from telling me about herself to expressing herself. That's such an important difference. Then she makes herself an object of description. We're not dealing with a living person. lnformation about her. .. l don't like to get a lot of information about a client in advance. l want to know are they're reasonably able to maintain, and reality testing is all right, that sort of thing. But too much information will just cloud the screen for me. l need to be as innocent, in a certain way, as l can be for each person. l need to be as innocent, in a certain way, as l can be for each person. To discover this unique person. And that sounds very nice and humanistic, and it is. But the real value is, that way l get to know the livingperson, not about a person who has that name.”39:00 Victor reflects on the therapist role in helping the client to not objectify themselves but to enter more deeply in their experience and to be present (“search process”) 42:00 James Bugental also talked about ‘resistance' which is resistance to life. These are coping patterns created for survival, defense mechanisms. They work for us but also limit us. Examples, intellectualizing, or mocking oneself, or hiding emotions. Helping clients become more flexible with their coping patterns.47:00 “inclusion not amputation” another James Bugental quote . He also talked about the co-occuring counter balancing energies of support and encouragement or the ‘backstop' that urges them forward. 50: 30 Tim reads a quote by Rollo May and asks for Victors reflections. “....and the problem is that psychotherapy becomes more and more a system of gimmicks. People have special ways of doing their own therapy. They learn which particular buttons to push. They're taught various techniques by which they can, so that they can at least cure this isolated symptom or that. And that wasn't the purpose at all, of Freud and Jung and the rest of the really great men who began our field. Their purpose was to make the unconscious conscious. And that's a great--there's a great deal of difference between them.This was what Freud was setting out to do. It's what Jung is trying to do. It's what Adler and Rank did. These people never talked about these gimmicks. It just didn't interest them. What did interest them was making a new person. You see, the new possibilities come up. Then you have--then you change the person. Otherwise, you change only the way he behaves, only the way he approaches this or that incidental problem. The problem's going to change in six months when he'll be back again for some more so-called therapy.” -Rollo May52:00 Victor reflects on some of the context surrounding more technique based therapies and the importance of therapist reflecting on their use of self, to sit with difficult emotions, not necessarily always needing to ‘do' something to the client. The ability to sit with clients and to be with their emotions. 58:32 Victor shares about his orientation and perspective towards psychotherapy.1:03:30 We explore the words. “Self-Connection”

The Science of Psychotherapy
Andrew Jamieson talks Midlife - Humanity's Secret Weapon.

The Science of Psychotherapy

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 49:54


Andrew Jamieson trained at the Bath Centre for Psychotherapy and Counselling and received an MA in Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapy at Middlesex University. He lectures and writes articles on a series of subjects including psychotherapy's interconnection with philosophy music and literature. Today we talk with him about his latest book, Midlife: Humanity's Secret Weapon, where he draws on history, psychology, science and literature, to show just how ubiquitous, and crucial, the ‘midlife crisis' is, and the devastating consequences for society at large if we continue to regard it as something we can, and should, avoid. You can find Andrew's book at all the major booksellers, here's a link to his book on Amazon. Thanks for listening! Support us by becoming a subscriber to The Science of Psychotherapy Academy! Or you can simply buy us a cup of coffee! Please leave a review! (Reviews are fabulously important to us! On your podcast player you should find an option to review at the bottom of the main page for the podcast - after the list of available episodes) - Here's a link for iTunes. And please subscribe to our show!  You can also find our podcast at: The Science of Psychotherapy Podcast Homepage If you want more great science of Psychotherapy please visit our website thescienceofpsychotherapy.com Grab a copy of our latest book! The Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Psychotherapy

How To Love Lit Podcast
Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 1 - Meet The Author, Discover Local Color And Feminism!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 45:43


Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 1 - Meet The Author, Discover Local Color And Feminism!   I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love lit Podcast.  This episode we begin a journey to a very unique American location to discuss a very American author. Kate Chopin, was born in St Louis but her heritage is more associated with Louisiana than with Missouri as she is from an originally American people group, the Louisianan Creole's.  Christy, I know, you lived a part of your life in Louisiana, and your dad's family is from Louisiana.  As we discuss Kate Chopin and her unusual and ill-received novel The Awakening, I think a great place to start our discussion, especially for those who may not be familiar with American geography, is with the Pelican State itself.   What makes Louisiana so unusual than the rest of the United States, and why does that matter when we read a book like The Awakening.    Well, there are so many things that people think of when the think of Louisiana- Louisianan distinctive include Mardi Gras, crawfish bowls, jazz music, bayous, The French Quarter of New Orleans and its beignets.  The list is cultural distinctives is long.   But, just for a general reference, Louisiana is part of the American South.  Now, it might seem that the states that constitute the South are kind of all the same- and in some respects that's true.  Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Georgia, Tennessee, Florida, South Carolina, Virginia, and the rest of them, … after all, they all succeeded from the Union during the Civil War, they all had slaves, they all have had to one degree or another racial tension over the last two hundred years, and, of course, to bring it to modern-day, they all are deeply entrenched in a tradition of American football, barbeque, shot guns, sweet tea, the Bible and a general admiration of good manners that include addressing each other as mr. mrs, yes mam and no sir.      Ha!  Yes, that IS the South.  I remember moving down here and being frustrated that I could never find anywhere that served tea without sugar- and when they say sweet tea down here- I'm talking one step away from maple syrup.      I like it!!!       People do and feel strongly about it.  In fact a lot of people have a lot have strong feelings about this part of the United States.  Some love the South; others hate it.  It's a part of the United States that is historical, by American standards, although laughably young compared to other parts of the world,  and controversial- to this very day.     Yes, yet having said that,  once you move here, it doesn't take you long to realize that  The South is not one cohesive unit.  Every state is very different.  Florida was colonized by the Spanish- and has strong ties to places such as Cuba to this day.  Virginia was the seat of government and is still central to the heart of American politics.  The horse-racing people of Kentucky are very different from their cotton-growing neighbors in Mississippi.  There are many many cultural distinctives that are both old and deep.  Which brings us to the great state of Louisiana- Louisiana, especially South Louisiana, in some ways has more in common with the Caribbean islands than it does with other parts of the United States.  My daddy was born in Spring Hill, Louisiana and raised in Bastrop Louisiana which are in North Louisiana- far from the coast but the people of north Louisiana share many commonalities with their Cajun and Creole brothers.  I have early memories of magnolia trees, cypress trees, bayous, shrimp gumbo,  and, of my Uncle Lanny taking us in the middle of the night out with his hound dogs to go coon hunting- as in racoon hunting.      So, for the record, these are things you don't see in other parts of the United States.      Indeed, they don't have bayous and gumbo anywhere else- and although they do have racoons in other places and likely hunt and eat them, I don't know.  The whole government of Louisiana is different and its visible.  They have parishes instead of counties.  The law is based on French law, not British law which affects everything.   It is predominantly Catholic not Protestant, hence Mardi Gras, which is what they call Carnival in Brazil but which we don't celebrate in other part of the US.  But what interests us for this book is the ethnic origins of the people indigenous to the region.     The rural part of the state has been dominated by a group we call Cajuns.  Cajuns are Roman Catholic French Canadians, or at least their descendents were.      They were run out of the Captured French Colony called Acadia in North Eastern Canada- it's actually be termed “the Acadian diaspora”.  Acadia was in the maritime provinces up on the Atlantic side, near the US state of Maine. That part of Canada was very British hence the obvious antagonism.      Well, The word Acadians kind of morphed into Cajuns over the years.  That's one people group.  But we also have another distinctively Louisianan people group  called the Louisiana Creoles.  This group of people ethnically are entirely different group than the Cajuns but also speak French.  Our author today, Kate Chopin was a creole, and she wrote about Lousianan Creole people.  Garry, before we introduce the Mrs. Chopin, local color and her influencial work, The Awakening, let's learn just a little about these remarkable people.  Who are the Creoles of Louisiana?    Well, let me preface by saying, as Kate Chopin would be the first to admit, history is always messy- people marry, intermarry, languages get confused and muddled, so when we talk about distinctives, we are talking about generalities, and if you want take to talk about Creole people the first word that must come to mind is multi-cultural.  There are creole peoples all over the Caribbean.  Haiti is the first country that comes to mind, so we need to be careful as we speak in generalities. But  the first generality you will notice of the Louisianan Creole people shows up in the first chapter of Chopin's book, and that is that they also speak the French language, except for the Louisiana Creoles that can mean two different actual languages.  Today, and the latest stat, I saw was from May of 2020,  1,281,300 identified French as their native tongue- that would be Colonial French, standard French and the speakers of would include both people groups the Cajuns and the Louisianan Creoles.  But what is even more interesting than that is that the language Louisiana Creole is its own distinctive indigenous language, and is not the same as Haitian Creole or Hawaiian Creole or any other form of Creole where you might hear that word.  Meaning, Louisianan Creole although having origins in the French language is not French at all but its own distinct language.   This is confusing because the Cajuns speak a dialect of French that sounds different than the French from France or Quebec, but it's still French and French speakers can understand what they are saying even if it sounds different than the way they might pronounce things.  That's different. Creole is French-based, but has African influences and is literally its own language and French speakers cannot understand it.  Today it's an endangered language, only about 10,000 people speak it, but it is still alive.       Yeah, that wasn't something I understood as a teenager living in Louisiana. I thought Cajun- Creole all meant Lousianan.  Since we lived in North Louisiana, I never met anyone personally who spoke Lousiana Creole.  All the Creole's I came into contact, including Mrs. Devereaux, my French teacher spoke traditional French, which is what they do in Chopin's book too, btw.       Of course, Cajuns and Creole people have a lot in common in terms of religion and even in taste in cuisine, but where they differ tremendously is in ethnicity and also in social class.  The Cajuns are white and from Canada but often rural and historically lower-middle class.  The Creole's are not white, but culturally a part of the urban elite, the ruling class.  They are the first multi-cultural people group on the American continent and deserve a special status for that reason.    Explain that, because that's really interesting.  Today, to be multi-cultural is cool, but 100 years ago when ethnic groups did not intermingle, and being a multi-cultural group that was upper class seems like a huge anomaly.  Although I will say the word “creole” tips you off to the multi-cultural element.  It actually comes from the Portuguese word “crioulo” and the word itself means people who were created.     And again, I do want to point out that this is kind of a very big simplification of a couple of hundred years of history, but in short, the criolos were people who were born in the new World- but mostly of mixed heritage.  Gentlemen farmers, primarily French and Spanish came over to the new world.  A lot of them came  by way of the Caribbean after the slave revolt in Haiti.   They had relationships and often even second families with local people here. Many were Black slaves, others were native Americans, lots were mulattos who also came from the Caribbean.  Unlike mixed raced people from Mississippi or Alabama, Creoles were not slaves.  They were free people.  They were educated.  They spoke French and many rose to high positions of politics, arts and culture. They were the elite, many were slaveholders.  Now, I will say, that most chose to speak Colonial French over Louisiana Creole as they got more educated, also over time as we got closer to the Civil War era being mixed race in and of itself got pretty complicated with the black/white caste-system of the South, which is another story in and of itself.   And as a result, you had creoles who were identifying as white and others who didn't- Chopin's family were white creoles.  But regardless of all that, but in the 1850s and through the life of Chopin, until today, Creoles are a separate people group that identify themselves as such.  They are a proud group of people who worship together, connect socially together, and often build communities around each other. They have societal behaviors and customs that set them apart, and we learn by looking at life through Edna Pontellier's eyes, have a culture that can difficult for an outsider to penetrate, if you marry an insider.    And so enters, Mrs. Kate Chopin, born in 1851 to a mother who was Creole and a father who was a Irish, both Catholic. She was not born in Louisisana, but in the great midwestern city of St. Louis.  St Louis, at the time had a rather large Creole population by virtue of being a city on the Mississippi river- which runs from New Orleans miles north. Her mom's family was old, distinguished and part of what has been termed the “Creole Aristocracy”.  Kate grew up speaking French as a first language, and as many Creole women was raised to be very independent by three generations of women in the household. She received an exceptional education, was interested in what they called “the woman question”.  This will give you an indication of how progressive her family actually was, now brace yourself because this is scandalous….on a trip to New Orleans at the ripe age of 18, Kate learned to smoke.    Oh my, did she smoke behind the high school gym or in the bathroom stalls?    Ha!  Who even knows, but we do know that at age 19 she married the love of her life, another Creole, Oscar Chopin.  Kate and Oscar were very compatible and the years she was married to him have been described as nothing but really happy by all of her biographers that I'm familiar with.  They lived in New Orleans at first and then to Natchitoches parish in the central Louisiana where he owned and operated a general store.  They were married for 12 years, and- this small fact wipes me out- they had five sons and two daughters.    Ha!  That confirms all the Catholic stereotypes of large families.      I know right, that's just a lot…and their lives were, by all accounts, going well until…there's always an until… Oscar suffered the fate of a lot of people around the world even to this day, who live in hot climates.  He caught malaria, and suddenly died.  And there Kate was, alone in the middle of the interior of Louisiana,  with this store and all these kids.  She ran it herself for over a year, but then decided to do what lots of us would do in that situation…she moved back to the hometown of her childhood, St. Louis so she could be near her mother- I didn't mention it before but her father had died in a terrible railroad accident when she was a young child and her brother had died in the Civil War- so basically all of the men that had meant anything to her at all, had all died.  One of Kate's daughters had this to say about that later on when she was an adult talking about her mom, “When I speak of my mother's keen sense of humor and of her habit of looking on the amusing side of everything, I don't want to give the impression of her being joyous, for she was on the contrary rather a sad nature…I think the tragic death of her father early in her life, of her much beloved brothers, the loss of her young husband and her mother, left a stamp of sadness on her which was never lost.”      Goodness, that Is a lot of sadness.    Well, it is and it took a toll.  When she got back to St. Louis, Dr. Kolbenheyer, their obgyn and a family friend talked her into studying some French writers for the sake of  mental health, specifically Maupassant and Zola and take up writing.  She took that advice ..…so at age 38 a widow with six living children, Chopin began her writing career.  A career, sadly that was only going to last five years.  It started great, and she was super popular, but then….she wrote a scandalous book and was cancelled, and I mean totally cancelled.  Five years after the publication of  this candalous book that today we call The Awakening, she had a stroke and died.  At the time of her death, Kate Chopin as a writer, was virtually unknown and uncelebrated.      What do you mean by cancelled? That sounds like a crazy story for a mommy writer.    True, and it is.  When she started  writing, she was super popular.  This kind of reminds me a little of Shirley Jackson, honestly.  She wrote short things for magazines for money.  What made her work popular, at least in part, was because writing about a subculture of America that people found interesting.  Although she was living in St. Louis, her stories were set in Louisiana amongst the Creole people- and people loved it.  This movement in American literature where authors focus on a specific region or people group  has been called “Local Color”, and her ability to showcase the local color of the Creole people led her to success.        Subcultures are so fascinating to me and I'm always amazed at how many different subcultures there are- and I'm not talking about just ethnically. There are endless subcultures on this earth, and most of the time we don't even know what we're looking at.    Oh, for sure.  I think of guitar players as their own subculture- they speak their own language, have their own passions, I wouldn't be surprised if they have their own foods.     HA!  Do I sense a bit of mockery?  But you are right, we do have a little bit of a subculture, but if you think guitarists are a subculture, what do you think of my cousin Sherry who is neck deep into Harley Davidson culture and goes to Sturgis, South Dakota every year.     True, and there are hundreds of thousands of people who participate in that subculture all over the world   And of course, we're talking about hobbies which are not the same as actual ethnic subcultures in any location, understanding and just seeing behind the fence of someone else' experience is the fun.  The idea of living life vicariously through the stories, so to speak, of people who are so radically differently is one of the things I most love about reading.  In the real sense of the term “local color” though, this was an actual movement after the Civil War.  Authors were using settings from different parts of the country and it made the writing feel romantic for people unfamiliar with the setting while actually being fundamentally realistic- I know that's a paradox, but if you think about it it makes sense.  They were works that could only be written from inside the culture by someone who was a part of it- that's what made them realistic.   Chopin was considered a local color author because she was Creole writing about the world of Louisiana Creoles.      Well, apparently it was well received.  She got stories printed first in regional publications but then in national publications.  “The Story of an Hour” which was the only story I had ever read of hers, and I didn't know this, was published in Vogue in 1894.      Very impressive, Houghton Mifflin, the publisher that to this day publishes quite a bit of high school literature textbooks actually published a collection of her stories, titled it Bayou Folk.  So, just in the title, you can tell they are playing up her Louisiana connection.  And that book was a success.  Chopin, who kept notes on how well all of her works were doing, wrote that she had seen 100 press notices about the book.  It was written up in both The Atlantic and the New York Times.  People loved how she used local dialects. They found the stories and I quote “charning and pleasant.”  She was even asked to write an essay on writing for the literary journal Critic- which I found really insightful.     Well, of course, all of these things sound like a woman bound for monetary and critical success- stardom of her day.       And so her trajectory kept ascending.  She was published in the Saturday Evening Post.  Of course that was a big deal.  Everything was moving in the right direction….until.. The Awakening.  The Awakening was too much and she crashed immediately and hard.     You know, when I read these reviews from 1899, it's so interesting how strongly they reacted.  Let me read a few, her local paper, The St Louis Daily Globe-Democrat wrote this, “It is not a healthy book….if it points any particular moral or teaches any lesson the fact is not apparent.” The Chicago Times Herald wrote, “It was not necessary for a writer of so great refinement and poetic grace to enter the over-worked field of sex-fiction.  This is not a pleasant story.”  Here's another one, “its disagreeable glimpses of sensuality are repellent.”      She was not prepared for this.  She did not expect it.  She was expecting people to see it as the American version of some of the things she had been reading in French that had been published in France.  Her treatment of sexuality is what really got her, and maybe if her protagonist had been male she could have gotten away with it.  Actually, I'm pretty sure, she would have gotten away with it, there are other authors who did.  But discussing how women felt about sexuality- and let me say- in case you haven't read the book- this is not a harlequin romance.  She doesn't talk about hot steamy passion in descriptive tones.  She is very polished and shows deference to the WAY things were expressed in her day.  The problem was not in how she was treating sexual content- the problem was that she WAS discussing how women felt about sexuality and this just was too realistic.  People weren't and maybe we still aren't, ready to be vulnerable about how we feel about intimacy.      You know, I tell students all the time that in American politics, sexual issues have always been used as a wedge issue to define people's position as good or bad people.  That has not changed in the American political scene in 200 years and is something our European and Asian friends have mocked us about for just as long.  We are a people committed to moralizing, even to this day.  For a long time, it was cloaked in religion, but now, hyperbolic moralizing, although not done in the name of a faith is still a favorite American pastime.      Well, honestly, I guess that's also been true for the arts as well.  But honestly, greatr art is never moralizing.  And Chopin knew that.  Furthermore, if anyone had read that essay Chopin printed about her writing that I referenced, they would have seen that Chopin, by design, does NOT moralize in hers.  She does not condemn or judge.  She has no interest in telling us how we should or shouldn't behave.  She sees the role of the artist, and clearly stated as much,  and the role of fiction as in demonstrating how we genuinely ARE as human beings.  It is a role of showcasing the human experience.  It is meant to help us understand ourselves.  What she does in her writing by using a culture that is unfamiliar to us, is allow us a safer space from which we can pull back the veil that IS our experience, so we can see ourselves.  Let me quote her from that essay and here she's talking about the Creole people of Louisiana,    “Among these people are to be found an earnestness in the acquirement and dissemination of book-learning, a clinging to the past and conventional standards, an almost Creolean sensitiveness to criticism and a singular ignorance of, or disregard for, the value of the highest art forms. There is a very, very big world lying not wholly in northern Indiana, nor does it lie at the antipodes, either. It is human existence in its subtle, complex, true meaning, stripped of the veil with which ethical and conventional standards have draped it.”  Well, regardless of how she wanted to come across, apparently, she struck a nerve people didn't want struck.  The Awakening unsettled America.  The book was published in April of 1899, by August critics were destroying it, and again I'll use the reviewers words,  it had been deemed “morbid and unwholesome” and was reproached on a national stage.  She was scorned publicly.  When she submitted a new short story to the Atlantic “Ti Demon” in November after the publication of The Awakening it was returned and rejected.    Her own publisher, the one who had published the controversial book decided to “shorten is list of authors”- and they dropped her.  Of course to be fair, they claimed that decision had nothing to do with the problems with the reception of The Awakening.    I'm sure that it didn't.  Chopin was obviously crushed.  She would only write seven more stories over the next five years.  In 1904 when she died of a stroke, she was basically a forgotten writer.  And likely would have remained forgotten until, ironically the French discovered the novel in 1952.  A writer by the name of Cyrille Arnavon translated it into French under the title Edna with a 22 page introduction essay called it a neglected masterpiece.  What he liked about it had nothing to do with “local color” or creole people or anything Americana.  He saw in it what we see in it today- psychological analysis.      So fascinating, this is the 1950s; this is exactly the time period psychology is shifting from Freudian interpretations of Chopin's' day into behaviorism and eventually to humanistic psychology.      Why does this matter?    With Freud everything is secret and we're ruled by unseen forces we don't understand without psychoanalysis.  Chopin's book came out when this was how we were looking at the world.  After him came Skinner's behaviorism which said everything can be reduced to rewards and punishments.   Humanistic psychology is this third way of looking at things.  It's extremely empathetic.  Names like Karl Rogers were looking at life with the idea that it's just plain difficult to be a human, and we need to understand this complexity.  They would like books that are not all black/white thinking or moralistic.  This is what's crazy to me about Chopin.  She wrote in the days of Freud, but she was so far ahead of her time psychologically; nobody would get her for another 60 years- literally two entire movements later in the field of psychology.      Well, when they did get her, they really got her.  In 1969 a Norwegian critic Per Seyersted brought her out into the open in a big way.  This is what he said, “ Chopin, and I quote “broke new ground in American literature. She was the first woman writer in her country to accept passion as a legitimate subject for serious, outspoken fiction. Revolting against tradition and authority; with a daring which we can hardy fathom today; with an uncompromising honesty and no trace of sensationalism, she undertook to give the unsparing truth about woman's submerged life. She was something of a pioneer in the amoral treatment of sexuality, of divorce, and of woman's urge for an existential authenticity. She is in many respects a modern writer, particularly in her awareness of the complexities of truth and the complications of freedom.”    Finally people were understanding what she was trying to do.  That's exactly what she wanted to show- the complexity of being human.  Here's another Chopin quote whole talking about the role of a writer, “Thou shalt not preach; “thou shalt not instruct thy neighbor”.  Or as her great- grandmother Carleville, who was extremely influencial in her life, used to tell her, Kate's grandmother who raised her was known for saying this “One may know a great deal about people without judging them.  God does that.”    Well, she was immediately resurrected.  Today she is considered one of America's premiere writers.    Well, it also didn't hurt her reputation that she was being discovered in Europe at the exact same time, the women's movement was taking off in the United States and finding an unsung feminist writer was very popular.     Yeah, I thought she WAS a feminist writer, but you don't see her as that.    I really don't, and that's not to say there isn't any feminism in the book, because obviously, it's about life as a woman at the turn of the century.  Virginia Wolfe famouslty argued in her essay A Room of One's Own that no one knew what women were thinking and feeling in the 17th century because they weren't writing.  Well, you can't say that about Chopin.  She was absolutely writing about what women were thinking and feeling, it just took 60 years for the world to allow her to share it.        If we want to talk the particulars about The Awakening, which of course we do, we have a female protagonist.  I'm not going to call her a hero because I don't find anything heroic about her.  But it's very very honest characterization of what women feel, and honestly, perhaps it's what a lot of people feel- both men and women when they live, as we all do, within cultures of high expectations.      Isn't writing about standing up to cultural norms and societal expectations kind of cliché?  I'm surprised you find it interesting in this situation.     Well, it for sure can be.  It's what a lot of teenage angst poetry is about.  But Chopin's book is a lot more complex than just a denouncement on social expectations of women's roles.  In some ways, that's just the setting.  This particular woman, Edna, is for sure, unhappyily objectified by a husband.  That part is obvious.  But, Chopin isn't necessarily moralizing against this or anything else.  In the opening encounter between husband and wife, we see the wife being objectified, but we also see that they have worked out some deal.  She has a very privileged life.  It's not a life between two people who have emotional intimacy, for sure.  These two clearly don't.  Edna asks if her husband plans on showing up for dinner.  He basically sayd, I don't know- I may; I may not.  It doesn't appear Edna could care less one way or another and Chopin isn't condemning them; she is observing.  This are the deals people are working out in the world.  She makes other observations in regard to Edna and her relationship with her children.  She loves her children; sort of; but it's certainly not the motherly and passionate devotion most mothers feel towards their kids.  It's definitely not the self-denying ideal, we see expressed through a different character in the book.  Again, Chopin is not endorsing nor condemning.  She's observing.  There's no doubt, Chopin herself was progressive.  She was raised in a house of dominant women.  She herself was a head of household.  She was educated.  She made money, but she had healthy relationships with the men in her life.  She is not a man-hater, that I can tell.  She never remarried but there is reason to believe she had at least one  other significant male relationship after her husband's death.  So, portraying her as a woman who influenced feminism in any kind of deliberate way, I don't think is something that she intended, nor was it something that happened.  She was cancelled.    I understand that, it's just interesting that today, we think of her first and foremost as a feminist writer in large part because she had sexual content in her books.  Although, as I think about the progressive women in the 1890s, what we know about them from history is that most were not really be fans of indiscriminate sex.     Oh my, we're getting edgy here, but I have to ask.  Why do you say that?    You have to understand this is before birth control.  Sexual relationships for women meant running the very real risk of generating children which was often a life-risking ordeal.  Kate herself had gone through that seven times in twelve years.  Women were spending half of their lives pregnant.  Many progressive women in this time period were not fighting for the freedom to have sex, they were fighting for the right to NOT have it.  They wanted the right to say no.  The goal of Self ownership was central to nineteenth century feminism.  Woman's rights were about possessing a fully realized human identity.  We think of this today in terms of sexual freedom but that's the arrogance of the presence kicking in.  Obviously human sexuality is a core part of the human experience and that's likely why it's central to Chopin's story, but there are other aspects of person hood.  Women, especially educated ones, were interested in navigating a sense of place in the community and the universe at large- and that involves all kinds of things- hard things like love, connections, maternity.    Exactly, and that's why Edna is so complicated.  Being a human is difficult.   Navigating  “the woman's sphere”, to use the expression of  the notable Chopin scholar Sandra Gilbert is complicated.  And so, we all find ourselves, one way or another in cages- some of our own making, some of the makings of our community, our religion, our culture, our own personalities- whatever it is.  And that is the opening of our story.  The Awakening starts with a woman in a cage.  This is not to say that men do not experience cages or awakenigs- they absolutely do, but Chopin is a woman and will speak from inside the world of women.  She will drop a woman named Edna, a middle child Presbyterian English speaking girl from Kentucky, into a French speaking Catholic world of elite Creole women.  Edna is flawed, but not awful.  She's flawed in the sense that we are all flawed.  This woman acts out- in the way that many of us have acted out- often as children, but for some of us, we don't experience this desire for agency until later in life.  For Edna it comes at the age of 26 and when it does- she will scandalize her world the way acting out always does.  She finds herself in a cage and decides she wants out...but then what…where do you go from there.  Let's read how Chopin sets this up in the first paragraph of her story.    A green and yellow parrot, which hung in a cage outside the door, kept repeating over and over:  “Allez vous-en! Allez vous-en! Sapristi! That's all right!”  He could speak a little Spanish, and also a language which nobody understood, unless it was the mocking-bird that hung on the other side of the door, whistling his fluty notes out upon the breeze with maddening persistence.  Mr. Pontellier, unable to read his newspaper with any degree of comfort, arose with an expression and an exclamation of disgust.  He walked down the gallery and across the narrow “bridges” which connected the Lebrun cottages one with the other. He had been seated before the door of the main house. The parrot and the mocking-bird were the property of Madame Lebrun, and they had the right to make all the noise they wished. Mr. Pontellier had the privilege of quitting their society when they ceased to be entertaining.    Christy, does she give the entire story away in the beginning?    She's doing something.  She opens with a bird- a parrot. We will talk more about this later, but birds are a big deal in this book.  But why a parrot- what do parrots do- well they imitate.  They talk.  This parrot is in a cage repeating something an English reader may not understand.      What does that phrase mean?    It means Go away! Go away!  For God's sake!  The bird is telling everyone to go away, and Mr. Pontellier pretty much ignores the bird and does actually go away.  The bird speaks a little Spanish but also a language no one else understands.  There's a lot of intentionality here.  This book begins with a bird in a cage and the book ends with a bird, but I won't tell you how we find that bird yet.       These 19th century writers were always using symbols on purpose.       They really do.  And if this one is our protagonist- what we can see is that she's beautiful, she's in a cage, and although she can talk, she cannot articulate something that can be heard properly or understood.      And so that is our starting point.    I think it is.  Next episode, we will join Edna and explore this beautiful place, Grand Isle- the site, and if the title of the book hasn't given it away yet, I will, of her Awakening.  We will watch Edna awaken- but then, we know from our visit with Camus…that is only step one.  Now what.    Indeed…now what.  Well, thank you for spending time with us today.  We hope you have enjoyed meeting Kate Chopin and jumping into the first paragraph of her lost but rediscovered American masterpiece, The Awakening.  And if you did, please support us by sharing this episode with a firend, either by text, by twitter, Instagram or email.  That's how we grow.  Also, if you have a favorite book, you'd like us to discuss, you are always invited to connect with us, again via all the ways Modern world people do.    Peace out!                 

VIFF Podcast
‘Mare of Easttown' Director Craig Zobel on “humanistic” crime drama

VIFF Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 67:20


In this episode, we're featuring a creator talk from the 2021 Vancouver International Film Festival with Craig Zobel – the director behind the wildly popular HBO crime drama, Mare of Easttown, starring Kate Winslet.The Emmy-nominated director spoke to host Zach Lipovsky about crafting a crime series that leaves room for soulful human drama and humour, shooting emotional and technically daunting scenes, and working with Director Of Photography Ben Richardson on letting characters guide the shot styles.This conversation was recorded on October 4, 2021.––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––This podcast is brought to you by the Vancouver International Film Festival.Presented on the traditional and unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and sel̓íl̓witulh (Tsleil-Waututh) nations.The Greater Vancouver International Film Festival Society is a not-for-profit cultural organization that operates the internationally acclaimed Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF), the year-round programming of the theatres at the VIFF Centre and the online streaming platform, VIFF Connect. See what's playing now.As a nonprofit cultural organization, VIFF relies on community support to help make everything we do possible.  You can show your love of cinema by making a tax-deductible gift to VIFF. goviff.org/donate

RAWring Twenties Podcast
Humanistic Astrologer Jessica Lanyadoo on birth charts, sex, and the Saturn return!

RAWring Twenties Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 60:43


In this episode Brenda and Julia are joined by renowned Astrologer Jessica Lanyadoo to get real and raw on all things astrology! We talk: Empowerment through independent learning How having knowledge of our birth chart can help us to know ourselves better and help us in relationship to others The push and pull between our destiny based on our birth charts and our own free will What were born with and how it influences us How astrology effects our romantic relationships and where to look in our charts for different aspects of this Sun sign compatibility?! How our birth chart effects our sex lives Composite charts for couples Saturn return! What is it and how we can prepare for it Understanding failure & so much more! ♡ Jessica on instagram: @Jessica_lanyadoo ♡ Ghost of a podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ghost-of-a-podcast-astrology-advice-with-jessica-lanyadoo/id1422483488 ♡ Listen on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rawring-twenties-podcast/id1494981855 ♡ Subscribe to RAWring Twenties on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqIjQO1tys3_U-aaHYkHUuA Check out our website and shop the new merchandise: ♡ www.rawringtwentiespodcast.com Contact #R20 Squad! ♡Email: RAWringtwentiespodcast@gmail.com ♡Instagram: @rawringtwentiespodcast Host personal pages: ♡Brenda @balancewithbrenda, @officialbrendaa ♡Julia @Julia_tolchin

K12ArtChat the Podcast
Episode 74 - Jason Blair - A Humanistic Approach to Art Education

K12ArtChat the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 38:21


The Creativity Department speaks with Jason Blair about bringing a personal and humanistic approach to the art room. Schools aren't just preparing students for college and career; they're also developing active citizens in humanity. Since there is no dedicated class for this, Jason uses exercises in his art room to build safe spaces and help students feel more comfortable in social settings. Take a listen to hear how you can implement something similar!

Grow Your Brand
Why taking risks is important & breaking through the assumptions that hold us back

Grow Your Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 38:34


In this episode I'm talking about risk-taking, types of risks and why taking risks is important to achieve our career and life goals. I also share 3 types assumptions: paradigmatic assumption, prescriptive assumption and causal assumption to help us understand more about how we can get in our own way or identify how others can get in their own way of reaching their potential.To access the episode on decision making I mention in this podcast head over to my episode published on Nov 30th, 2020: "Decision making in business for optimal growth"You can also access my short 3-minute video on the 7 step decision making process here: https://youtu.be/d53AFjxT5hQAnd if you're interested in the analytical video I put together taking a closer look at the "law" of attraction, you can watch it here: https://youtu.be/T7sHon8GZGkThis podcast is free, but it isn't cheap. To show your support you can leave a rating, write a review or share this episode with someone who'd like it. You can also buy me a cup of coffee on ko-fi here: https://ko-fi.com/laurenkress or hire me to speak at your event - to find out about my rates and availability, send me a message on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurenkress89/Acknowledgement of Country:In the spirit of reconciliation I would like to acknowledge that this podcast is recorded on the traditional land of the Bidjigal and Gadigal People and pay my respects to their Elders past and present. I would also like to acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. I pay my respect to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living and working on the land today - the land that always was and always will be Aboriginal Land.

MILLENIALS SEEKING WISDOM
How To Master Your Life: Taking Charge of Your Destiny with Angela Santi (Journey with Christian D Evans)

MILLENIALS SEEKING WISDOM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 54:49


Italian by birth and cosmopolitan by vocation, Angela is the one-of-a-kind Dolce Vita Leadership and Lifestyle Designer for ultra-high performers and global business leaders. She is fiercely protective of her craft - the art that is the science behind the good life. As such, she has pioneered the Four Pillars of Dolce Vita life mastery model. Working privately with a select group of elite business owners and executives, her Mediterranean-infused methodology ascends today's high flyers to unprecedented levels of success while living Le Dolce Vita (the signature Italian lifestyle), through her bespoke best-life blueprint, a transformational implementation of daily business and personal routines and habits falls effortlessly into place. Humanistic by nature, Angela's love for people initially led her to 20+ years in HR and Organizational Development.Angela believes that even those who have achieved what others have defined for them as the highest levels of success deserve to truly, deeply, love - and live - their one life to its fullest.She believes in a world where successful and lighthearted entrepreneurs create a top-down revolution, empowering every single person that works with them to do the same, and create a new culture of the workplace. Connect with Angela Santi: https://www.linkedin.com/in/angelasanti/ website:https://angelasanti.it/ #Master your life #Taking charge #Christiandevans #journeywithchristiandevans #destiny #meaningfulrelationship #bestlives #badhabits ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What is Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast and Why is Everyone Talking About it? __________ Get Mentored by Christian D Evans: www.christiandevans.com __________ You've probably heard about Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast by now. It seems like everyone is talking about it. So what exactly is Christian D Evans Podcast? And is it even worth the hype? Well friends, I'm answering all of your questions in this Podcast Section. I'm going to tell you everything you need to know about Journey with Christian D Evans Podcast, so be sure to check it out! __________ RESOURCES & LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS VIDEO:Personally Coached by Christian D Evans - APPLY HERE: https://www.christiandevans.com/ninja-marketer46592986 __________ BUSINESS/SOCIAL MEDIA TIPS:FREE $10 Million Dollar Training from $10M/yr CEO:https://www.christiandevans.com/10-million-ceo-explains53321492“How to impact the world as a Missionary? Ben & Colette Interview”:https://youtu.be/glfpJpL2oaA“Are Your Limiting Beliefs Stopping You from Achieving Your Goals?”:https://youtu.be/ZnNiZGU5YoA“How To Unleash your Potential with Carol Edwards”:https://youtu.be/ZfrIySHr2jA __________ CONNECT WITH ME: TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZTdujUXWv/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/evansandfamily/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christian_d_evans/?hl=en Journey with Christian Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/5BecmOVFSTLB1J08P3INSB?si=rUDkdD4EQ4yGyi9baaKwbQ

The Wild Feather
27. Helping entrepreneurs set boundries and achieve balance

The Wild Feather

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 36:19


Italian by birth and cosmopolitan by vocation, Angela is the one-of-a-kind Dolce VITA Lifestyle Designer for elite entrepreneurs, executives, and experts.  Working privately with a select group of ultra-high performers and global leaders, she has pioneered the Four Pillars of Dolce Vita life mastery model, her Mediterranean-infused methodology that ascends today's highflyers to unprecedented levels of success while living the sweet life.  Over the past decade, Angela has seen her signature framework optimize the personal and professional lives of those in the top tier of their industry, holding space for their biggest dreams and most expansive visions. Through her bespoke best-life blueprint, a transformational implementation of daily business and personal routines and habits falls effortlessly into place. It is a level of life alignment and comprehensive success that is born of Angela's unique perspective as a world traveler with a passion for the arts and music – as a tango dancer, and life enthusiast, living in Northern Italy. The world's sweet spot, where creativity, productivity, and Dolce Vita naturally collide. Humanistic by nature, Angela's love for people initially led her to 20+ years in HR and Organizational Development. It was reaching the pinnacle in corporate that helped Angela realize surface-level success is not sustainable. That her life, relationships, family, and passions needed to be nurtured. “Discipline is freedom!” This is her mantra. The pathway to thriving while living a meaningful life. A “disciplined rebel” – behind Angela's high achiever mentality beats the maverick heart of one who has always lived according to her own rules.  If Angela were a movie, she would be a remix of “Breakfast at Tiffany” AND “Easy Rider”: as she perfectly integrates and embodies the two opposites. Her style has a sophisticated, yet casual elegance; and her knowledge feeds her unassuming power. Angela believes that even those who have achieved what others have defined for them as the highest levels of success deserve to truly, deeply, love – and live – their one life to its fullest.  https://angelasanti.it/ (https://angelasanti.it/) https://www.linkedin.com/in/angelasanti/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/angelasanti/)

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus
Episode #42: Bonding Based Lovemaking, Family Constellations and the Power of the Subconscious Mind with Carolin Hauser, Author, Naturopathic Doctor, Humanistic Psychotherapist and Family Constellations Facilitator

Sex, Drugs, and Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 63:52


INTRODUCTION: Carolin Hauser, German-trained Naturopathic Doctor, Humanistic Psychotherapist, and Family Constellations Facilitator, is the author of the Award-winning book "Blossom: Your Seven Steps To Sexual Healing" and Creatrix of the Pleasure IQ and Blissful marriage Method. Carolin hosts the bi-weekly podcast "Divine Unity," a show on Love, Sex, and Spirituality. Carolin is an internationally recognized speaker and teacher on the subjects of spirituality, relationships, emotional healing, and Bonding Based Lovemaking. She combines her knowledge about energetic healing and conscious co-creation to help couples go from feeling frustrated, stuck, and disconnected in their intimacy to feeling deeply connected, excited, and fulfilled so that they can feel whole and fully expressed in life, and are able to create honeymoon feelings that last. Her work is based on the intersection of cutting-edge intimacy advice and practically applied quantum physics and biology. It shows how each individual's authentic and true self is the source of one's own good – a place of unlimited abundance, creativity, courage, and joyful existence.  INCLUDED IN THIS EPISODE (But not limited to): ·      Bonding Based Lovemaking ·      Family Constellations·      The Blissful Marriage Method·      Surviving Anorexia and Bulimia·      The Power of the Subconscious ·      The Cost of Evolution ·      What's Wrong With Orgasms?·      How to Have Sex Without Intercourse·      The Dangers of Overextending Ourselves·      How Dopamine is Connected with Becoming Boredom With Our Partners·      Let's Not Wait Till We Get to Heaven to Experience Paradise CONNECT WITH CAROLIN: Website & Books: http://carolinhauser.com/free-training/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/CarolinHauserFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarolinHauser/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carolinisabellehauser/Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarolinHauserLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carolin-hauser-1b103111/  CAROLIN'S RECOMMENDATIONS: Cupid's Poisoned Arrow: https://amzn.to/3ihYjww  CONNECT WITH DE'VANNON: Website: https://www.SexDrugsAndJesus.comYouTube: https://bit.ly/3daTqCMFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/SexDrugsAndJesus/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sexdrugsandjesuspodcast/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TabooTopixLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/devannonEmail: DeVannon@SexDrugsAndJesus.com  DE'VANNON'S RECOMMENDATIONS: ·      Pray Away Documentary (NETFLIX)o  https://www.netflix.com/title/81040370o  TRAILER: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tk_CqGVfxEs ·      Upwork: https://www.upwork.com·      FreeUp: https://freeup.net·      Disabled American Veterans (DAV): https://www.dav.org·      American Legion: https://www.legion.org INTERESTED IN PODCASTING OR BEING A GUEST?: ·      PodMatch is awesome! This application streamlines the process of finding guests for your show and also helps you find shows to be a guest on. The PodMatch Community is a part of this and that is where you can ask questions and get help from an entire network of people so that you save both money and time on your podcasting journey.https://podmatch.com/signup/devannon  TRANSCRIPT: [00:00:00]You're listening to the sex drugs and Jesus podcast, where we discuss whatever the fuck we want to! And yes, we can put sex and drugs and Jesus all in the same bed and still be all right at the end of the day. My name is De'Vannon and I'll be interviewing guests from every corner of this world as we dig into topics that are too risqué for the morning show, as we strive to help you understand what's really going on in your life.There is nothing off the table and we've got a lot to talk about. So let's dive right into this episode.De'Vannon: Good day to everyone. And thank you so much for joining the six jugs and Jesus podcast. Yet again, today, I'm talking with Carolyn Houser, she's a German train, the nature of pathic doctor and humanistic psychotherapist and family constellations facilitator.And this whole episode is about using unconventional means to solve life's problems. So in today's show, Carolyn is going to give us a unique look into orgasms. We're going to talk about how she survived [00:01:00] anorexia and bulemia, we're going to get into the dangers of overextending ourselves.And then we're going to talk about how dopamine is connected with becoming bored with our partners. And ultimately this is all about. How we can get paradise here on earth, rather than waiting till we die to get it in heaven. Have a good listen. Good morning, morning. Good morning, Caroline. Carolyn. Sorry. Welcome. Welcome. Welcome to the sex drugs and Jesus podcast. How are you today? My lovely lady.Carolin: I'm great. I'm excited to be here. De'Vannon: I'm so excited to, to have you, my dear. So you have quite a few, titles associated with your name. And so right off the off the bat, I want to, I want you to break down. What these different things are because anybody who researches you is going to see this. And it all sounds quite impressive and everything like that.But I want to know what it is. So [00:02:00] there's three things. It's your, your, your bio was telling me when I researched you that you're a German train nature, pathic doctor, a human stick, a humanistic psychotherapist, and then a family constellations facilitator. There's a whole, that's on like some cool shit. So what it is.Carolin: So naturally I was trying to germinate to be a naturopathic doctor. And naturopath is basically like a medical doctor. We just learn to treat things natural way, and we're not allowed to do surgery, or we're not allowed to treat infectious diseases and give immunizations, but then we have to be able to diagnose everything.And because it's more of a natural, You know, way of medicine, reason why I studied it in Germany, it allows you to touch people and basically do counseling or do therapy. Like psychotherapy, that's also including touch. So I was very much interested in the connection between our soul and our body and our and our body and that kind of stuff.So that's why I studied that. And then the humanistic [00:03:00] psychotherapist is also a little bit different than marriage, you know, a licensed marriage counselor. He wanted to stick second pair therapy is very much on principles where we include the whole human being. So my understanding is in the United States, when you're a marriage and family therapist, you're not allowed to touch people.And for me and everything that I've studied in terms of trauma healing, and really helping people heal their nervous systems, do have to work with the body and I've always been wanting to be able to, you know, help people and also touch them, or, you know, like there's a lot of body work modalities that are deeply. Healing that goes hand in hand with actually helping you heal your psychological stuff or the trauma that you've encountered. So for me, I've always looked at healing as something that goes hand in hand, and then the family constellations is a modality. That's an energy worker modality that really helps you basically when you have blocks.So when you don't, when you're keep doing the same thing over and over and over again. So when you have these patterns that keep you from really living your best life, the constellation processes of processing [00:04:00] can make visible what the block is and remove it in a sense. And it's a modality that saved my life.That's what I got. Well, I must've really anorexic and bulimic from 10 to 20 and nothing helps. And I received a family constellation session and within a short amount of time, I was able to let go of the addiction basically. And that's what got me into then, you know, studying all this other stuff.De'Vannon: You said you were interested in belief make from the age of 10 to 20.Carolin: Yes. De'Vannon: Well, I'm sorry that you had to go through that. I'm glad that you got got your deliverance girl. So when you went through the anorexia and bulemia, do you feel like that that wasn't any, what was the root of that? Was it an emotional problem? Was it problem? What do you think caused that?Carolin: Well, you know, I didn't know for 10 years I had no idea what it had costs it, you know, and then when I did this family constellation session, what came out was that so I had known that my [00:05:00] grandparents were wisdoms in the second world war because they were Germans living in Eastern Europe. So my grandmother and my mother's side, they were incarcerated from when my grandma was 10 till she was 20.Right. And so what came out in my constellation session, I set my soul in the sense, wanting to take on my grandmother's fade. So my grandmother was really like suffering with no food and, you know, not even she was in the winter from like 10 to 20, like they had a lot of hardship. And so my soul was going, let me take it on for you.Maybe I can make it better somehow. And we don't do this stuff consciously, subconsciously. I wanted to take on the pain basically. And that's so, so my eating disorder was kind of like a loyalty to my ancestors being starved on my specifically, my grandma. Being starved from when she was 10 to 20. So that's what came out.And then once, you know, once you can see it, and obviously it was a lot of emotion that?came out with it. There was no need for me to have the eating disorders anymore. Like they just went away. De'Vannon: So is [00:06:00] that particula