Podcasts about Psychotherapy

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Clinically applied psychology for desired behavior change

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    Best podcasts about Psychotherapy

    Show all podcasts related to psychotherapy

    Latest podcast episodes about Psychotherapy

    The Pulse
    Talking Therapy

    The Pulse

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 52:10


    When we're stressed, upset, feeling down, or off, most of us have things we do to decompress. Things we find therapeutic — maybe it's listening to music, working with our hands, or unplugging for a while.  But sometimes these mood boosters don't do the trick and it seems like it's time to talk to a professional.  During the pandemic, more people sought counseling than ever before. But the process of therapy can still seem a bit opaque. What exactly happens in therapy? How does it work? And which approach is right for which issues? On this episode, we get inside the heads of therapists to find out how they ply their craft, and what it takes to really feel better.  We hear stories about what happened when a city took a bold step toward providing free, virtual mental health services to its residents. Also: what happens when politics and therapy collide; how Freud's brainchild — psychoanalysis — is still relevant; and what it's like to grow up as the child of two shrinks. Also heard on this week's episode: We talk with veteran relationship therapist Argie Allen-Wilson about who should get therapy and why, how long therapy should last, and how to break up with your therapist. Allen-Wilson is CEO and co-founder of Family and Individual Therapeutic Healing (or F.A.I.T.H.) Inc. and Connections Matter.' Freud may have given rise to modern talk therapy — but these days, a lot of his ideas, from penis envy to the Oedipal complex, have fallen out of favor. So where does that leave modern psychoanalysis? Reporter Liz Tung talks with psychoanalysts Jonathan Shedler and Steven Kuchuck. For more on psychoanalysis, see Kuchuck's new book “The Relational Revolution in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy,” and Shedler's “That Was Then, This is Now: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy for the Rest of Us.” From the time she was a kid, Dara Lovitz had one big fear: vomiting. But when she became a mother, she knew things had to change. Lovitz explains her journey, step by step, from phobia to acceptance through exposure therapy. Her book, with psychologist David Yusko, is “Gag Reflections: Conquering a Fear of Vomit Through Exposure Therapy.” Can you imagine having a therapist around 24/7 — analyzing your behavior, your moods, maybe even your dreams? For journalist Micah Toub, that was just normal life growing up as the son of two shrinks. Nichole Currie reports. Toub's book is “Growing Up Jung: Coming of Age as the Son of Two Shrinks.” This episode was first broadcasted on January 7, 2022

    Weights and Plates Podcast
    #31 - The Emotions Behind Eating Disorders, Body Dysmorphia with Dr. David Puder

    Weights and Plates Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:40


    Dr. David Puder, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, athlete, lifter, and fan of the Starting Strength model, joins the podcast to discuss the emotions and drives that underly eating disorders, body dysmorphia, and the subclinical dissatisfaction with food and body composition that we often encounter in the gym.   In addition to seeing patients and doing therapy, Dr. Puder hosts a highly successful podcast about psychiatry, psychotherapy, and the broader world of mental health called Psychiatry and Psychotherapy: https://www.psychiatrypodcast.com https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/psychiatry-psychotherapy-podcast/id1335892956     Weights & Plates: https://weightsandplates.com Robert Santana on Instagram: @the_robert_santana   Trent Jones: @marmalade_cream https://www.jonesbarbellclub.com jonesbarbellclub@gmail.com

    Fearlessly Facing Fifty
    EP 156: What is Psychedelic Psychotherapy? Meet Heather Lee

    Fearlessly Facing Fifty

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 49:13


    Talks On Psychoanalysis
    Psychoanalysis as Politics: Aspiring to Think In the Age of Anti-Thinking - Ian S. Miller

    Talks On Psychoanalysis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 15:50


    This podcast discusses the political nature of psychoanalytic audacity in our era of fake news and disinformation. Today, gullible populations accustom themselves to the lies and misrepresentations of anti-thinking, often through the rumor-mills of social media, where any and every thought, no matter how bizarre, is leveled to an equality of consideration (Frankfurt, 2005; Hayden, 2018; Lipton, 2018; Miller, 2018). Opposed to this flattening of critical meaning, is the psychoanalytic model of enlightenment through mobilization of creative thinking.   Ian S. Miller is a clinical psychologist/psychoanalyst and writer based in Dublin. His most recent book is Clinical Spinoza: Integrating his Philosophy with Contemporary Therapeutic Practice (Routledge, 2022). He is also the author of Defining Psychoanalysis: Achieving a Vernacular Expression (Karnac, 2016); On Minding and Being Minded: Experiencing Bion & Beckett (Karnac, 2015); and co-author of Beckett and Bion: The (Im)patient Voice in Psychotherapy and Literature (Karnac, 2013) as well as On the Daily Work of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (Routledge, 2018). He serves as Associate Editor on the American Journal of Psychoanalysis.   Link to the paper https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MFzT5Mr5XOcf8nSkZqLC6piT3qU-_Q0o/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=112457875385152358388&rtpof=true&sd=true

    Darkness Radio
    S17 Ep78: PTSDreams: Healing Trauma and Decoding Your Soul w/ Linda Yael Schiller

    Darkness Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 74:10


    Darkness Radio presents PTSDreams: Healing Trauma and Decoding Your Soul with Psychotherapist/Author, Linda Yael Schiller! On today's Darkness Radio, we take a deep dive into your dreams with Linda Yael Schiller! We talk with Linda about healing PTSD and deep seeded trauma through dreamwork, the difference between dreaming about a dead relative and a dream visitation, visiting past lives in dreams, what those dreams mean, and so much more!! Linda's dreamwork treatment is able to provide support for healing at all levels of the self: mind, body, heart, and spirit.  Her Philosophy incorporates both deep healing at the source and practical coaching for daily life issues and dilemmas. Check out this show and her books for this innovative information! Learn more about Linda Yael Schiller and get her books here: https://lindayaelschiller.com/ #Paranormal #Supernatural #paranormalpodcasts #darknessradio #timdennis #lindayaelschiller #psychology #psychotherapy #ptsd #dreams #dreamwork #posttraumaticstressdisorder #trauma #dreamvisitations #pastlives #afterlife #spiritguides #astraltravel #astralrealm #astralbody #soul #healingsouls #ghosts #spirits

    Shrink Rap Radio Psychology Interviews: Exploring brain, body, mind, spirit, intuition, leadership, research, psychotherapy a
    #806 David E. Scharff MD Discussing International Perspectives on Psychoanalytic Therapy

    Shrink Rap Radio Psychology Interviews: Exploring brain, body, mind, spirit, intuition, leadership, research, psychotherapy a

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022


    David E. Scharff, M.D. is Co-Founder and Former Director, International Psychotherapy Institute; Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and Georgetown University; Supervising Analyst, International Institute for Psychoanalytic Training; Honorary Fellow, Tavistock Relationships, London; Former Chair, The IPA's Committee on Couple and Family Psychoanalysis; He has pioneered the use of technology for distance psychotherapy education and training since 1998. He is editor of the journal Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy in China, and Director of the Training Programs in Analytic Couple and Family Therapy in Beijing and Moscow. He is a Child and Adult Analyst in Private Practice with children, adults, couples and families in Chevy Chase, Maryland. With Dr. Jill Scharff, he is the 2021 winner of the Mary Sigourney Award in Psychoanalysis, the most prestigious award in the field. Dr. Scharff has been author and editor of more than 30 books, with foundational texts on family, couple and individualpsychoanalytic therapy, and innovative training of psychotherapists and psychoanalysts. He has organized more than 100 conferences in the United States and abroad, and taught internationally on five continents including 30 countries. His recent initiatives involve organizing training programs in China and Russia. He is founder of a journal called “Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy in China.” His book “The Sexual Relationship” in 1982 has been followed by more than 30 books and 100 articles including the classics“Object Relations Family Therapy” and “Object Relations Couple Therapy”, both with Jill Savege Scharff. Recent publications have included “Psychoanalytic Couple Therapy” edited with Jill Scharff. His most recent books are “The Use of the Self in Psychoanalysis,” (2019) and “Marriage and Family in Modern China: A Psychoanalytic Exploration” (Routledge, 2021). Sign up for 10% off of Shrink Rap Radio CE credits at the Zur Institute

    My Therapist's A Witch
    3: Practices for PMDD - Tracking Your Cycle, Holistic Approaches, and Removing the Taboo

    My Therapist's A Witch

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 53:25


    In this episode I'm sharing some of the key practices I've use to manage my PMDD. One that's been particularly useful for me is consistently tracking my movement through different phases of my cycle, and I give a detailed explanation of how I do that. I also talk a bit about my personal story, and how we can change our relationship with our challenges - which then allows us to change our experience of them. Topics: 0:00: Welcome2:30: What my PMDD looks like 8:00: What's PMDD? 16:00: Depression and suicidality 21:00: Holistic and spiritual approaches 24:30: Practices 30:00: Separating thoughts from who you are 35:00: Ritualizing 40:00: Framing the phases 51:15: The hero's journey About Elizabeth: Elizabeth Ferreira is a somatic psychotherapist in training. Her approach to mental health is holistic, non-judgmental, and centered in the belief that all beings have the capacity to heal, grow, and reduce suffering.Follow Me On:YouTubeInstagram

    PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
    PsychEd Episode 45: Perinatal Psychiatry with Dr. Tuong Vi Nguyen

    PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 40:17


    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers perinatal psychiatry with Dr. Tuong Vi Nguyen, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, McGill University and Scientist and Scientist, RI-MUHC, Brain Repair and Integrative Neuroscience (BRaIN) Program, Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation.    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:   By the end of this episode, you should be able to… Define the field of perinatal psychiatry Describe the key issues that should be addressed in pre-conception psychiatric counseling Discuss the management approach for prescribing medications during pregnancy Recognize the prevalence of mood disorders during the perinatal period Recall the diagnostic criteria for postpartum depression Consider the risk factors and explanatory models for postpartum depression Discuss the use of screening tools for postpartum depression Outline the treatment for postpartum depression Describe the clinical presentation of postpartum psychosis and recognize the urgency of this condition List important risk factors for postpartum psychosis Discuss the management for postpartum psychosis   Guest: Dr. Tuong Vi Nguyen   Hosts: Nima Nahiddi (PGY4), Audrey Le (PGY1), and Arielle Geist (PGY2)    Produced by: Nima Nahiddi (PGY4), Audrey Le (PGY1), Rebecca Marsh (PGY2) and Arielle Geist (PGY2)    Audio editing by: Audrey Le   Show notes by: Arielle Geist    Interview content: Introduction - 00:00 Learning objectives - 00:43 Defining the field of perinatal psychiatry - 01:55 Key issues to address in preconception counseling - 02:50 Management approach for prescribing medications during pregnancy - 07:00 Prevalence of mood disorders during the perinatal period - 12:11 Diagnostic criteria for postpartum depression - 14:05 Differentiating postpartum psychosis from postpartum depression - 16:52 Risk factors and explanatory models for postpartum depression - 18:58 Screening tools for postpartum depression - 20:15 Treatment for postpartum depression - 22:13 Pharmacotherapy - 22:20 Psychotherapy - 27:34 Clinical presentation of postpartum psychosis - 29:07 Risk factors for postpartum psychosis - 30:43 Postpartum psychosis prognosis and impacts on attachment- 32:57 Management of postpartum psychosis -35:30 Closing comments - 38:00   Resources: Bérard, A., Zhao, J. P., & Sheehy, O. (2017). Antidepressant use during pregnancy and the risk of major congenital malformations in a cohort of depressed pregnant women: an updated analysis of the Quebec Pregnancy Cohort. BMJ open, 7(1), e013372. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013372 Boukhris, T., Sheehy, O., Mottron, L., & Bérard, A. (2016). Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children. Jama Pediatrics, 170(2), 117-24. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3356. Brown, A. S., Gyllenberg, D., Malm, H., McKeague, I. W., Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S., Artama, M., Gissler, M., Cheslack-Postava, K., Weissman, M. M., Gingrich, J. A., & Sourander, A. (2016). Association of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Exposure During Pregnancy With Speech, Scholastic, and Motor Disorders in Offspring. JAMA psychiatry, 73(11), 1163–1170. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.2594 Cohen, J. , Hernández-Díaz, S. , Bateman, B. , Park, Y. , Desai, R. , Gray, K. , Patorno, E. , Mogun, H. & Huybrechts, K. (2017). Placental Complications Associated With Psychostimulant Use in Pregnancy. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 130(6), 1192-1201. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002362. Huybrechts, K. F., Hernández-Díaz, S., Patorno, E., Desai, R. J., Mogun, H., Dejene, S. Z., Cohen, J. M., Panchaud, A., Cohen, L., & Bateman, B. T. (2016). Antipsychotic Use in Pregnancy and the Risk for Congenital Malformations. JAMA psychiatry, 73(9), 938–946. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.1520 Huybrechts, K. F., Palmsten, K., Avorn, J., Cohen, L. S., Holmes, L. B., Franklin, J. M., Mogun, H., Levin, R., Kowal, M., Setoguchi, S., & Hernández-Díaz, S. (2014). Antidepressant use in pregnancy and the risk of cardiac defects. The New England Journal of Medicine, 370(25), 2397–2407. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1312828 Imaz, M. L., Oriolo, G., Torra, M., Soy, D., García-Esteve, L., & Martin-Santos, R. (2018). Clozapine Use During Pregnancy and Lactation: A Case-Series Report. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 9, 264. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2018.00264 Nörby, U., Forsberg, L., Wide, K., Sjörs, G., Winbladh, B., & Källén, K. (2016). Neonatal Morbidity After Maternal Use of Antidepressant Drugs During Pregnancy. Pediatrics, 138(5), e20160181. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-0181 Nörby, U., Winbladh, B., & Källén, K. (2017). Perinatal Outcomes After Treatment With ADHD Medication During Pregnancy. Pediatrics, 140(6), e20170747. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0747 Reis, M., & Källén, B. (2013). Combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and sedatives/hypnotics during pregnancy: risk of relatively severe congenital malformations or cardiac defects. A registered study. BMJ Open, 3, e002166. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-002166 Sundram S. (2006). Cannabis and neurodevelopment: implications for psychiatric disorders. Human psychopharmacology, 21(4), 245–254. https://doi.org/10.1002/hup.762   References: Boland, R., Verduin, M., & Ruiz, P. (2021). Psychopharmacology. In Kaplan & Sadock's synopsis of psychiatry (Twelfth edition.). Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer. Jones, I., Chandra, P.S., Dazzan, P., & Howard, L.K. (2014). Bipolar disorder, affective psychosis, and schizophrenia in pregnancy and the post-partum period. Lancet, 384(9956), 1789-1799. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61278-2. Nieldson, D., Videbech, P., Hedegaard, M., Dalby, J., & Secher, N.J. (2005). Postpartum depression: identification of women at risk. An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 107(10), 1210-1217. https://doi-org.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2000.tb11609.x Schiller, C.E., Meltzer-Brody, S., & Rubinow, D.R. (2015). The role of reproductive hormones in postpartum depression. CNS Spectrums, 20(1), 48-59. doi: 10.1017/S1092852914000480 Viguera, A. (2021). Mild to moderate postpartum unipolar major depression: Treatment. UpToDate. Accessed 2021-01-18. Wisner, K.L., Sit, D.K.Y., & McShea, M.C. (2013). Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings. JAMA Psychiatry, 70(5), 490-498. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.87   CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association. For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast), Facebook (PsychEd Podcast), and Instagram (@psyched.podcast). You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. For more information, visit our website at psychedpodcast.org.

    PVRoundup Podcast
    FDA authorizes mRNA COVID-19 vaccines for children as young as 6 months

    PVRoundup Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 6:38


    What are the details of the COVID-19 vaccine approvals in children under 5? Find out this and more in today's PV Roundup podcast.

    The Science of Psychotherapy
    Jay Noricks talks about parts and memory therapy

    The Science of Psychotherapy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 48:57


    We catch up with Jay Noricks to talk about his book Parts and Memory Therapy: The Clinical Guide and his approach to therapy. Find out more at https://partsandmemorytherapy.com/ Thanks for listening! Support us by becoming a subscriber to The Science of Psychotherapy Academy! Or you can simply buy us a cup of coffee! Please leave a review! (Reviews are fabulously important to us! On your podcast player you should find an option to review at the bottom of the main page for the podcast - after the list of available episodes) - Here's a link for iTunes. And please subscribe to our show!  You can also find our podcast at: The Science of Psychotherapy Podcast Homepage If you want more great science of Psychotherapy please visit our website thescienceofpsychotherapy.com Grab a copy of our latest book! The Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Psychotherapy

    Mental Status
    MS41: Liza Mordkovich, Licensed Social Worker, talks feeling guilty when making changes—and doing it anyway

    Mental Status

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 49:22


    About Today's Guest:Liza Mordkovich is a Licensed Social Worker, Licensed Art Therapist, Psychotherapist and Coach. She is passionate about helping individuals conquer anxiety, addiction, stress and working through perinatal mood disorders. Liza combines evidence based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and dialectic behavioral therapy (DBT) to help individuals cope with emotional distress while drawing from mindfulness, meditation, hypnotherapy, art therapy and trauma focused approaches to best tailor treatment.Liza is the the Founder and Director of Brooklyn Center for Mindfulness and Psychotherapy. You can find her on instagram at @brooklynmindful, on Facebook, or on the Brooklyn Mindful website.Credits, links & other things: Intro & Outro Music: DriftMaster by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com Mental Status IG: @mentalstatuspod Talk to me: mentalstatuspod [at] gmail.com Apply to be a guest on this show: Interviewee Interest form

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
    My White Coat Doesn't Fit

    Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


    “My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget

    Life Transformations
    Upside of a Chaotic Child [Encore]

    Life Transformations

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


    Life Transformations with Michael Hart Aired: June 27th, 2022 on CHRI Radio 99.1FM in Ottawa, Canada. For questions or to schedule an appointment with Elim Counselling Services, call 1-877-544-ELIM(3546) or email mhart@elimcounsellingministry.com. Visit elimcounsellingministry.com for more information. For more CHRI shows, visit chri.ca

    American Sex Podcast
    The BDSM Test w/ Midori & Joe Zarate-Sanderlin - Ep 192

    American Sex Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 134:31


    “The BDSM Test” is infamous in the kink community and beyond. Since 2014, thousands have proudly posted results like a badge of honor on FetLife profiles. We use it as a roadmap, educational tool, and kink negotiation starter. It's even gone vanilla as the focus of social media challenges and pop magazine writeups. But is this kink subculture phenomenon all it's cracked up to be? While some find it helpful & validating, many say it's othering, stigmatizing, and normalizes red-flag behavior disguised as “kink.” Midori & kinky therapist Joe Zarate-Sanderlin join us on ep 192 to deconstruct the BDSM test question by question + explore its wider impact. Why don't we scrutinize it the same way vet other educational sources? Who wrote this kink test, why, and what are they using the massive amount of data they're collecting about our deviant desires for? Turns out, it's a bit of a mystery…   Midori Bio “Your Fairy God-Auntie of Kink. Exploding Expectations. Challenging Conventions.” Trailblazing educator, sexologist, artist, and irritant to banality, Midori founded Rope Dojo and ForteFemme: Women's Dominance Intensive. She penned the first English instruction book on Shibari, “Seductive Art of Japanese Bondage” in 2001, paving the way for the popularity of rope. Dan Savage calls her the “Super Nova of Kink,” while others affectionately call her Auntie Midori for her cool, tell-it-like-it-is, funny, reality-based teaching. She is also the author of “Wild Side Sex,” “Master Han's Daughter,” and “Silk Threads.” Education, Coaching, Private Learning & Art: https://planetmidori.com. Special membership perks! Learn, laugh, and enjoy her special online classes, events, and art at www.patreon.com/PlanetMidori  where she is working on her next shibari book!   Joe Zarate-Sanderlin Bio "Joe Zarate-Sanderlin, an Assigned Male at Birth non-binary person (pronouns: they/them/theirs), came of age in the New York City kink scene in the late 1990s and early 2000s and they have connections in the Boston and San Francisco kink communities. They are a California Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with a private practice in San Francisco where they specialize in working with gender, sexuality, and relationship diversity. They teach several courses at Golden Gate University and were recognized as an Outstanding Adjunct Professor for 2022. They provide training and consultation regarding Talking to Clients about Sex, Gender in Psychotherapy, Open Relationships, BDSM Relationships, and other topics. In addition to private practice, their clinical experience includes being supervised by Dossie Easton for two and half years plus volunteering at a Catholic school for three years, a continuation high school for one year, and at a low-fee clinic for four years.  They worked for the Burning Man Emergency Services Department for ten years, both in the Nevada desert and in the streets of San Francisco. In their spare time, they ski, coach and referee soccer, brew kombucha, dance to 80s music, and parent elementary-aged old twins."   Episode 192 Links Midori Twitter https://twitter.com/PlanetMidori Midori Instagram https://www.instagram.com/planetmidori/ Midori Newsletter https://www.fhp-inc.com/newsletter Midori class/event calendar http://www.FHP-Inc.com/classes Midori's Patreon https://www.patreon.com/PlanetMidori/ Joe Zarate-Sanderlin Twitter https://twitter.com/jzsmft Joe Zarate-Sanderlin Website http://www.jzsmft.com/ Joe Zarate-Sanderlin Email: joe@jzsmft.com Joe Zarate-Sanderlin  GGU Presents: Empathic Communication https://tinyurl.com/GGU-Empathy Joe Zarate-Sanderlin Gender Inclusive Language https://tinyurl.com/GGU-Gender Joe Zarate-Sanderlin Rebel Therapist: Express Yourself https://rebeltherapist.me/podcast/93 The BDSM Test http://BDSMTest.org @FocusedOnInfinity “Welcome to America” https://www.tiktok.com/@focusedoninfinity/video/7113012283181190442?is_from_webapp=1&sender_device=pc&web_id=6901962179530294789 @MargaretCho “Don't Be Scared” https://www.tiktok.com/@themargaretcho/video/7112909096608730410?is_from_webapp=1&sender_device=pc&web_id=6901962179530294789 TASHRA -THE ALTERNATIVE SEXUALITIES HEALTH RESEARCH ALLIANCE https://www.tashra.org/ CARAS - The Community-Academic Consortium for Research on Alternative Sexualities https://www.carasresearch.org/ Sexual Health Alliance Kink Informed Certification Program for Therapists & Care Professionals https://sexualhealthalliance.com/kink-informed-certification-program Romancing the Shadow: Challenging Limiting Beliefs Through Kink- Midori https://zippermagazine.com/challenginglimiting-beliefs-through-kink/ Additional Links ZipperMagazine.com https://zippermagazine.com/ Zipper Magazine Instagram https://www.instagram.com/zippermagdotcom/ Zipper Magazine Twitter https://twitter.com/ZipperMagDotcom Zipper Magazine Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Zipper-Magazine-113123824749292 Zipper Magazine Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxFDRtDhukxyQ_9t-Xfo2-w Open Deeply Podcast http://opendeeplypodcast.com Sunny Megatron TikTok https://www.tiktok.com/@sunnymegatron Ken's charity DnD game Mondays 4pm-7pm PT https://www.twitch.tv/thunderpantsacademy American Sex Podcast Discord Community http://bit.ly/discordasp American Sex Podcast Patreon http://patreon.com/americansex Kink Academy Online BDSM Learning Library http://bit.ly/kinkacademy Sunny's Free Kink Negotiation & Scene Planning Mini-Workbook https://sunnymegatron.gumroad.com/l/negotiationwb   Episode 192 Sponsor & Affiliate Discount Codes/Links *by using our links & codes you can help support our work while saving a few bucks too—win/win! 15% off AND free shipping when you go to http://LikeAKitten.com/sunny OR enter code SUNNY at checkout Get up to 2 free months of podcasting service with Libsyn using this link https://signup.libsyn.com/?promo_code=SUNNY or use code SUNNY Hot & Healthy Erotic Humiliation recorded class https://gum.co/humiliationclass Prostate Play for Beginners (recorded class) from Sugar Baltimore https://www.sugartheshop.com/prostate-milking-for-beginners.html Sunny & Ken's classes on Kink Academy http://bit.ly/kinkacademyelectric & http://bit.ly/kinkacademyhumiliation 10% off American Sex Podcast & Sunny Megatron merch with code SUNNY (t-shirts, mugs, phone cases & more) http://bit.ly/sunnyshirts 15% off your order at Lovehoney when you use this link http://bit.ly/lovehoney15 This link can be a little wonky and does not keep tracking cookies. If the discount does not show up in your cart (or disappears after you shop around on the site), access the site with that link again. Your items will still be in your cart & the discount will appear) 15% off everything at Lelo.com with code SUNNY 10% off everything (with minor restrictions) online from woman-owned, feminist, trans & queer-friendly Early To Bed http://bit.ly/sunnyetb with code SUNNY 10% off everything from Fun Factory using this link http://bit.ly/sunnyfunfactory and the code SUNNY at checkout 15% off most items from Stockroom https://bit.ly/sunnystockroom15 with code SUNNY _______________________________________________________________ –Submit your BDSM & sex advice questions by email to americansexpodcast@gmail.com –To support American Sex podcast, please visit http://patreon.com/americansex (plus you'll get all episodes early, secret episodes, bonus stories from guests, on-air shout-outs, stuff in the mail & more!) –Get friendly with us on Twitter at @AmericanSexPod or visit sunnymegatron.com or americansexpodcast.com –Join our mailing list by visiting http://sunnymegatron.com/newsletter Sunny & Ken, xo!

    The Adulting With ADHD Podcast
    88 - Adverse Childhood Experiences with Nicoleta Porojanu

    The Adulting With ADHD Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 28:07


    [Pssst … To access the podcast archives, visit patreon.com/adultingwithadhd.] In this episode, I'm joined by therapist Nicoleta Porojanu, who uses her clinical background and personal experience in trauma to help others find healing.  Highlights: Nicoleta's story Adverse Childhood Experiences defined Psychotherapy's role in addressing ACEs - is it enough on its own? How does a patient know when the healing is done? Is it ever done? Mentions/links: https://nicoletaporojanu.com/ https://nicoletaporojanu.com/resources/ https://www.facebook.com/nicoletaporojanupage https://nicoletaporojanu.com/open-to-happiness-podcast/  

    The Codependummy Podcast
    Hypnotherapy and Codependency with Shara Prophet

    The Codependummy Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:01


    -What is hypnotherapy and how can it help one heal from codependency? -With hypnosis, what are the short-term and long-term benefits? -If we feel “addicted” to our codependent relationships, how can we interrupt our patterns to create new ones? Thank you for tuning in! This week, I sat down with Ms. Shara Prophet, hypnotherapist, to talk all about hypnotherapy and how it can help promote our healing from codependency. You'll hear Shara share about her work as a hypnotherapist, her own journey of healing from codependency, and how she helps her clients on a daily basis overcome their bad habits, addictions, and toxic patterns. Is codependency an addiction that hypnotherapy can help treat? Shara weighs in and then provides us with helpful steps we can take to interrupt our codependent patterns through self-hypnosis. It's a must-listen! More on this episode's guest: Shara Prophet is a speaker, teacher, author, life coach, Hypnotherapist, and mystic. She is the founder of Open Door Hypnosis, a global private hypnotherapy practice and The B.E.M.A.G.I.C.  School, an online learning institute for Spiritual Sciences and personal development. Shara's passion is helping others reach their full potentional by showing them how to harness the power of their subconscious mind to heal themselves. Her motto is “Blessed is she who knows hypnosis is key.” Free 20-minute phone consultation, https://hypnosishealing.as.me/FREECONSULT opendoorhypnosis.com https://www.facebook.com/hypnosisiskey/ https://www.instagram.com/sharaprophet_cht/ linktr.ee/sharaprophet_cht https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharaprophet Helpful links for the podcast: www.codependummy.com www.codependummy.com/toolsforhealing JOIN OUR MAILING LIST FOR ALL THINGS CODEPENDUMMY: https://keap.app/contact-us/2302598426037497  Make a donation via PAYPAL to support the show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=RJ3PSNZ4AF7QC  More deets on this episode: We start with our “typical two” and hear Shara's definition of codependency and experiences of it from her own life.  Shara then describes to us what hypnotherapy is, what her work as a hypnotherapist entails, and how we can integrate hypnosis to promote our healing from codependency.  We explore the short-term and long-term benefits of hypnosis, which, despite the initial impact, requires our ongoing commitment to making choices that promote our healing.  Shara walks us through ways that we can interrupt our codependent partners through awarfeness, activating oru minds, listening to our bodies, and creating new “anchors” to promote new patterns.  Thanks for coming on Shara! Take her up on her offer for a free 20-minute consultation: Free 20-minute phone consultation, https://hypnosishealing.as.me/FREECONSULT Questions for you, my dear listener:  What are your thoughts on Shara's definition of codependency? How can you relate to Shara's experiences of codependency from her own life? Do you sense that your codependency is like an addiction to certain people, patterns, and roles? After hearing about hypnotherapy, is it something you want to incorporate into your healing journey from codependency? What is one codependent pattern you can interrupt with the steps Shara introduced to us? Thank you for listening! Helpful links: www.codependummy.com www.codependummy.com/toolsforhealing marissa@codependummy.com JOIN OUR MAILING LIST FOR ALL THINGS CODEPENDUMMY: https://keap.app/contact-us/2302598426037497  Make a donation to support the show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=RJ3PSNZ4AF7QC  https://linktr.ee/codependummy Please leave a rating & review. A subscribe and share is welcomed! RRSS!

    Adventures Through The Mind
    Getting Discomfortable With Shame | A.J. Bond ~ ATTMind 162

    Adventures Through The Mind

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 84:39


    A.J. Bond—author of Discomfortable: What Is Shame and How Can We Break Its Hold—joins us on Adventures Through The Mind to talk about what shame is, what it feels like, and how it impacts our sense of self and perception of the world. We also talk about healthy vs unhealthy shame; internal vs. external shame; attachment styles and shame's link to our developmental past and early relationship with our parents; intimacy and how shame hinders our ability to truly connect with others; unconditional love and ayahuasca's impact on AJ's healing through shame; and, of course, how to navigate shame in a way that supports healing the wounds around which our shame directs us. ... For links to A.J.'s work, full show notes, and a link to watch this episode in video, head to bit.ly/ATTMind162 *** FULL TOPICS BREAKDOWN BELOW *** ... This episode is sponsored by Maps of the Mind and their upcoming workshop Facilitating Psychedelic Experiences, happening on Saturday, July 2nd More details can be found here: mapsofthemind.com/facilitating-psychedelic-experiences-workshop/ Use discount code JESSO40 in the section that says 'have a coupon' to get a ticket for £40 ... SUPPORT THE PODCAST Patreon: https://patreon.com/jameswjesso Paypal Donation: https://www.paypal.com/biz/fund?id=383635S3BKJVS Merchandise:  https://www.jameswjesso.com/shop/ More Options: https://www.jameswjesso.com/support Newsletter:  https://www.jameswjesso.com/newsletter *** Extra BIG thanks to my patrons on Patreon for helping keep this podcast alive! Especially my $23+ patrons, Andreas D, Clea S, Joe A, Ian C, Yvette FC, Chuck W, Alex F, Eliz C, Nathan B, Nick M, & Chloe C ***** Episode Breakdown (0:00) Opening | Ad for upcoming workshop sponsoring this video (6:01) Interview Begins (6:31) Why shame is an important topic for psychedelic culture (8:31) Shame: what it is and what its made of (11:57) The affect of shame (13:34) Shame as an evolutionary survival adaptation  (21:07 ) Healthy vs. unhealthy shame (24:30) Internal vs. external Shame (27:58) Narcissism, canceling, and toxic shame (34:35) Shame's link to our developmental past and early relationship with our parents (40:01) Healing the past to liberate ourselves from unhealthy shame | getting discomfortable with shame (46:18) Why how we do a thing matters as much as the thing we do (51:58) Bringing our shame healing/liberation to a systemic level (55:40) All the ways shame will weave itself into your healing (57:32) Intimacy and how shame hinders our ability to truly connect with others (58:18) Connection and relationship is essential components of our healing  (1:05:07 ) Unconditional love and ayahuasca's impact on AJ's healing through shame (1:11:59) Develop a meta-scaffolding that allows us to be with our reactivity in a healthy way (1:14:06) Some basic steps for navigating shame (1:18:26) Follow-up and social links (1:20:41) Outro | Info about workshop sponsoring this video ***** SUPPORT THE PODCAST Patreon: https://patreon.com/jameswjesso Paypal Donation: https://www.paypal.com/biz/fund?id=383635S3BKJVS Merchandise:  https://www.jameswjesso.com/shop/ More Options: https://www.jameswjesso.com/support Newsletter:  https://www.jameswjesso.com/newsletter OR you can buy a copy of one of my books! Decomposing The Shadow: Lessons From The Psilocybin Mushroom – https://www.jameswjesso.com/decomposing-the-shadow/ The True Light Of Darkness — https://www.jameswjesso.com/true-light-darkness/

    Psychoanalytic Thinking with Dr Don Carveth
    Psychoanalysis as Meditation

    Psychoanalytic Thinking with Dr Don Carveth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 28:59


    In this episode, Dr Carveth discusses psychoanalysis as meditation: Observing ego. Inner watcher. Symbolic subject vs. Imaginary Ego. Deconstruction. Disillusionment with disillusionment. Dr Carveth works with Aodhán Moran to produce this podcast. If you'd like to inquire about Aodhán's services, contact him here.

    Chicago Psychology Podcast
    Modern Brides & Grooms: Weddings in the Age of Marriage Equality with Mark O'Connell, LCSW

    Chicago Psychology Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 43:48


    Mark O'Connell is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and an actor. He holds degrees in social work from Hunter College in NYC as well as an MFA in acting from the Trinity Rep Conservatory. He is also the author of The Performing Art of Therapy, available from Routledge Press. He is also the author of Modern Brides & Modern Grooms: A Guide to Planning Straight, Gay & Other Nontraditional 21st Century Weddings. Mark joins Dr. Hoye to discuss Modern Brides & Grooms.When things are just abided unconsciously, we lose sight of intention and meaning. Mark's book re-affirms and reinvigorates the idea of the wedding as a meaning-making, social event, just as theatre is, especially participatory theatre. In essence, the legalization of same sex marriage has afforded everyone the opportunity to think outside of the box regarding their marriages and social constructs. It's freeing for everyone. In this episode we cover:• No longer a need for a contra attitude to things outside the “norm.”•Emotional Engulfment & Abandonment in relationships and how couples can consciously navigate these attachment roles•Utilizing wedding planning as a way to “test drive” your relationship and your •Wedding as Theatre •Creativity in planning•Consciously creating ceremony and ritual •The Supreme Court's current decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade and it's possible effect on other decisionsThe Book:https://markoconnelltherapist.com/books/modern-brides-modern-grooms/Mark O'Connell's Website:https://markoconnelltherapist.com The Psychology Talk Podcast is a unique conversation about psychology around the globe. Your host Dr. Scott Hoye discusses psychology with mental health practitioners and experts to keep you informed about issues and trends in the industry. https://psych-talk.comhttps://www.instagram.com/psychtalkpodcast/

    My Therapist's A Witch
    2: Polyvagal Theory, and Finding What Works for You

    My Therapist's A Witch

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 46:45


    Learning how to resource and regulate yourself, particularly if you have any form of neurodivergence, can be really challenging. On today's episode I share lessons from Polyvagal Theory that have been very helpful for me and those I've worked with. We then transition into an exploration focused on finding and claiming what works for YOU, allowing those practices to be natural sources of joy and ease without getting caught up in the views and judgements of other people.Timestamps:0:00: Welcome and grounding practice3:40: Polyvagal theory, and how to use it15:50: Finding what actually regulates you23:30: Reminders and intentions29:20: Claiming your weird33:30: "What would you do if everything were a blank slate?"41:30: Closing practiceAbout Elizabeth: Elizabeth Ferreira is a somatic psychotherapist in training. Her approach to mental health is holistic, non-judgmental, and centered in the belief that all beings have the capacity to heal, grow, and reduce suffering.Follow Me On:YouTubeInstagram

    Psych With Mike
    Men in Psychotherapy

    Psych With Mike

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:52


    This week we are joined by St. Louis Professional Counselor, Michelle Steeg. Michelle, Brett, and. I discuss men in psychotherapy.   Contact Michelle https://michellesteeg.com/   What kind of issues do men face? https://www.goodtherapy.org/learn-about-therapy/issues/men-issues  

    Battered Souls with Dylan Charles
    Battered Souls #047 - Psychotherapy & Sacred Medicine with Gerard Artesona

    Battered Souls with Dylan Charles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 58:32


    In this episode of Battered Souls I speak with psychotherapist and healer Gerard Artesona. Gerard has a long history of working with ayahuasca, and uses these experiences to shape his perspective in his personal psychotherapy practice. We talked about his story of growing up in a somewhat dysfunctional family and feeling like an outsider, his work with clients, his perspectives on psychology, and how ayahuasca has changed his life. Enjoy! _Dylan Charles Connect with Gerard Email - atmacore@gmail.com His Website - www.Gerardamft.com  ———————————— Get my weekly newsletter, ‘On The Path' … https://bit.ly/3jdhXL5 Access a FREE 15-minute coaching session… https://bit.ly/2XM2xFY Visit us on the web – Battered Souls Stop by Dylan's site – Waking Times ———————————— Support Battered Souls with Cryptos! BITCOIN – 1PgkuMTxVwVEhgbKuXQQ1Qi8kYzsX2fn68 ETHEREUM – 0xaec9c156C492d964Ad6C8bD1377152b85Be230F6 ————————————

    Better Together with Maria Menounos
    486. Heal PTSD & Trauma using this Psychotherapy Technique with EMDR Therapist Tammy Valicenti

    Better Together with Maria Menounos

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 51:24


    Originally Aired: Dec 16, 2019 June is PTSD awareness month, we are rerunning our interview with psychotherapist Tammy Valicenti.  How have we gone this long without hearing about EMDR-Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing? The team feels indebted to Tammy Valicenti, a practicing psychotherapist and trauma recovery specialist with expertise in trauma and addiction recovery, for teaching us about this therapy that is helping heal people with incredible success rates. EMDR helps the patient process and resolve stored memories using an eight-phase approach. Practitioners initially used it to treat people with traumatic memories, but they now use it to treat a variety of disorders, including: phobias, PTSD, anxiety, chronic pain and depression. EMDR addresses the past experience of trauma, the present triggers for dysfunctional emotions and beliefs, and the positive experience needed to improve future mental and emotional functioning. About Tammy: Tammy Valicenti, LICSW is the founder of The Transformation Center located in the Berkshire hills of Massachusetts. She is a practicing psychotherapist with expertise in trauma and addiction recovery. Tammy works with clients nationally and internationally and has renowned success utilizing EMDR to treat trauma, anxiety and panic as well as to enhance performance for actors and entrepreneurs. Tammy has over twenty years of experience treating various forms of trauma and addiction, and has helped foster life-changing results for survivors of rape and sexual assault. As a result of her success, Tammy has been called on by leading addiction treatment centers in the U.S. to perform EMDR therapy for their inpatient clients.

    The Ḥabura
    Taking Breaks from Torah Study - Senior Rabbi Dweck

    The Ḥabura

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:32


    Rabbi Joseph Dweck is the Senior Rabbi of the S&P Sephardi Community of the UK - the country's oldest Jewish community established in 1656. He was elected to this position in 2013, with a 270–4 vote, a margin believed to be the largest in UK synagogue history.Rabbi Dweck is American born, and studied in Jerusalem at Yeshiva Hazon Ovadia under the tutelage of former Sephardi Chief Rabbi Ovadia Yosef. Rabbi Dweck received his rabbinic ordination from Rabbi Ovadia Yosef under the auspices of the Sephardic Rabbinical College of Brooklyn, led by Rabbi Shimon Alouf and Rabbi Harold Sutton. He has a Master of Arts Degree in Jewish Education from Middlesex University in conjunction with The London School of Jewish Studies, and he is working toward a Masters in Psychotherapy at Regents University London.We are an online and global Bet Midrash with international students, striving to know God by embracing the world through the lens of Torah. Web: www.TheHabura.com WhatsApp: https://chat.whatsapp.com/LAurH2Lw3y92gF31PhzN42Instagram: @TheHabura Facebook: The Habura A project of the Senior Rabbi's Office (www.seniorra