Podcasts about levers

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Best podcasts about levers

Latest podcast episodes about levers

Jorgenson's Soundbox
SquidDAO: Web3 Project Deep-Dive: Part Crypto Hedge Fund, Part NFT DAO. An Anonymous Conspiracy for Mutual Enrichment

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 109:05


SquidDAO is an “Economic Flywheel denominated in Ethereum.” What does that mean? Good question, I wondered too. It's basically a conspiracy amongst anonymous people on the internet to make money together. And anyone can join! I dug in with a few members to see what it's all about.  They sell NFTs, they issue tokens, they invest a treasury… they earn money! And they share it with token and NFT holders.  This is my first pseudonymous podcast as well as the longest one I've ever done. In this episode, we explore a relatively new web3 project, Squid DAO, with a few guys I only know by their online handles. Squid DAO is described as an economic flywheel backed by Ethereum and is part company, part DeFi investment fund, and part NFT project. SQUID is currently trading for roughly the value of the assets it holds in the treasury, which could make it a great investment opportunity. Squid DAO is a great microcosm of the world of web3 as it is essentially a megatron of the various forks of web3 projects, which makes it a great learning opportunity. To start off the episode, each team member provides a little on their background and how they got involved in Squid DAO. Big Squid has a background in FinTech, got started in crypto in December of 2017 and eventually left his regular job to be a crypto DeFi degen full time and went on to work full time on Squid DAO. Squid Steed says he's very new compared to most people in the degen space. He's worked in TradFi for 12 years and says he is mainly focused on top-down optimization of Squid DAO. ZOption went from working at a big bank to starting a couple tech companies, and he got started in crypto in 2016 as a miner. He first got involved in Squid DAO by making an early investment and realizing the DAO could use some help. We then go over a 101 of what Squid DAO is. Based on a TradFi web2 description, it is a SPAC that raised ETH. Squid DAO is now tasked with putting the ETH to work, and it can be described as a profitable tech company with different revenue streams. The DAO is an investment vehicle through which the more ETH comes in. The more ETH is invested, and the more strategies there are to look into. Squid DAO has three revenue sources from forked protocols: the first is similar to raising money from bonds, the second is interest earned from putting ETH to work, and the third is NFT auctions. Also important is the opportunity for users to interact with the DAO and contribute. We also talk about why the team chooses to be anonymous and how trust is built. ZOption says that wallets and blockchains never lie and you know everyone's position. The team members all concur that it is easier to stay anonymous and that contributors prove themselves through their work rather than politics. The culture and people in the Discord, including the big whales, are helpful and respectful, and everyone is working towards a common goal but in different ways. Members are allowed to come up and present their strategies to be approved by the DAO's governance. We explore the economics of the DAO and why it is denominated in ETH rather than dollars. It can be valued via income derivative, the multiple on the treasury, or what it is trading at against what is on the balance sheet. Recently, a new governance proposal was passed making Squid and NFTs productive assets so that users may better run analyses. ETH is considered the best index and essentially operates like cash for the DAO.  We wrap up the episode by talking about how to learn more and get involved. Squid DAO's Twitter and Discord are great ways to learn more, but the best way to gain mastery is by investing your own money. If looking to get involved, you can help with whatever skills you have to offer, be it marketing, as a developer, a degen or coding strategist, or someone with a web2 background. Links:    Squid DAO NFT Auctions   Squid Docs   Squid Treasury Dashboard   Squid Discourse (Governance Forum)   Olympus DAO   Index Coop   SquidDAO Discord   The Squids on Twitter   @SquidDAO @BigSquid0x @Zoption @0xSquidSteed Topics:   (4:53) - Introducing the Squids: Big Squid    (9:10) - Introducing the Squids: Squid Steed   (13:05) - Introducing the Squids: ZOption    (17:05) - Squid DAO 101: What the Hell is it?   (19:55) - Squid's three different revenue protocols   (26:08) - What are the opportunities for an individual who interacts with SquidDAO?   (27:50) - What's the draw for people to get involved in Governance?   (31:17) - Incentive Alignment   (34:13) - Do Squid NFT Holders accrue new ETH in their wallet periodically?   (39:13) - Alpha Sharing   (41:26) - How do you build trust as an anonymous account?   (48:25) - Why are you all working so hard to stay anonymous?   (52:36) - How was SquidDAO born?   (56:19) - What does the “Org Chart” for the DAO look like?   (58:10) - What do partnerships look like?   (1:05:15) - The economics of the DAO   (1:22:07) - Building around ETH & other strategies   (1:27:51) - SquidDAO by the Numbers: The difference between market value and risk-free value   (1:32:44) - Putting Squid numbers in the context of a SPAC   (1:35:21) - What does the SquidDAO look like at it's highest aspiration?   (1:37:50) - What kind of help do you need to get there faster?   (1:41:32) - Who should people follow on Twitter & where should potential investors go?   (1:44:21) - Wrap up and final thoughts Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Simon Judd: How Index Coop is building Crypto Index products   Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse)   Sean O'Connor: How Blockchain is Changing Society with Costless Transactions     If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Tim Hwang: Trade Journal Cooperative, Robot Lawyers, Bubble in Digital Ads, Zuck Being Quantitatively Weird, and Misinformation as Warfare

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 59:11


Tim Hwang is the most interesting man on the internet. He runs a project called the Trade Journal Cooperative, which I've subscribed to for years. We talk about how the Trade Journal Cooperative got started it, how Tim *secretly* went to law school, and several other projects Tim is working on including an academic journal dedicated to bizarre images of Mark Zuckerberg. Thought that was all? That's not all. Also using bots to wage information wars on social media, and Tim's book which predicts an online advertising bubble. My favorite thing about Tim is his ability to sit on the fence between very serious and very whimsical. To start our conversation, Tim talks off the cuff about one of his heroes, Charles Fort, who compiled books of anomalous phenomena and is the source of the term “Fortean.” This explains a lot about Tim.  We then explore Tim's role as a trade journal sommelier and the Trade Journal Cooperative which provides a quarterly exploration of various industries. We talk a bit about the vastness of the trucking industry and also about the elevator, i.e., vertical transportation, industry. Tim also tells us the awkward story of how he somewhat unintentionally ended up going to law school secretly, and we explore some of the projects he started after graduating, including Rosen, Wolfe and Hwang, a boutique law practice that specializes in serving the unique needs of independent creators and small to midsize technology businesses, and Robot, Robot & Hwang, which was created off the notion of creating a fully automated law firm. Among other projects, Tim also started the academic journal The California Review of Images and Mark Zuckerberg, which explores why Zuckerberg seems to be exceptionally good at ending up in strange images and what that says about the media and culture.  I ask Tim to talk about his 2019 paper titled “Maneuver and Manipulation: On the Military Strategy of Online Information Warfare,” which is about how bots shape discussions online and the possible strategies of combating public manipulation. We also talk about a couple of branches off the information warfare piece, the National Conspiracy Writing Month (NaCoWriMo), in which participants complete a “daunting, but straightforward challenge to develop a deep, viable and complete conspiracy theory during the 30 days of November,” and COGSEC, which is a conference on the real-world practice of countering online influence operations. We wrap up our discussion talking about Tim's recently published book The Subprime Attention Crisis that explores the bubble of online advertising and its potential implications on web2 giants.   Links:    Charles Fort Books   The Trade Journal Cooperative   Iron Clad Contract Management    Maneuver and Manipulation: On the Military Strategy of Online Information Warfare   Sub-prime attention crisis by Tim Hwang   The Dawn of Everything by David Graeber   TimHwang.org   Tim on Twitter Topics:   (1:51) - Who are your heroes?   (3:04) - The Trade Journal Cooperative: Trucking, Magicians & the Pasta Economy   (9:36) - Has this led you into any investments or is it pure voyeurism?   (11:28) - Engineering Randomness & Curating the Journal   (16:17) - The man behind the Co-Op: Secretly going to Berkeley Law School   (19:06) - Being a lawyer for the “Extremely Online” market and trying to build a fully-automated firm   (21:46) - The Legal Automation space   (26:05) - Tim's Scholarly Papers about Absurd Cultural Phenomena   (34:14) - Thoughts on AI over the next decade   (37:05) - Information warfare & the responsibility of Social Platforms   (44:30) - National Conspiracy writing month & COGSEC (Countering Online Influence Operations)   (48:50) - The premise for Tim's book: Subprime Attention Crisis   (54:07) - Web3   (55:56) - Book recommendations Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Sean O'Connor: How Blockchain is Changing Society with Costless Transactions If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Entrepreneurs on Fire
3 Levers to Double Revenue with Simon Severino

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 26:06


Simon helps business owners in SaaS and Services run their company more effectively which results in sales that soar. He created the Strategy Sprints™ Method that doubles revenue in 90 days by getting owners out of the weeds. Simon is a TEDx speaker, Contributor to Forbes and Entrepreneur Magazine, and member of the Silicon Valley Blockchain Society. Top 3 Value Bombs: 1. Less is more. 2. Don't do everything at once. 3. Whatever you think right now, even it's hard, just keep rolling. It's not about winning the game all the time. It's about staying in the game, learning, and keeping moving. Strategy Sprints – Book a time with Simon and get 1-hour FREE coaching.  Double your revenue in 90 days! Sponsors: Clay Clark: Looking for a business coach who has helped thousands of entrepreneurs increase profitability by an average of 104% annually - all for less money than it would cost to hire a minimum wage employee? And all on a month-to-month basis!? Schedule your free consultation today with Clay Clark at ThrivetimeShow.com/fire! HubSpot: Start giving your customers what they deserve. Learn more about how you can transform your customer experience with a HubSpot CRM Platform at HubSpot.com!

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Solocast #2 - Web3 by a Winter Fire

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 43:13


This week's podcast is my second SoloCast, and during the episode, I share my thoughts and some predictions on the potential impacts and implementations of web3. The blockchain can be basically defined as a cryptographic breakthrough that allows for openness but with very careful editing permissions. While web1 resulted in costless publication and web2 in costless communication, web3 allows for costless transactions. This will likely increase the number of transactions we make. Web3 can also create cheap digital scarcity which may help authenticate originality in the digital world. Why does this all matter? My answer to this question regards the implications of web3 on the cost of trust and decentralization. Currently, the cost of trust in the market is relatively high, and with increasing transactions and original creations occurring via the blockchain, we will have to pay less for trust. Also, there will be less need for centralized parties such as brands or centralized banks, though it's too early to say which authorities will all be affected. Next, I make some predictions about what will happen as the blockchain gets deployed. The first to be impacted is the management of digital items, with finance and gaming among the earlier industries. Also, we will likely see digital components getting separated from analog components so that they can be managed on the blockchain. Another trend that may happen is that the blockchain may be implemented to manage atoms in the real world. To wrap up the SoloCast, I explore the implications of web3. It will probably impact managerial culture, and DAOs (distributed autonomous organizations) will likely take over some market share from companies. I also believe the biggest networks will be bigger than the biggest companies, in part because there is no cap on involvement in web3 networks and ecosystems. My goal in sharing my thoughts is not just to tell you what I think will happen but to provide some notions and rough directions so that you can hopefully overlay some of these lessons into your own experience and expertise. Web3 is still not easy to navigate, and it is still early in its implementation, but it provides incredible opportunity, and it is fun to get involved.   Links:    Eric's Blog   Eric's blog post on digital scarcity   Eric's Blog post on The Cost of Trust   Technological revolutions and Financial Capital by Carlota Perez   SquidDAO   Topics:   (0:08) - Introducing the Web3 discussion   (4:13) - What is the Blockchain?   (6:06) - Lowering transaction costs across Web1, Web2 & Web3   (9:46) - Creating cheap, digital scarcity   (12:12) - Why does the blockchain matter? Trust & Decentralization   (18:50) - What happens when blockchains are deployed? Digital and Physical impacts.   (26:26) - Technological Revolutions & Financial Capital by Carlotta Perez   (28:23) - DAO: Distributed Autonomous Organization   (30:51) - Predictions: The biggest networks will be bigger than the biggest companies   (39:03) - Wrap Up: What do you have to do?   (42:02) - Web3 is supposed to be fun!   Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 Simon Judd: How Index Coop is Building Crypto Index Products   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Consulting Success Podcast
Winning The New Year: 5 Growth Levers For Entrepreneurial Consultants In 2022: Podcast #219

Consulting Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 12:32


2021 has been a tough and challenging year. But despite it all, we have to give it to ourselves for making it here—almost greeting the new year ahead. It is time to learn from the past and look forward to a new and better future. Let us win the new year as host Michael Zipursky discusses the five growth levers we need to reach our goals as entrepreneurial consultants this coming 2022. Do you want to achieve something bigger and succeed in the new year? Tune in and find out how to make a significant difference!Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://www.consultingsuccess.com/podcast

Down to Dunk OKC Thunder Podcast
Time to Pull the Levers?

Down to Dunk OKC Thunder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 72:43


Andrew Schlecht and Alex Speers discuss the Thunder's loss to the Kings, SGA's improvements, and is it time to pull even the tiniest of levers? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Course Creators HQ
E075: Sneak Peek Into 5 Profit Levers for Online Courses

Course Creators HQ

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 14:01


How well will your course sell? There are 10 Profit Levers that will affect whether or not someone buys your course... and in this episode host Julie Hood shares the first 5 profit levers to help you get organized for the new year.  LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE  Special Offer - Join the Course Profits Accelerator program through June 30, 2022! Get the special pricing at http://CourseProfitsAccelerator.com   KEY TAKEAWAYS FOR ONLINE COURSE CREATORSWhat are the first 5 Profit Levers?COURSE with one resultKnowing WHO is the perfect person for your courseCreating an incredible OFFERA persuasive SALES PAGEDesign a LAUNCH PLAN that keeps you organized(Get the other 5 levers in CourseProfitsAccelerator.com)  COME VISIT!Sign up for my free course  Is My Course Idea Any Good? here. GoodPods Let's talk about this episode on GoodPods – https://CourseCreatorsHQ.com/goodpods (mobile only, download the app first) Clubhouse Connect with me on Clubhouse for FREE masterclasses at @JulieHood. Website https://www.CourseCreatorsHQ.com Facebook https://www.facebook.com/CourseCreatorsHQ Instagram  https://www.instagram.com/CourseCreatorsHQ Twitter https://www.Twitter.com/CourseHQ 

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Track Zach Marshall #2: Focusing on customers, building MVPs, and creating trust as a new startup.

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 84:11


Welcome to the second episode of Track Zach, a series of quarterly podcast episodes in which we will be following Zach's journey as he starts and scales his private security marketplace, Conterra. We will check in on how the previous goals Zach set are going, hear about what he's learned and how he's pivoted, and see what he is looking to accomplish in the next quarter in the huge, fragmented, and heavily middle-manned $50 billion industry of private security.    This quarter, Zach's target was at least ten customers, 300 professionals to sign up on the supply side, and a new website launched by October 1st. His original thesis was to collect the supply side of the marketplace first. The website ended taking up longer than expected, which made him think he's building the wrong thing. Zach stopped pushing for signups and though he didn't get 300, there was a ton of word of mouth and recommendations going around. Zach was “collecting no's” the second-best thing to yesses, and from the no's, he was able to listen to what customers want, learn from that, and alter how they go to market.    He highlights that one of the main issues in the security industry is a lack of trust amongst providers/security professionals and a fear of being taken advantage of. With this, he found collecting demand to be proving to be more difficult, while the supply side is coming easier, prompting him to alter his original thesis and focus more on the demand side.    With all these observations, Zach says he gained clarity, and now things are starting to come together. He intends to focus the business on being the connective tissue and reputation for the major players in the space, and by doing so, they can cut out the major middlemen and reallocate that cash to those in the industry that should really have it. He is also shifting expectations and being clearer on focusing in on the things that will impact the business in a greater and faster way rather than the things that won't have as much impact, and he is getting better at vetting and hiring.    Zach explained his new technical roadmap as a process that starts with building a wheel, then a skateboard, then a scooter, then a bicycle, then a motorcycle, then a car. He explains that at this point, they have built skateboards.   During the next quarter, Zach expects to be neck-deep in fundraising and finding the right partners, and he is aiming to be confident in knowing the right amount of capital he'll need. He predicts the team will look a little different as he continues to recruit for an operations person. For the next 90 to 180 days, he will be mainly focused on operations, and he hopes to learn exactly what a world-class security recruiting company looks like.  Links:    Conterra   Workrise   Zach on Twitter   Jeremiah Rogers Coaching   Attivo outsourced accounting   Ben & Jerry's vs. Amazon: Strategy Letter Topics:   (1:58) - What is the one sentence overview of your experience over the past 3 months?   (3:02) - How are your goals coming along?   (21:00) - “You can't sell what you don't have.”   (22:22) - Where's the seam between a staffing agency and a marketplace?   (24:40) - What's the value proposition for clients to convince them to switch to Contara?   (27:00) - Has anything changed in the long-arch of the market size or market need with Contara?   (30:24) - Reviewing Zach's tweets: Over-scheduling yourself   (33:52) - What are some focuses that have panned out incredibly well?   (38:12) - Zach's team   (41:06) - Reviewing Zach's Tweets: Hiring an outsourced accounting firm   (45:38) - Raising capital   (47:42) - How far up is the plateau for conterra?   (51:57) - How's your personal stress level and work habits changed over the past 6 months?   (55:03) - Building out an office   (57:02) - Where do you want to be in 3 months?   (1:07:30) - Is there anything listeners can do to be helpful over the next 90 days?   (1:11:24) - Diversifying a marketplace based on niche use cases   (1:15:05) - Is there anything you've changed your mind on in the last 12 weeks?   (1:18:18) - Wrap up & final thoughts   Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Kevin Espiritu: Bootstrapping Epic Gardening to 8 figures by mixing Media + D2C Biz models. Oh and Poker, Pink Pineapples, and Male Models   Introducing "Track Zach" with Former Navy SEAL Zach Marshall     If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Health Supplement Business Mastery
The Missing Conversion Levers To Sell Dietary Supplements Online

Health Supplement Business Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 13:41


The Average CRO - Conversion Rate Optimization Agency Misses The Mark In The Health Industry Brought to you by http://www.creativethirst.com The revenue optimization agency for health supplement companies. Specializing in split tests, funnels, upsells, and direct response copywriting so you can maximize profitability and scale.  - - -  Getting people to your sales page or funnel is how you grow a direct to consumer supplement company. But how do you get them there?The quickest way to do that is though paid advertising.Buying buyers with ad dollars to scale is how all the supplement business do it.Now you can discover the strategies and tactics that work in supplement advertising.For just $7.Click here to grab your copy of the Health Supplement Ad Swipe Guide.

The Ted O'Neill Program
12-23-2021 The Scale of Polarity and Other Levers

The Ted O'Neill Program

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 12:05


Coach Ted talks about how our individual experiences are situationally different, as is the gravity we assign our obstacles.

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker
PMP275: 6 Literacy Levers, Part 2 with Brad Gustafson

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 23:59


What would happen if you asked your team, ‘What question would you predict I'm going to ask in a meeting?' Continue readingPMP275: 6 Literacy Levers, Part 2 with Brad Gustafson The post PMP275: 6 Literacy Levers, Part 2 with Brad Gustafson first appeared on Principal Matters.

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Chris Powers: Starting A Real Estate Empire at 17, Focus, Podcast Flywheels

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 106:47


In the last episode, we discussed alternative assets, and in this episode, we take a deep dive into the career of Chris Powers, the master of one specific alternative asset: real estate. Chris began his real estate career when he was just 17 years old and has spent the last 17 years building Fort Capital, a real estate firm in Fort Worth, Texas. Chris was a hungry 17-year-old, just showed up at college, bought his first house with no money down in 2004. By the time he left college, he had 12 houses. Fast forward to 2021, just this year, along with investors, they purchased $500 million of industrial real estate in Texas. Throughout the episode, we discuss Chris's journey in real estate, investing, recruiting, and podcasting. We started the conversation by asking Chris who his heroes are. He shared the story of his father who went back to college to pursue medicine even after being a lawyer for 13 years. His dad taught him the valuable lessons that you only live one life and that money can only make you so happy. Chris bought his first house at 17 when he was starting college and got into real estate as a means to make money during his studies. He was driven by constantly waking up and feeling behind and wanting to do something. Before graduating, he bought more student housing, started a property management business, and started a leasing business. He graduated in 2008, during the economic collapse, and had no choice but to continue in real estate. From 2010 to 2015, Chris was doing a bit of everything related to real estate – he was building custom homes and spec homes, buying land, VC investing, and had a small team that he managed. Despite having some success, he realized he wasn't compounding his business the way he wanted. Reading Good to Great by Jim Collins motivated him to narrow the focus of his business. Chris talks about his need to be able to recruit and the importance of having a mission. We also discuss how flywheels can propel us forward, and for Chris, his flywheel is based on his podcast, Twitter, real estate business, and investors that create a virtuous cycle of growth. Recently, Chris has transitioned out of being the CEO of Fort Capital, and he is learning how to be an owner. He is also focusing on his VC Funds and building Powers Capital, which he says will function like a family office but also will function like private equity. We wrap up the conversation discussing when enough is enough and measuring impact; Chris says he's no longer in it for the money but rather to see what it is possible to accomplish during the one life he has.   Links:    Chris on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fortworthchris   The Fort Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/4dLKPVTiXWmrFwd43iN2LZ    Chris Powers & Pete Chambers Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2X8vKyUIQaIxV5Mr9J5KMv Good to Great by Jim Collins:  https://amzn.to/3yJV9Jc   Owned and Operated Podcast w/ Chris Powers: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/21-chris-powers-building-%24600mm-commercial-real-estate/id1560999545?i=1000527344852   Fort Ventures: https://www.fort-ventures.com/   On Deck: https://beondeck.com/   Token Economy - How the Web3 Reinvents the Internet by Shermin Voshmgir:  https://amzn.to/3mpmHi7 Topics:   (3:52) - Who are your heroes?   (7:56) - Chris' upbringing & his father's impact on him   (20:47) - Chris starting his career in RE at age 17   (26:17) - Reflecting on the '08 financial crisis   (35:02) - What was your next big inflection point after graduating college in 2008?   (41:02) - You can't scale when you're not clear on your path   (47:52) - The results of learning to focus   (59:22) - What's role does Fort play in your investor's portfolios?   (1:05:41) - How does an investor recoup their money?   (1:09:26) - Compounding business with online content and media   (1:13:20) - The divergence of focusing the mission of Fort Capital and the mission of Chris Powers   (1:19:31) - What is your day-to-day like now?   (1:25:00) - Chris' VC investing exposure   (1:31:11) - What's the end goal for you?   (1:42:27) - What is the most foundational principle you can offer all entrepreneurs? Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Mitchell Baldridge: Defeating Taxes, Crypto & Financial Planning   Codie Sanchez: Drug Cartels, Vanguard, and Goldman Sachs Nick Huber: How to Build Leverage, Buy Businesses, and Go Viral on Twitter   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

The Wired Educator Podcast
WEP 214: The Six Literacy Levers, an Interview with Brad Gustafson

The Wired Educator Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 54:15


This is the wired educator podcast episode 214, my interview with Brad Gustafson. Brad is an amazing educational leader, an award winning principal and the author of a fantastic new book titled The Six  Literacy Levers. We talk about literacy leadership, The Swiss-Army Knife of Literacy, Shiny Book Report Syndrome, and so much more!  Brad was on the Wired Educator Podcast way back in episode 121 where we talked about his book Reclaiming Our Calling. Now Brad is back with a brand new book focused on Literacy. Literacy is something I am personally passion about and something I'm professionally working on with my district. I am so excited to share this interview with you. We talk about: Why literacy? Why now? The difference between reading skills and motivation Creating Reading Community It doesn't matter what you teach. It doesn't matter what your role is in education. This episode is absolutely for you. But before I share this amazing interview with you there's something I wanna tell you about. Dr. Brad Gustafson is an award-winning principal, best-selling author, speaker, and avid reader. Brad's newest book The 6 Literacy Levers, is a practitioner-friendly guide to championing readers--from anywhere in your school or organization. He also wrote Reclaiming Our Calling and Renegade Leadership. All of Brad's books are built on the belief that everything we do starts with relationships and connectedness. When Brad isn't in school, there's a good chance he's being schooled. He enjoys anything that's competitive including fishing, pickleball, ping pong, playing hearts, and battling Pokémon with his son. You can also find Brad with his high school sweetheart and their three kids spending time on the lake, reading, and writing. Mentioned in this episode:  Cherry Street Mission in Toledo Ohio Brad's books:  The 6 Literacy Levers Reclaiming Our Calling  Renegade Leadership Brad's website and blog: www.bradgustafson.com Follow Brad on Twitter: @GustafsonBrad Listen to Brad's Podcast: unearthED  ------------------------- Sign-up for Kelly's newsletter here. Kelly Croy is an author, speaker, and educator. If you'd like to learn more about Kelly or invite him to your school or conference to speak please send him an email.  Subscribe to The Wired Educator Podcast with 214 episodes of interviews and professional development. • Visit Kelly's website at www.KellyCroy.com. • Looking for a dynamic speaker for your school's opening day? • Consider Kelly Croy at www.KellyCroy.com • Order Kelly's books, Along Came a Leaderand Unthink Before Bed: A Children's Book on Mindfulness for your personal library. • Follow Kelly Croy on Facebook.  • Follow Kelly Croy on Twitter.  •  Follow Kelly Croy on Instagram       

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker
PMP274: 6 Literacy Levers with Brad Gustafson

Principal Matters: The School Leader's Podcast with William D. Parker

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 23:59


This week we share the first of a two-part series with Dr. Brad Gustafson. Listen-in as we discuss rethinking leadership Continue readingPMP274: 6 Literacy Levers with Brad Gustafson The post PMP274: 6 Literacy Levers with Brad Gustafson first appeared on Principal Matters.

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Phil Huber: Crazy Alternative Assets, Crypto for Financial Advisors & the Book Writing

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 82:14


In this week's episode, I talk with Phil Huber, the Chief Investment Officer at Savant Wealth Management and author of the new book The Allocator's Edge. This episode does not include financial advice.* Rather, we talk about the advice Phil gives other people about their finances and the book he wrote about financial advice. We begin the episode with a discussion about financial advising and what goes into becoming a CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) and a CFP (Certified Financial Planner). We also talk about how it's important to find the right financial advisor as a person's financial life becomes more complex. I ask Phil if any of his clients ever ask if he can YOLO them so hard with investing, and he discusses advisors' business of growing and preserving wealth responsibly. Phil's new book focuses on alternative investments, and he gave us a glimpse of what those investments are. He demonstrates how diversifying clients' portfolios help manage risk. Phil explains catastrophe reinsurance, and we discuss the recent proliferation of alternative investing apps and platforms and how barriers are being broken down to previously inaccessible asset classes for average investors.   Any conversation involving alternative investments would in one way or another, end up with crypto. Phil talks about how advisors are trying to navigate crypto and the current difficulties of incorporating it into clients' investment portfolios as well as possibilities for its inclusion in the future. We end the episode talking about the process of writing a book and how it differs from blogging. Phil wrote The Allocator's Edge for himself ten years ago. By reading his book, Phil believes that investors can become more comfortable discussing and using alternative assets.   Links:    The Allocator's Edge by Phil Huber - https://amzn.to/3m1tu1d   Savant Wealth Management - https://savantwealth.com/    Phil Huber's Twitter: https://twitter.com/bpsandpieces  Topics:   (2:12) - What do you learn as a CFA?   (4:30) - Is there value in normal people getting a CFP or CFA just to make them more stable in their financial knowledge?   (5:35) - At what point does having a financial planner become a necessity?   (7:18) - How are you sure that you're bringing on a competent financial advisor?   (9:18) - How much range is there in the recommendations you give a client or what you specialize in with your practice?   (17:36) - “Diversification preserves wealth, but focus creates it.” Do you see this statement as true with the clients you work with?   (21:43) - How do you hammer home the concept of increasing a client's savings rate?   (25:07) - How do you prepare to be level-headed through times when facing the fears of clients?   (29:00) - The Allocator's Edge    (39:30) - A discussion on Inflation   (42:05) - Catastrophe reinsurance   (46:11) - Accessibility to the average investor   (50:25) - Cryptocurrency   (1:00:42) - Is there a missing product that needs to be built for more mainstream crypto adoption?   (1:06:37) - How does blogging compare to writing a book?   (1:09:11) - How long have you been working on this book?   (1:15:15) - What are the prerequisites to reading this book?   (1:17:57) - What is the ‘Yolo' portfolio?   (1:19:36) - Wrap Up Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Mitchell Baldridge: Defeating Taxes, Crypto & Financial Planning   Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse)   David Perell: Intellectual Openness & Mental Models for Success   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

The Construction Leading Edge Podcast
#233: The Biggest Levers You Can Pull & Simple Solutions to Painful Problems

The Construction Leading Edge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 53:31


Figuring out the 20% of activities that will yield 80% of results is good.  Figuring out the 5% that will give you 95% is even better, which is what these 5 Big Levers will do for you. What you'll learn about in this construction podcast episode: The 5 Biggest Levers you can pull to get 95/5 results in your business. Painful problems don't necessarily require painful solutions. Why you need to elevate and detach from your business. The two biggest human motivators, and how to leverage them. The first law of combat according to Jocko Willink and Leif Babin. How to design your company for the future. The "Nail the Handoff" process, and how to do it with your team. The #1 sales process lever to pull for homebuilders, remodelers and small commercial GCs. The difference between two personal trainers, and the lesson I learned. How to improve the chances of achieving your goals to 95%. Resources mentioned in this construction podcast episode: Builder Mastermind Group - https://buildermastermindgroup.com Move the Needle 90 Day Accountability Challenge - https://buildermastermindgroup.com/move CompanyCam - The photo app every contractor needs - https://companycam.com/cle Curri - Sign up to get $40 of free credit.  Use Curri to deliver your materials.  https://www.constructionleadingedge.com/curri  

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2 Could You Pass The CEO Test? Adam Bryant

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 30:55


There is practical training and a test to become a driver, yet often, there is no real training or test to become a good CEO. In fact, the research shows that most people in management don't get any real leadership training until they have on average 10 years in management. The result is fumbling or downright failed leadership. Now, you may have been a leader for a long time, but if there was a CEO Test, do you honestly believe you would pass? Let's find out together. Our guest is Adam Bryant. Adam has interviewed more than 700 CEOs about the key leadership lessons they've learned, first as a journalist at The New York Times, and now in his interview series on LinkedIn as part of his consulting work with ExCo Group, an executive mentoring and leadership development firm. Adam's written his third book, "The CEO Test: Master the Challenges that Make or Break All Leaders," with Kevin Sharer, the former CEO of Amgen. The book is published by Harvard Business Review Press. Website https://adambryantbooks.com Social Media https://twitter.com/adambbryant https://www.linkedin.com/in/adambryantleadership Part 1) The Challenges that Make or Break All Leaders The Clarity of Strategy The Dangers of Presumptive Knowledge Would You Pass The CEO Test? 4 Step Strategy: What, Levers, Challenges and The Scoreboard Leadership is...Everything The Importance of Specificity Be & Do Use Your Time Machine The Paradoxes of Leadership Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast
Ecommerce Platform Optimization Levers -- Kevin Indig // Shopify

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 20:35


This is our 2nd part conversation with Kevin indig of Shopify. Yesterday, Kevin and I talked about e commerce platform optimization levers, specifically what Shopify is doing to make sure it shows up highly in Google. Today, we're going to continue our conversation talking about some SEO secrets for Shopify store owners. Show NotesConnect With: Kevin Indig: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Shoot the Moon with Revenue Rocket
Levers & Currency: M&A Deal Structures

Shoot the Moon with Revenue Rocket

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 33:17


Today's deal structures are continuing to evolve in an effort to attract sellers and maximize valuations when justifying accretive business combinations.  The use of equity, employment agreements and bonuses are on the rise as buyers secure deals through sweetening the pot.  That said the “cash is king” still holds water as sellers are not always sold on the combined business outlook or even just stability of the global economy and taking your returns at close appeals to many, especially when the sellers are not looking to stick around post close. In this episode we will talk about the levers we are seeing in deals these days and how buyers and sellers are reaching alignment.  Seller note:An owner of the business act like a bank where the owner lends the buyer money that thy are going to pay over time. This would also include interest that is paid over time with a higher interest rate than a typical bank. This is a way for you to receive the money from selling the business over time by providing financing to the buyer. A seller note is typically not contingent on the performance of the business. Equity: Using stock as a means of currency in a deal is not new but what is starting to pop up a little more than usual is the use of equity in the form of ESOP (employee stock option plan) and warrants as a means to retain leadership, management and even contributors. In today's job market the value of talent is even more important as employee retention is under pressure across all industries.  We are also seeing the traditional use of equity for things like earnouts as buyers look to preserve cash for growth / operations by increasing the value at a later date with some committed or liquidible buyouts in the future.  These scenarios are seen less these days as the consolidation is in full swing and deals are almost always competitive.  Employment agreements: When the sellers are tied to a deal post close we often see lofty employment agreements make their way into transactions.  The agreements often off-set some of the seller buybacks and business expense carve outs that the original owners had in place as part of a lifestyle embedded into the corporations operating expenses (condos, boats…) People being sold on selling need assurances that life post close on a personal level will improve.  These employment agreements will often include large cash bonuses and at times have limited deliverables.  All in all it is a form of seller financing.  While we are not opposed to these types of levers being used we do ensure that the parties account for them in a combined proforma and that the deal is still a win / win and affordable for both parties post close.  Cash:Cash is still the most attractive currency in deal structures as the parties have a clear demarcation in the change of ownership and those selling have received the return on their efforts.  All contributions moving forward are a derivative of future efforts and success.  That said, we also see cash used in earnout scenarios and it is important for the parties to properly account for these payments in the forward looking financial planning of the combined business.  Earnouts:We usually see earnouts play a role when a seller is looking to exit at a higher valuation than the buyer is willing to attribute to the deal.  So the buyer attributes targets to go forward business that if obtained generate additional compensation to the previous owners.  While this can be a common lever in deals it is also a common area where things fall apart in the future and you end up in conflict.  A few things to consider when structuring an earnout are:Do the proceeds generated by the targets fund the earnout? Will the earnout generate bad behavior on the business development front? Should the earnout only be tied to net new business or should customer retention play a role?

Stellar Labs Podcasts
The Future of Learning #19: How to make training really stick

Stellar Labs Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 34:25


Dr. Ina-Weinbaeur Heidel reveals some of the easy to implement key factors to make training more effective. Find out what you can do by listening to this podcast.

The Education Gadfly Show
#798: Which metro areas are accelerating student learning? - 12/08/21

The Education Gadfly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 26:51


On this week's Education Gadfly Show podcast, Adam Tyner, Fordham's Associate Director of Research, joins Mike Petrilli and David Griffith to discuss our new analysis, America's Best and Worst Metro Areas for School Quality, some of which may surprise you. And on the Research Minute, Amber Northern examines the effectiveness of efforts to diversify the teacher workforce.Recommended content:Fordham's new report at metro.fordhaminstitute.org.More of our work on metro areas:What You Make Depends on Where You Live: College Earnings Across States and Metropolitan Areas.How Aligned is Career and Technical Education to Local Labor Markets?The study that Amber reviewed on the Research Minute: Dan Goldhaber and Etai Mizrav, “The Prospective Teacher Pipeline: Simulation Evidence on Levers to Influence Teacher Diversity,” CALDER Working Papers (December 2021).Feedback welcome!Have ideas or feedback on our podcast? Send them to our podcast producer Pedro Enamorado at penamorado@fordhaminstitute.org.

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Bram Kanstein: Effing around on the internet - MicroStartups, Crypto/NFT's & Course Building.

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 65:46


Bram Kanstein has become a professional at fucking around on the internet. He has built dozens of products, three of which he successfully sold, and he previously spent time working for a VC and Product Hunt.   We dive right into talking about Startup Stash, which is listed as the number one product on Product Hunt. Startup Stash is described as a curated directory of resources and tools for startups. Two years after launching and going viral, he sold the micro product for Ethereum. He also discusses the first company he sold, roadtoscale.com, and says that both products' success came from delivering value to the right audience.   Bram talks about how he discovered and fell in love with Product Hunt, which became the tool for his hobby of curating and discovering new startups. He loved Product Hunt so much that he joined the company a short few weeks after launching Startup Stash.   Bram got involved crypto when he was still a student and learned through experience. He recounts a funny crypto story of creating an account in the game, Second Life just to buy some BTC. After day trading for a period around 2013, he sold his Bitcoin and forgot about crypto for a while. In 2017, he discovered Ethereum and got back into crypto. Recently, Bram launched an NFT collection based on a color alphabet.   Currently, Bram is consulting a large company on innovation practices and validating new ideas. He is also teaching an online course, No Code MVP, and is working on his new idea, seedrounds.eu, which is aimed at improving deal flow for investors. The main TLDR he wants to share with everyone is, “fucking around the internet can pay off.”   Links:    Product Hunt - https://www.producthunt.com/   Startup Stash - https://startupstash.com/   Microacquire - https://microacquire.com   LAUNCH Conference - https://launch.is/   Road to Scale - https://roadtoscale.com/   No Code MVP - https://nocodemvp.com/   Seedrounds.eu - https://seedrounds.eu/   Bram on Twitter - https://twitter.com/bramk Topics:   1:35) - How Bram got involved with Product Hunt and launching Startup Stash   (9:21) - What was StartUp Stash like as a company? How did it make money?   (11:14) - Selling Startup Stash   (12:51) - The growing Micro Acquisitions market   (15:32) - Bram on quitting his job to work at Product Hunt   (18:00) - The niche of building and selling small products   (21:45) - What's the value to the buyers for these products?   (24:48) - How do you think about your day to day work?   (31:22) - Europe & The Netherlands   (33:21) - Bram's journey into Crypto   (43:20) - The upside of a decentralized ecosystem   (47:23) - Building conviction for the 1000x return   (51:40) - How NFT's & BTC saved Twitter   (53:57) - Bram's NFT collection and the potential for Web3 & BTC   (1:02:10) - What Bram is currently working on Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Kevin Espiritu: Bootstrapping Epic Gardening to 8 figures by mixing Media + D2C Biz models. Oh and Poker, Pink Pineapples, and Male Models   Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse)   David Perell: Intellectual Openness & Mental Models for Success   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Consulting Success Podcast
Pulling the Right Levers for Rapid Consulting Revenue Growth with Felix Velarde: Podcast #215

Consulting Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 45:09


Growing the revenue of your consulting business is not an easy task. There are many ways to do this whether it be marketing yourself better or having a clear proposition. Launch your consulting business by pulling the right levers with your host Michael Zipursky and his guest Felix Velarde. Felix is the CEO of The 2Y3X Programme. He is also the author of Scale at Speed. Join Michael and Felix as they discuss why your core values need to be aligned with your team's values. Learn how teaching played a big role in Felix's scaling journey. Also, find out how to properly sell to your target audience. All of these things will accumulate to growing your consulting business. Join in and start learning!Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://www.consultingsuccess.com/podcast

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Patrick Campbell on The Biggest Levers You Can Pull to Grow in 2022

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 11:59


Today we are going to talk about the biggest levers you can pull to grow in 2022 with Patrick Campbell!

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Chris Sparks: High-stakes Poker, the training regimen of a world-class mental athlete, and coaching the top 0.01%

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 113:45


Chris says he isn't the best poker player in the world, but he may be the most profitable.  Pro poker player Chris Sparks is training for the highest-stakes tournament he has ever played in after a long sabbatical. He says he has already decided he is going to win, and now he is doing the necessary things to create that outcome. What is the dynamic amongst poker friends? Chris says “frenemies” – all bets are off when the cards are on the table. Chris only plays when he expects to make money, and elaborates on the role of recreational players, stating that if you can't recognize the fish at the poker table, you are the fish. In the poker world, the meta skill of finding good games, of getting invited, and staying invited are critical. A good example is how Chris got invited to a famous comedian's poker parties multiple times. Chris recounts these parties that feature full sets of dealers, cocktail waitresses, and masseuses--and it all ends when the comedian gets tired. We talk about Chris's consulting agency, Forcing Function, travel, and living with one of the world's best pianists. Currently, Chris is coming out of a sabbatical and is preparing to play his largest tournament to date, with the prize pool potentially reaching seven figures.  For Chris, everything is a bet. But with any bet, the decision should be weighed with the things surrounding it and you go in with eyes wide open.   Links Chris' Website - https://www.chrissparks.io/ Forcing Function - https://www.forcingfunction.com/ Chris Spark's essay on Poker: Play to Win: Meta-Skills in High Stakes Poker Rounders Movie - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9r-K5dmt0Rc  Molly's Game movie - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vu4UPet8Nyc  The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron - https://amzn.to/3ljtOIh  Forcing Function Podcast - https://www.forcingfunction.com/podcast Forcing Function Performance Library - https://www.forcingfunction.com/library  Experiment without limits workbook - https://www.forcingfunction.com/workbook  The Fifth Discipline Field Book by Peter Senge - https://amzn.to/3I5rrCU  The Systems Bible by John Gall - https://amzn.to/3D3S9bj    Topics (1:50) - What is life like as a professional poker player? (5:28) - The different levels of professional poker  (9:34) - “I'm not one of the world's best poker players, but I am one of the most profitable.” (12:10) - Why is being the best not necessarily the indicator of being the most profitable? (14:38) - How do you navigate the nuance of the myriad ways to play poker? (18:23) - The world of high-stakes poker and the increasing privatization of games (23:15) - How do you keep getting invited back to games when the people who know you, know how good you are? (25:43) - The Mathematical side of Poker: The Ying (29:20) - What's the training you go through to become better than average with the probability and mathematical side of poker? (31:27) - The Psychological side of Poker: The Yang (33:59) - What does it feel like inside when you're playing in a high stakes game with huge decisions to make? (40:02) - Where did you pick up the concepts of Morning Pages & Captain's Log? (42:18) - The importance of slowing down (43:25) - Chris' current training regime (48:13) - How has your preparation changed over your career? (50:53) - How do you train for 12 hours of playtime per day? (53:54) - Free will and controlling your future self (1:00:09) - How do you decide what you want? (1:03:47) - Chris' upcoming tournament (1:04:43) - Where does poker fit in the long arc of your life?  (1:08:33) - Playing Zero-Sum games (1:11:32) - Chris' Coaching practice (1:18:28) - Defining systems & bottlenecks in life (1:22:06) - Chris' relationship with Japan (1:28:33) - The mindset relationship between Poker & Investing (1:34:24) - What do you consider your ‘edges' when thinking about investing? (1:37:29) - What was it like to live with one of the greatest pianists in the world? (1:42:37) - The power of rest and recovery (1:43:59) - Chris' relationship with caffeine and sugar (1:49:36) - Book recommendations and how to learn more about how Chris thinks (1:52:32) - Wrap Up   Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Kevin Espiritu: Bootstrapping Epic Gardening to 8 figures by mixing Media + D2C Biz models. Oh and Poker, Pink Pineapples, and Male Models Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse) David Perell: Intellectual Openness & Mental Models for Success   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Lifeonaire
The 4 Levers of Wealth Creation with Mindy Jensen and Scott Trench of BiggerPockets

Lifeonaire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 47:35


How do you build wealth from scratch? How do you grow your wealth so you can retire early or have more free time?  Mindy and Scott of BiggerPockets get these questions all the time...and they have answers!  This week, they share the 4 Levers of Wealth Creation, a powerful model for helping you build your wealth so you can experience financial freedom. They unpack: The 4 levers (Spend Less, Make More, Invest, and Create) Why Spend Less is the simplest (and often most impacting) lever to pull How to use what you want in life to direct your wealth building strategy (and yes, there is even a strategy for when you DON'T know what you want in life!) How intentionality and action are essential for changing your wealth situation And that's just the tip of the iceberg. This episode truly is for everyone, because regardless of where you are in your wealth building journey, these are the levers EVERYONE needs to consider when taking action steps towards financial freedom. Grab a notebook and get ready for some expert BiggerPockets insight!

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Kevin Espiritu: Bootstrapping Epic Gardening to 8 figures by mixing Media + D2C Biz models. Oh and Poker, Pink Pineapples, and Male Models

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 87:25


This week's guest is my friend, Kevin Espiritu. Kevin is the founder of Epic Gardening, the world's biggest gardening education platform. We became good friends over the internet--Kevin and I talked about the trend of parasocial relationships and how you can get to know someone despite having little to no in-person interaction.   We talked about how Kevin transitioned from making a living out of playing poker, to building websites, to marketing and blogging, and finally, working full-time on Epic Gardening. This project went on to garner the biggest gardening audiences on YouTube, TikTok, and Instagram and has branched into direct-to-consumer business without any ad spend.   Kevin relates his mistake in scaling the company revenue faster than he built the team, saying he likely left growth on the table. Leveraging people was a challenge at first. He says he thinks of himself more as a content creator and not really as a writer or YouTuber or podcaster, which eventually helped ease the process of trusting new team members to take on such responsibilities as he grew the company.   Kevin is now raising PE money and making an acquisition as an independent entrepreneur. We've had such a wonderful conversation that goes beyond Epic Gardening and into fun stuff like how creators can implement web3 tools, Kevin's short career as a male model, pink pineapple piracy, and so much more.   Additional Resources   Epic Gardening - https://www.epicgardening.com/ Epic Gardening on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/user/EpicGardening Epic Gardening on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/epicgardening Epic Gardening on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/epicgardening/ Epic Gardening on Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@epicgardening The Epic Gardening Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/epic-gardening-daily-growing-tips-and-advice/id1221085548 Scribe Media - https://scribemedia.com/ Missouri Star Quilt Company - https://www.missouriquiltco.com/ The Fish that Ate the Whale by Rich Cohen - https://www.amazon.com/Fish-That-Ate-Whale-Americas/dp/1250033314   Topics   (1:22) - Thoughts on Podcasting & being ‘internet friends' (3:35) - How do you feel about accidentally becoming famous? (4:48) - Kevin's story: Poker, Blogging & Epic Gardening (15:09) - Scaling platforms & building a team (28:07) - Introducing Products (32:36) - Balancing loving gardening and running a business (38:08) - Kevin's Consumption: YouTube, Podcasts, etc. (39:46) - Book writing & publishing (45:41) - Raising capital & compounding patience (54:50) - Kevin's stint as a male model (57:13) - Acquisitions & Plant commerce Logistics (1:00:44) - How does IP work in the agricultural world? (1:04:51) - The opportunity cost of reading (1:06:16) - Web3 & Crypto (1:15:23) - To what extent can we all be growing our own food? (1:22:11) - A return to wholesomeness (1:25:34) - Wrap up   Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse) Nick Huber: How to Build Leverage, Buy Businesses, and Go Viral on Twitter   If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant   Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant   The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Gravity - The Digital Agency Power Up : Weekly shows for digital marketing agency owners.
The three levers which unlock small business wealth, Tara Newman

Gravity - The Digital Agency Power Up : Weekly shows for digital marketing agency owners.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 40:59


This week we're talking about money with my personal money muse - Tara Newman. We're talking about a particular kind of money - it's what we call PROFIT - and here's the thing…  not all business make money.  There's a sliding spectrum of solvency, ranging from life support through to dream business.   Today we're going to talk about how we can move you off of money life support and a little closer to the business of your dreams. Tara's Website : https://theboldleadershiprevolution.com/ ---- Get your copy of my Personal Brand Business Blueprint It's the FREE roadmap to starting, scaling or just fixing your expert business. http://www.amplifyme.agency/roadmap (www.amplifyme.agency/roadmap) ---- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkhcc6rfcnaKF3vZGRDkCGQ?sub_confirmation=1 (Subscribe to my Youtube!! ) Follow on Instagram and Twitter http://instagram.com/bobgentle (@bobgentle) Join the Amplify Insiders Facebook Community : http://www.amplifyme.agency/insiders (www.amplifyme.agency/insiders) Please take a second to rate this show in Apple Podcasts. ❤ It will mean a lot to me.

The Swyx Mixtape
The 3 Levers of Fasting [Peter Attia]

The Swyx Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:25


Listen to the Tim Ferriss Show: https://tim.blog/2021/06/14/peter-attia-transcript-2/TranscriptI think that one thing that I absolutely learned through fasting is the enormous importance of strength training throughout a fast. You're going to lose muscle mass when you fast, you have to accept that. So the question is how do you minimize that damage? How do you lose as little muscle mass as possible? And strength training daily during a fast has become an important part of that. But when you look at time-restricted feeding, or people call it intermittent fasting, although I don't like that term very much. I think time-restricted makes more sense when you're just talking about 16 or 18 hours. I'm really starting to see a lot of people who do that excessively and who aren't necessarily training correctly. They lose weight, but they're losing muscle more than they would want to see.And we just had a patient who we did a DEXA scan on last week and it was probably the first one we've done in 18 months on him. And in that 18 month period, his body weight had not changed. Maybe he was a bit lighter, actually, he might've lost four pounds. But his body fat was so high I almost fell off my chair and he doesn't look chubby, but it speaks how much muscle he's lost. So his body fat went from about 18 percent to 30 percent.Tim Ferriss: Yikes.Peter Attia: It's just a totally unacceptable amount of fat for someone his age. And his visceral fat went up, which I actually care more about than body fat. We can talk about that later, but his visceral fat also went up. So, this is a guy who has religiously been doing his time-restricted feeding every day, but he doesn't really lift weights.He walks and does some yoga and stuff like that, but he's not doing strength training. So I think in a person like that, there's a real downside to too much time-restricted feeding. And even for myself, in the last four or five months, I did a DEXA back in January and I hadn't done one in years. And from January to the last period that I had done a DEXA, my body weight was almost identical. Maybe I was two pounds lighter this year versus the last time. But my body fat was up.I think I went from 10 to 16 percent body fat. And again, you could say, “Well, 16 is not the end of the world,” but that was a significant loss of muscle and gain of fat. And I did wonder if that was just too much, because I always exercise in the morning, but then don't eat. So to exercise, and especially when you're strength training, to provide yourself with any amino acids every single day to undergo muscle protein synthesis, I think is a little bit risky. So I've been looking at other strategies around that. So for example, front-loading the meals.Tim Ferriss: Quick question, and then we'll come back to front-loading meals. During that period of time, were you doing, and I may be misremembering, one three-day fast a month or one week-long fast every quarter? What was the frequency of — Peter Attia: All of the above. Yeah, I probably spent maybe two years doing seven days a quarter, maybe a year doing three days a month. But in between it's also doing lots of time-restricted. And honestly, I think the daily time-restricted was a bit more the issue because I think the three-day fast a month with a lot of lifting, I didn't sense I lost a lot of muscle during that period of time, but I think every day, exercising in the morning, not putting calories in until later in the day, it has to be taken in the context of an individual. So if you're someone who's 100 pounds overweight or you have diabetes, it's a totally worthwhile trade-off to lose muscle mass because you're losing more fat mass along the way. So you are going to technically get leaner with that approach, but when you take a relatively healthy and lean individual, one has to be a little bit careful and look for alternative ways to get the benefits of that fast.Tim Ferriss: So you were saying something about front-loading meals.Peter Attia: Yeah. So I just find nowadays, although probably not tonight.Tim Ferriss: Almost certainly not tonight.Peter Attia: I'm going to eat a little bit more early in the day and a little less late in the day. So — Tim Ferriss: There may or may not be some mezcal involved.Peter Attia: There will be.Tim Ferriss: So we won't take either of our Oura Ring data as the standard for this evening. I totally got caught up in my own fantasy narrative — Peter Attia: Fantasies about mezcal?Tim Ferriss: So front-loading meals, could you just walk back and explain — Peter Attia: In an ideal world I think that the best way to do time-restricted eating would be to eat a big breakfast. So it would be to wake up, exercise, eat a huge breakfast. By huge I don't mean gluttonous, but that's your biggest meal of the day at say — I don't know, let's just put some numbers to it. You wake up at six, you work out from seven to 08:30, at nine o'clock you're eating your largest meal. You eat another meal at one o'clock that is modest and you don't eat again. That would be a great way to do 16 hours of not eating a day. That's problematic for two reasons. The first is it's socially problematic. It's really easy to not have breakfast because very few people eat breakfast with other people, but dinner is our social meal. And for obvious reasons, it just poses a difficulty to be the guy who never eats dinner.Tim Ferriss: Just as a side note, I've been at multiple dinners now, quite a few actually, where you've been fasting and we've all been sitting, drinking wine, and you just pass the cheesecake at the end and you take a big whiff and then continue moving it along. It's entertaining, but it is pretty antisocial to be that guy.Peter Attia: To be that guy drinking the soda water. And then the other thing is I think for many people it is hard to go to bed hungry and truthfully in a longer fast it gets easier because if you're fasting for seven days, by the time you hit that fifth day, a lot of your hunger has dissipated, but 16 hours of not eating can generally pose some hunger and for some reason, I just think psychologically in the evening we're a little less busy, so it's even more noticeable. Whereas if you're doing the traditional way that people think about not eating for 16 hours, it's pretty easy to wrap yourself up and work in the morning, skip breakfast, and delay your lunch a little bit.So I don't know that I have a great answer for that other than I think people should be a little cautious and not just apply the same hammer to every nail and think about their own physiology a little bit and rely on these technologies like DEXA to make sure. Which again is so readily available, relatively inexpensive, and provides both good information about body composition and also this thing of visceral fat.Tim Ferriss: We'll come to the visceral fat in just a second. On the DEXA note, about — I don't know, a year and a half or two years ago, I recall a conversation with a DEXA technician who said to me, “Over the last 12 months, I've seen many cases of people coming in who are newly avowed intermittent fasters who have had their body composition flip, basically.” Not necessarily flip, but they've had massive jumps in the percentage of body fat. And I put that on social as a note, not to say that all people who do time-restricted feeding experience this, and it was hilarious and also frustrating to see how many religious zealots there are around intermittent fasting who were just like, “Bite thy tongue.”Peter Attia: Wait. But you said that according to this tech that they got better intermittent fasting or worse?Tim Ferriss: No, they got worse.Peter Attia: Oh, they got worse. So, it met with what I'm describing.Tim Ferriss: It's exactly compatible with what you're saying, but there was a lot of resistance to the idea that would even be possible. Which I found really interesting, more social commentary than anything else.Peter Attia: I think it just speaks to why I don't like talking about nutrition very much because it does lend itself to politics, not literally, but it's the politics/religion ethos, which is: whatever you're eating is obviously the only thing. And I guess I just encourage people to be much more attuned to all of the tools. So caloric restriction, dietary restriction, time restriction, you've probably heard me go on and on about my framework, the three levers. Always pull one, sometimes pull two, occasionally pull three, never pull none. So time restriction, what we're talking about, restricting when you eat, but otherwise not restricting how much or what. Dietary restriction is restricting some of the content in what you eat. So not eating carbs, not eating wheat, not eating meat.Tim Ferriss: Not eating Doritos.Peter Attia: Right. Not eating sugar. Those are all forms of dietary restriction. And then caloric restriction is restricting the amount. And so if you are never pulling one of those levers, which means you're eating anything you want, any time, how much, whatever, that's called the standard American diet.Tim Ferriss: SAD.Peter Attia: Yeah, the SAD. And we've been running a very good natural experiment on that for 50 years and the data are in. So it turns out that less than 20 percent of the population, probably less than 10 percent of the population, is genetically robust enough to tolerate the SAD. So, that's a great piece of data. There are people out there who can eat KFC and Doritos and pizza any time they want and they're generally okay to a first-order approximation. I would add that we don't really know the answer to this question because we don't have super granular data at the population level. But notwithstanding that, at least at the surface level, it appears that 10 percent of the population are largely immune to the SAD. But for the rest of the 90 percent of us schmucks, which I'm certainly in that camp, the SAD is lethal.And so you've got to come up with a way to escape the gravitational pull of the SAD. And that's why I think having these three levers at your disposal is the key. And yeah, I think that what happens is people get so into the camp of their lever, it's all time restriction or it's all dietary restriction, not too many people are in the all calorie restriction group. There's a whole Calorie Restriction Society, and so there certainly are people that are in that camp, but it's usually the first two camps that have the most zealots.

Direct Advice For Dads Podcast
Parental Guidance's Dr Justin Coulson: The “levers” of parenting

Direct Advice For Dads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:21


You may know him from Channel 9's show, Parental Guidance. Dr Justin Coulson is also a dad to SIX girls! This episode is an open and forthright discussion about modern-day parenting.

The Site Shed
The 7 Business Levers

The Site Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 42:58


Scaling your business to drive sales without the training or experience can easily turn into a disaster, but it's not at all impossible. One of the key things to consider in your marketing efforts is putting a management framework in place, which includes focusing on: Where your numbers are; What's currently driving profit; and What is being implemented in each area of your business. In this insightful episode, we're joined by Pete Williams — a renowned marketing strategist and author of the book, Cadence: A Tale of Fast Business Growth. Pete talks about the 7 Business Levers and how you can apply these areas of focus to your business framework so you can see your business scale in no time.  Be sure to take note of these straightforward strategies that'll help you flip that switch for consistent growth and massive success. Let's dive in! Discussion Points:  0:00 Opportunity Analysis 1:55 Welcome to the podcast 2:11 How his book, Cadence, came to be 4:55 How the principles of the 7 Business Levers can help scale your business 8:54 The 7 Levers Framework  10:56 Why builders end up in the project management space 11:44 Filling the gaps using the framework 14:27 The 7 things that drive profit 20:44 Focus on these areas when you get off the tools 23:59 How to improve profit margin by boosting productivity  33:36 Why corporate checklists promote consistency 36:18 Applying the Peter Principle About the Guest:  Pete Williams is a distinguished advisor, Professor of Practice, and author of the multi-awarded book, Cadence: A Tale of Fast Business Growth. He has co-founded a number of businesses including Preneur Group, a consulting firm committed to guiding entrepreneurs through the 7 Levers approach to business growth.  Resources:  The Opportunity Assessment (FREE GIVEAWAY FOR A LIMITED TIME) Go to https://tradie.wiki/grow and use the code: SITESHED Join a global community of 6000+ trade professionals https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheSiteShed Download sample chapters of the book (​​https://www.cadencebook.com/) Connect with Pete Williams: Visit Pete's website (https://www.preneurgroup.com/) Twitter: https://twitter.com/preneur/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/preneur/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/preneurmarketing/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/preneurmarketing/ Books mentioned in this episode:  Cadence, A Tale of Fast Business Growth by Pete Williams (https://amzn.to/2TBmoFM) Built to Sell by John Warrillow (https://amzn.to/3y6UjFM) Who by Dr. Geoff Smart (https://amzn.to/2TfzCY4) The E-Myth by Michael E. Gerber (https://amzn.to/3awaX6g) Traction by Gino Wickman (https://amzn.to/3rkX6Z1) Connect with me on LinkedIn. For more podcast episodes, you may also visit my website. You can listen from your mobile device right now.

Jorgenson's Soundbox
David Perell: Intellectual Openness, Mental Models for Success, and Peculiar Ways of Looking at The World

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 103:43


This week's guest is David Perell. David is a creator, a writer, and a teacher at his massively successful online writing course, called Write of Passage. The success of his course gave me inspiration for my own course, and gives me fundamental optimism about the future of education. David and I have been friends for years, so this is less of an interview and more of a one-sided hang-session, where I get the pleasure of drawing out new ideas and experiences from David that I haven't heard before. This is… basically what it's like to hang out with us in person, and I'll let you decide if that's a good thing or not :). David is a man of endless-energy. He is reference-rife and story-stacked. I always have a great time talking with David, and I welcome you to join the conversation.    As always, additional resources to enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  The upcoming Porter Robinson documentary that David is working on.  How David applied the ideas of Peter Thiel to… everything in life How to learn writing the fun way (less grammar more jammin)  Mental models for building successful products and companies What it means for something to “move” us The most interesting modern art form of today What deliberate consumption looks like    Additional Resources:   The Economy is Mind-Bogglingly Huge — Eric Jorgenson   Practice Analytically, Perform Intuitively - David Perell My Principles of Company Building - David Perell Peter Thiel's Religion - David Perell Saving the Liberal Arts - David Perell David's Essays Write of Passage Course David's Twitter David's Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Twitter        Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Solocast: Metagames, Feedback Loops and Transcending The Muggle World Joe Hertler: Tapping Into Creative Genius & Pursuing Joy Through Creativity --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

The Ted O'Neill Program
11-16-2021 Levers

The Ted O'Neill Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:02


Coach Ted talks about some of the various levers and how we use them in conjunction with the formulas to engage the new.

Star Wars 7x7 | Star Wars News, Interviews, and More!
2,690. Rae Sloane at the Battle of Endor

Star Wars 7x7 | Star Wars News, Interviews, and More!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 12:03


"The Levers of Power" by Jason Fry has the dual joys of filling a gap in Admiral Rae Sloane's history and giving us a new view on the Battle of Endor, but also feels a little out of place in the "Rise of the Empire" bind-up. Punch it! ***I'm listener supported! Join the community at http://Patreon.com/sw7x7 to get access to bonus episodes and other insider rewards.*** 

Music Lesson Business Academy
Grow Your Profits With The 7 Levers Of The Music Lesson Business

Music Lesson Business Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 17:06


In this episode we re-visit the 7 levers of the music lesson business. I always go back to this when I feel like I don't know what to focus on.. Get a free PDF download of the "7 Levers Of The Music Lesson Business HERE  

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Dan Reecer: What Is Polkadot And Why It's The Future of Web3

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 64:53


Today, my guest is Dan Reecer. Dan joined the crypto world 3 years ago instead of going to get his MBA, and is now VP of Growth for Acala, the Defi Network launching soon on the Polkadot Blockchain Platform. Don't worry, all of those words get explained in the podcast.  In this conversation, I try to bring us all (myself included) from basics to applications of blockchain, and help us all see around the next few corners we'll all go through together over the next decade. We talk about: Dan's path to working in crypto, what Polkadot is, where it came from, why it's different from Bitcoin and Ethereum, and how crypto will benefit people not already in the space.   Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   (I encourage you to go play around with some of these tools and technologies. Things start to click when you actually use them and feel them work.)    Topics Covered:  What is Polkadot? Where Polkadot came from and why it's different from Bitcoin and Ethereum What does a multi-chain future look like? Why do we need that? What problems does Polkadot solve? What is Acala?  How crypto will benefit normal people Dan's path to working in Crypto    Additional Resources:   The Infinite Machine book by Camilla Russo Dan Reecer's Twitter Polkadot Twitter Acala Twitter Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Twitter      Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Sky King: The Next Level of the Internet, Decentralization, and Becoming a Player in the Game of Life Jason Hitchcock: Your Guide to Web3 (DeFi, NFTs, and The Metaverse) Sean O'Connor: How Blockchain is Changing Society with Costless Transactions Simon Judd: How Index Coop is building Crypto Index products --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Which Levers Do You Need to Pull to Scale Your Agency Faster?

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 14:11


Do you know which levers you can pull in order to scale your agency faster? Greg Bond believes his purpose in life is to add value to other people's lives. He is the head of revenue at SharpSpring, a company that aims to help businesses better understand their customers so they can maximize their value proposition. Greg oversees the sales function and works really close with the marketing team. He understands what it is agencies, and end-users, are really trying to do with that platform. Greg discussed the levers agencies need to pull to scale faster, some of the challenges agencies face, and what works for showing ROI and continuing to grow. 3 Golden Nuggets Levers you can pull to scale faster. One of the biggest challenges for agency owners is when they need to hire new employees and must raise their prices to be able to afford that. Will their clients pay that? Well, that depends. Do they know how much value they are delivering to their clients? Sharpspring focuses on ROI and being able to report specifically on this piece of revenue. With the consolidation of tools and bringing data into one place, you'll have a centralized data repository that drives your automation engine and behavioral tracking, making your message more relevant. This is what gets you extra conversion rates and will help you grow your revenue. Why are agencies bad at their own marketing? You probably recognize this. The cobbler's shoes. Agencies spend a lot of time and effort working with their customers and they don't do a great job of marketing for themselves. Agencies spend all their time trying to blow their clients away to get more clients through word of mouth. That's great, of course. It's the first requisite to start scaling. However, you can't raise your prices when you're built on referrals. About this, Jason asks, what if you hire a hunter? That way, con can stop self-sabotaging, you'll continue to scale, and you can finally raise your prices. What works for showing ROI. For Greg, it's all about showing value at the end of the funnel. Agencies bought into the lead marketing approach, he says. But with new customers these days there are multiple interactions before they actually make a purchasing decision. So the idea is being able to track all the different interactions across the entire funnel. Having all that data in one place and being able to map it to a singular campaign and then show when this deal actually does close enables agencies to tell what contributed to a sale and report on it in a way with confidence. YOUTUBE AUDIO LINK Levers You Can Pull To Scale Your Agency Faster and Why Agencies Are Bad at Their Own Marketing Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk and I have another amazing episode with my friends at SharpSpring. We're going to talk about what are the levers you need to pull in order to give your clients better results to scale your agency even faster. We all want to know this, so let's go ahead and get into the episode. Hey, Greg. Welcome to the show. Greg: [00:00:25] Hey! Thanks, Jason. Happy to be here, man. Jason: [00:00:28] Yeah. Excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Greg: [00:00:32] Yeah, so my name is Greg Bond and I'm the head of revenue over at SharpSpring, which very recently we were acquired by Constant Contact. So, um, a lot of really cool integration stuff going on there between those two companies. And yeah, I just kind of oversee our entire kind of sales function and work really close with our marketing team. I actually, I've been with the company a while and I came from VP of customer success. So very close to our customer base and really understanding what it is that our agencies and even our end users are really trying to do at the platform and kind of what their pain points are and what they're struggling with. And I've been able to bring a lot of that into the revenue focus of the company. So… Jason: [00:01:13] Awesome. Let's get into it. Let's talk about some of the levers that agencies can pull in order to kind of scale their agency faster and get better results for their clients. Greg: [00:01:25] Yeah. And I, I think, you know, when we talk about this, especially in the context of SharpSpring, I think what a lot of it focuses in on for us is tool consolidation. I think is one of the main things. Over the years, the technology revolution of the past 10 years, you know, the past decade. Um, has brought a lot of different point solutions to market that are fantastic tools. But the problem with them is that you end up with siloed databases and all this information that, that sits in each individual tool. And you almost have to have a whole team of operational wizards to connect these things and pull all that data together. You've got all this different reporting that's ended up end up in silos. And you can't really work to unify that customer experience and report on where exactly what attribution is the attribution that you should be pointing towards for your clients that you're working with to say, hey, this is where that sale came from. And at Sharpspring what we really focus our customers in on is ROI and being able to report specifically on this piece of revenue, where did it come from? We talk a lot about being a full-funnel marketer, and I think that's really the space where we want to play and where we think agencies can leverage to improve their own results. Jason: [00:02:45] So ROI has always been very important. And I think a lot of… You know, when I talk to agencies, one of their biggest challenges that they have is well, I can't afford to hire someone right now. I'm like, well, why don't you charge more? They're like, well, I don't know if they'd pay that. Um, and then my next question to them is, well, how much value do you deliver your clients? And a lot of them go, I don't know. And which is really freaking scary. So depending on your industry, sometimes it's hard to show an ROI. How have you found... Or what are some of the things that have worked for agencies for showing ROI in order for them to, you know, have the client stay with them longer, as well as to charge more? Greg: [00:03:29] It really is about showing that value at the bottom of the funnel. I think agencies in the past and marketers, just digital marketers period, they… They bought into this inbound marketing approach where you have the lead magnet. Somebody fills out a form and that form gives you somebody's email address in a really nice tidy bow of, hey, this is where this person came from. But the new customers, these days, there's multiple interactions before they actually make a purchasing decision. And so you have all of this noise in the system. So being able to track all the different interactions across the entire funnel, sometimes people move into the middle of the funnel and then back up to the top and then back down. And, you know, they may not necessarily be ready yet when they talk to your sales team. And to be able to kind of… Keep all of that data in one place and be able to map it to a singular campaign and then show when this deal actually does close. That's the place where I can now track all of those interactions back and say, whether I want to look at first touch or last touch or any different number of touches and attribution. I can tell you what contributed to that, that sale and be able to report on it in a way with confidence, right? Like being able to go to your client with confidence and say I am 100% sure that our marketing efforts drove this sale. As well as your sales team, right? Like, I don't want to take the sales team out of it. The sales team has a role to play as well. But marketing runs alongside the sales team and helps enable them to be able to close those deals. And you need a singular system that can track all of those interactions without some sort of XL ninjitsu happening there in the middle of it. Yeah. Jason: [00:05:14] You know, Dean Jackson always talks about out of a hundred percent of the pie. Like he always draws like this square and then he basically draws a line down the square and says 50% will never buy from you. And that out of the other 50%, they'll eventually buy from you, but maybe like 10% are ready to buy now. Then the other 40% is over time, right? And so it's really important to really kind of think about it in that way, because a lot of people just go after the 10% and they forget about the 40%. Like, when I look at our data and the different things… There's a lot of times people don't engage with us or, well, jump into the mastermind or buy a, our framework for like two or three years. Which I'm like, that's awesome. Like we held their attention that long, but you know, some people. Yeah. Greg: [00:06:07] And I talk a lot about it with our teams. I talk a lot about the buyer's journey. And there are plenty of people who fall into the bottom of your funnel, who are ready to buy right now. It's the first time you ever talked to them, right? But that's where they are in their buyer's journey. And they just happened to find you at that time. I think so many people look for that, you know, zero moment of truth, that, that place where, you know, that's all marketing is like targeting that person. But there are so many other people, like you said, there's a, the vast majority of the people who will buy from you in the future are not at that point yet. And how do you nurture them to get there? And how do you drop them in at the top of your funnel? Where at the top of your funnel, it's damn near impossible to keep them accurately it attributed to the right campaign over a long period of time. But you still have to fill that top of the funnel and help nurture them down. But with a unified database and behavioral tracking and a tool like SharpSpring, you now have that ability to get all those different touch points in and have them all in the system so that when two years from now three years from now, they actually do convert into a sale, you know exactly how to attribute that marketing spend. Jason: [00:07:19] You've been working with agencies for a long time. Why are agencies so bad at their own marketing? Greg: [00:07:25] That's a great question. I mean, I think one of it is, it's, you know, the cobbler shoes. They've spent a lot more time and effort working with their customers and in collaboration with their, their clients. So they don't do a great job of marketing for themselves. And I, and I think the other one is the number one way that agencies get businesses through word of mouth. Word of mouth is about delivering results, right? If you deliver results above and beyond the expectations of your clients, that's where you get that word of mouth from. And so they spend all their time and I believe rightly so, they should spend all their time trying to blow their clients away and just deliver those results. Again, being able to point back to the ROI and say, hey, this marketing spend this effort that we drove, drove these results. And if you do that over and over again, you'll get word of mouth. And so it'd be great if you could also fill the top of your funnel with a bunch more content, but if it comes at, at the risk of losing the results for your clients, then I don't think it's worth either. Jason: [00:08:28] Yeah, I see that, you know, I, I just had, um, as we're recording this. A week ago, we had 28 of the best agencies over at the house for a three-day experience. And we all talked about like, where were the biggest challenges? Some of them were, you know, we're not doing our own marketing. And they thought, well, in order to scale my agency, the lever I need to pull is the sales. And I need to find a hunter. I, I started asking more questions as well, why? I was like, well, what about the business coming to you? And they said exactly what you're saying, most of their businesses generated by word of mouth. I said, well, congratulations, you're doing a great job. That's prerequisite one for scaling an agency. Right? Like, because there's a lot of people that take a stupid Facebook course and go, I'm a Facebook ads agency. They can't deliver shit. And then it screws it up for all the legit people out there. But what I told them, I said, what if you actually hired a hunter in order to scale? They're like, what about the leads? I'm like, well, that's the other thing, you pull the marketing lever, you can start generating and building your pipeline. Because what I found was there's a lot of owners that the better they do in marketing, the more meetings they have. Soon they get overwhelmed and then they start self-sabotaging themselves. And a lot of you listening right now, you're doing this shit right now. I can promise you. You're self-sabotaging yourself, but if you hired a hunter, then they can start closing that business. They're not going to sabotage you. They want to do well. And then you can scale. Then you can raise your damn prices because when you're built on referrals, you can't raise your prices because they're like, oh, I paid 10,000 a month. You can't charge a hundred thousand to a guy that just referred you 10,000. It's just a different playing field. Greg: [00:10:16] And I think agencies, it's such a unique business because it is a professional service. And, in professional services businesses, it's the expertise that people are buying, right? And the agency owner and the principal is that main source of vision and creativity. So you have to have them involved in the sale. And you also want them involved in every client engagement. That's what the clients purchased, right? So it becomes a scalability issue for your agency, right? Like there's only a certain amount that you can scale yourself. And so you have to hire people who have that ability to cast a vision and be that sort of thought leader as well alongside of you. And you need to be able to share the spotlight a little bit with them. Or at least have, like you said, that hunter that goes out and brings people in front of you and does it in a way that doesn't require a ton of your time so that you can spend the time delighting your customers with incredible results. Jason: [00:11:09] Yeah, exactly. And, and I look at it to have going, you know, as your business scales and you scale the agency, you better damn well start putting the people in place for this, right? Like you should have someone like the director of happiness, making sure you're delivering the results, right? That's what we have. So I don't have to. Like, my attention to detail is probably like everybody else's, that's why I was telling you, like our shows use like 10 to 15 minutes. Like we're all like attention to detail, like bird, where's the bird? So… Well, this has all been amazing, Greg. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think our audience needs to know about? Greg: [00:11:47] I don't think so. I mean, I think we kinda covered all the, all the main topics that I think are worth really focusing on. But I think one thing that I want to make sure is clear here is when we talk about tool consolidation… And I think everyone hears cost savings, right? They hear that, oh, I can make my life a little simpler, have fewer log-ins and things like that. And that's not really what we're saying. What we're saying is the consolidation of tools and bringing all that data into one place and being able… For that CRM, that centralized data repository to be the thing that drives your automation engine and all that behavioral tracking, being able to make your message more relevant. The right person, the right message. The right person, the right time. That is what gets you those extra conversion rates. That is what helps you grow your revenue. And it's not just, oh, you get to save some money. Yeah. Okay. That's cool. Yeah. That's another benefit. But the real benefit here is... It's actually the right way to build a customer experience that people will go nuts for. Jason: [00:12:52] Awesome. I love it. Now, Greg, you guys have a special offer for our audience for a short time. So tell us about. Greg: [00:12:59] We do. We want to offer anyone that that's a listener of your podcast series a half off their onboarding and their first month free. So big offer here for, for you guys, um, especially for, for this podcast and your audience, Jason. Jason: [00:13:13] Sweet. Thank you very much. Where can they get this? Cause now they're, you know, if you want to get… right? Like, we need to tell them. So where's the call to action, so you can give me attribution for it? Greg: [00:13:24] So head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency, and you can schedule a demo right there and that will help us secure that offer for you. Jason: [00:13:35] Awesome. And you'll be able to schedule with one of their cool strategists that can walk you through everything and set you up. So I highly recommend SharpSpring, go check it out and get your half month or the full month and a half off the onboarding. That's a tongue twister. Greg: [00:13:52] It is a tongue twister. You know, it's about a $1,600 value right there. Jason: [00:13:55] Ooh, go get it, guys. Go get it while it's hot. But, uh, thanks so much for coming on the show and uh, until next time have a Swenk day.

Sensus Fidelium Catholic Podcast
Resistance Podcast #207: Economic Personalism: 5 Levers of Change w/ Michael Greaney & Dawn Brohawn

Sensus Fidelium Catholic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 63:46


Center for Economic and Social Justice - https://www.cesj.org/economic-personalism-book/ Michael's website https://just3rdway.blogspot.com/ Amazon link for the Book - https://www.amazon.com/Economic-Personalism-Property-Justice-Person/dp/0944997139 https://uni-muenster.academia.edu/JulianStrube

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Cliff Kuang: Optimizing User Interface And The Massive Opportunities Within Design

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 77:39


Today my guest is Cliff Kuang, author of a fantastic book called User Friendly: How The Hidden Rules of Design are Reshaping The Way We Live, Work, and Play, which was called a "tour de force" by the New York Times. He was the Design editor of Fast Company, and Editor at Wired Magazine. From there he went on to work at Google as a Senior Staff Designer on an innovations team. Cliff is obsessive about the deepest challenges facing UX design today such as the metaphors that undergird what we do, the future of digital ecosystems, and the future experiences those ecosystems can unlock. Enjoy these topics and many more on this episode of Jorgenson's Soundbox!   Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  What Cliff is doing to change the entire landscape of user interface What a unicorn is within the design industry and why they're a dying breed The universal problem of design What is “good” design How metaphor and feedback are at the core of user interface How design is empathetic Why we are in the ever-present of user interface    Quotes   “In the age of invisible updates delivered via the cloud we sort of live in this ever-present, we don't remember what our tech interfaces looked like 10 years ago. There's no past and there's no future. It's very strange the way we live with technology and design right now.” - Cliff Kuang   “There's this magical tension within design between creating something new and creating something recognizable. You're trying to create something magic that feels like you've always used the thing but it's actually the first time you've ever used it. That's the magic of design.” - Cliff Kuang  Additional Resources:   User Friendly Cliff's Twitter Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Twitter      Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Eric Jorgenson: Metagames, Feedback Loops and Transcending The Muggle World Sky King: The Next Level of the Internet, Decentralization, and Becoming a Player in the Game of Life   --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Movement Made Better Podcast
#69 Levers and Ranges of Motion with Dennis Dunphy and Neal Valera

Movement Made Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 21:14


Check out this week's podcast episode with Stick Mobility Founders Dennis Dunphy and Neal Valera! In this week's podcast, the coaches talk about working with clients with previous injuries, accounting for limb length when considering ranges of motion, social media influencers, and other interesting topics in the health and wellness space and beyond.   In this podcast we discuss: 01:51 - Limb lengths and appendages regarding proper form 04:47 - Working with clients with previous injuries 09:22 - Strength and Mobility “influencers” 11:08 - Ranges of motion | Contortion, mobility, and body types 19:09 - Closing thoughts More from Stick Mobility: https://stickmobility.com/ https://www.instagram.com/nvstrength/ https://www.instagram.com/diamondphysiquesj/

Elevate School Leadership
S4E5 - We need to make it easier and more attractive to be an educator - Daniel Bauer

Elevate School Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 44:37


Chief Rukus Maker at Better Leaders Better Schools Daniel Bauer - absolutely PACKS this episode with smart, practical advice and resources for school leaders who are seeking to LEVEL-UP! Daniel's "5 Levers of Leadership" alone are worth the listen!daniel@betterleadersbetterschools.comCall or text Daniel: 312 788.75957:00 5 Levers of Leadership- Gift yourself a deep work block once per week- Fighting distraction by going old school- Be intentional with technology- See yourself in 3D - Do it, Delete it or Defer it- Invest in developing emotional intelligence - Create more results and get paid more7:30 Deep Work by Cal Newport12:00 What is it worth to you to experience abundance in your wealth, health & relationships12:00 TalentSmart - Emotional Intelligence 2.012:45 75% of leaders allow emotions to drive their decisions14:15 Invest, Learn & Teach14:30 The Dream Manager by Matthew Kelly15:15 Everybody wakes up each day with some kind of dream16:00 YouTube video: The Dream Manager18:15 STREAKS19:00 Share non-school related info with your staff & parents19:00 Share your failures in public20:45 School leaders need to stop trying to please everybody21:15 Seth Godin21:30 Austin Kleon - Steal Like an Artist23:45 Purple Cow25:30 There's a weight & responsibility to school leadership28:15 The number one enemy to excellence is isolation28:45 Simon Sinek - Just Cause29:00 My just cause is to connect, grow & mentor every school leader who wants to level up30:00 We need to make it easier and more attractive to be an educator32:30 MASTERMIND: UNLOCKING TALENT WITHIN EVERY SCHOOL LEADERHere are some additional resources supporting our mission.Episodes, Feeback, Show Notes & more - www.elevateschool.usFacebook Group   LinkedIn GroupConnect with Matt on LinkedInConnect with Kevin on LinkedInComments or Questions? - kevin@theSMARTsub.com

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20 Growth: The 3 Levers to Successful Growth Models, The 3 Types of Growth Hires Startups Need To Know, The 3 Stages All Successful Growth Teams Need To Go Through with Elena Verna, Advisor @ MongoDB and HP

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 44:13


Elena Verna is a master when it comes to all things starting and scaling growth organizations. Previously, Elena spent over 7 years as SVP Growth @ SurveyMonkey where she ran product, growth marketing, and data teams. Post SurveyMonkey, Elena worked with the rocket ship that is Miro both as Interim CMO and as an advisor. Elena has also advised some of the best growth orgs with advisor roles at HP, MongoDB, Netlify, Maze, and many more awesome companies. In Today's Episode with Elena Verna You Will Learn: 1.) How Elena made her way into the world of tech and growth from a Craiglist job listing? What was her big break in the world of growth with her first Head of Growth role? 2.) How does Elena define "growth" and "Head of Growth"? When should startups not have a growth team? What are the 3 main levers to the growth model today? How does Elena advise between hiring a CMO vs Head of Growth? Where do many founders make mistakes with this decision in mind? 3.) Who are the wrong people to hire for your growth team? What characteristics and traits do these people have that make them bad for growth? What questions does Elena ask in interviews to determine if they have these traits? How does Elena advise founders structure the process of hiring their "Head of Growth"? Should it be internal promotion or external hire? 4.) Where do most founders go wrong in the onboarding phase of their growth team? What do you have to have in place before the growth team starts? What are the biggest red flags for founders when reviewing their growth teams in the first 3 months? Why does Elena not like post-mortems? What is the optimal relationship between CEO and Head of Growth? 5.) How can growth teams work most effectively with both product and engineering teams? How do they need to communicate to ensure a healthy relationship? Where do growth teams most often make mistakes here? What have been some of Elena's lessons on how growth can experiment without angering engineering teams?

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Mitchell Baldridge: Defeating Taxes, Financial Planning, and Flipping A Bored Ape NFT for $250k

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 113:55


Mitchell Baldridge is an accountant and financial planner who also identifies as a libertarian anarchist crypto-degenerate. We talk through the creation of his firm, everything financial planning entails, and how he flipped a Bored Ape NFT for $250k. A little something for everyone today! Mitchell can't be everyone's personal planner and accountant, (though he is mine and I'm very grateful for that!) but he offers expertise that can help anyone. Taxes are likely your single largest expense over your entire life, so it pays to understand them.   Be sure to tweet or email me so I know what you think of the episode, and be well!   Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  Crypto plays in the public markets Wealth-building and preservation strategies 101 resources for people who want to self-educate on financial planning and taxes How web3 could affect accounting and tax over a 20-year time horizon? Mitchell's business specifically What is the path and what do you learn to become a CFP and accountant When should someone start working with a CFP or accountant? How do you know if you have a good accountant? A good financial planner?  Additional Resources:   Mitchell Twitter  Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Twitter      Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Eric Jorgenson: Metagames, Feedback Loops and Transcending The Muggle World Sky King: The Next Level of the Internet, Decentralization, and Becoming a Player in the Game of Life   --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
Will Schmitt (Miroma Ventures) - Investing with a value add, considerations before heading to retail and pulling the right levers for growth

The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:22


Presented by Ferret: Ferret is the first relationship intelligence tool for all business savvy investors to know, for the first time, who they can trust Click Here to jump to the top of the waitlist.  Presented by Gorgias: Gorgias is the #1 helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce stores, and can turn your customer support into a profit center.If you're looking to increase your retention for your business, mention Consumer VC and get 2 months of Gorgias for free. Click Here to get started.  Our guest today is Will Schmitt, Head of Venture Strategy at Miroma Ventures. Miroma just launched a $100 million fund focused on consumer and media brands. Previously he was at Naturaza and led investments in OROS, Yellowbird - If you remember the founder of Yellowbird, and Cleancult. He also previously co-founded Trail Post Ventures with Nick Mindel. We discuss how Will thinks about fund differentiation, starting a business online vs. retail, and pulling the right levers for growth. Without further ado, here's Will. Some of the questions I ask Will: What was your attraction to finance and consumer? What were doing before Miroma Ventures? How did you end up joining Miroma?  How do you think about fund differentiation? When do you typically like to partner with companies? I've had on investors who say for digitally native brands, don't touch paid marketing until you get to $1 million in sales via word of mouth. I've had other investors who say the bar is so high that you should only really be thinking about raising venture capital if you have a $10 million revenue run rate. How do you think about the right growth levers, when to use them and if a company can be venture backabl When are early signs that a consumer brand has gotten past the noise? Community has become a bit of buzzword. How have you seen brands build community? One of your missions is to invest in under represented founders, particularly female founders. As Claire Diaz-Ortiz said on her episode if you don't have a biast, you actually aren't human and the biasm in venture is people typically invest in people who look like them. i.e. overwhelming majority of VCs are white males, so the majority of founders that get funded are white males.What do you do differently? How do you think about breaking that mold and make sure you have a diverse network? How do you think about diversification? What does a great exit look like for you? I've had on Ernesto Schmitt (related?) and he said that brands are heading into retail way too early. I then had on Andy Dunn from Bonobos who thinks you should start in retail from the very beginning. When do you think is the right moment to head into retail? What are some of the particular verticals or trends that you are excited about? What's one thing you would change about venture capital? What's one book that inspired you personally and one book that inspired you professionally? What's the best piece of advice that you've received? What's one piece of advice for founders?

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Eric Jorgenson: Metagames, Feedback Loops and Transcending The Muggle World

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 55:48


Just me and you today, dear listener -- and I'm going to talk through some ideas that have been fascinating me recently, weaving together authors like Rory Sutherland, Eliezer Yudkowsky, and Nassim Taleb. As I reviewed my highlights from books, blogs and articles that I've been collecting over the past 10 years the main ideas that jumped out at me are playing the metagame and feedback loops. Both of these are ways to transcend the muggle world and start playing a different game.    I hope you enjoy this format -- if you love it (or hate it, actually), please tweet or email me so I know whether to ever do this again. It's all part of the sandbox experience!    Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  What are Metagames How Metagames change the game and allow you to dominate What are feedback loops Why we accept false barriers to cushion our egos Places to intervene in a system The power of transcending paradigms How a system can be destroyed by ignoring feedback How to expand your theoretical fish tank   Favorite Quotes: “In any system where there are norms, there are strengths and weaknesses to those norms. If you follow the norms of the system, the results you get are likely to be the norm. When you play a different game, a metagame, you have the opportunity to outperform.” -fs.blog   “Play the metagame in your domain too, whether you're head of an organization or just starting out. Blowout the walls of your fish tank and transcend paradigms.” - Eric Jorgenson   “False barriers are accepted because they are the path of least resistance for the ego” -Eric Jorgenson    Additional Resources:     Alchemy Rory Sutherland Moneyball Michael Lewis Inadequate Equilibria Eliezer Yudkowsky Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life Nassim Nicholas Taleb Systemantics. The Systems Bible John Gall and D.H. Gall User Friendly Cliff Kuang Structures J. E. Gordon Mike Barton Runs England's Best Police Force. What Sets Him Apart? Readwise Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Leverage Course    Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Codie Sanchez: Learning Leverage From Drug Cartels, Vanguard, And Goldman Sachs Sky King: The Next Level of the Internet, Decentralization, and Becoming a Player in the Game of Life   --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach
Consider the Levers of Society That Make the Most Impact

A Phil Svitek Podcast - A Series From Your 360 Creative Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:13


In this episode, I invite you to reflect and consider what levers in society are the most effective to achieve the goal you're after. I use a Tweet from @NathanHWilliams as a starting point into this deep lesson with some harsh truths. Namely that real change is hard and takes time and effort. In order to do this work, we must put our egos off to the side. There are no quick fixes to the progress we'd like to see happen. That's what I explore in this episode. After listening, kindly feel free to ask questions or offer opinions of your own, whether down in the comment section or by hitting me up on social media @PhilSvitek. Lastly, for more free resources from your 360 creative coach, check out my website at http://philsvitek.com. RESOURCES/LINKS: -Coach or Consultant Services: https://philsvitek.com/lets-work-together/ -Podcast Services: http://philsvitek.com/podcastservices -Love Market Film (available now): https://www.amazon.com/Love-Market-Amy-Cassandra-Martinez/dp/B09DFS3FTZ/ref=sr_1_14 -Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/philsvitek -Merchandise: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/phil-svitek---360-creative-coach/ -Instagram: http://instagram.com/philsvitek -Facebook: http://facebook.com/philippsvitek -Twitter: http://twitter.com/philsvitek -Financially Fit Foundation: http://financiallyfitfoundation.org -Master Mental Fortitude Book: http://mastermentalfortitude.com -Elan, Elan Book: http://philsvitek.com/elan-elan -In Search of Sunrise Film: http://philsvitek.com/in-search-of-sunrise

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Codie Sanchez: Learning Leverage From Drug Cartels, Vanguard, And Goldman Sachs

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 89:19


Codie Sanchez has been a journalist embedded with cartels, worked fancy-pants finance jobs at Goldman Sachs and Vanguard, and now -- she is an independent investor and entrepreneur. She owns a direct interest in FORTY FIVE businesses, with more than 25 cash flows. Codie's interests include boring businesses (like laundromats and property managers), online media companies, and service businesses. You'll hear us drop “leverage” a few times in this interview, and though it wasn't what I'd planned on talking about, I think Codie is a living example of the power of methodically applying leverage. If you want to build an independent career like Codie's, you'll love my course+community, called Building a Mountain of Leverage. Check it out at EJorgenson.com/Leverage Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  Putting money to work. (Angel Investing, Permanent Equity, Real Estate, and Stocks.) Leverage: The art of increasing your outcomes (tools, product, people, and capital.) How Codie keeps track of 45 different revenue streams What you can learn from cartels and spec ops organizations The universal language Why EQ is a better indicator for financial success than IQ How to create your own mentor How to build “free” equity How to withstand more than one bullet Favorite Quotes: “Civilize the mind, make savage the body, grow the revenue sheet” -Codie Sanchez   “Money is just a tool. The more tools I have the more ability I have to construct the world I want and the world that I think is best for all and for me and for the people that are around me.” -Codie Sanchez   “I think plans are normally for fairy tales. I truly believe that if people can follow their curiosity they're gonna end up exactly where they're supposed to be. The only thing you should be focused on is what is interesting to you, what you can get lost in.” -Codie Sanchez   Additional Resources:     Codie Sanchez Twitter Codie Sanchez Instagram UnconventionalAquisitions.com  The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Leverage Course    Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Andrew Wilkinson: Investing vs. Operating, De-risking Leverage, and The Best Part About Business Nick Huber: How to Leverage Twitter, an Abundance Mindset, and A Love of Chaos Andrew Finn of WaitButWhy: How To Acquire A Free Company And Knowing When To Eat A Shitburger    --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Track Zach Marshall Vol 1: From Navy SEAL To Marketplace Founder -- Future of Private Security

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 93:55


Today, we're kicking off a new long-term segment, called Track Zach -- my buddy Zach Marshall just founded a company called Conterra, and is about 3 months into the journey. I plan to have a conversation with him every 3 months or so to get a real-time, much more honest, interesting look at startup life. Zach, now in his second career after the Navy SEALs,  is setting his considerable will against a new challenge -- starting a venture-backed company to fix today's outdated, broken system for hiring private security around the world. Enjoy the ride! If you're not on my email list, fix that asap by going to ejorgenson.com -- I share weekly blog posts, podcast highlights, and new exciting new projects!    Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  What drives someone to become a Navy SEAL What is private security? Conterra: the private security marketplace How Conterra is going to revolutionize a $50 billion dollar industry labor marketplace for private security industry The current state of Conterra and where it's going Favorite Quotes: “In the military you have to learn things extremely fast and not just to pass a test, now you are responsible for these things. For example a skydiver in charge of a civilian drop in a stadium is coordinating all sorts of things and he has 10,000, maybe 5,000 jumps. Meanwhile I had to do the same thing in the service and I had around 65 jumps.” - Zach   “In the military you're just given this massive amount of responsibility so you have to actually pay attention to every detail. Attention to detail is one of those phrases said thousands and thousands of times in the spec ops community and it really is true.” - Zach Additional Resources:   Conterra Email Zach: zach@goconterra.com Eric Jorgenson Newsletter Eric Jorgenson Leverage Course    Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Andrew Wilkinson: Investing vs. Operating, De-risking Leverage, and The Best Part About Business Nick Huber: How to Leverage Twitter, an Abundance Mindset, and A Love of Chaos Andrew Finn of WaitButWhy: How To Acquire A Free Company And Knowing When To Eat A Shitburger    --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant

Business Growth Accelerator
102 | The 4 growth levers you can pull to grow any business with Pete Martin

Business Growth Accelerator

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:00


Leverage across multiple aspects of the business is the biggest competitive advantage any business can have. If you really want to take your business to the next level, you NEED leverage. And, if you can build leverage across different aspects of your business it will amplify your leverage. So what can you do? learn what are the key aspects of your business, and how to create leverage in them, that will build synergies across your entire business.Luckily for you, my friend Pete Martin is going to reveal 4 pillars of business leverage on this week's episode of the Business Growth Accelerator! He and his company Askmyboard.com helped multiple companies DOUBLE their valuation in 12 months. He is sharing stuff that works in real life that you can implement too. Here's what Pete and I covered on the show:

Jorgenson's Soundbox
Andrew Finn of WaitButWhy: How To Acquire A Free Company And Knowing When To Eat A Shitburger

Jorgenson's Soundbox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 103:41


Today, I'm talking with my new Capital Camp buddy Andrew Finn. He is the co-founder of the blog Wait But Why. Since age 25 he's been patiently building, buying, and operating small businesses. Now, he and Tim Urban share a portfolio of cash-flowing small businesses. Together we discuss how to get a free company, why it is often easier to buy a company than build it, and when to eat a shitburger. Enjoy these topics and countless others on this episode of Jorgenson's Soundbox.    Additional resources to help enrich your experience below:   Topics Covered:  How to get a “free” business What a $100,000 failure in early stage podcasting looked like Why it's easier to buy a company than build a company Why “doing it later” is a risk and the opportunity cost that comes with it The importance of judgement and getting experience making ‘real decisions' How to be a legitimate player in “the game” An illustration of a jobless renegade pirate's day looks like Eating shitburgers, and how to know when to stop   Favorite Quotes: “If I do all this maneuvering, find this company, sell at this price, sell some debt and get some money. In 5 years it'll be like poof here's a free company and I get my money back.” - Andrew Finn   “Your job is not to win the SMB game, it's to win the game. It's to win the game of money in a way that will benefit your life. Like, we're invested in crypto, and the stock market too.”   “All service businesses are chicken, just as much as software. You pay someone $X. Resell their time for $X + $Y. And the entirety of the business is justifying and expanding Y to both customers and workers. Y comes from well managed opex, capex, and organization structure. To do it well, you have to just laser focus on what you're providing in exchange for Y. The market gets pissed long-term if it doesn't feel like you're providing enough, and every day it conspires to ask you the question.” - Andrew's Twitter Additional Resources:   Wait But Why Andrew Finn's Personal Blog G64ventures - Andrew's holding company Andrew Finn Linkedin Jorgenson Leverage Course    Additional Episodes If You Enjoyed: Andrew Wilkinson: Investing vs. Operating, De-risking Leverage, and The Best Part About Business Nick Huber: How to Leverage Twitter, an Abundance Mindset, and A Love of Chaos Sky King: The Next Level of the Internet, Decentralization, and Becoming a Player in the Game of Life If you enjoy podcasts with Brent Beshore of Permanent Equity or Patrick O'Shaughnessy, you're going to love this one!  --------------------------------------------------------------- Huge thanks to Modern Stoa (modernstoa.co) for their help on creating and growing this very podcast you're listening to now. If you need help with podcast growth or monetization, go to modernstoa.co or hit the founder up on Twitter (@consumersky) or Instagram (@iamaskyking).       If you want to support the podcast, here are a few ways you can:  >> Buy a copy of the Navalmanak: www.navalmanack.com/  >> Share the podcast with your friends and on social media  >> Give the podcast a positive review to help us reach new listeners  >> Make a weekly, monthly, or one-time donation: https://app.omella.com/o/9Bufa  >> Follow me on Twitter: @ericjorgenson >> Follow @FirstsFamous on Twitter  >> Learn more and sign up for the “Building a Mountain of Levers” course and community: https://www.ejorgenson.com/leverage  I appreciate your support!     Important quotes from Naval on building wealth and the difference between wealth and money:   How to get rich without getting lucky. - Naval Ravikant   Making money is not a thing you do—it's a skill you learn. - Naval Ravikant   I came up with the principles in my tweetstorm (below) for myself when I was really young, around thirteen or fourteen. I've been carrying them in my head for thirty years, and I've been living them. Over time (sadly or fortunately), the thing I got really good at was looking at businesses and figuring out the point of maximum leverage to actually create wealth and capture some of that created wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Seek wealth, not money or status. - Naval Ravikant    Wealth is having assets that earn while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant    Money is how we transfer time and wealth. - Naval Ravikant   Ignore people playing status games. They gain status by attacking people playing wealth creation games.    You're not going to get rich renting out your time. You must own equity—a piece of a business—to gain your financial freedom.  - Naval Ravikant       The most important skill for getting rich is becoming a perpetual learner. You have to know how to learn anything you want to learn. The old model of making money is going to school for four years, getting your degree, and working as a professional for thirty years. But things change fast now. Now, you have to come up to speed on a new profession within nine months, and it's obsolete four years later. But within those three productive years, you can get very wealthy. - Naval Ravikant     Important quotes from the podcast by Naval on Leverage:   “Give me a lever long enough and a place to stand, and I will move the earth.”  —Archimedes    To get rich, you need leverage. Leverage comes in labor, comes in capital, or it can come through code or media. But most of these, like labor and capital, people have to give to you. For labor, somebody has to follow you. For capital, somebody has to give you money, assets to manage, or machines. - Naval Ravikant   Fortunes require leverage. Business leverage comes from capital, people, and products with no marginal cost of replication (code and media). - Naval Ravikant   Capital and labor are permissioned leverage. Everyone is chasing capital, but someone has to give it to you. Everyone is trying to lead, but someone has to follow you. - Naval Ravikant   Code and media are permissionless leverage. They're the leverage behind the newly rich. You can create software and media that works for you while you sleep. - Naval Ravikant   If you can't code, write books and blogs, record videos and podcasts. - Naval Ravikant   Leverage is a force multiplier for your judgment. - Naval Ravikant   Apply specific knowledge, with leverage, and eventually you will get what you deserve. - Naval Ravikant   “We live in an age of infinite leverage, and the economic rewards for genuine intellectual curiosity have never been higher. Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant   Important Quotes from the podcast on Business and Entrepreneurship   There is no skill called “business.” Avoid business magazines and business classes. - Naval Ravikant   You have to work up to the point where you can own equity in a business. You could own equity as a small shareholder where you bought stock. You could also own it as an owner where you started the company. Ownership is really important.     Everybody who really makes money at some point owns a piece of a product, a business, or some IP. That can be through stock options if you work at a tech company. That's a fine way to start.    But usually, the real wealth is created by starting your own companies or even by investing. In an investment firm, they're buying equity. These are the routes to wealth. It doesn't come through the hours. - Naval Ravikant