Podcasts about Roya

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Best podcasts about Roya

Latest podcast episodes about Roya

Israel News Talk Radio
Alexa! What are my notifications - Lighten Up!

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 48:48


Steven Explains to Roya the adventures of living with an 80 year old woman ( aka Steve's mom) and much more on this week's Lighten Up on Israel News Talk Radio Lighten Up! 30JAN2023 - PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio
No Side Salad for You!!! - Lighten Up!

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 50:16


Roya and Steven talk about the dumbest story ever, Angry School Board members & George Santos dream of becoming Ms Gay Rio Dijenero. And much much more on Lighten Up Lighten Up! 23JAN2023 - PODCAST

Strange & Unusual
Ep 140: White Dudes Doing White Dude Stuff - Branch Davidians

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 51:09


This story has EVERYTHING: reincarnated biblical characters, child brides, sex bans, and necromancy duels. The beginning of the end for another cult as Casey dives into what led them to the edge before Roya covers the devastating plunge over it next week. Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod on IG at: @strange_unusual_podcast Twitter: @_strangeunusual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: calamitycasey

Haymarket Books Live
Iranian Women Show the World How to Fight for Our Rights

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 86:28


Join an educational panel featuring Iranian activists and scholars for a discussion of the struggle in Iran and what we can learn from it. Chanting “Women, Life, Freedom,” protests continue to sweep Iran following the death of Mahsa Amini at the hands of Iranian police. As our rights in the U.S. are threatened by the government, politicians and the courts, Iranian women and their allies are pointing the way forward to winning rights in far more difficult circumstances. They are fighting for self-determination and the right to control their lives free of outside intervention, including from the United States. We in the United States have a lot to learn from people in other countries about how to preserve and expand our rights. We embrace the right of all to control their lives free of outside intervention, including from the United States. Please join Chicago for Abortion Rights for an educational panel featuring Iranian activists and scholars for an exciting discussion about their struggle to win women's rights to control their own bodies and much more! Speakers: Mahshid Mir studied medicine in Tehran and after graduation moved to the US for her postdoc fellowship in cardiology at Harvard. Her residency training in internal medicine was at St. Joseph Hospital in Chicago. Mir is a healer in her day job and an activist in her volunteer time, finding the meaning of life in advocating for the right thing and devoting her life to improvement. Dr. Zohreh Ghavamshahidi is a retired Iranian-American political science professor who taught at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, where she was chair of the Women's Studies and Anthropology Departments, and taught courses in international relations and international law. A Fulbright Scholar, she has written extensively about the intersections of gender and religious identities in the Middle East and in the diaspora, and their relationships to state building and common stereotypes. Roya Karbakhsh is an Iranian-born artist. Her work reflects the inner strength of women as captured through their eyes. As an observer and critic, her detailed works illuminate the feelings of repression and the desire for the collapse of the traditional ‘ways of life' that are demanded in Iran. Roya's paintings portray women from different levels of existence, and are brought together in scenes that seem to take place outside the normal perceptions of time. Her focus on the eyes show the spiritual power and the indomitable spirit that resides within the soul of all women. Karbakhsh works as a freelance artist and art teacher in Chicago and surrounding suburbs. Moderator: Mandy Medley is a socialist feminist and a member of Chicago for Abortion Rights. This event is sponsored by Chicago For Abortion Rights and Haymarket Books. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/T9EfOQ7hhVg Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Israel News Talk Radio
Composting and Slurpees!! - Lighten Up!

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 49:02


Roya and Steven discuss being buried with food and Racist stoves! And much much more on Lighten Up Lighten Up! 16JAN2023 - PODCAST

Try Not To Blink
Try to Connect

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 63:44


Jimmy and Roya speak with Dr. Courtney Melchione this week on Try Not 2 Blink. Dr. Melchione is the amazing Optometrist that patient Marko Coady spoke of during the last episode of 2022. We had to go full circle to speak with the Doctor about how she makes such a difference in her patients' lives. Listen to her journey through optometry school, two years in Guatemala at a non-profit clinic, to residency, and now in private practice.  SOURCESSpecialty Eye CareDr Courtney MelchioneVA Scope ExpansionNaturalVueMisightJustin Kwan ODValley Contax Vision ProjectTry Not to Blink is powered by Valley ContaxValley Contax WebsiteValley Contax Instagram

Try Not To Blink
Eye Invent

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 57:39


This week on Try Not 2 Blink, Jimmy and Roya have fellow podcaster, speaker, and founder of Augmented Vision Labs, Dr. Fayiz Mahgoub. Listen as he shares his journey to America and his passion for optometry as he shares how he gives back during his career and what inspired him to invent the S5 inserter and the S5 mini.SOURCESDr Fayiz Mahgoub LinkedInAugmented Vision LabsDr Fayiz Mahgoub InstagramModern OD Article April 2021Odsonfb.comS5 Mini on AmazonDr. Mahgoub's EmailTSA PreCheckClearFacebook: Fayiz Mahgoub

Try Not To Blink
The NFL Dropout

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 55:48


It's a New Year! Tune in as Jimmy and Roya reminisce about their 2022 resolutions and hear their goals for 2023. They continue the episode with private practice owner, engaging speaker, and glaucoma specialist Dr. Michael Cymbor. Listen as he shares his knowledge and tidbits on nerve fiber defects (NFL).SOURCESDr Mike Cymbor: LinkedInNittany Eye AssociatesDr Mike CymborDr Cymbor's Upcoming EventsProgressing GlaucomaOMD resident vs. OMD vs. GLC specialistOHTS StudyOptomap CaliforniaHaag Streit OctopusLIGHT StudyZioptanEagle Pharmacy

Breakthrough Marketing Secrets
Building an Engaged, Responsive Email List [& how to create motivational content]

Breakthrough Marketing Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 18:59


SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ
Ukraine today - 31/12/2022 - Україна сьогодні - 31/12/2022

SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 15:16


Key partners of Ukraine, in particular the United States, support the Ukrainian peace formula. This was announced by the head of the Office of the President of Ukraine, Andriy Yermak. He emphasized that Ukraine should become stronger, continue to de-occupy all its territories and restore peace, but on its own terms. And these conditions for ending the war were clearly announced by President Volodymyr Zelenskyi during his speech at the G20 summit in Bali, Indonesia. In November 2022, President Zelensky announced to the leaders of the G20 countries a "peace formula" to overcome the Russian threat. It, in particular, provides for defense support for Ukraine, protection of territorial integrity and punishment of those guilty of armed aggression. The formula also provides for countering ecocide and fixing the end of the war. But in order to achieve peace, Ukraine must first stand up to the occupier and liberate the lands occupied by Roya, and for this we need weapons, reminds Andriy Yermak. In this, Ukrainians rely on their partners. - Ключові партнери України, зокрема Сполучені Штати, підтримують українську формулу миру. Про це повідомив керівник Офісу президента України Андрій Єрмак. Він наголосив, що Україна має ставати сильнішою, продовжувати деокуповувати всі свої території та повертати мир, проте на власних умовах. І ці умови для припинення війни чітко озвучив президент Володимир Зеленський під час виступу на саміті Великої двадцятки на індонезійському Балі. У листопаді 2022-го Президент Зеленський озвучив лідерам країн "Великої двадцятки” (G20) "формулу миру" для подолання російської загрози. Вона, зокрема, передбачає оборонну підтримку України, захист територіальної цілісності та покарання винних у збройній агресії. Також формула передбачає протидію екоциду та фіксацію завершення війни. Але, щоб досягти миру Україні спочатку треба встояти перед окупантом і визволити окуповані Роєю землі, для цього потрібна зброя - нагадує Андрій Єрмак. В цьому українці покладаються на своїх партнерів.

Try Not To Blink
Step Through Door To Another Universe

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 49:52


We have a very special episode today as we continue our series on being grateful for scleral lenses this month. Jimmy and Roya speak with patient Marko Coady on his inspiring scleral lens journey on how scleral lenses have impacted his life. SOURCESMarko Coady: LinkedInSpecialty Eye CareDr Courtney MelchioneValley Contax Vision Project

As The Leader Grows with Ken Joslin
Roya Mattis | The #1 Reason Relationships Fail

As The Leader Grows with Ken Joslin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 43:54


Today's episode, “The #1 Reason Relationships Fail,” features my guest, Roya Mattis. Roya helps high-achieving women level up performance, profitability, energy & peace. She is a SELF-AWARENESS expert and the #1 Energy Magnet Coach. She helps women become ENERGY MAGNETS in their physical bodies, feminine energy and magnetize the type of relationship they crave, especially after divorce or in the committed stage of up-leveling to prevent it. In this episode, Roya gives Ken the #1 reason relationships fail. She'll enlighten you with her take on the root causes of these problems, not just the symptoms! She'll give you a host of things to do to ensure you are running at the most elite version of yourself. Some of which you may never have given thought to until now.Don't miss this episode if you are struggling with your relationship!If you want to hear more from the greatest minds in leadership, go to growstackdrive.com/create and grab your ticket to CREATE—the #1 Entrepreneur Conference in the Southeast! If you enjoyed this episode, please share it on social media and tag Ken Joslin.

The goop Podcast
Gwyneth Paltrow x Roya Rastegar: A Women-Led Iranian Revolution

The goop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 57:06


Roya Rastegar is an Iranian American academic and a founding member of the Iranian Diaspora Collective, which is a nonpartisan multifaith group amplifying the voices of Iranians in Iran. She joins GP to discuss the ongoing uprising being led by young Iranian women, why it's not only about women's rights but human rights everywhere, and actionable ways to support this critical movement. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Musiques du monde
#SessionLive de Liraz et #playlist de Sophian Fanen

Musiques du monde

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 48:30


Du live israélo-iranien avec Liraz et ses musiciens qui interpréteront 2 titres dans le Grand studio et la sélection musicale de Sophian Fanen en 5 morceaux. Chaque mois, le critique musical Sophian Fanen propose 5 nouveautés ou morceaux qui ont marqué l'actualité. Il ouvre avec une légende de la chanson brésilienne Gal Costa, disparue le 9 novembre 2022.   Playlist Sophian - Gal Costa et Tim Bernardes, Baby, tiré de l'album «Nenhuma Dor» (Biscoito Fino, 2020) - Natalia Lafourcade, De todas las flores, tiré de l'album «De todas las flores» (Sony Music Mexico, 2022) - Liraz, Roya, tiré de l'album «Roya» (Glitterbeat Records, 2022) - Soyouz et Kate NV, I Knew It, tiré de l'album «Force of the Wind» (Mr Bongo, 2022) - Loyle Carner, Nobody Knows (Ladas Road), tiré de l'album «Hugo» (Universal Music Operations, 2022). Puis nous recevons l'artiste israélienne d'origine iranienne Liraz  dans la #SessionLive pour la sortie du nouvel album Roya.  La chanteuse israélo-persane primée Liraz a sorti son nouvel album Roya. Ce troisième album est une collection de 11 titres qui s'enrichissent de son mélange caractéristique de rythmes tradi-modernes et de sonorités rétro-persanes, Roya («fantaisie» en farsi) est une musique comme un portail magique, une porte arquée vers un lieu de paix, de joie et de liberté sans entrave, avec son tchador.  Liraz et son sextet israélien (trois femmes, trois hommes) ont enregistré pendant dix jours à Istanbul, dans un studio en sous-sol, à l'abri des regards et débordant de créativité. Avec eux, au violon, à l'alto et au tar, le luth iranien en bois en forme de guêpe, des compositeurs et des musiciens de la capitale iranienne, Téhéran ; les mêmes joueurs anonymes qui avaient déjà collaboré avec Liraz en ligne, sans poser de questions, sans montrer leur visage, sous le radar de la police secrète de Téhéran, pour son album Zan sorti en 2020. Cette fois, tout le monde a travaillé collectivement, face à face, cœur à cœur. Le sentiment omniprésent de danger et de peur a fini par céder à la joie de l'aventure partagée. «Je ne me souviens que de fragments : la peur et l'anxiété que j'ai ressenties lorsque j'ai su qu'ils étaient en route. Les larmes de joie et de soulagement que nous avons toutes versées en nous embrassant», raconte Liraz. «Et la musique que nous avons faite ! Une telle musique !»   Titres interprétés au Grand studio - Roya, Live RFI voir le clip  - Azizam, extrait de l'album Roya voir le clip  - Doone Doone, Live RFI.   Line Up : Liraz Charhi – chant, Gilad Levin – guitare, Eitan Drabkin – claviers, Amir Sadot – basse, Roy Chen – batterie. Claire Simon – traduction. Son : Benoît Letirant, Fabien Mugneret. Réalisation : Steven Helsly. ► Album  Roya (Glitterbeat Records 2022).

Confessions of a Male Gynecologist
21: Feminade and Affordable Hormone Testing: Roya Pakzad, CEO

Confessions of a Male Gynecologist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 38:56


“Honor your body. If something doesn't feel right, it's because it's not right.” - Roya Pakzad Being in control of your health is empowering, but often, that's easier said than done. High deductibles, restrictions on insurance coverage, and the cost of working with functional medicine practitioners are just some of the barriers that prevent women from accessing the full range of testing and modalities that could provide them with the help they need. Today I'm joined by Roya Pakzad, CEO and founder of Feminade, to talk about women's health and hormones and how the medical system has minimized women. After dealing with hormonal imbalances and nightmare experiences in the traditional medical system, Roya was determined to create a platform that gives women answers. From that mission, Feminade was born. In this conversation, Roya and I talk about why most women would benefit from annual hormone testing, the problems with access to appropriate testing and understanding the results, why Feminade has been life-changing for so many people, what you can do to support the women-led uprising in Iran, and more.   About Roya Pakzad Roya Pakzad is a fierce doer with the mind of an engineer and the heart of an advocate. Her interest in helping all women take charge of their hormones is personal. Her journey led to many naturopathic and functional medicine doctors who listened to her story and helped her get to the root cause of her symptoms. Along the way, she discovered protocols that balance hormones instead of masking them. Because she wasn't satisfied with simply healing herself, she founded Feminade to make holistic healthcare that targets hormonal imbalances accessible and affordable for everyone with a uterus.   Highlights Roya's repeated negative experiences with doctors, starting with her first visit to a gynecologist at age 19 The motivation and inspiration behind starting Feminade Highlighting the problems of affordability and access to quality healthcare Getting started with Feminade's extremely accessible options for at-home testing and telehealth The markers tested in Feminade's hormone testing kit Why most women will benefit from hormone testing What you need to know about the current women-led uprising in Iran How you can support the movement in Iran Roya's message for women getting minimized by the medical system   Connect with Roya Pakzad & Feminade Website https://feminade.com/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/feminadeinc/ Twitter https://twitter.com/feminadeinc   Resources Dr. Shawn Tassone's Practice https://www.drshawntassone.com/ Dr. Shawn Tassone's Book | The Hormone Balance Bible https://tassonemd.com/hormone-balance-bible/ Dr. Shawn Tassone's Integrative Hormonal Mapping System | Hormone Archetype Quiz https://tassonemd.lpages.co/hormonearchetypequiz/     Disclaimer This podcast and website represent the opinions of Dr. Shawn Tassone and his guests. The content here should not be taken as medical advice and is for informational purposes only. Because each person is so unique, please consult your health care professional for any medical questions.

The Strategerist
The Afghan Dreamers Robotics Team -- Roya Mahboob and Somaya Faruqi

The Strategerist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 32:22


In the years after the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan, women made tremendous gains in the country. In particular, they were able to be educated and become leaders in fields like engineering, as Somaya Faruqi and Roya Mahboob did.  The Afghan Girls Robotics Team, founded by Roya and captained by Somaya, even stepped up during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic to make low-cost ventilators out of car parts to help fill a desperate need in their country.Roya and Somaya were able to escape Afghanistan before the Taliban returned to power and once again took rights away from women in the country. This Human Rights Day, we celebrate the brave women who show the world their courage, heart, and brilliant minds despite the obstacles placed in their way.RelatedDigital Citizen FundAfghan Dreamers robotics team on TwitterRoya Mahboob on TwitterSomaya Faruqi on TwitterRoya Mahboob is also a Presidential Leadership Scholar -- learn more about the program.

Try Not To Blink
Manipulate a Piece of Plastic

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 65:34


Join Jimmy and Roya as they speak with guest Dr. Amanda Dieu, Professor of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine at Casey Eye Institute. Listen as she shares why she chose to attend Optometry School, why she applied for the fellowship at Casey Eye Institute, and what made her fall in love with Oregon. Hear what advice she has for current students and about her dog following on Instagram.SOURCESDr Amanda Dieu OSHUDr Amanda Dieu LinkedInMedical Contact Lens Fellowship

Try Not To Blink
Masterclass in Scleral Lens Logistics

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 57:43


December is scleral lens month on TN2B. Join Jimmy and Roya as they share tips on getting started with scleral lenses with the initial lens selection, patient insertion, ordering the lens from the manufacturer, and the patient's first dispensing appointment. Stay tuned all month for more great episodes on scleral lenses. SOURCESPepsiDopesickThe SwimmersValley ContaxBoost Program

AJC Passport
Celebrating Mizrahi Heritage Month with The Forgotten Exodus: Iran

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:56


Too few people know that parts of the Arab world and Iran were once home to large Jewish communities. This Mizrahi Heritage Month, let's change the story, with the final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, the first-ever narrative podcast series devoted exclusively to the rich, fascinating, and often-overlooked history of Mizrahi and Sephardic Jewry. Thank you for lifting up these stories to celebrate Mizrahi Heritage Month. If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to the rest of The Forgotten Exodus, wherever you get your podcasts.   __ Home to one of the world's oldest Jewish communities, the story of Jews in Iran has been one of prosperity and suffering through the millennia. During the mid-20th century, when Jews were being driven from their homes in Arab lands, Iran assisted Jewish refugees in providing safe passage to Israel. Under the Shah, Israel was an important economic and political ally. Yet that all swiftly changed in the 1979 Iranian Revolution, which ushered in Islamic rule, while chants of “Death to Israel” and “Death to America” rang out from the streets of Tehran.   Author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian shares her personal story of growing up Jewish in Iran during the reign of the Shah and then Ayatollah Khomeini, which she wrote about in her memoir Journey From the Land of No. Joining Hakakian is Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history who wrote From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of AJC Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants.  In this sixth and final episode of the season, the Hakakian family's saga captures the common thread that has run throughout this series – when the history of an uprooted community is left untold, it can become vulnerable to others' narratives and assumptions, or become lost forever and forgotten. How do you leave behind a beloved homeland, safeguard its Jewish legacy, and figure out where you belong? __ Show notes: Listen to The Forgotten Exodus and sign up to receive updates about future episodes.  Song credits:  Chag Purim · The Jewish Guitar Project Hevenu Shalom · Violin Heart Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Oud Nation”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Haygaz Yossoulkanian (BMI), IPI#1001905418 “Persian”: Publisher: STUDEO88; Composer: Siddhartha Sharma “Meditative Middle Eastern Flute”: Publisher: N/; Composer: DANIELYAN ASHOT MAKICHEVICH (IPI NAME #00855552512), UNITED STATES BMI Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Persian Investigative Mystery”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Peter Cole (BMI), IPI#679735384 “Persian Wind”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Sigma (SESAC); Composer: Abbas Premjee (SESAC), IPI#572363837 “Modern Middle Eastern Underscore”: Publisher: All Pro Audio LLC (611803484); Composer: Alan T Fagan (347654928) “Persian Fantasy Tavern”: Publisher: N/A; Composer: John Hoge “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. ___ Episode Transcript: ROYA HAKAKIAN: In 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. When I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience. This is The Forgotten Exodus.  Today's episode: Leaving Iran MANYA: Outside Israel, Iran has the largest Jewish population in the Middle East. Yes, the Islamic Republic of Iran. In 2022. Though there is no official census, experts estimate about 10,000 Jews now live in the region previously known as Persia.  But since the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Jews in Iran don't advertise their Jewish identity. They adhere to Iran's morality code: women stay veiled from head to toe and men and women who aren't married or related stay apart in public. They don't express support for Israel, they don't ask questions, and they don't disagree with the regime. One might ask, with all these don'ts, is this a way of living a Jewish life? Or a way to live – period?  For author, journalist, and poet Roya Hakakian and her family, the answer was ultimately no. Roya has devoted her life to being a fact-finder and truth-teller. A former associate producer at the CBS news show 60 Minutes and a Guggenheim Fellow, Roya has written two volumes of poetry in Persian and three books of nonfiction in English, the first of which was published in 2004 – Journey From the Land of No, a memoir about her charmed childhood and accursed adolescence growing up Jewish in Iran under two different regimes.  ROYA: It was hugely important for me to create an account that could be relied on as a historic document. And I did my best through being very, very careful about gathering, interviewing, talking to, observing facts, evidence, documents from everyone, including my most immediate members of my family, to do what we, both as reporters, but also as Jews, are called to do, which is to bear witness. No seemed to be the backdrop of life for women, especially of religious minorities, and, in my own case, Jewish background, and so I thought, what better way to name the book than to call it as what my experience had been, which was the constant nos that I heard. So, Land of No was Iran. MANYA: As a journalist, as a Jew, as a daughter of Iran, Roya will not accept no for an answer. After publishing her memoir, she went on to write Assassins of the Turquoise Palace, a meticulously reported book about a widely underreported incident. In 1992 at a Berlin restaurant, a terrorist attack by the Iranian proxy Hezbollah targeted and killed four Iranian-Kurdish exiles. The book highlighted Iran's enormous global footprint made possible by its terror proxies who don't let international borders get in the way of silencing Iran's critics.   Roya also co-founded the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, an independent non-profit that reports on Iran's human rights abuses.  Her work has not prompted Ayatollah Khameini to publicly issue a fatwa against her  – like the murder order against Salman Rushdie issued by his predecessor. But in 2019, one of her teenage sons answered a knock at the door. It was the FBI, warning her that she was in the crosshairs of the Iranian regime's operatives in America. Most recently, Roya wrote A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious about the emotional roller coaster of arriving in America while still missing a beloved homeland, especially one where their community has endured for thousands of years. ROYA: I felt very strongly that one stays in one's homeland, that you don't just simply take off when things go wrong, that you stick around and try to figure a way through a bad situation. We came to the point where staying didn't seem like it would lead to any sort of real life and leaving was the only option. MANYA: The story of Jews in Iran, often referred to as Persia until 1935, is a millennia-long tale. A saga of suffering, repression, and persecution, peppered with brief moments of relief or at least relative peace – as long as everyone plays by the rules of the regime. SABA SOOMEKH: The history of Jews in Iran goes back to around 2,700 years ago. And a lot of people assume that Jews came to Iran, well at that time, it was called the Persian Empire, in 586 BCE, with the Babylonian exile. But Jews actually came a lot earlier, we're thinking 721-722 BCE with the Assyrian exile which makes us one of the oldest Jewish communities.  MANYA: That's Dr. Saba Soomekh, a professor of world religions and Middle Eastern history and the author of From the Shahs to Los Angeles: Three Generations of Iranian Jewish Women between Religion and Culture. She also serves as associate director of American Jewish Committee in Los Angeles, home to America's largest concentration of Persian Jewish immigrants. Saba's parents fled Iran in 1978, shortly before the revolution, when Saba and her sister were toddlers. She has devoted her career to preserving Iranian Jewish history.   Saba said Zoroastrian rulers until the 7th Century Common Era vacillated between tolerance and persecution of Jews. For example, according to the biblical account in the Book of Ezra, Cyrus the Great freed the Jews from Babylonian rule, granted all of them citizenship, and permitted them to return to Jerusalem to rebuild their Temple.  The Book of Esther goes on to tell the story of another Persian king, believed to be Xerxes I, whose closest adviser called Haman conspires to murder all the Jews – a plot that is foiled by his wife Queen Esther who is Jewish herself. Esther heroically pleads for mercy on behalf of her people – a valor that is celebrated on the Jewish holiday of Purim.  But by the time of the Islamic conquest in the middle of the 7th Century Common Era, the persecution had become so intense that Jews were hopeful about the new Arab Muslim regime, even if that meant being tolerated and treated as second-class citizens, or dhimmi status. But that status had a different interpretation for the Safavids. SABA: Really things didn't get bad for the Jews of the Persian Empire until the 16th century with the Safavid dynasty, because within Shia Islam in the Persian Empire, what they brought with them is this understanding of purity and impurity. And Jews were placed in the same category as dogs, pigs, and feces. They were seen as being religiously impure, what's referred to as najes. MANYA: Jews were placed in ghettos called mahaleh, where they wore yellow stars and special shoes to distinguish them from the rest of the population. They could not leave the mahaleh when it rained for fear that if water rolled off their bodies into the water system, it would render a Shia Muslim impure. For the same reason, they could not go to the bazaars for fear they might contaminate the food. They could not look Muslims in the eye. They were relegated to certain artisanal professions such as silversmithing and block printing – crafts that dirtied one's hands.  MANYA: By the 19th century, some European Jews did make their way to Persia to help. The Alliance Israélite Universelle, a Paris-based network of schools founded by French Jewish intellectuals, opened schools for Jewish children throughout the Middle East and North Africa, including within the mahalehs in Persia.  SABA: They saw themselves as being incredibly sophisticated because they were getting this, in a sense, secular European education, they were speaking French. The idea behind the Allianz schools was exactly that. These poor Middle Eastern Jews, one day the world is going to open up to them, their countries are going to become secular, and we need to prepare them for this, not only within the context of hygiene, but education, language.  And the Allianz schools were right when it came to the Persian Empire because who came into power was Reza Pahlavi, who was a Francophile. And he turned around and said, ‘Wow! Look at the population that speaks French, that knows European philosophy, etc. are the Jews.' He brought them out of the mahaleh, the Jewish ghettos, and said ‘I don't care about religion. Assimilate and acculturate. As long as you show, in a sense, devotion, and nationalism to the Pahlavi regime, which the Jews did—not all Jews—but a majority of them did. MANYA: Reza Pahlavi took control in 1925 and 16 years later, abdicated his throne to his son Muhammad Reza Pahlavi. In 1935, Persia adopted a new name: Iran. As king or the Shah, both father and son set Iran on a course of secularization and rapid modernization under which Jewish life and success seemed to flourish. The only condition was that religious observance was kept behind closed doors. SABA: The idea was that in public, you were secular and in private, you were a Jew. You had Shabbat, you only married a Jew, it was considered blasphemous if you married outside of the Jewish community. And it was happening because people were becoming a part of everyday schools, universities.  But that's why the Jewish day schools became so important. They weren't learning Judaism. What it did was ensure that in a secular Muslim society, that the Jewish kids were marrying within each other and within the community. It was, in a sense, the Golden Age. And that will explain to you why, unlike the early 1950s, where you had this exodus of Mizrahi Jews, Arab Jews from the Arab world and North Africa, you didn't really have that in Iran.  MANYA: In fact, Iran provided a safe passage to Israel for Jewish refugees during that exodus, specifically those fleeing Iraq. The Pahlavi regime considered Israel a critical ally in the face of pan-Arab fervor and hostility in the region. Because of the Arab economic boycott, Israel needed energy sources and Iran needed customers for its oil exports.  A number of Israelis even moved to Tehran, including farmers from kibbutzim who had come to teach agriculture, and doctors and nurses from Hadassah Hospital who had come to teach medicine.  El Al flew in and out of Tehran airport, albeit from a separate terminal. Taking advantage of these warm relations between the two countries, Roya recalls visiting aunts, uncles, and cousins in Israel.  ROYA: We arrived, and my mom and dad did what all visiting Jews from elsewhere do. They dropped to their knees, and they started kissing the ground. I did the same, and it was so moving. Israel was the promised land, we thought about Israel, we dreamed about Israel. But, at the same time, we were Iranians and, and we were living in Iran, and things were good.  This seems to non-Iranian Jews an impossibility. But I think for most of us, it was the way things were. We lived in the country where we had lived for, God knows how many years, and there was this other place that we somehow, in the back of our minds thought we would be going to, without knowing exactly when, but that it would be the destination. MANYA: Relations between the Shah and America flourished as well. In 1951, a hugely popular politician by the name of Mohammad Mosaddegh became prime minister and tried to institute reforms. His attempts to nationalize the oil industry and reduce the monarchy's authority didn't go over well. American and British intelligence backed a coup that restored the Shah's power. Many Iranians resented America's meddling, which became a rallying cry for the revolution. U.S. officials have since expressed regret for the CIA's involvement.  In November 1977, President Jimmy Carter welcomed the Shah and his wife to Washington, D.C., to discuss peace between Egypt and Israel, nuclear nonproliferation, and the energy crisis.  As an extension of these warm relations, the Shah sent many young Iranians to America to enhance their university studies, exposing them to Western ideals and values.  Meanwhile, a savvy fundamentalist cleric was biding his time in a Paris basement. It wouldn't be long before relations crumbled between Iran and Israel, Iran and the U.S,. and Iran and its Jews.  Roya recalls the Hakakian house at the corner of Alley of the Distinguished in Tehran as a lush oasis surrounded by fragrant flowers, full of her father's poetry, and brimming with family memories. Located in the heart of a trendy neighborhood, across the street from the Shah's charity organization, the tall juniper trees, fragrant honeysuckle, and gold mezuzah mounted on the door frame set it apart from the rest of the homes.  Roya's father, Haghnazar, was a poet and a respected headmaster at a Hebrew school. Roya, which means dream in Persian, was a budding poet herself with the typical hopes and dreams of a Jewish teenage girl.  ROYA: Prior to the revolution, life in an average Tehran Hebrew Day School looked very much like life in a Hebrew Day School anywhere else. In the afternoons we had all Hebrew and Jewish studies. We used to put on a Purim show every year. I wanted to be Esther. I never got to be Esther. We had emissaries, I think a couple of years, from Israel, who came to teach us how to do Israeli folk dance. MANYA: There were moments when Roya recalls feeling self-conscious about her Jewishness, particularly at Passover. That's when the family spent two weeks cleaning, demonstrating they weren't najes, or dirty Jews. The work was rewarded when the house filled with the fragrance of cumin and saffron and Persian dishes flowed from the kitchen, including apple and plum beef stew, tarragon veal balls stuffed with raisins, and rice garnished with currants and slivers of almonds.  When her oldest brother Alberto left to study in America, a little fact-finding work on Roya's part revealed that his departure wasn't simply the pursuit of a promising opportunity. As a talented cartoonist whose work had been showcased during an exhibition in Tehran, his family feared Alberto's pen might have gone too far, offending the Pahlavi regime and drawing the attention of the Shah's secret police.  Reports of repression, rapid modernization, the wide gap between Tehran's rich and the rest of the country's poor, and a feeling that Iranians weren't in control of their own destiny all became ingredients for a revolution, stoked by an exiled cleric named Ruhollah Khomeini who was recording cassette tapes in a Paris basement and circulating them back home.  SABA: He would just sit there and go on and on for hours, going against the Shah and West toxification. And then the recordings ended up in Iran. He wasn't even in Iran until the Shah left. MANYA: Promises of democracy and equality galvanized Iranians of all ages to overthrow the Shah in February 1979. Even the CIA was surprised.  SABA: I think a lot of people didn't believe it. Because number one, the Shah, the son, was getting the most amount of military equipment from the United States than anyone in the Middle East and in the Persian Gulf. And the idea was: you protect us in the Gulf, and we will give you whatever you need. So they never thought that a man with a beard down to his knee was able to overthrow this regime that was being propped up and supported by America, and also the Europeans. Khomeini comes in and represents himself as a person for everyone. And he was brilliant in the way he spoke about it. And the reason why this revolution was also successful was that it wasn't just religious people who supported Khomeini, there was this concept you had, the men with the turbans, meaning the religious people, and the you know, the bow ties or the ties, meaning the secular man, a lot of them who were sent by the Shah abroad to Europe and America to get an education, who came back, saw democracy there, and wanted it for their country.  MANYA: Very few of the revolutionaries could predict that Tehran was headed in the opposite direction and was about to revert to 16th Century Shia Islamic rule. For almost a year, Tehran and the rest of the nation were swept up in revolutionary euphoria.  Roya recalls how the flag remained green, white, and red, but an Allah insignia replaced its old sword-bearing lion. New currency was printed, with portraits bearing beards and turbans. An ode to Khomeini became the new national anthem. While the Shah had escaped on an Air France flight, corpses of his henchmen graced the front pages of newspapers alongside smiling executioners. All celebrated, until the day one of the corpses was Habib Elghanian, the Jewish philanthropist who supported all of Iran's Hebrew schools. Charged and convicted as a Zionist spy.  Elders in the community remembered the insurmountable accusations of blood libel during darker times for Iran's Jews. But younger generations like Roya's, who had not lived through the eras of more ruthless antisemitism and persecution, continued to root for the revolution, regardless of its victims. Meanwhile, Roya's Jewish day school was taken over by a new veiled headmistress who replaced Hebrew lessons with other kinds of religious instruction, and required robes and headscarves for all the students.  ROYA: In the afternoons, from then on, we used to have lessons in a series of what she called: ‘Is religion something that you inherit, or is it something that you choose?' And so I think the intention, clearly, was to convince us that we didn't need to inherit our religions from our parents and ancestors, that we ought to consider better choices. MANYA: But when the headmistress cut short the eight-day Passover break, that was the last straw for Roya and her classmates. Their revolt got her expelled from school.  Though Jews did not universally support Khomeini, some saw themselves as members of the Iranian Communist, or Tudeh Party. They opposed the Shah and the human rights abuses of his monarchy and cautiously considered Khomeini the better option, or at least the lesser of two evils. Alarmed by the developments such as Elghanian's execution and changes like the ones at Roya's school, Jewish community leaders traveled to the Shia holy city of Qom to assure the Supreme Leader of their loyalty to Iran.  SABA: They did this because they wanted to make sure that they protected the Jewish community that was left in Iran. Khomeini made that distinction: ‘I am not against Jews, I'm against Zionists. You could be Jewish in this country. You cannot be a Zionist in this country.'  MANYA: But that wasn't the only change. Right away, the Family Protection Law was reversed, lifting a law against polygamy, giving men full rights in divorce and custody, and lowering the marriage age for girls to nine. Women were banned from serving as judges, and beaches and sports events were segregated by gender.  But it took longer to shut down universities, albeit for only two years, segregate public schools by gender, and stone to death women who were found to have committed adultery. Though Khomeini was certainly proving that he was not the man he promised to be, he backed away from those promises gradually – one brutal crackdown at a time. As a result, the trickle of Jews out of Iran was slow.  ROYA: My father thought, let's wait a few years and see what happens. In retrospect, I think the overwhelming reason was probably that nobody believed that things had changed, and so drastically. It seemed so unbelievable. I mean, a country that had been under monarchy for 2,500 years, couldn't simply see it all go and have a whole new system put in place, especially when it was such a radical shift from what had been there before. So I think, in many ways, we were among the unbelievers, or at least my father was, we thought it could never be, it would not happen. My father proved to be wrong, nothing changed for the better, and the conditions continued to deteriorate. So, so much catastrophe happened in those few years that Iran just simply was steeped into a very dark, intense, and period of political radicalism and also, all sorts of economic shortages and pressures. And so the five years that we were left behind, that we stayed back, changed our perspective on so many things. MANYA: In November 1979, a group of radical university students who supported the Iranian Revolution, took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran, seized hostages, and held them for 444 days until President Ronald Reagan's inauguration on January 20, 1981. During the hostages' captivity, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Iran. The conflict that ensued for eight years created shortages on everything from dairy products to sanitary napkins. Mosques became distribution centers for rations. ROYA: We stood in line for hours and hours for eggs, and just the very basic things of daily life. And then it became also clear that religious minorities, including Jews, would no longer be enjoying the same privileges as everyone else. There were bombings that kept coming closer and closer to Tehran, which is where we lived. It was very clear that half of my family that was in the United States could not and would not return, because they were boys who would have been conscripted to go to war. Everything had just come apart in a way that was inconceivable to think that they would change for the better again. MANYA: By 1983, new laws had been passed instituting Islamic dress for all women – violations of which earned a penalty of 74 lashes. Other laws imposed an Islamic morality code that barred co-ed gatherings. Roya and her friends found refuge in the sterile office building that housed the Jewish Iranian Students Association. But she soon figured out that the regime hadn't allowed it to remain for the benefit of the Jewish community. It functioned more like a ghetto to keep Jews off the streets and out of their way. Even the activities that previously gave her comfort were marred by the regime. Poetry books were redacted. Mountain hiking trails were arbitrarily closed to mourn the deaths of countless clerics.  SABA: Slowly what they realize, when Khomeini gained power, was that he was not the person that he claimed to be. He was not this feminist, if anything, all this misogynistic rule came in, and a lot of people realize they, in a sense, got duped and he stole the revolution from them. MANYA: By 1984, the war with Iraq had entered its fourth year. But it was no longer about protecting Iran from Saddam Hussein. Now the Ayatollah wanted to conquer Baghdad, then Jerusalem where he aspired to deliver a sermon from the Temple Mount. Meanwhile, Muslim soldiers wounded in the war chose to bleed rather than receive treatment from Jewish doctors. Boys as young as 12 – regardless of faith – were drafted and sent on suicide missions to open the way for Iranian troops to do battle.  SABA: They were basically used as an army of children that the bombs would detonate, their parents would get a plastic key that was the key to heaven. And the bombs would detonate, and then the army would come in Iranian army would come in. And so that's when a lot of the Persian parents, the Jewish parents freaked out. And that's when they were like: we're getting out of here.  MANYA: By this time, the Hakakian family had moved into a rented apartment building and Roya was attending the neighborhood school. Non-Muslim students were required to take Koran classes and could only use designated water fountains and bathrooms.  As a precaution, Roya's father submitted their passports for renewal. Her mother's application was denied; Roya's passport was held for further consideration; her father's was confiscated.  One night, Roya returned home to find her father burning her books and journals on the balcony of their building. The bonfire of words was for the best, he told her. And at long last, so was leaving. With the help of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Roya and her mother, Helen, fled to Geneva, and after wandering in Europe for several months, eventually reunited with her brothers in the United States. Roya did not see her father again for five years. Still unable to acquire a passport, he was smuggled out of Iran into Pakistan, on foot.  ROYA: My eldest brother left to come to America in the mid-70s. There was a crack in the body of the family then. But then came 1979, and my two other brothers followed. And so we were apart for all those very, very formative years. And then, in 1984, when my mother and I left and my father was left alone in Iran, that was yet another major dramatic and traumatic separation. So, you know, it's interesting that when I look back at the events of 1979, I think, people constantly think about the revolution having, in some ways, blown up Tehran, but it also blew up families. And my own family was among them.  MANYA: While her father's arrival in America was delayed, Roya describes her arrival in stages. She first arrived as a Jewish refugee in 1985 and found her place doing what she had always done – writing in Persian – rebuilding a body of work that had been reduced to ashes.  ROYA: As a teen I had become a writer, people were encouraging me. So, I continued to do it. It was the thing I knew how to do. And it gave me a sense of grounding and identity. So, I kept on doing it, and it kind of worked its magic, as I suppose good writing does for all writers. It connected me to a new community of people who read Persian and who appreciated what I was trying to do. And I found that with each book that I write, I find a new tribe for myself.  MANYA: She arrived again once she learned English. In her first year at Brooklyn College, she tape-recorded her professors to listen again later. She eventually took a course with renowned poet Allen Ginsberg, whose poetry was best known for its condemnation of persecution and imperial politics and whose 1950s poem “Howl” tested the boundaries of America's freedom of speech.  ROYA: When I mastered the language enough to feel comfortable to be a writer once more, then I found a footing and through Allen and a community of literary people that I met here began to kind of foresee a possibility of writing in English. MANYA: There was also her arrival to an American Jewish community that was largely unaware of the role Jews played in shaping Iran long before the advent of Islam. Likewise, they were just as unaware of the role Iran played in shaping ancient Jewish life. They were oblivious to the community's traditions, and the indignities and abuses Iranian Jews had suffered, continue to suffer, with other religious minorities to keep those traditions alive in their homeland.   ROYA: People would say, ‘Oh, you have an accent, where are you from?' I would say, ‘Iran,' and the Jews at the synagogue would say, ‘Are there Jews in Iran?' MANYA: In Roya's most recent book A Beginner's Guide to America, a sequel of sorts to her memoir, she reflects on the lessons learned and the observations made once she arrived in the U.S. She counsels newcomers to take their time answering what might at first seem like an ominous or loaded question. Here's an excerpt: ROYA: “In the early days after your arrival, “Where are you from?” is above all a reminder of your unpreparedness to speak of the past. You have yet to shape your story – what you saw, why you left, how you left, and what it took to get here. This narrative is your personal Book of Genesis: the American Volume, the one you will sooner or later pen, in the mind, if not on the page. You must take your time to do it well and do it justice.” MANYA: No two immigrants' experiences are the same, she writes. The only thing they all have in common is that they have been uprooted and the stories of their displacement have been hijacked by others' assumptions and agendas. ROYA: I witnessed, as so many other Iranian Jews witness, that the story of how we came, why we came, who we had been, was being narrated by those who had a certain partisan perspective about what the history of what Jewish people should be, or how this history needs to be cast, for whatever purposes they had. And I would see that our own recollections of what had happened were being shaded by, or filtered through views other than our own, or facts other than our own. MANYA: As we wrap up this sixth and final episode of the first season of The Forgotten Exodus, it is clear that the same can be said about the stories of the Jewish people. No two tales are the same. Jews have lived everywhere, and there are reasons why they don't anymore. Some fled as refugees. Some embarked as dreamers. Some forged ahead without looking back. Others counted the days until they could return home. What ties them together is their courage, perseverance, and resilience–whether they hailed from Eastern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, or parts beyond. These six episodes offer only a handful of those stories–shaped by memories and experiences. ROYA: That became sort of an additional incentive, if not burden for me to, to be a witness for several communities, to tell the story of what happened in Iran for American audiences, to Jews, to non-Iranian Jews who didn't realize that there were Jews in Iran, but also to record the history, according to how I had witnessed it, for ourselves, to make sure that it goes down, as I knew it. MANYA: Iranian Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left their homes in the Middle East to forge new lives for themselves and future generations.  Many thanks to Roya for sharing her family's story and for helping us wrap up this season of The Forgotten Exodus. If you're listening for the first time, check out our previous episodes on Jews from Iraq, Yemen, Egypt, Libya, and Sudan. Go to ajc.org/theforgottenexodus where you'll also find transcripts, show notes, and family photos. There are still so many stories to tell. Stay tuned in coming months. Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions and memories alive. Call 212.891.1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Tune in every Friday for AJC's weekly podcast about global affairs through a Jewish lens, People of the Pod, brought to you by the same team behind The Forgotten Exodus.  Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed the episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

Beyond The Horizon
Prince Andrew Branded As An Egotist By The Former Head Of Roya Security (11/30/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 12:46


Another former member of the royal protection detail has come out and branded Andrew an egotist after it was revealed that he would appeal the decision that will see him lose his taxpayer funded security detail, noting how many crimes were unsolved in the UK and how that money (3 million pounds a year) could go towards solving those crimes. Let's dive in!(commercial at 7:21)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11475885/Prince-Andrew-branded-egotist-ex-head-royal-security-faces-losing-3m-protection.html

Encore!
Liraz Charhi brings Iran and Israel together for the riskiest album of 2022

Encore!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 11:22


Liraz Charhi, the Israeli-Iranian singer and star of the Mossad spy TV series "Tehran", talks about the secret mission that brought together Israeli and Iranian musicians to create her new album "Roya", in tribute to the protesters in Iran. Meaning "Fantasy" in Persian, it was recorded with artists from Tehran in Istanbul earlier this year in a basement over 10 days. The Iranian musicians could have been arrested for the collaboration, so Liraz only told her family the day before she left. Not even her manager believed it would actually happen.

Parenting with Impact
Bonus Archive Ep 026: Helping Siblings in a Family with ADHD

Parenting with Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 22:08


Siblings fight – we wish it didn't happen, but sometimes there's nothing we can do. Or is there? Sometimes, a fight is just a fight. But more often than not, there's a deeper issue at play. For example, a squabble over a stuffed animal may actually be a competition for attention. Roya Kravetz is a Board Certified and ICF Credentialed Life Coach specializing in strength-based coaching for children, teens, adults, and parents whose lives are affected by ADHD or similar behavioral and/or organizational challenges. She is also a certified Career Coach, mainly for clients with an ADHD diagnosis. Roya is Co-Founder and a Thought-Leader for Parenting 2.0, an international movement that facilitates positive change by nurturing a more proactive life skills educational process. She has been published several times and is a regular speaker at local, national and international conferences. Fluent in three languages, Roya coaches clients nationally and internationally Top 10 Ways to Stop Meltdowns in Their Tracks In this FREE insider's guide from the experts at ImpactParents, learn 10 tips that will actually help you reduce the frequency and intensity of meltdowns for good! Used by parents all over the world, successfully help children manage their intense emotions and triggers so they learn to respond with respect and calm. Listen to this bonus episode from the archives of ImpactParents with Roya Kravetz about some of the best ways to help kids get along, especially siblings in a family with ADHD. Here is what was covered on this special archival episode: What is the impact of ADHD on family dynamics? How important it is to educate both the child and the parents about ADHD? How do ADHD coaches help to modify the family dynamic?   Related Blogs: Pick Your Battles To Achieve Family Peace How to Get Siblings to Love Each Other 3 step Method to ACE Communication with Complex Kids & Teens Six Things to STOP Saying to your (ADHD) Kids Why Nagging Doesn't Work, Especially for Kids with ADHD Relationships by Design   Connect with Roya: Website Facebook Twitter   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Strange & Unusual
Ep 136: How About Arson? - 15 Minutes of Fame

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 39:12


Another episode, another pair of absolute dick bags. Roya talks about the Bever Family Murders right out of her neck of the woods in Broken Arrow Oklahoma as well as the origins of the name for a crime committed for fame. Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod on IG at: @strange_unusual_podcast Twitter: @_strangeunusual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: rap2h

The John Batchelor Show
1/4: While the Old World struggles. 1/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 10:54


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/4: While the Old World struggles. 1/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian https://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Guide-America-Immigrant-Curious/dp/0525656065/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1622853677&sr=1-1 A stirring, witty, and poignant glimpse into the bewildering American immigrant experience from someone who has lived it. Also, a mirror held up to America. Into the maelstrom of unprecedented contemporary debates about immigrants in the United States, this perfectly timed book gives us a portrait of what the new immigrant experience in America is really like. Written as a "guide" for the newly arrived, and providing "practical information and advice," Roya Hakakian, an immigrant herself, reveals what those who settle here love about the country, what they miss about their homes, the cruelty of some Americans, and the unceasing generosity of others. She captures the texture of life in a new place in all its complexity, laying bare both its beauty and its darkness as she discusses race, sex, love, death, consumerism, and what it is like to be from a country that is in America's crosshairs. Her tenderly perceptive and surprisingly humorous account invites us to see ourselves as we appear to others, making it possible for us to rediscover our many American gifts through the perspective of the outsider. In shattering myths and embracing painful contradictions that are unique to this place, A Beginner's Guide to America is Hakakian's candid love letter to America.

The John Batchelor Show
2/4: While the Old World struggles. 2/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 8:04


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 2/4: While the Old World struggles. 2/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian https://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Guide-America-Immigrant-Curious/dp/0525656065/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1622853677&sr=1-1 A stirring, witty, and poignant glimpse into the bewildering American immigrant experience from someone who has lived it. Also, a mirror held up to America. Into the maelstrom of unprecedented contemporary debates about immigrants in the United States, this perfectly timed book gives us a portrait of what the new immigrant experience in America is really like. Written as a "guide" for the newly arrived, and providing "practical information and advice," Roya Hakakian, an immigrant herself, reveals what those who settle here love about the country, what they miss about their homes, the cruelty of some Americans, and the unceasing generosity of others. She captures the texture of life in a new place in all its complexity, laying bare both its beauty and its darkness as she discusses race, sex, love, death, consumerism, and what it is like to be from a country that is in America's crosshairs. Her tenderly perceptive and surprisingly humorous account invites us to see ourselves as we appear to others, making it possible for us to rediscover our many American gifts through the perspective of the outsider. In shattering myths and embracing painful contradictions that are unique to this place, A Beginner's Guide to America is Hakakian's candid love letter to America.

The John Batchelor Show
3/4: While the Old World struggles. 3/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 12:14


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 3/4: While the Old World struggles. 3/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian https://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Guide-America-Immigrant-Curious/dp/0525656065/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1622853677&sr=1-1 A stirring, witty, and poignant glimpse into the bewildering American immigrant experience from someone who has lived it. Also, a mirror held up to America. Into the maelstrom of unprecedented contemporary debates about immigrants in the United States, this perfectly timed book gives us a portrait of what the new immigrant experience in America is really like. Written as a "guide" for the newly arrived, and providing "practical information and advice," Roya Hakakian, an immigrant herself, reveals what those who settle here love about the country, what they miss about their homes, the cruelty of some Americans, and the unceasing generosity of others. She captures the texture of life in a new place in all its complexity, laying bare both its beauty and its darkness as she discusses race, sex, love, death, consumerism, and what it is like to be from a country that is in America's crosshairs. Her tenderly perceptive and surprisingly humorous account invites us to see ourselves as we appear to others, making it possible for us to rediscover our many American gifts through the perspective of the outsider. In shattering myths and embracing painful contradictions that are unique to this place, A Beginner's Guide to America is Hakakian's candid love letter to America.

The John Batchelor Show
4/4: While the Old World struggles. 4/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 8:34


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 4/4: While the Old World struggles. 4/4: A Beginner's Guide to America: For the Immigrant and the Curious by Roya Hakakian https://www.amazon.com/Beginners-Guide-America-Immigrant-Curious/dp/0525656065/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1622853677&sr=1-1 A stirring, witty, and poignant glimpse into the bewildering American immigrant experience from someone who has lived it. Also, a mirror held up to America. Into the maelstrom of unprecedented contemporary debates about immigrants in the United States, this perfectly timed book gives us a portrait of what the new immigrant experience in America is really like. Written as a "guide" for the newly arrived, and providing "practical information and advice," Roya Hakakian, an immigrant herself, reveals what those who settle here love about the country, what they miss about their homes, the cruelty of some Americans, and the unceasing generosity of others. She captures the texture of life in a new place in all its complexity, laying bare both its beauty and its darkness as she discusses race, sex, love, death, consumerism, and what it is like to be from a country that is in America's crosshairs. Her tenderly perceptive and surprisingly humorous account invites us to see ourselves as we appear to others, making it possible for us to rediscover our many American gifts through the perspective of the outsider. In shattering myths and embracing painful contradictions that are unique to this place, A Beginner's Guide to America is Hakakian's candid love letter to America.

Try Not To Blink
Master Your Money

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 58:45


Roya begins this week sharing more of her journey in Costa Rica as she opens the doors to her practice Ojos Del Mar. Then fellow podcaster and owner of Optometry Wealth Advisor, LLC, Evon Mendrin, joins them to talk about how he helps optometrists make better decisions by understanding their financial health, starting with student loans.SOURCESOjos Del MarEvon Mendrin - LinkedInOptometry Wealth AdvisorThe Optometry Money PodcastStudent Loan PlannerAdam CmejlaStudent Loan Tax Experts

The Eagle's View
Fall Is Giving

The Eagle's View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 8:14


Fourth grader Roya makes her hosting debut on this week's episode. She will be joined by fellow fourth grader Rafay as he interviews fifth grader Alex about his experience at camp. Fifth graders Arvind and Ben will also be on the show discussing some serious issues along with a brief history lesson. Third graders Ajit and Ruby join "Poetry Corner" with their original poem "Fall Is" and Matthew has the Joke of the Week. Please do not forget to donate your non-perishable food items this week at Emerson. If you are interested in helping out after the food drive please visit https://www.foodgatherers.org/ to learn how you can help those in need this holiday season. Enjoy!

Ohrenbär Podcast | Ohrenbär
Wir gesucht! Was hält uns zusammen? (5/7): Leiselotte wird laut

Ohrenbär Podcast | Ohrenbär

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 9:19


Wenn es Streit gibt, dann kann Leiselotte kaum etwas sagen. Sie traut sich nicht. Doch als die Jungs sie und Roya zu sehr ärgern, findet sie plötzlich ihre Stimme. Ganz schön laut! Aus der OHRENBÄR-Hörgeschichte: "Wir gesucht! Was hält uns zusammen? ARD-Themenwoch 2022" (Folge 5 von 7) von Manfred Lafrentz. Es liest: Catherine Stoyan.

Strange & Unusual
Ep 134: Naur - Inspirational Crimes

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 45:11


Following up on last week's episode, Roya is covering Richard Chase, a killer who inspired Criminal Minds with a small bonus of Robert Ressler who helped create the BSU team at the FBI. It's creepy. We laugh because it's uncomfortable (but also because Roya can't say ‘broke into the home' you'll find out when you get there). Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod on IG at: @strange_unusual_podcast Twitter: @_strangeunusual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: rap2h

The Eastern Front
Special Edition: Iran on the Eastern Front (with Roya Hakakian)

The Eastern Front

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 41:32


Giselle, Dalibor, and Iulia are joined by Roya Hakakian to discuss the following: Should we consider Iran to be a part of the eastern front? Roya says yes. She analyzes the Iranian people's recent uprising through both historical and modern lenses, considering how these protests are unique and how the United States can better support their struggle for civil liberties. She then connects the current struggle in Iran to the war in Ukraine, arguing that the Iranian people took inspiration from Ukraine's incredible pushback against Russia. Show notes: "Ukrainians and Iranians Have the Same Enemy. They Should Have the Same Ally" by Roya Hakakian. Sign up for The Eastern Front's newsletter here and enter to win Eastern Front swag here!

Try Not To Blink
TLDR Things Are Getting Spicy

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 55:15


On this special Halloween episode, Jimmy and Roya share a little history about Halloween and their favorite family traditions. Listen as they discuss a study on the possible connection between glaucoma and Alzheimer's. Along with guidelines for continuing education credits and more. They also continue with the TN2B segment about Boards review questions, Try Not To Stress. SOURCESAlzeheimer's + NTGCognivueCognivue White PaperOIGDopesickOpen Payments DataAOA TLDR for OIG OpinionOIG Full OpinionOptoPrep

The Eagle's View
Don't Fear the Dummy

The Eagle's View

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 9:02


We have not one, but two hosts for this weeks edition of "The Eagle's View." Fifth grader Alex returns to host with fourth grader Corinne. They are not only hosting, but they also have segments that include a return of two favorites "Play What" and "This Week in History." First grader Hannah shares a very spooky Joke of the Week and Roya let's us know about her passion for all things ventriloquism (don't be afraid of the dummy). Enjoy!

Strange & Unusual
Ep 132: I Think You Need to Unpack That - Werewolves

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 36:55


Not the longest episode in the world, but Roya tried to find cases that weren't super well known and also were about actual werewolf myths/legends instead of just ‘The Werewolf of Milwaukee' or something. So please enjoy this episode covering the cow murdering debutante, Emmie Burt and the reigning champion of the ‘see what had happened was' defense, Manuel Blanco Romasanta. Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod on IG at: @strange_unusual_podcast Twitter: @_strangeunusual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: rap2h

Discover Lafayette
Lafayette City Court Judicial Candidates Speak at Lafayette Parish Bar Association Forum

Discover Lafayette

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 76:59


Toby Aguillard, Roya Boustany, and Jules Edwards III met on October 13, 2022, at a forum sponsored by the Lafayette Parish Bar Association. Each had the opportunity to discuss their unique qualifications to serve as our newest Lafayette City Court Judge. The Bar Association did not endorse any candidate and Discover Lafayette does not either; we are proud to make this forum available to the general public so that Lafayette residents can make an informed decision upon exercising their right to vote. The election will take place on November 8. Early voting takes place at the Registrar of Voters Office from October 25 through November 1, 2022, from 8:30 am to 6 pm, excluding Sunday. Each candidate offers extensive legal experience and a passion for public service. In this audience populated by local attorneys, the questions were a bit more technical than in a usual forum yet this podcast will give our listeners a chance to hear what drives each candidate. Toby Aguillard has always felt called to public service. As a young man, he graduated from St. Joseph's Seminary College, a Benedictine college and monastery in Covington, then followed his heart when he realized that marriage was important to him. He served as Lafayette City Police Chief under former Mayor-President Joel Robideaux. Toby worked as Deputy Sheriff for the Cameron and East Baton Rouge Sheriffs' offices and following graduation from Southern University Law Center as a prosecutor in the DA's office in Cameron Parish and the Louisiana Attorney General's Office. He served as director of the Internet Crimes Division of the Tangipahoa Parish Sheriff's Office immediately prior to his appointment as Chief in Lafayette. In order to build trust in the Lafayette community, he continued the community outreach program initially begun under former Deputy Chief Reginald Thomas, where officers walked door to door to meet with residents; he believes that these community outreach sessions gave him unique insights into how to deal with City Court litigants. "My biggest challenge serving as Lafayette City Police Chief was the day that we lost Officer Michael Middlebrook. Everything came after that. There was an immediate firestorm over insurance benefits for his family. There were 300 police officers who were angry that Michael Middlebrook gave his life and his family lost their benefits immediately. It was about negotiating with the City Council and the Mayor-President to negotiate the issue. The Police Union was down my back and it was an extremely difficult time. But in a few days, we were able to smooth it out. I had to take a strong leadership role, telling my guys, 'You have to trust me.' And they did. My experience working with the budget as Chief will also be of great value to the City Court." Toby Aguillard Roya Boustany, the youngest candidate at 36 years of age and a graduate of Southern University Law Center, serves as a Chief Felony Prosecutor for District Attorney Don Landry. She recounted how she always wanted to be a prosecutor and wants to give both victims and defendants a voice. One young victim of rape at the age of 11 left a lasting impression upon Roya as the young girl stated that Roya was the first person to ever listen to her. Roya stays busy in court and has prosecuted many felony criminal cases, including those involving the gamut from theft to rape and murder. She previously served as Public Defender. Roya is extremely involved in leadership positions in the community, serving as President-elect of Junior League of Lafayette, President of the Lafayette Young Lawyers Association, a graduate of Leadership Lafayette XXXII, and Acadiana Center for the Arts Board member, among many other activities. "I've handled thousands of cases as a prosecutor in my career. The judge needs to be an open-minded, fair, equitable, caring, and compassionate person. That is what we all want and expect. You expect someone to listen to you,

Strange & Unusual
Ep 131: A Bowel Instruction - Happy Endings Pt 2

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 59:28


Previously on The Strange and Unusual, deception, secret pasts, assault, and dirty scrubs. We continue our adventure on the roller coaster that was Debra Newell's marriage to John Meehan. The twists! The turns! The absolute roasting we gave Arlane! We hope you all enjoyed it as much as Roya did having no idea about this case somehow. Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod on IG at: @strange_unusual_podcast Twitter: @_strangeunusual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: rap2h

Try Not To Blink
Glaucoma's a Marathon

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 46:00


Join Jimmy and Roya as they discuss MIGS with returning guest Dr. Justin Schweitzer. Learn how to educate your patients on their options and the studies that back up the data. Dr. Schweitzer shares his new spirit animal and invites you to his upcoming presentation at Academy in San Diego. Roya continues with the Try Not To Stress Series by putting Dr. Schweitzer on the spot. 

Try Not To Blink
Be Extraordinary, Not Ordinary

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 62:16


Roya and Jimmy talk with Licensed Optician and Image Consultant Wendy Buchanan. Learn how she takes control over the sales process to make buying glasses an experience for patients and how she built her mobile eyewear boutique along with the programs she has developed to teach her success to others. SOURCESCLASS SymposiumWendy Buchanan: LinkedInPerceptions EyewearBe SpectacularHip OpticalStyle to SellOptoPrep

Important, Not Important
Science at the Click of a Button

Important, Not Important

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 66:13


There's a very particular bottleneck where groundbreaking science is more applicable than ever but inaccessible to many.  The tools are unaffordable to the schools and groups who could use them to hook kids right when they're most excited, kids with a huge variety of lived experienced, who have grown up in the climate era, and in the COVID era, who see and want to solve problems they can touch and feel – but because of costs and access, they never get to try. Or the bottleneck presents as being frustratingly inefficient, to the labs who actually do this stuff every day, the ones who see a peer's research and try to replicate it, but don't have the funding or people or bandwidth or all three to spend time filling test tubes. Building better processes isn't the sexiest science you can do, but the science doesn't happen, or nearly enough of it, or fast enough, without the help of someone who's been affected by these inefficiencies. Someone who can see the whole journey and identify areas where existing ways of doing things and tools for doing things can be made more reliable, more useful, and more affordable, to more people. Roya Amini-Naieni is one of those people, and she's my guest today, straight from her lab. This is another in our series of conversations with 776 fellows, a two-year program for young people who want to build a better future. Roya is not only a 776 fellow but also the co-founder and CEO of TriloBio, where she's working on revolutionizing synthetic biology by changing the way synthetic biologists do science. Roya's had an incredible journey so far, the child of Iranian immigrants, the child of engineers, and the apprentice to so many mentors who have seen her ambition and seem to understand that Roya has identified a way to stand up for better access to the tools of the future, and along the way, maybe even put a dent in the universe. ----------- Have feedback or questions? http://www.twitter.com/importantnotimp (Tweet us), or send a message to questions@importantnotimportant.com New here? Get started with our fan favorite episodes at https://www.importantnotimportant.com/podcast (importantnotimportant.com/podcast). ----------- INI Book Club: https://bookshop.org/a/8952/9781492180746 (The Mom Test) by Rob Fitzpatick https://parahumans.wordpress.com/ (The Worm Webseries) Find all of our guest recommendations at the INI Book Club: https://bookshop.org/lists/important-not-important-book-club (https://bookshop.org/lists/important-not-important-book-club) Links: Learn more about TriloBio on the https://trilo.bio/#/ (website), https://www.linkedin.com/company/trilobio/ (LinkedIn), or https://mobile.twitter.com/trilobio (Twitter) Follow Roya on https://mobile.twitter.com/royanaieni (Twitter) Learn more about the https://www.776.org/ (776 Foundation Fellowship Program) Find your https://igem.org/ (iGEM) team Fulfill your genetic engineering dreams with your own kit from https://www.the-odin.com/ (The Odin) Get your own https://bento.bio/ (Bento Lab) Follow us: Subscribe to our newsletter at http://newsletter.importantnotimportant.com/ (newsletter.importantnotimportant.com) Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ImportantNotImp (twitter.com/ImportantNotImp) Follow Quinn: http://twitter.com/quinnemmett (twitter.com/quinnemmett) Edited by https://anthonyluciani.com (Anthony Luciani) Produced by https://twitter.com/willowbeck_ (Willow Beck) Intro/outro by Tim Blane: http://timblane.com/ (timblane.com) Advertise with us: https://www.importantnotimportant.com/sponsors (https://www.importantnotimportant.com/sponsors)

Winter is Here with Garry Kasparov and Uriel Epshtein
Did the War in Ukraine Cause the Iranian Protests?

Winter is Here with Garry Kasparov and Uriel Epshtein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 39:17


As Iran enters its fourth week of protests, Roya Hakakian joins Uriel Epshtein for a conversation on Iran and its place in the global battle between tyranny and freedom. They discuss the murder of Mahsa Amini, the irrationality of Iran's morality police, and how the situations in Ukraine and Iran are connected. Roya Hakakian is a writer, journalist, poet, and political activist. She was a founding member of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center and is a permanent member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Roya has served on the board of Refugees International, a non-profit dedicated to human rights and the relocation of refugees, and as a fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale University. Her writing appears in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and NPR's All Things Considered.The Winter is Here podcast and the newsletter The Democracy Brief will be running on alternating Thursdays. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit renewdemocracy.substack.com

Try Not To Blink
Dr Eye Health Heats It Up

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 61:11


This week on Try Not 2 Blink, Jimmy and Roya are honored to have Dr. Joseph Allen join them to discuss the benefits of warm compresses and the opportunity to win a TearRestore kit for your office. Dr. Allen talks about his YouTube channel, Doctor Eye Health, and his mission to educate patients with his videos. SOURCESTearRestoreDr. Eye Heath Youtube ChannelDr. Eye Health InstagramDr. Eye Health FacebookDr. Eye Health TwitterDr. Joseph Allen: LinkedInDr. Joseph Allen: Pinecone Vision CenterDEWS IIOjos Del Mar

Strange & Unusual
Ep 129: The One Where We Talk A Lot About Game of Thrones - Happy Endings

Strange & Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 38:36


While Roya was initially going to make this a cruel pun about crimes in massage parlors, a patreon member suggested a very interesting survivor story. To fill the episode out a little more, Roya found another! Hope you're not scared of planes by the end of this and if you're ever in a plane crash I hope you're as lucky as these two women, Juliane Koepcke and Vesna Vulović. Email us at: Strangeunusualpodcast@gmail.com Patreon: Patreon.com/strangeunusual Follow the pod on IG at: @strange_unusual_podcast Twitter: @_strangeunusual Facebook: The Strange and Unusual Podcast 'Elevator' music: Private Hell Productions Theme song: rap2h

Try Not To Blink
Don't Go The Extra Step

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 52:58


Jimmy and Roya continue to speak with the cornea and contact lens residents. This week they talk with Dr. Stephanie Schumacher, the outgoing Michigan College of Optometry resident. Dr. Schumacher shares her story of what motivated her to pursue optometry, the most significant advice she obtained during her residency to eliminate chair time, and what led her to her current position.SOURCESDry eye + Water IntakeOptoPrepMIGSDr Stephanie Schumacher: LinkedInInstagram @dr.stephschumacherUniversity of Waterloo

Try Not To Blink
Full Circle

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 54:58


Roya and Jimmy talk with returning guest Dr. Cindy Shan to hear from her after wrapping up her Cornea and Contact Lens Residency. Hear what inspired her to become an Optometrist and the challenges for Canadian citizens working in the US. The Try Not To Stress series continues with a segment about Boards review questions. TN2B teamed up with Optoprep, a premier Boards review service, to compile questions so you can study smarter, not harder.SOURCESDr. Cindy Shan: LinkedInDr. Cindy Shan: InstagramCovalent CareersEpisode: ~71 What Should I Be When I Grow Up

Background Briefing with Ian Masters
September 25, 2022 - Christopher Chivvis | Aram Shabanian | Roya Hakakian

Background Briefing with Ian Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 62:29


Putin's Nuclear Sabre-Rattling and How to Deal With It | Hideous Russian War Crimes Unearthed in Ukraine | Iran's Corrupt and Hypocritical Clerical Mafia Could Soon be Toppled backgroundbriefing.org/donate twitter.com/ianmastersmedia facebook.com/ianmastersmedia

Bubbles & Biz
Bubbles and Biz with Roya Dedeaux

Bubbles & Biz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 39:32


This week's chat is a blast! I sit down and sip with Roya Dedeaux, a licensed therapist, author, speaker and playful parenting expert! We chat about bringing play into our businesses and our lives. It really is a great conversation and totally gave me a new perspective on a few things in my personal life (parenting) as well as my business! We also chat about what marketing strategies she loves, how she gets out of her comfort zone to grow her business and SO many other fun things - you seriously have to hear about all the fun + playful things she has going on that help in so many ways! Grab a glass and let's chat!

Try Not To Blink
The Wolver Green

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 66:29


This week Jimmy and Roya discuss with Dr. Harry Green, an Assistant Clinical Professor at UC Berkeley, how diabetes affects the eyes and the convenience of telehealth. They also continue with the TN2B segment about Boards review questions, Try Not To Stress. They teamed up with Optoprep, a premier Boards review service, to compile questions so you can study smarter, not harder.SOURCESOptoprepDr Harry Green: UC BerkeleyDr Harry Green: LinkedInDiabetes TechnologyEyePACS

Try Not To Blink
No Time To Settle

Try Not To Blink

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 50:39


In this episode, Jimmy and Roya chat with Dr. Klaus Ito about his recent cornea and contact lens residency, joining his mom in private practice, his awesome experience at Valley Contax's Residency Summit on the Oregon Coast and more...SOURCESDr Klaus Ito: LinkedInDr Klaus Ito: InstagramDr Klaus Ito: UVA HealthDr Klaus Ito: Ocean Park OptometryContact Lens Institute HonorMemorial Eye Center + Dr. Tom ArnoldVision Expo West Panel

The CyberWire
Roya Gordon: Becoming a trailblazer. [Research] [Career Notes]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 11:03


Roya Gordon, a Security Research Evangelist at ICS cybersecurity firm Nozomi Networks, started her career as an intelligence specialist in the U.S. Navy. After her time serving, Roya spent time as a Control Systems Cybersecurity Analyst at the Idaho National Laboratory and then took the role of Cyber Threat Intelligence Manager at Accenture. She shares her story after the NSA accepted her and then quickly diverted, creating a new path for Roya to follow. She shares the jobs she went after along the way, leading up to Nozomi Networks and how she wishes to be a trailblazer for young black women everywhere. She hopes to shape young women's minds on what the cybersecurity industry is actually like, in hopes that she can be a figure people look up to.