Podcasts about Diagnosis

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Result of medical diagnostics

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  • 9,156EPISODES
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Best podcasts about Diagnosis

Show all podcasts related to diagnosis

Latest podcast episodes about Diagnosis

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz
DRwJL – A Couple, Both with Alz Diagnosis, Share Their Inspiring Journey

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 58:43


The Doctor's Art
The Doctor as Detective (with Dr. Lisa Sanders)

The Doctor's Art

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 50:43


As the real-life inspiration for and medical consultant to the popular TV show House, M.D., journalist-turned-physician Dr. Lisa Sanders has played quite the role in elevating the prestige and drama of medical diagnosis. For the past 20 years, Dr. Sanders has written a column in the New York Times titled Diagnosis, in which she discusses bizarre and fascinating medical cases. In 2019, this column was turned into a Netflix documentary series of the same name. She has garnered much acclaim for presenting the process of diagnosis as a detective story, rather than the rote recall of a set of facts and figures. Dr. Sanders joins us in this episode to speak about her remarkable career path, her work, and how storytelling contributes to patient healing.In this episode, you will hear about:Dr. Sanders' career prior to medicine as a TV journalist and how it influenced her path as a physician - 1:59Dr. Sanders' revelation about diagnosis as detective work and how she developed her passion for it - 4:59Being part of the handful of “weirdos” that Yale Medical School admits every year, and combating imposter syndrome - 7:14Dr. Sanders' reflections on the how money-making impacts physician burnout and how the burden of choice in medical career paths may lead to a sense of disconnect - 12:39Medical diagnosis itself as a kind of healing, allowing patients to contextualize their circumstances within their personal narratives - 18:05Dr. Sanders' best-practices on communicating with patients - 29:03The methodology of solving and describing medical mysteries - 32:10Challenges and opportunities in eliciting and listening to patient stories - 42:16Dr. Sanders' hope that the human dimension of medicine does not get displaced by the technical dimension, and why storytelling is integral to patient healing - 46:41Dr. Lisa Sanders is the author of several books, including Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis (2009), andDiagnosis: Solving the Most Baffling Medical Mysteries (2019)She writes a column for the New York Times called Diagnosis, which can be found archived hereFollow Dr. Sanders on Twitter @LisaSandersmdVisit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to info@thedoctorsart.com.Copyright The Doctor's Art Podcast 2022

Psound Bytes
Ep. 169 "Skin Cancer and Psoriasis"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 23:41


Listen as dermatologist Dr. Laura Ferris, Professor of Dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh, joins us to talk about the primary types of skin cancer, how it compares to psoriasis, risk factors (including those associated with medications), diagnosis, treatments, and steps to protect your skin while in the sun. Psound Bytes is supported by unrestricted educational grants from AbbVie, Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb and Janssen. 

PulmPEEPs
20. Top Consults: Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosis

PulmPEEPs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 60:06


This week on Pulm PEEPs, we are continuing our Top Consults series with a discussion on the work-up and diagnosis of Pulmonary Hypertension. See our prior Radiology Rounds on signs of PAH on CT scan, and listen to our follow-up … Continue reading →

BackTable ENT
Ep. 63 Evaluation and Management of Nasal Valve Collapse with Dr. Moustafa Mourad

BackTable ENT

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 53:12


In this episode of BackTable ENT, Dr. Agan and Dr. Shah discuss nasal valve collapse and repair with Dr. Moustafa Mourad, a New York City-based facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon. The CME experience for this Podcast is powered by CMEfy - click here to reflect and unlock credits & more: https://earnc.me/SKIPQb --- CHECK OUT OUR SPONSOR Athletic Greens https://www.athleticgreens.com/backtableent --- SHOW NOTES First, Dr. Mourad delineates how he evaluates patients presenting with possible nasal valve collapse. There are two sets of nasal valves, an internal set and an external set. The tell tale signs of nasal valve collapse is dynamic nasal airway obstruction, a situation in which airflow is affected by deep breathing or structural rearrangement by the patient is required to breathe more easily. Internal nasal valve collapse patients usually find relief with structural rearrangements, such as blowing up their cheeks in order to breathe or using nasal strips. External nasal valve collapse patients find difficulty in breathing while exercising. Diagnosis of nasal valve collapse can also be complicated because many breathing problems are multifactorial. Therefore, otolaryngologists must be thorough in their initial evaluations and choose which causes to prioritize. Dr. Mourad also explains risk factors for nasal valve collapse. Because nasal cartilage grows weaker overtime, older patients are more likely to experience valve collapse. Younger patients presenting with valve collapse will most likely have had previous nasal surgeries, such as septoplasties and rhinoplasties. Other risk factors for valve collapse include trauma of the nasal tip or dorsum, avid athletes, and the Caucasian ethnicity (because of thinner and more cephalically oriented nasal cartilages). Next, Dr. Mourad discusses how he conducts the physical exam. He always scopes patients to look for abnormal anatomy or signs of allergies. Then, he has the patient breath while observing each of their nostrils. He observes the nostrils before and after the administration of decongestant. If the patient has a very good response to the decongestant, he starts to investigate for evidence of allergies, turbinate hypertrophy, and irritation–all of which can be treated by medical therapy. Then, he observes the patient breathing and nasal pinching as he lifts up the nasal tip and performs a caudal maneuver on the patient's nose. Finally, he takes photos and maps out the patient's internal and external anatomy. Dr. Mourad only considers surgical repair if the patient's complaint can be traced back to an anatomical abnormality. Then, Dr. Mourad walks through his surgical technique for nasal valve collapse. For an internal valve repair, he uses a simple endonasal approach. However, whether he uses an open or closed approach for an external nasal valve repair depends on the type of cartilage defect. As external valve repairs have aesthetic impacts, it is important to warn patients about changes in appearance beforehand. Additionally, Dr. Mourad prefers to obtain his implanted cartilage graft directly from the patient's rib, as cadaver rib may warp and ear cartilage may not be strong enough. He uses a taper needle to suture spreader graft because it allows him to be more gentle with the cartilage. He does not typically recommend synthetic nasal implants to patients, as they can become infected, but still educates patients about all their options. For anesthetic, he mixes a solution of lidocaine with epinephrine and tranexamic acid to reduce post-operative swelling. Finally, Dr. Mourad discusses his post-operative care regimen for nasal valve surgery.

Life With Herpes
How I Spent My 4th of July with a Herpes Diagnosis

Life With Herpes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 5:23


In your 20's your 4th of July should be spent having fun with friends at the beach. Having just gotten diagnosed with herpes you won't believe how I spent my 4th of July. Spoiler alert there was lots of crying over my herpes diagnosis.

Help and Hope Happen Here
Misty Hughes will talk about her diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia which she recived just before her 9th birthday, and how her recovery led her to want to help and serve others, which she has been doing for most of the past 40 years.

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 44:12


Misty Hughes was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia just before her 9th birthday. As she recovered from this form of Pediatric Cancer, she decided to establish her main goal in life which was to help and serve others. Misty has accomplished this goal in several ways, whether it was to volunteer at both the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and the American Heart Association,  being a fitness trainer , or now 40 years removed from her cancer battle, going to the University of Houston to get her degree in social work. Her goal with this degree at least to some extent is to help families that have to deal with Pediatric Cancer. 

Get Pregnant Naturally
How To Look Beyond Your Fertility Diagnosis So You Can Improve Pregnancy Success

Get Pregnant Naturally

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 32:58


We're digging into why these symptoms matter when you are TTC. Many times we get myopically focused on egg health and miss all the other symptoms that may be contributing to our fertility diagnosis. Our body wants to procreate, but right now, it may be under attack by seemingly healthy foods, gut infections, environmental toxins and more. We can research and figure out what worked for someone else or take a targeted approach and determine what is right for our bodies. With a targeted approach, you can get pregnant naturally or increase your chances of pregnancy success with your eggs. This episode is for you: 1. You know there is a reason why it's not working, but no one has run the tests to figure out why (hint, it's not about focusing on egg quality) 2. You want to get pregnant naturally, but you were told that IVF is your only option, and it has you second-guessing your decision 3. You are moving to IVF in the next 3-6 months and want to improve your chances of it working.   In this episode, you'll learn: 1) The top symptoms and themes we see with low AMH, high FSH, premature ovarian insufficiency and diminished ovarian reserve so that you can improve pregnancy success 2) Why IVF may not be your next best step and how to know when it is right for you 3) How to optimize your chances of a successful IVF after failed, cancelled or being told you are a “poor responder” --- Fab Fertile Method https://www.fabfertile.com/what-we-do/ Stuck in a food rut? Not sure what exactly to eat to enhance your fertility? Get your free copy of our Summer Fertility Recipe Guide at https://www.fertilitydietfreebie.com/. --- Book your Supercharge Your Fertility Discovery call here with your partner (https://bit.ly/getpregnantpodcast) During our call, we'll be discussing what you have tried so far and where you've faced challenges. This can feel stressful but is designed to help us get to the root cause of your fertility issues and will help me to give you the best possible action plan at the end of the call. However, to reassure you – on this call we won't be digging into the trauma associated with infertility/miscarriage/loss – rather we are focused on solutions and an ACTION PLAN as to how our Fab Fertile Method can help you get pregnant naturally. --- This episode is sponsored by: Legacy Legacy: the digital fertility clinic that allows you to test, freeze, and improve your sperm from home. Legacy allows you to test your sperm with a mail-in kit so you can produce a sample in the comfort of your own home. Their kits use a transport media that's clinically proven to protect and extend the life of sperm for overnight shipping. Legacy's kit does not require a prescription, and semen analysis starts at $199. Every client has the option to discuss their results with one of their male fertility specialists if they choose. Use code FabFertile for 20% off your fertility analysis at https://www.givelegacy.com/. --- Join the Fab Fertile Support on Facebook for motivation, support, and education to prepare for pregnancy success. --- Check out https://www.fabfertile.com/blog/how-to-look-beyond-your-fertility-diagnosis-so-you-can-improve-pregnancy-success/

Yale Cancer Center Answers
Addressing Cancer Disparities at the Community Level

Yale Cancer Center Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 29:00


Addressing Cancer Disparities at the Community Level with guests Dr. Beth Jones and Monique Stefanou July 3, 2022 Yale Cancer Center visit: http://www.yalecancercenter.org email: canceranswers@yale.edu call: 203-785-4095

Neuro Pathways: A Cleveland Clinic Podcast for Medical Professionals

Rob Wilson, DO, addresses the often challenging diagnosis and management of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), as well as the mounting evidence that that number of individuals afflicted with POTS has grown, and continues to grow, with the arrival of SARS-CoV-2.

Type 1 on 1 | Diabetes Stories
Type 1 on 1: The Diaries - I had my knickers and my hypo things

Type 1 on 1 | Diabetes Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 51:13


Welcome to Type 1 on 1: The Diaries! Writer and broadcaster Jen Grieves and producer Ami Bennett are good friends - who both happen to live with type 1 diabetes. For this special spin-off series of Type 1 on 1, nana diabetic Jen (25 years) and baby diabetic Ami (3 years) chat through the frustrating, funny and challenging experiences they've faced each week thanks to this ridiculous condition. All in the hope that their stories might help you too.This is a bit of a howler, so we hope you're ready for a touch of nonsense this week! A bit of fun is very necessary when dealing with type 1 diabetes, right?Ami's still trying to tackle type 1 diabetes and swimming, and while it resulted in yet another escapade this week, two lovely kind strangers came to her rescue and restored all faith in humanity. Jen's been stuck with a consistently high blood glucose and hasn't really done a whole lot to try and fix it (oops).Meanwhile Ami's been for her first visit to the diabetes therapist and they've got a very helpful theory to discuss - if only they could figure out their primary colours first…More about Paul Gilbert's emotional regulation systems: https://mi-psych.com.au/your-brains-3-emotion-regulation-systems/ Thanks so much to Ypsomed MyLife Diabetescare for sponsoring this episode. https://www.mylife-diabetescare.com/en/Come and say hi on Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/missjengrieves/

Texas Matters
Texas Matters: Diagnosis Diabetes

Texas Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 28:59


How and why is childhood type-2 diabetes is on the rise? What are the health consequences and barriers to treatment? Why is there no national strategy to respond to the rise in type-2 diabetes?

Freely Filtered, a NephJC Podcast
Freely Filtered 047: CHAP, time to treat hypertension in pregnancy

Freely Filtered, a NephJC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 79:22


The Filtrate:Joel TopfNayan AroraSophia AmbrusoSwapnil HiremathJosh WaitzmanSpecial Guest:Natalie Bello Director of Hypertension Research at Cedars SinaiEditor:Nayan AroraShow Notes:NephJC summary of CHAPCHiPS TV showCHIPS study: Less-Tight versus Tight Control of Hypertension in PregnancyPrevention, Diagnosis, and Management of Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy: a Comparison of International Guidelines (Pubmed)SFLT in preeclampsia from where else but NephMadness and here.Aspirin Use to Prevent Preeclampsia and Related Morbidity and MortalityUS Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement (JAMA)The NNT for aspirin in pregnancy is like a relationship on Facebook, it's complicated. Astrologic signs as predictor of aspirin effectiveness in Randomised trial of intravenous streptokinase, oral aspirin, both, or neither among 17,187 cases of suspected acute myocardial infarction: ISIS-2. ISIS-2 (Second International Study of Infarct Survival) Collaborative Group (Pubmed) ACOG revises the guidelines on hypertension: Clinical Guidance for the Integration of the Findings of the Chronic Hypertension and Pregnancy (CHAP) StudyMeta-analysis showing treating blood pressure in pregnancy didn't help. Antihypertensive drug therapy for mild to moderate hypertension during pregnancy.

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill
202: Therapy culture. Does everything need a diagnosis?

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 46:49


P&C drink and review a single-hop IPA, then discuss therapy culture. Are we addicted to therapy? Have we redefined ourselves around our emotions? Are we all vulnerable, broken, "at risk," scarred for life? There's been an erosion of the boundary between the private and the public. Now we have TV shows where people disclose their personal issues. There's nothing more virtuous today than seeking treatment. We've demonized silence, stoicism and a stiff upper lip. Do healthy people really have to talk about themselves? Publicly?

Arthritis Life
“Camp is Where She Can Be Herself:” The importance of Community with JIA

Arthritis Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 86:30


In this episode, parents Leeza Broome and Courtney Bruce share why arthritis-specific summer camps have been such a lifeline to their families over the years. As volunteers, they helped start the very first Pacific Northwest family camp for kids with arthritis, “KAT-Fish Camp,” which has historically been put on by the Arthritis Foundation. Cheryl also shares her experiences volunteering at the camp. All three speakers share their favorite camp memories from the last two decades and explore the importance of community and belonging in chronic illness communities.Episode at a glance:Diagnosis story: Courtney shares her daughter's diagnosis story at 18 months, which started with a swollen knee and a misdiagnosis.Diagnosis story: Leeza shares her son's diagnosis story, which started with difficulty getting out of the toddler bed and swollen fingers.Why is it important to have family camps for kids with juvenile idiopathic arthritis? Leeza and Courtney share what they've learned in the parent education sessions, from advocacy to emotional tips for coping with injecting a child who's afraid of needles. Cheryl, Leeza and Courtney explore the emotions that parents, children with JIA and siblings experience at these camps including: relief, shared anger at similar negative experiences people have gone through, envy, hope and more.Favorite camp memories: all three speakers share their favorite memories, from S'Mores and campfire songs to talent shows.Where can you sign up to volunteer at a camp or attend one? Links below!Medical disclaimer:All content found on Arthritis Life public channels was created for generalized informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.Episode SponsorsRheum to THRIVE, a community support & education program Cheryl created to help people with rheumatic disease go from overwhelmed, confused and alone to confident, supported and connected. Join the waitlist for the next group, which starts in September 2022!Rheumatoid Arthritis Roadmap, a self-paced online course Cheryl created that teaches you how to confidently manage your physical, social and emotional life with rheumatoid arthritis.Full Episode Details, Links plus Transcript:Go to the show page on the Arthritis Life website. 

Neurology Minute
The Value of Neuroimaging in Dementia Diagnosis - Part 3

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 3:08


In part 3 of a 3-part series, Cyrus A. Raji, MD, Ph.D., discusses his article, "The Value of Neuroimaging in Dementia Diagnosis" from the June Continuum Dementia issue. This article and the accompanying Continuum Audio interview are available to subscribers at continpub.com/NeuroimagDementia.  

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast
190: Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy and Pediatric Dysphagia

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 63:19


Guest: Raquel Garcia, SLPD, CCC-SLP, CNT, BCS-S - In this course, the presenter discusses hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and how this devastating diagnosis can result in pediatric dysphagia. We learn about new resources and organizations, such as “Hope for HIE”, that are educating and advocating interprofessional practice partners and caregivers about the most current research to advance the quality of care for even our littlest patients.

JAMA Clinical Reviews: Interviews about ideas & innovations in medicine, science & clinical practice. Listen & earn CME credi

Carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger are common hand conditions in primary care practice that are associated with pain and disability. In this JAMA podcast, JAMA Deputy Editor Mary M. McDermott, MD, and Kelly Currie, MD, assistant professor in the Washington University Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery in St Louis, Missouri, discuss the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions and other hand problems that are commonly encountered in primary care. Related Content: Common Hand Conditions Patient Information: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Neurology Minute
The Value of Neuroimaging in Dementia Diagnosis - Part 2

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:52


In part 2 of a 3 part series, Cyrus A. Raji, MD, Ph.D., discusses his article, "The Value of Neuroimaging in Dementia Diagnosis" from the June Continuum Dementia issue. This article and the accompanying Continuum Audio interview are available to subscribers at continpub.com/NeuroimagDementia.

RealTalk MS
Episode 252: The Journey from MS Diagnosis to Podcaster to Patients Getting Paid with Kathy Reagan Young

RealTalk MS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 32:44


When I began thinking about launching RealTalk MS, one of the first things I did was listen to other podcasts for the MS community. Five years ago, there weren't nearly as many podcasts focused on MS as there are today, but one of the podcasts I listened to was FUMS. And after listening to that podcast, I remember feeling inspired about moving forward with my plans for launching this podcast. Joining me to talk about her journey from being diagnosed with MS to launching her podcast and learning how patients get paid is the voice and energy behind the FUMS podcast, Kathy Reagan Young. We're also talking about a new venture from France, aimed at myelin repair. We'll share the details of a treatment for urinary incontinence for people living with MS that will soon be available in European Union countries. And we'll tell you about the first robotic exoskeleton that's received FDA clearance for use by people with MS. (And we'll tell you why that's going to make a real difference for some people living with progressive MS!) We have a lot to talk about! Are you ready for RealTalk MS??! 250 Episodes -- 1.500,000 Downloads and counting!   :22 FIND Therapeutics and SATT Connectus collaborate on myelin repair 2:14 Dysport receives favorable opinion from the EU  3:28 FDA grants clearance for robotic exoskeleton use by people with MS  6:09 Kathy Reagan Young's journey from diagnosis to giving MS the finger and learning how patients get paid  8:45 Share this episode  31:12 Download the RealTalk MS app for your iOS or Android device   31:32 SHARE THIS EPISODE OF REALTALK MS Just copy this link & paste it into your text or email:  https://realtalkms.com/252 ADD YOUR VOICE TO THE CONVERSATION I've always thought about the RealTalk MS podcast as a conversation. And this is your opportunity to join the conversation by sharing your feedback, questions, and suggestions for topics that we can discuss in future podcast episodes. Please shoot me an email or call the RealTalk MS Listener Hotline and share your thoughts! Email: jon@realtalkms.com Phone: (310) 526-2283 And don't forget to join us in the RealTalk MS Facebook group! LINKS If your podcast app doesn't allow you to click on these links, you'll find them in the show notes in the RealTalk MS app or at www.RealTalkMS.com National MS Society COVID-19 Vaccine Guidance for People Living with MS https://www.nationalmssociety.org/coronavirus-covid-19-information/multiple-sclerosis-and-coronavirus/covid-19-vaccine-guidance STUDY: Efficacy and Safety of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Patients with Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity Incontinence Performing Regular Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Pooled Results of Two Phase 3 Randomized Studies (CONTENT1 and CONTENT2) https://sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S03022838220116803 RealTalk MS #198: Dr. Brian Sandroff Shares the Results of Kessler Foundation's Robotic Exoskeleton-Assisted Exercise Pilot Study https://realtalkms.com/198 Join the RealTalk MS Facebook Group https://facebook.com/groups/realtalkms Download the RealTalk MS App for iOS Devices https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/realtalk-ms/id1436917200 Download the RealTalk MS App for Android Deviceshttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=tv.wizzard.android.realtalk Give RealTalk MS a rating and review http://www.realtalkms.com/review Follow RealTalk MS on Twitter, @RealTalkMS_jon, and subscribe to our newsletter at our website, RealTalkMS.com. RealTalk MS Episode 252 Guest: Kathy Reagan Young Tags: MS, MultipleSclerosis, MSResearch, MSSociety, RealTalkMS Privacy Policy

Neurology Minute
The Value of Neuroimaging in Dementia Diagnosis - Part 1

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 2:10


In part 1 of a 3 part series, Cyrus A. Raji, MD, Ph.D., discusses his article, "The Value of Neuroimaging in Dementia Diagnosis" from the June Continuum Dementia issue. This article and the accompanying Continuum Audio interview are available to subscribers at continpub.com/NeuroimagDementia.  

Cardionerds
215. Atrial Fibrillation: Screening, Detection, and Diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation with Dr. Ben Freedman

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 49:35


CardioNerds (Dr. Kelly Arps, Dr. Colin Blumenthal, Dr. Dan Ambinder, and Dr. Teodora Donisan) discuss the screening, detection, and diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) with Dr. Ben Freedman. AF is frequently undiagnosed and its first manifestation can be a debilitating stroke. European and American guidelines differ slightly with regards to guidelines for AF screening in asymptomatic individuals. There are multiple methods available to screen for AF; the setting and the clinical scenario can help guide the choice. Consumer-led screening has its own challenges, as it can detect AF in a younger population where we should prioritize aggressive management of risk factors and comorbidities. There is uncertainty regarding the minimum AF burden that increases thromboembolic risk, however a high CHAD2S2-VASc score remains the strongest predictor of stroke risk independent of AF burden. Perioperative AF associated with non-cardiac surgery has increased risk of future stroke and adverse cardiac outcomes and should likely be treated as a new diagnosis of chronic AF.    This CardioNerds Atrial Fibrillation series is a multi-institutional collaboration made possible by contributions of stellar fellow leads and expert faculty from several programs, led by series co-chairs, Dr. Kelly Arps and Dr. Colin Blumenthal. This series is supported by an educational grant from the Bristol Myers Squibb and Pfizer Alliance. All CardioNerds content is planned, produced, and reviewed solely by CardioNerds. We have collaborated with VCU Health to provide CME. Claim free CME here! Pearls • Notes • References • Guest Profiles • Production Team CardioNerds Atrial Fibrillation PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Pearls and Quotes - Screening, Detection, and Diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation “Stroke is a poor early sign of AF.”  AF remains frequently undiagnosed and there remains uncertainty about the optimal target population and screening methodology.  “We have to tailor AF screening to the purpose we're using it for”  If in a primary care setting, check the pulse. If the goal is to exclude high-risk AF –  handheld ECG for heart rhythm snapshots are appropriate. If the goal is to identify or exclude AF with a high level of certainty, continuous monitors are necessary for greater sensitivity. Consumer-led screening is performed by (mostly young) individuals using commercial monitors and smart watches, facilitating earlier recognition of paroxysmal AF in this population. In these cases, we should prioritize aggressive management of risk factors and comorbidities to reduce the risk of progression to persistent AF. There is no specific cutoff for AF duration which has been identified to predict elevated stroke risk; AF is likely both a risk factor and a risk marker for stroke, suggesting an underlying atrial myopathy. Non-cardiac surgeries and procedures can be considered “AF stress tests.” If AF occurs in these settings, it is usually more clinically significant and has a higher risk of stroke and death than AF associated with cardiac surgeries.  Notes - Screening, Detection, and Diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation Notes drafted by Dr. Teodora Donisan and reviewed by Dr. Kelly Arps 1. Why is it important to screen for AF and who should be screened?  AF is frequently undiagnosed and its first manifestation can be a debilitating stroke or death. Let's go over a few numbers:  15% of people with AF are currently undiagnosed and 75% of those individuals would be eligible for anticoagulation.1   10-38% of individuals with ischemic strokes are found to have AF as a plausible cause, and the true proportion may be even higher, given difficulties in detecting intermittent AF.2  Current guideline recommendations:  

Something in the Wilderness
43. Swim w/ Laura Kane, Author

Something in the Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 57:30


Laura Kane, the author of “Luceat Lux Vestra: Let Your Light Shine” joins us with some very personal content and why this particular song is so special to her. Learn about her recent book that ties each chapter back to a different Andrew song and also about her battle and survivor story with cancer. Official Music Video: https://youtu.be/sA8PaIw5gcE Order “Luceat Lux Vestra: Let Your Light Shine” by Laura Kane: https://fultonbooks.com/books/?book=luceat-lux-vestra Entertainment Tonight Interview: https://youtu.be/WeQLeiWkdgg Music Box version: https://youtu.be/EjYuw-UdqrA Instagram Live, March 2020: https://youtu.be/Zs3pqaIpRRo?t=158 Live at the El Rey, 2012: https://youtu.be/h5fraTwsgeg Piano-only version at The Bing Lounge 101.9 FM in Portland, 2011: https://youtu.be/aomb4YyAWP8 Wine and Warpaint cover: https://youtu.be/-HTG3cgTbLw

Yale Cancer Center Answers
Advancing our Understanding of Gastrointestinal Diseases

Yale Cancer Center Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 29:00


Advancing our Understanding of Gastrointestinal Diseases with guest Dr. Stavroula Hatzios June 26, 2022 Yale Cancer Center visit: http://www.yalecancercenter.org email: canceranswers@yale.edu call: 203-785-4095

OC Talk Radio
A woman deals with the roller coaster ride of diagnosis, being cancer free, to reoccurrence.

OC Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 22:44


Laurie Paolone went to lunch with friends.  Later when she wasn't feeling well she thought she had food poisoning.  When the symptoms became worse she went to the Dr and was treated for an ulcer. It wasn't until someone noticed she was jaundice (yellowing of skin/eyes) that she was told to go to the ER immediately and learned she had pancreatic cancer.   The first thing Laurie thought of was "oh my God, I can't have my parents bury me."  Laurie shares her inspirational journey through the roller coaster ride of diagnosis, the Whipple, chemotherapy, radiation, being cancer free to reoccurrences, only OC Talk Radio, Orange County's only community radio station, live streamed from UCI Beall Applied Innovation Center at the Cove.   '

How To Stay Married (So Far)
97: Married Life ONE YEAR on SINCE Mark's Bi Polar Diagnosis

How To Stay Married (So Far)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 37:13


Join television presenter Nadia Sawalha and her husband Mark Adderley as they take you on a journey through the ups and downs of married life. Offering their insights of life from the marriage trenches, there's no holds barred with this very relatable pair as episode by episode they share the impact of everything from addiction, rehab, parenthood to marriage counselling has had on their marriage.

Keeping Current CME
Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis in Meningitis & Encephalitis: Tips to Utilize Syndromic Testing in Practice

Keeping Current CME

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:15


Did you know that rapid diagnostic methodologies can provide advantages over traditional culture-based methods? Find out how in this Medscape program. Credit available for this activity expires: 6/24/2023 Earn Credit / Learning Objectives & Disclosures: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/976064?src=mkm_podcast_addon_976064

Changing the Rules
E112: Medical Advancement in the Diagnosis of IBS, Guest Dr. Mike Stierstorfer

Changing the Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 20:08


Dr. Mike Stierstorfer Website:  podcast.stopmyibs.com Transcription:Intro00:02Welcome to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best lives and advice on how you can achieve that too.  Join us with your lively host, Ray Lowe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.Ray Loewe00:17Good morning, everybody. And welcome to changing the rules. Changing the rules is a weekly podcast where every week we try and highlight what we think is one of the luckiest people in the world. So the luckiest people in the world are people who redesign their own lives, under their own terms and live them the way they want. And they're usually people who think outside of the box when they address problems and issues. And they don't, they're not constrained to the rules of life. You know, one of the things that we find is that all through our lives were given rules that we're supposed to live with. And we're given them by our parents, and then by the schools. And sometimes we get saddled with so many rules that they become barriers to doing what we want to do and what we need to do. And we have with us today, one of the luckiest people in the world, and you're gonna see that he just attacks problems in an entirely different way. He doesn't let himself be constrained by the norms. And because of that, he has successes that other people don't have. So, Mike, Mike Stierstorfer did I pronounce that right today, Mike? You did. That's amazing in itself. Okay. But welcome to changing the rules. And let me give people a little background on you. I found out something unusual. I live in a little town called Lancaster, Pennsylvania. And I asked Mike if he had heard about it. Then he said, Well, I have to go to school there. He went to Franklin and Marshall. So he knows more about this place than I do. And then he went from there on to Temple to get his MD and set up his own practice as a dermatologist, which is really interesting, because of the work he's doing is an entirely different area. And he's been on the staff at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital for a long time teaching interns, teaching residents, is that correct? Mike? Dermatology residents? Yes. Okay, so so he's got incredibly great credentials for what he's doing. And so let's start off, Mike with an event that occurred, I think, was on July 3, 2008.Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  02:39That was the exact day that it happened. And I remember it so well because it was a beautiful day, the day before Fourth of July. And I had lunch at a Mexican restaurant. And within an hour or so after lunch, I started getting an upset stomach, some nausea, and belly pain. And I assumed it was from something I had just eaten and that it would go away by the next day like things usually do. Turns out those same symptoms persisted for the better part of the following year, accompanied by some other symptoms that pretty much qualified for criteria that are used to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome. And that's where everything started. That day, I remember it well, because that night I was walking around, everybody's having a nice time and I'm walking around with an upset stomach, not too happy that I was missing out on all the fun.Ray Loewe03:35Okay, so let's take a minute and talk about this thing called irritable bowel syndrome. It's not it's not something we enjoy talking about on the air. But it is a problem that many, many, many people have, and is not easily diagnosed and solved. So give us a little bit of the background and then we're gonna go into some of the unique solutions that you've been able to come up with.Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  04:01Yes, so irritable bowel syndrome is extremely common. It affects 10 to 15% of Americans or 30 to 45 million Americans. And over 50% of those people with IBS report that foods aggravate their symptoms. It's been felt to be what's called a functional disorder. In other words, one of the in which there's nothing physically wrong. There are several criteria that make up the diagnosis of IBS. You have to have belly pain at least once a week for the past three months, once at least six months prior to that. And it needs to be accompanied by things like onset of the symptoms being associated with changing the way your stool looks either looser or harder. Also, or accompanied by the pain getting better or worse with a bowel movement and also, the bowels moving more or less frequently. Um, upon onset of the symptoms, so there's very strict criteria that are used to make the diagnosis.Ray Loewe05:06Okay? And the cure for this is a traditional process is you go to a gastroenterologist, and they have a process for diagnosing this, which is not necessarily the most pleasant thing in the world to go through right?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  05:20Yeah, they pretty much want to rule out other things that could have a more detrimental long-term consequence to your health. They want to rule out things like inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, gluten sensitivity, celiac disease, things like that even colon cancer. So they want to make sure you don't have that. And sometimes they can do that just clinically by asking you questions and examining you. But often these people go through a lot of testing with various types of scopes, and blood tests and radiographic tests, even CAT scan. So there's a lot often that goes into the evaluation before they come to the conclusion it's just IBS. I shouldn't say just IBS, because it can be a serious problem, too. Yeah.Ray Loewe06:04So so here you are in an entirely different field. Okay. And unfortunately, you're having these symptoms. So what happened here? What did you do you know, what's the new way you look at this thing?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  06:21So for the better part of the year, I had these symptoms, I had the big evaluation that didn't find anything. And finally, about a year later, I was trying to determine whether foods are playing a role I avoided gluten, I avoided lactose things that are known to cause GI issues. Nothing helped about a year into it, I got a lucky break, really, I ate Indian dinners at the same restaurants twice within a week of one another. And both times, my symptoms flared up severely worse than normal, but they're the same kind of symptoms I was usually getting. So I knew it was something in the food I was eating for the first time. And I knew it wasn't the Indian spices because I in general, don't eat them that often. And I was having these symptoms, on average, probably half the days. So the thing that I thought about because it's in pretty much everything we eat unless we're intentionally trying to avoid it was garlic. So I just stopped eating garlic. And literally the next day, my symptoms were completely gone. At that point, I felt that this had to be a new allergy to garlic because you can become allergic to something at any point in time, it doesn't have to be something new, repeat exposure, you could come allergic to it. So I set out to try to determine what type of allergy this was. I didn't really know much about IBS, I wasn't really interested in GI as a medical student, I'm a dermatologist. So I first tried a blood test that would look for a peanut type allergy, which everybody's pretty familiar with. And that test was negative for garlic. That's the same kind of test that the allergist says with a prick and scratch test. So that's called a type one allergy, that was negative, I still was convinced it was an allergy. And in Dermatology, we do a type of allergy test called a patch test, frequently for people who have a rash called eczema and we suspect that their Eczema is being caused by something that's touching their skin, in other words, an allergic reaction causing their eczema type of rash. So that's a different type of allergy than the peanut allergy completely different. It's called a type four allergy skin kind of allergy just causes poison ivy, and I decided to do a patch test on myself to garlic. And the patch test was positive I got a red itchy spot on my skin after leaving the garlic there for two days. So my thought at that point was likely the same type of inflammation I was getting in the skin from the patch test from the garlic was occurring in the lining of the intestine when I ate any foods containing garlic. So another point I should mention is that until the early 2000s IBS was felt to be something where there was nothing physically wrong. But in the early 2000s, inflammation has been identified and a lot of people with IBS, both with biopsies of the intestine and with blood tests that show that there's inflammation going on in the body. So most of the time though this inflammation, they don't know what's causing it. So my thought was likely this allergic reaction caused by the garlic in the intestine was causing inflammation causing the IBS symptoms. At that point, I wanted to figure I wanted to find out who else had looked into this. So I googled it and I found that no one ever investigated patch testing the foods for irritable bowel syndrome. So that's when I started with the research on it. I've done several clinical trials now that have been published. And the conclusion of these studies was that by identifying specific foods not just garlic-like but because to overwhelm 80 things now was in the studies up to 117 or 120 Different foods, that over 50% of people we test get either moderate or great improvement in their IBS symptoms by limiting the foods that they identify are identified by the patch testing. So this was completely new information. If you ask the gastroenterologist about food allergies, and IBS, they say they don't play a role. And the reason for that is that it's been taught to them because of other studies that have looked at type one food allergies. And there's another type of allergy called a type three allergy to but those types of testing are not helpful for IBS. So it's ingrained into gastroenterologists that food allergies don't play a role with IBS type four allergy testing by patch testing had never been done for IBS before. So essentially, those prior studies looking at the other types of allergies were like, barking up the wrong tree looking for the wrong type of allergy, you wouldn't be able to check my garlic allergy by doing a type one allergy test.Ray Loewe11:06Okay, so now we have a whole new series of ways to investigate a problem that people had. Now there. First of all, let's talk a little bit about your successes here. So you are telling me when we did our prep call about an 11-year-old girl that you had some success with. And once you go through that particular description, and let's find out what happened.Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  11:35This was one of the most gratifying experiences I had using this testing. This girl was missing school two or three days a week. And her mom somehow learned about this testing that I was doing. And later, she mentioned that she didn't really think it was going to help but she thought I tried she tried anyway, because it was such a desperate situation. And this girl was allergic to benzoyl peroxide, which is used to bleach flour and some cheeses. And she was also allergic to something called pining alpha, which is a naturally occurring chemical that's found in parsley, carrots, parsnips, and celery. So these allergies were identified, she went on to eliminate those foods from her diet and she's 100% Better, she hasn't missed a day of school. And her mom said that when the girl gets sick, she would make her vegetable soup with all those vegetables. And she said I was poisoning my daughter. So yeah, this is an example where like, for me, it was, I was lucky because it was garlic. It was something I could figure out by the process of elimination just from what I had eaten and what I knew I didn't eat that often. But something like pining alpha, you would never be able to figure that out just by the like elimination diet or process of elimination. So this is where the patch testing really becomes useful.Ray Loewe13:01Okay, so so we have uncovered largely by chance, because you were the patient, right? You had a series of issues, and you wanted to solve them for yourself. So how does this figure it out into where the medical community is going with taking care of IBS?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  13:23Well, this is really very early. We're just trying to get the message out there to doctors and to patients about this. That's not an easy task. The goal is that eventually, we hope that the first thing that we've done with people with IBS is this patch testing before subjecting them to all these invasive procedures and radiographic studies where they get radiation and not to mention the cost of those procedures and then putting them on all these different medications that may or may not help at some are quite expensive. Some of them are up to $1,000 a month. So we feel that this testing should be a first-line option for patients with IBS. It's a very simple solution, it identifies specific foods, it's much easier to typically avoid foods found here than doing something like the low FODMAP which is a popular diet for people with IBS, which is very difficult to fall involve lots of different foods here with the patch so you can avoid one or two specific foods or three or four whatever we find and potentially get better. So the goal is that this will be a first-line option for people with IBS and save them a lot of aggravation, testing, and treatments that don't work and expense that goes along with it.Ray Loewe14:43and this isn't stuff that has to go through FDA approval and stuff because the tests are, are approved. It's just a question of getting the medical community to look at this as an option for treating and cure, right?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  14:57So the tests are done with what are called compounded allergens and compounded. And these are considered medications by the FDA So, but because they're compounded, there are a set of guidelines using compounded medications for patients where they don't actually have FDA approval, they have to be prescribed for a specific patient and a patient's name. And they have to the manufacturing of these allergens has to be done by a licensed compounding pharmacist following what are called USP guidelines. So it's accessible to properly licensed doctors and other providers now, as long as they do it in a specific patient's name.Ray Loewe15:41Yeah. And what percentage, you know, IBS is caused by a whole lot of things, right. But when you look at the kinds of things that you're trying to address here is do you have any idea of what percentage of the IBS community or what communities are the wrong word, but,the problems that can be fixed by this?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  16:04Well, yeah, you're right. IBS probably is caused by a lot of different things. But our studies have shown that a significant percentage of these people have these food allergies. In my studies, within the patients who have long-term follow-up, were getting an eight to 10 improvement on a scale from zero to 10, of about a third of the patients and moderate improvement or five to seven on a scale of 10 and another 25%. So I don't know the exact number, but I would venture to guess that probably at least 25%, if not higher than that conservatively, have food allergies that are contributing are completely causing their symptoms.Ray Loewe16:43Well, cool. You know, we're unfortunately, we're near the end of our time already. And I find it fascinating to talk to people like you because you think outside the box. And that's why you are one of the luckiest people in the world. You're not constrained to normal things. You know, you're thinking outside the box, and you're making progress. So where are you going to go from here? What's the next step?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  17:08Well, I do, I do want to just follow up on that comment, right. And I do feel in a lot of ways that I have been extremely lucky to make this discovery really was a very lucky setup circumstance, I pretty much followed my nose. This was not an epiphany that I came up with. But it involves a lot of luck. To make the discovery IBS has been described since 1944. And no one ever before recognize this connection between this type of allergy type four food allergy detectable by patch testing and IBS symptoms. So the luck involved. The fact that first of all, I developed irritable bowel syndrome, some people may call it bad luck, but in a lot of ways, for many people with IBS, it was very good luck. And even for me that I was able to find something that relieve my symptoms. Also, it was lucky that it happened to be garlic and that I ate those two Indian dinners within a week of one another was able to make the connection to garlic was also lucky that I was a dermatologist and I had the tools and the knowledge and the resources to pursue this further. And was also lucky that it turned out to be a type of allergy that in Dermatology we deal with all the time, like for allergies, for allergic contact dermatitis. So there was a perfect storm of circumstances that created this lot that involve that enabled me to make this what I feel is a significant discovery in medicine.Ray Loewe18:35Yeah, but it takes some knowledge and it takes some effort and it takes some you got to follow the luck. Otherwise, the luck never materializes. So, you know, thank you so much for being with us. If people want more information, where can they go to find out more about you and more about what you're doing? And we'll post this, by the way in the notes on our podcast, so they'll be able to see it. But where do they go?Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  19:01Thank you. There's a URL. It's podcast.stopmyibs.com. And patients will be able to get and doctors get a lot of information there. And if they have questions beyond that, our contact information is available there on the website. So we're very happy to talk to anybody who'd like to discuss this further.Ray Loewe19:24Oh, cool. Well, thank you so much for being with us. And continue your great work. And maybe we'll uh another six months or so we'll have you back again. And we'll find out what's happened and where the progress has been. So have a great day. And thanks so much for being with us.Dr. Mike Stierstorfer  19:41Thank you very much.Outro  19:45Thank you for listening to changing the rules. Join us next week for more conversation, our special guest, and to hear more from the luckiest guy in the world. 

Talking Pediatrics
'Tis the Season: Updates in Pediatric Allergy Diagnosis and Treatment

Talking Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 25:12


There is not a pediatric clinician among us who doesn't have a patient with allergies, including food allergies, environmental allergies and/or seasonal allergies. On this episode, we talk with Dr Nicole Chase, pediatric allergist and immunologist, about all things allergy including: current recommendations for food introduction, oral food challenges, pitfalls in “allergy testing” in primary care and what's new and on the horizon for treatment of allergies with immunotherapy.

Public Health On Call
484 - Lyme Disease: Diagnosis, Prevention, and How Long COVID is Helping to Advance Awareness and Research for Chronic Lyme

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 15:22


First identified 50 years ago, Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness endemic to many parts of the U.S. While the acute infection can be treated with antibiotics if diagnosed in time, 10-20% of people still go on to experience persistent symptoms like fatigue, brain fog, and pain. Lyme expert John Aucott talks with Stephanie Desmon about how to prevent Lyme disease, what we know about chronic Lyme, and how long COVID is helping to draw attention to it and other diseases like chronic fatigue.

Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes
#706 Bold Beginnings: Adult Diagnosis

Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 29:16


Bold Beginnings will answer the questions that most people have after a type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Grace has type 1 diabetes and body dysmorphia. Show notes for people who are Bold with Insulin Get your supplies from US MED with the link or 888-721-1514 Learn about the Dexcom CGM You may be eligible for a free 30 day supply of the Omnipod DASH  InPen from Medtronic Diabetes Get Gvoke Glucagon  CONTOUR NEXT ONE smart meter and CONTOUR DIABETES app Learn about Touched By Type 1 Tak the T1DExchange survey A full list of our sponsors  How to listen, disclaimer and more Apple Podcasts> Subscribe to the podcast today! The podcast is available on Spotify, Google Play, iHeartRadio, Radio Public, Amazon Music and all Android devices The show is now available as an Alexa skill. My type 1 diabetes parenting blog Arden's Day Listen to the Juicebox Podcast online Read my award winning memoir: Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal: Confessions of a Stay-At-Home Dad The Juicebox Podcast is a free show, but if you'd like to support the podcast directly, you can make a gift here or buy me a coffee. Thank you! Follow Scott on Social Media @ArdensDay @JuiceboxPodcast Disclaimer - Nothing you hear on the Juicebox Podcast or read on Arden's Day is intended as medical advice. You should always consult a physician before making changes to your health plan.  If the podcast has helped you to live better with type 1 please tell someone else how to find the show and consider leaving a rating and review on iTunes. Thank you! Arden's Day and The Juicebox Podcast are not charitable organizations.

Typology
Pathological: More than a Diagnosis, feat. Sarah Fay (Type 5) [05-048]

Typology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 68:57


After reading Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses, I was delighted to have the opportunity to sit down and discuss the book with author Sarah Fay. In this exploration of the ways we pathologize our human experiences, Sarah opens the door to a new conversation about mental health. In this episode, Sarah shares:  How and why do we categorize ourselves to make everyday life easier How any diagnosis can turn into a self-fulfilling prophecy Her recommendations for when you are handed a diagnoses Why recognizing signals in your body can help you learn how to process feelings and emotions   Sarah Fay (Ph.D., Iowa MFA) is an award-winning author and mental health advocate working to improve how we think and talk about mental health by moving the conversation away from simplistic diagnoses and toward a deeper understanding of our mental and emotional lives. Her personal experience of being diagnosed with six different mental health disorders and finding no relief led her to investigate the diagnoses we receive and to write her journalistic memoir, Pathological: The True Story of Six Misdiagnoses which Apple Books chose as one of the Best Books in March. Sarah has shared her story on NPR, Salon, and more.  I hope you find this conversation as fascinating as I did.  Be sure to share the episode with your friends and family.

Audio Podcast
Blood Tests for Mitochondrial Disease Diagnosis

Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 82:26


As a follow-up discussion to Dr. Fran Kendall's presentation on "Muscle Biopsy Testing for Mitochondrial Disease", MitoAction welcomes Dr. Steve Sommer of MEDomics to discuss testing for mitochondrial disease using a blood sample. About MEDomics After 23 years in academia, Dr. Steve Sommer started MEDomics in order to apply a revolutionary technology called "NextGen sequencing" to clinical mitochondrial medicine. (www.medomics.com) MEDomics sequences the entire mitochondrial DNA genome thousands of times. That sometimes allows the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease to be made with a blood sample rather than with painful muscle biopsies. MitoDx is a test of unprecedented power for diagnosing mitochondrial genome disease, which is roughly "half the elephant" of mitochondrial disease.

Motherhood in ADHD
E148: Stop the Summer Chaos! 5 Simple Steps to creating a flexible summer schedule for the ADHD family - Q&A Session: "Top Tips" Encore

Motherhood in ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 19:58


It's June, and your kids are either home now or about to be home for the whole summer.  That is three unstructured months of chaos ahead of you... cue panic! Wait! It doesn't have to be! You asked; I answered: What does Patricia's summer schedule look like?  With a few minutes of planning, you'll create a flexible structure to fit any family during the summer break and all year long.  No need to panic nor roll your eyes at me! Having a schedule doesn't mean you're stuck with a minute-by-minute inflexible itinerary sucking the fun out of every hour. Your summer vacation can still be full of fun and freedom and impromptu activities without you losing your sanity on the daily. Having a running list of activities to keep everyone entertained keeps my stress down and decision fatigue low. There's no scrambling around in the morning trying to figure out, "Mom, what are we going to do today?" Or the wasted mornings where I can't figure out what the answer is, and all of a sudden its lunchtime, and I still don't know what we're going to do today, and it's half over! Today we're walking through what the schedule setup looks like, as well as how I have implemented that framework for our family with specifics on time and activities. Our family has used this basic schedule for multiple years, and we adapt it as our kids grow from babies to toddlers to preschoolers to elementary school to adults (that's for me, the mom.)  **Note: This episode originally aired in June of 2021. As I take a break for the summer and quality time with my family, I'm sharing episodes that will help you get ready for the summer, support you with some integral support skills for ADHD, and then get ready for the new school year. To hang out with me over the summer, you can: 1) hop on over to our free Facebook community to meet your people and feel like you're not a weirdo -AND/OR-  2) join me on Wednesdays during our weekly meetings by signing up for my course, Daily Planning for ADHD Moms, where you'll get your day organized and actually show up for stuff mostly on time, or my program, Time Management Mastery for ADHD Moms where you'll create the best daily routine for you and your family that your ADHD brain will actually be okay with following. Get stuff done while you love your life & your brain.  I'm cooking up some other stuff behind the scenes. Plus, I'll see you in the fall with brand new episodes! Talk to you then, Successful Mama!  Read the transcript and view the show notes on the Motherhood in ADHD blog. 

Parkinson's Disease Caring Podcast
#29 Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychosis of Parkinson's disease: What a caregiver needs to know!

Parkinson's Disease Caring Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 50:14


On this episode, I discuss what a caregiver needs to know when confronted with psychosis exhibited by their loved one. It is important for caregivers to understand some of the common and reversible causes of psychosis related to Parkinson's disease. The psychosis may manifest as visual, auditory, or tactile hallucinations. In some cases, delusional thoughts and paranoia may be present during the psychotic episode. When a loved one experiences psychosis, you must know what kind of medical attention your loved one will require and be armed with the knowledge of treatment options. I discuss numerous medication options to treat psychosis. You must be aware of potential side effects as well as the black box warning on these medications. Finally, I discuss some of the treatments in the research pipeline and how to find out more information about these medications in clinical trials. The Parkinson's Disease Caring podcast is produced and hosted by Dr. Kevin Klos. Please visit www.pdcaring.com for more resources and information. 

Seizing Life
A Parent's Guide to Your Child's Epilepsy Diagnosis and Treatment

Seizing Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:45


Child neurologist, Dr. Doug Nordli provides a guide for parents of children with epilepsy to help navigate diagnosis, physicians, and treatment decisions. The post A Parent's Guide to Your Child's Epilepsy Diagnosis and Treatment appeared first on CURE Epilepsy.

KAXE/KBXE Morning Show
Meet Mike Adkinson: A Man Who Drove A John Deere Tractor 1,700 Miles From Washington to MN To Support His Brother's Parkinson's Diagnosis

KAXE/KBXE Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 20:41


Mike's brother Dan was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease a year ago

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
My Perspective: Living With HIV Is Life Changing but Not Life Limiting

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 11:48


In this episode, Yvette Raphael provides her perspectives and advice as an individual living with HIV in South Africa for more than 20 years. She shares her experiences and ideas for how to improve processes related to HIV diagnosis, care linkage, and treatment.Presenter:Yvette RaphaelContent based on an online CME program supported by an independent educational grant from Gilead Sciences, Inc.Link to full program: https://bit.ly/3tmgozy

PN podcast
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): diagnosis and management

PN podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 30:21


Dr. Amy Ross Russell(1), interviews Assoc. Prof. Todd Hardy(2) and Dr. James Triplett(3), about their recent paper detailing the clinical approach to diagnosis and management of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES). Read this latest Editor's Choice paper on the Practical Neurology website (https://pn.bmj.com/content/22/3/183) and the June print issue of the journal. The paper is also discussed by Practical Neurology editors, Dr. Phil Smith and Dr. Geraint Fuller, in their latest podcast: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/editors-highlights-of-the-june-2022-issue?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/pn-podcast (1) Neurology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, UK (2) Staff Specialist Neurologist at Concord Hospital, Clinical Associate Professor in Medicine at the University of Sydney, Australia (3) Staff Specialist Neurologist and Neurophysiologist, Concord Hospital, Sydney, Australia Please subscribe to the Practical Neurology podcast via all podcast platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify, to get the latest podcast every month. If you enjoy our podcast, please consider leaving us a review or a comment on the Practical Neurology Podcast iTunes page (https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/pn-podcast/id942932053). The PN podcast is produced by Letícia Amorim and edited by Brian O'Toole. Thank you for listening.

Live Yes! with Arthritis
Newly Diagnosed: Control the Emotional Toll

Live Yes! with Arthritis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 29:09


Grief, anger, anxiety and stress often come with an arthritis diagnosis, and they may continue to come and go. Listen to a rheumatologist/researcher discuss the link between chronic pain and emotions, how they influence each other and strategies to deal with it. Visit the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast site to get show notes and a full transcript: https://arthritis.org/liveyes/podcast We want to hear from you. Tell us what you think about the Live Yes! With Arthritis Podcast. Get started by emailing podcast@arthritis.org. Special Guest: Dr. Francis Keefe.

Not Just Little Adults
Episode 22 - 7 year old with vomiting and fatigue

Not Just Little Adults

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 40:40


University of Florida students Rohan Patel, Cathleen Mestre, Estherland Duqueney, Lauren Katzell, Torie Livingston, Precious Ichitie discuss a case presented by fellow classmate Tayna Latortue about a 7 year old with vomting and fatigue.

Autism Science Foundation Weekly Science Report
Is autism a yes/no diagnosis?

Autism Science Foundation Weekly Science Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:48


This week's podcast highlights a paper from the IBIS (infant brain imaging study) that tracks infants from 6 months to 5 years of age to examine how ASD symptoms cluster together. These infants either have a diagnosis or they don't, or they have something which doesn't meet diagnostic threshold but is still impairing in some … Continue reading "Is autism a yes/no diagnosis?"

Capital FM
A Ray Of Sunshine Ep5 Endo Symptoms Diagnosis And Mis Diagnosis

Capital FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 17:18


A Ray Of Sunshine Ep5 Endo Symptoms Diagnosis And Mis Diagnosis by Capital FM

Emergency Medical Minute
Podcast 791: Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Emergency Medical Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 3:44


Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD Educational Pearls: Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State (HHS) is less common than Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) but is associated with a mortality rate up to 10 times greater than that seen in DKA Typically seen in elderly patients with severely elevated blood glucose levels (>1000 mg/dL) and an increased plasma osmolality Unlike in DKA, patients with HHS do not have elevated ketones Treatment of HHS includes insulin administration along with correcting fluid and electrolyte abnormalities When treating HHS, it is important to monitor and follow osmolality regularly because over-rapid correction can result in the development of cerebral edema References Fayfman M, Pasquel FJ, Umpierrez GE. Management of Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State. Med Clin North Am. 2017;101(3):587-606. Gosmanov AR, Gosmanova EO, Kitabchi AE. Hyperglycemic Crises: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State. In: Feingold KR, Anawalt B, Boyce A, et al., eds. Endotext. South Dartmouth (MA): MDText.com, Inc. Copyright © 2000-2022, MDText.com, Inc.; 2000. Long B, Willis GC, Lentz S, Koyfman A, Gottlieb M. Diagnosis and Management of the Critically Ill Adult Patient with Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State. J Emerg Med. 2021;61(4):365-375.   Summarized by Mark O'Brien, MS4 | Edited by John Spartz MS4 & Erik Verzemnieks, MD   The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account.  Donate to EMM today!

The Vibrant Music Teaching Podcast | Proven and practical tips, strategies and ideas for music teachers

Children do not fit in little boxes. But when you understand the most useful tools for different types of neurodiverse piano students, you can prepare your teaching toolkit appropriately. Find out more about membership at vibrantmusicteaching.com.

Pelvic PT Rising
The Medical Diagnosis Is Not YOUR Diagnosis

Pelvic PT Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:07


Should your patient's medical diagnosis - received from their physician - impact your evaluation or treatment?  First of all....how often is their medical diagnosis actually 'right'?And secondly....even if it is, does it tell us anything about how to do our own jobs?In this 'sode we go over how to make sure the medical diagnosis or history doesn't sway your own diagnosis and treatment approach to make sure every patient gets a full, thorough evaluation and unique plan of care.Pelvic PT EssentialsLooking to boost your clinical confidence?  If you'd like to get more confident in your initial evaluation and communication skills, check out the Pelvic PT Essentials course!Shout Out and Get in Touch!If you're enjoying the podcast, please take a few seconds to take a screenshot and put it up in your Instagram Stories and tag Nicole (@nicolecozeandpt).  Or send us an email at Nicole@PelvicSanity.com with your thoughts, questions or ideas.  We'd love to hear from you!About UsNicole and Jesse Cozean founded Pelvic PT Rising to provide clinical and business resources to physical therapists to change the way we treat pelvic health.   PelvicSanity Physical Therapy together in 2016.  It grew quickly into one of the largest cash-based physical therapy practices in the country.

Christ Community Sunday - Leawood Campus
Sea [Signs of Life 02]

Christ Community Sunday - Leawood Campus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 38:02


Storms can be frightening. Storms and fear usually go hand in hand. This is not only true of weather-related storms, but also of life-related storms. We all face fearful storms and are living in a very fearful culture. Jesus is not only the creator of the omnipotent God of the universe, Jesus is the loving and attentive omnipresent God who is always there with us even in the midst of chaos. He is here with us and for us. Just before ascending into heaven, Jesus' last recorded words are, I am with you, even to the end of time. Jesus' uninterrupted and attentive presence in our lives is why we should not be paralyzed by fear. As apprentices of Jesus even in the midst of our greatest fears, our fiercest storms, in the deepest valleys of pain, grief, and doubt, we are never, ever alone.Sermon Notes: https://www.bible.com/events/4890674222.06.19

SeniorLivingGuide.com Podcast, Sponsored by: Parrish Healthcare
Beyond the Bedside: Staying Home After a Dementia Diagnosis

SeniorLivingGuide.com Podcast, Sponsored by: Parrish Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 38:16


While most people may consider the first steps of Assisted Living or Memory Care for family members that are diagnosed with Dementia, we are joined by Janetta Clayton from Beyond the Bedside. Janetta shares different approaches allowing your loved one to "age in place" within their own home, navigate the health system and access funds in order to help pay for services. The solutions and resources we discuss in this podcast can broaden a family with different options that they may not have known existed for their loved one. SeniorLivingGuide.com Podcast sponsored by Parrish Healthcare/Parrish Medical CenterThe background music is written, performed and produced exclusively by purple-planet.com.https://www.purple-planet.com/

Candace
Ep. 64 Why You Should Be Asking Questions About Justin Bieber's Ramsay Hunt Diagnosis 1/4

Candace

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 9:50


Why Justin Bieber's Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Diagnosis Should Raise Questions -- Today's Sponsors: Protect your online privacy with ExpressVPN. Get 3 Months FREE at www.expressvpn.com/CANDACE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Lucky Few
165. Delivering HOPE w/A New DS Diagnosis (ft. Rick Smith, father + advocate!)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 50:30


Rick Smith is a father of three (including Noah who has Down syndrome), a blogger, an advocate, and the founder of Hope Story! Like so many of us in the DS community, his child's diagnosis was delivered with an “I'm so sorry,” followed by the doctor offering anti-depressants to his wife. And now, 11 years later, Rick is on a mission to change what happens in the delivery room by educating medical professionals about what it means to live with Down syndrome through his non-profit, Hope Story. Today we're chatting about dads who advocate, releasing expectations for ALL of your children, what doctors need to know, and even a few tangents about social media advocacy etiquette (trust us - you'll relate). You can join Rick by becoming a Hope Advocate (connect with new parents + doctors in your area) with code THELUCKYFEW for a FREE Hope Kit that gives you all the tools you need. Oh and Happy Father's Day to all you dads out there shouting the worth of your kiddos! -- SHOW NOTES Follow Rick and his family on Instagram and Facebook Check out hopestory.org Become a Hope Advocate and use promo code THE LUCKY FEW to get the Hope Kit for FREE. Follow Hope Story on Instagram and Facebook Learn more about Hope Story's partnership with medical professionals Read Rick's blog on noahsdad.com LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support