Podcasts about middle eastern

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region that encompasses Western Asia and Egypt

  • 1,790PODCASTS
  • 2,726EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about middle eastern

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Latest podcast episodes about middle eastern

Things Are Going Great For Me with J. Claude Deering
Episode 18 - Actor Pej Vahdat (Bones) / Actor Mapuana Makia (Doogie Kameāloha, M.D.)

Things Are Going Great For Me with J. Claude Deering

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 121:19


J. Claude Deering (Twitter/Instagram) spoke with actor Pej Vahdat (Bones). Pej is a prolific actor who starred as Dr. Arastoo Vaziri on Bones, Kelly Patel on Empire, and Kash on Showtime's Shameless. He talks about the groundbreaking character arc of Dr. Vaziri on Bones. Struggling to get noticed early on in his career as a brown actor, and navigating an industry that often tokenizes and stereotypes Middle Eastern performers. He also talks about his stage work at Lincoln Center, his early career as a professional tennis player. And the incredible story of when he started his own agency in order to submit himself on projects. Followed by a second interview with Mapuana Makia (Doogie Kameāloha, M.D.). Mapuana currently stars as Dr. Noelani Nakayama on the new Disney+ series, Doogie Kameāloha, M.D. She talks about doing a network showcase at ABC, and going on to shadow direct for the showcase, in addition to co-teaching workshops for program. She also talks about working as a dialogue coach on set, growing up in Hawaii, working with teen actors, her old day jobs in bars and restaurants, and creating her own voiceover and audiobook business. Plus Winston Carter (Twitter/Instagram) and Claude chat about breaking the rules in art. If you like any of what you hear today, do us a BIG kindness - subscribe to the show. Leave us a nice comment. Tell your aunt about us! Give us those five stars wherever you're getting your podcasts from today. And subscribe to our Patreon for all our extras! We've got just TWO more episodes in Season 2, premiering every Thursday! Featuring interviews with Alyshia Ochse, Noah Maxwell Clarke, Stefanie Black, Shelly Bhalla, and more! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thingsaregoinggreatforme/support

The Burn Bag Podcast
After the Pivot: Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Mick Mulroy on U.S. Middle East Policy

The Burn Bag Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 64:22


A'ndre and Ryan interview Mick Mulroy, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Middle East (2017-2019), to get his take on U.S. Middle East policy in the aftermath of Afghanistan.  Mick, whose time as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense required that he oversee Middle Eastern policy for the Defense Department, discusses why he was in favor of maintaining a residual force in Afghanistan and elaborates on the consequences for U.S. security policy in the broader region and for counterterrorism purposes. Mick does outline why he is confident in the United States' ability to manage Middle Eastern policy in light of the 'Pivot to Asia', and digs into his views on the Yemen Civil War and Saudi involvement with it. We also dive a bit into Mick's service as a CIA Paramilitary Operations Officer and what that work in conflict zones entailed, and we highlight Mick's current work with the Lobo Institute and his advocacy on the issue of ending child soldiering.

The Lead
A Murder, A Protest, And The Newcastle United Takeover (Updated)

The Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:32


Yet another English Premier League club has now been purchased by a group of Middle Eastern investors with deep ties to their country's government. In this case, the team is Newcastle United -- a club with a rich history, but plenty of recent frustration -- and a group of investors backed by the Saudi Arabian royal family. The deal was officially confirmed on Thursday. Today, James Montague, a contributing writer for The Athletic, discusses the polarizing purchase, its connection to the high-profile murder of a Saudi journalist, and his fiancee's quest to stop the sale from happening. (Note: This is an updated version of an episode that originally aired on May 27, 2020, when it first looked like the deal was going through -- it has been updated to reflect the latest developments.)More from James Montague:https://theathletic.com/1788335/2021/10/06/why-does-saudi-arabia-want-to-buy-newcastle-united/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Alone at Lunch
84. Calling out Bullies with Melody Kamali

Alone at Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:29


This week we are joined by Melody Kamali! Melody is a writer and stand up comedian based in New York City. Melody produces and co-hosts the popular Dyking Out podcast which has been featured in a ‘best of' list by Logo and featured by A.V. Club, Vulture, Apple Podcasts, Broadway World and more.In this episode we discuss growing up in Central Connecticut, being Middle Eastern, moving to Chicago, speaking Farsi in the house, coming out, getting high at prom, and more. You don't want to miss out on our discussion about how comedy is high school! Give it a listen!Make sure to check out all her events and listen to the Dyking Out Podcast!Follow Melody: @melodykamaliFollow the podcast: @aloneatlunchpodCarly: @carlyjmontagEmily: @thefunnywalshEmail us! Aloneatlunch@gmail.com**LEAVE US A RATING AND REVIEW**

Cooking the Books with Gilly Smith

This week, Gilly is with surely everyone's food hero, Claudia Roden who brought Jewish and Middle Eastern food to the world. Yotam Ottolenghi and Sam and Sam Clarke at Moro are among the many chefs who say that it all started with Claudia. Now, at 85, she's got a new book out, Med which brings her personal stories and inventive flourish to the flavours of the Mediterranean. And she's still FULL of stories. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Equipped For Good
Missions Highlight - Ananias House (Live from Copperfield Church)

Equipped For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 13:19


https://ananiashouse.orgAnanias House was started after its founder, witnessed firsthand both the devastating impact the conflict in the Middle Eastern region had on his homeland and the miraculous power of God in the lives of His children caught in the crossfire. Churches were left with few resources to care for the enormous number of people flooding their doors seeking refuge and truth.Ananias House seeks to preserve the rich Christian heritage of Biblical times, and, in the face of darkness and despair, proclaim the light and hope of Jesus Christ to believers and peoples of other faiths alike through meeting practical and tangible needs, knowing that it is often in the darkest times that the power of God is most evident.As many Christians in the West wonder what they can do to stand with the persecuted Church, Ananias House provides an avenue through which they can engage in the work the Lord is doing in the greater Middle East, and North Africa through prayer, advocacy, and financial support, among other endeavors. Ananias House desires for God to be glorified in this region and works directly with local churches and Christian leaders through Biblical training and Gospel Centered resources.

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Special: How the World‘s Greatest Investors Win, with William Green and Phil Ordway

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 63:24


In this special episode, co-host Phil Ordway speaks with William Green about the book, "Richer, Wiser, Happier: How the World's Greatest Investors Win in Markets and Life". Enjoy the conversation!   About the Participants: Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. William Green is the author of Richer, Wiser, Happier: How the World's Greatest Investors Win in Markets and Life (Scribner/Simon & Schuster, April 2021). Over the last quarter of a century, he has interviewed many of the world's best investors, exploring in depth the question of what qualities and insights enable them to achieve enduring success. He's written extensively about investing for many publications and has been interviewed about the greatest investors for magazines, newspapers, podcasts, radio, and television. He has also given many talks about the lessons we can learn from the most successful investors, not only about how to invest but about how to improve our thinking. Green has written for many leading publications in the US and Europe, including The New Yorker, Time, Fortune, Forbes, Barron's, Fast Company, Money, Worth, Bloomberg Markets, The Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe Magazine, The New York Observer, The (London) Spectator, The (London) Independent Magazine, and The Economist. He has reported in places as diverse as China, India, Japan, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, the US, Mexico, England, France, Monaco, Poland, Italy, and Russia. He has interviewed presidents and prime ministers, inventors, criminals, prize-winning authors, the CEOs of some of the world's largest companies, and countless billionaires. While living in London, Green edited the European, Middle Eastern, and African editions of Time. Before that, he lived in Hong Kong, where he edited the Asian edition of Time during a period in which it won many awards. Green has collaborated on several books as a ghostwriter, co-author, or editor. One of them became a #1 New York Times and #1 Wall Street Journal bestseller in 2017. He also worked closely with a renowned hedge fund manager, Guy Spier, helping him to write his much-praised 2014 memoir, The Education of a Value Investor: My Transformative Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment. Green also wrote and edited The Great Minds of Investing, which features short profiles of 33 renowned investors, along with stunning portraits created by Michael O'Brien, one of America's preeminent photographers. Born and raised in London, Green was educated at Eton College, studied English literature at Oxford University, and received a Master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. He lives in New York with his wife, Lauren, and their children, Henry and Madeleine. The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

Answers TV Daily
Answers News: Did Asteroids Destroy Sodom?

Answers TV Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 35:38


Swiss psychologists develop phobia app; Parents choose charter and private schools for children locked out of public education; Biologists identify gene mutation linked to pigeon beak size; Texas governor signs law banning drugs that induce abortion; Interdisciplinary team publishes hypothesis to explain fire layer around Sodom; Geneticists analyze Polynesian DNA to map migrations . . . and other stories reviewed during this September 29, 2021, broadcast of Answers News. - - - - - - - - - - - "Then the Lord rained on Sodom and Gomorrah sulfur and fire from the Lord out of heaven. And he overthrew those cities, and all the valley, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and what grew on the ground." - - - - - - - - - - - Genesis 19:24-25 Articles: Incredibly realistic AR spiders are here to help you battle arachnophobia https://www.cnet.com/news/incredibly-realistic-ar-spiders-are-here-to-help-you-battle-arachnophobia/ Charter, private schools see growth during pandemic as 1.4 million kids taken out of public schools: study https://www.christianpost.com/news/240k-students-switch-to-charter-schools-during-pandemic-study.html Darwin's short-beak enigma solved https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210921125156.htm Texas governor signs bill banning ‘abortion inducing drugs' after seven weeks of pregnancy https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/texas-governor-signs-bill-banning-abortion-inducing-drugs-after-seven-weeks-of-pregnancy/ A giant space rock demolished an ancient Middle Eastern city and everyone in it – possibly inspiring the Biblical story of Sodom https://theconversation.com/a-giant-space-rock-demolished-an-ancient-middle-eastern-city-and-everyone-in-it-possibly-inspiring-the-biblical-story-of-sodom-167678 Story of epic human voyages across Polynesia revealed by genetics https://www.newscientist.com/article/2291104-story-of-epic-human-voyages-across-polynesia-revealed-by-genetics/ How humans lost their tails https://www.deccanherald.com/science-and-environment/how-humans-lost-their-tails-1032917.html Mathematical Analysis of Fruit Fly Wings Hints at Evolution's Limits https://www.quantamagazine.org/mathematical-analysis-of-fruit-fly-wings-hints-at-evolutions-limits-20210920/ Christian schools should be thoroughly Christian https://www.christianpost.com/voices/christian-schools-should-be-thoroughly-christian.html - - - - - - - - - - - Image by: Marharyta Marko Getty Image #1073058716 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/answerstv/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/answerstv/support

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Social Determinants of Health - Modifiable Risk Factors - Obesity and Energy Balance

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 21:35


In this Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) episode, Dr. Jacquelyne Gaddy (UNC-Chapel Hill) speaks with Dr. Marvella Ford (Medical University of South) and Dr. Jennifer Ligibel (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) on obesity and energy balance as modifiable risk factors and how clinicians can respectfully engage with their patients on this topic. View COI. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: education.asco.org | Contact Us Air date: 9/29/2021   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] LORI PIERCE: Hello. I'm Dr. Lori Pierce, the 2020-2021 president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Thank you for tuning in for this discussion on social determinants of health and their impact on cancer care. The purpose of this video is to educate and inform. It is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatments of individual conditions. Guests on this video express their own opinions, experiences, and conclusions. These discussions should not be construed as an ASCO position or endorsement. For this series on the social determinants of health, we invite guests with a wide range of views and perspectives. Some of these conversations may be provocative and some even uncomfortable. But ASCO is committed to advancing equitable cancer care for all individuals, every patient, every day, everywhere. I dedicated this vision to my term as ASCO president, and these conversations bring many voices to the table, voices that we need to hear to move forward and find solutions. We hope you learned new ways of thinking about these issues and we invite you to join us in working toward a world in which every person with cancer, no matter where they live or what resources they have, receives high quality equitable cancer care. Thank you. JACQUELYNE GADDY: Welcome to the ASCO Social Determinants of Health Series. I am Dr. Jacquelyne Gaddy, and I'm a current third year fellow in the Division of Oncology at UNC Chapel Hill. With me today is Dr. Marvella Ford, endowed chair of cancer disparities from the Medical University of South Carolina and South Carolina State University, and I also have the pleasure of having Dr. Jennifer Ligibel, director of the Zakim Center for Integrative Therapies and Healthy Living at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In this episode, we will be discussing obesity and energy balance as modifiable risk factors, and how clinicians can respectfully engage with their patients on these topics. Dr. Ligibel, we've had some time talking together. And I want to start by actually just getting an introduction of how we can actually relate cancer and the outcomes of cancer with this topic today of obesity. JENNIFER LIGIBEL: Sure. This is definitely a topic that we've learned a lot about, especially within the last few decades. We recognize that obesity is an epidemic, not just in the United States, but everywhere. In the US, many adult populations across various states have a prevalence of 40% or more of the adult population having obesity. And this rate is rising around the world. And we've known for a long time that obesity increases the risk of a lot of diseases, heart disease, diabetes. The connection between obesity and cancer is something that we have recognized more recently. And in fact, in 2016, the International Agency for Research in Cancer reviewed all of the data looking at the relationship between excess adiposity, whether it was measured through BMI, through body composition and the risk of developing cancer, and found that there were 13 different cancers for which there was a clear and consistent relationship between higher levels of obesity and higher levels of cancer. We also know that there's a relationship between a number of factors that contribute to excess adiposity, things like inactivity and poor dietary quality and excess cancer risk. We also know that individuals with obesity face increased challenges after cancer diagnosis. There are higher incidences of things like surgical complications, neuropathy, and other side effects of cancer therapies. And for many diseases, individuals with obesity at the time of cancer diagnosis have an increased risk of cancer recurrence and mortality as compared to leaner individuals. So we know that there is a strong relationship between obesity and the risk of developing cancer and the risk of dying from cancer, as well as suffering increased toxicity from cancer treatment. JACQUELYNE GADDY: Thank you for that, Dr. Ligibel. That gives us a really introduction into this important topic. And Dr. Ford, if we can dive a little bit deeper, I know this past summer for our ASCO conference, I had the pleasure of listening to you as you presented. And I wanted to specifically ask you to address what you discussed in regards to inflammation and its relation to cancer and obesity. MARVELLA FORD: Yes, absolutely. So as Dr. Ligibel just noted, there is an association between being overweight and likelihood of being diagnosed with cancer, and also, the cancer treatment outcomes. What we have seen is that there's an underlying association between bile inflammation. The same bile inflammation that is linked to heart disease is also linked to cancer. And the good news is that there's something that we can do about it. So when we talk about the modifiable behavioral health risks, this is one of them. What we're seeing is that physical activity can actually reduce levels of bile inflammation in the body, which is great news. And Dr. Ligibel and others around the country are leading the way in developing physical activity interventions for people who are diagnosed with cancer so that we can intervene early on to develop strategies to improve their cancer treatment outcomes. You know, that leads us to the broader question of physical activity for the general population. How can we increase physical activity for everyone to reduce cancer risk? And I think there are some very attainable goals that we can set and there are some strategies that are achievable that we can accomplish in that arena. JACQUELYNE GADDY: As we think about the social determinants of health and why we got started with this, and Dr. Pierce did an amazing job of putting that at the forefront of ASCO's goals this past year during her presidency, before we dive even deeper, Dr. Ford, I want you to address specifically, you had a wonderful figure. And I can kind of see it in my mind right now in regards to the race maps when addressing obesity, and again, tying that back into its relation to cancer. MARVELLA FORD: So when we talk about obesity, what we don't want to do is get into a blaming-the-victim kind of approach where, oh, these people are just so overweight, that is exactly what we do not want to do. It's really important to look at the social determinants of health and the contributors to overweight and obesity. Because people are working with what they have available to them. And so the map that you're talking about really highlights the social determinants of health in relation to obesity. And so what we saw-- I showed a series of maps-- is that obesity in the US, it's associated with race but it appears to be driven by socioeconomic position. So areas that have lower levels of income, education, you know, upward mobility is what we used to call it, have higher rates of obesity. And a lot of that is due to what's in those communities. And so if you drive around those communities, whether they're rural or urban, you see a lot of fast food places. You see a lot of food deserts. Food deserts are not just a purview of inner cities, urban areas, rural areas where you would think, well, that's ironic because food is grown in the rural areas. But rural areas can also be food deserts. And so in my work at the Hollings Cancer Center, we're focusing a lot on the I-95 corridor of South Carolina, which ranges from North Carolina at the top, to Georgia at the lower end. And I know that's been an area of interest to many in our state. And what we have seen is that it's one of the poorest and most medically underserved areas of our state. And if you just do a visual exam, if you drive on the I-95 corridor and just get off on some of the side roads, you see just a dearth of healthy foods, grocery stores. There are convenience stores. There are gas stations. I call it gas station food, convenience foods, where you can eat to fill up. But it's not really healthy food and it's not life-affirming, life-promoting, life-enhancing food. And so this is what people have available to them. We have seen this with the impact of COVID-19 on the school systems. What we're seeing is that the schools, even if they're closed due to COVID, they still have to remain engaged in food distribution. Because for a lot of the children, the meals that they had at school may have been the only meals that they had that day. And so kudos to the school systems around the country for continuing to distribute healthy food to the children even when school is not physically in session, even when they're in a hybrid model or a virtual model. And on the weekends, they're sending kids home with backpacks full of healthy foods. I just spoke with a principal on Friday. One student tested positive at a local high school, and so she had to inform the other students who were in contact with that student that they had to get sent home. And one young lady was crying and said, but I want to stay in school. And there are a lot of reasons, and one of them is food security, being able to eat healthy foods and having access to healthy foods. Healthy foods can help to reduce inflammation in the body. But we also know that there are stressors that are associated with the social determinants of health that also raise levels of bile inflammation, stress, stressors. What are the stressors associated with the social determinants of health? The same stressors that we're experiencing in this pandemic. The pandemic is really highlighting the stressors that many people in the US have lived with on a daily basis for decades. Job insecurity, food insecurity, housing insecurity, educational insecurity, not knowing whether if the rent increases by $30 in one month, it may not seem like a lot, but if your budget is already stretched really tight, you may not be able to make a $30 increase. And then, if you and your family are living in your car, how does that impact healthy eating, and how does that impact stress? And so all of these factors combined, there's kind of an interactive multiplicative effect on increasing levels of stress and stressors that people are facing. And again, the good news is that physical activity can help to lower those levels of bile inflammation. And I think we just need to be cognizant of where people are when we develop interventions and start with where they are in what's available and accessible to them in order for the interventions to really be successful. JACQUELYNE GADDY: Thank you for that, Dr. Ford. And I think you touched on a lot of different barriers that I know I can attest as a fellow and been in training for so long, and I know Dr. Ligibel can also likely attest to that as well. I'm from Buffalo, New York, a rather urban environment. And you know, my mom raised me as a single parent mother. So many of these barriers that you're describing I either experience personally or definitely have close friends, et cetera, that did have these barriers. Dr. Ligibel, I want to ask you in your day-to-day practicing, outside of the barriers that Dr. Ford addressed, what do you tend to see on a day-to-day basis that are common barriers that patients face when they're battling obesity? JENNIFER LIGIBEL: I think that's a great question. And I will say that one of the things that we've been doing through ASCO for the last few years through our work in the obesity initiative is trying to learn a bit more about what's happening in practice. What are patients hearing? What are doctors saying? And so in 2019, we conducted a survey that went out to all of ASCO membership asking anyone who actively participates in clinic, whether they were a physician, a nurse practitioner, a chemotherapy nurse, kind of all through the entire health team, do you talk to your patients about physical activity, about nutrition, about their body weight and how that may be connected to cancer? Now this was a survey, so the people that responded were very interested in this topic. And most of them indicated that they did talk about these topics with their patients. But they noted that they felt like they didn't have a lot of training in what's the best way to bring up these topics. And we asked them specifically, what do you think are barriers to patients making healthy lifestyle changes after cancer diagnosis? And one of the things that they said, certainly, barriers in terms of transportation and resources. There's just-- many places don't have physical activity programs to send their patients to. But they also talked about that patients weren't aware that this was an important part of their health, and that this really needed to be a message that was echoed many times, not just by one provider. So we followed up that survey to providers and asked patients, what are you hearing about nutrition and exercise from your cancer care providers? And not surprisingly, because this was patients that were also interested in this, they all said they wanted to hear about this. And only about half of them actually got any kind of information about a healthy diet or exercise or weight management from their providers. And so I think that there's clearly work that we still need to be doing, trying to figure out, how do you help providers talk about these things with their patients? How do you help patients make these types of healthy lifestyle choices after cancer diagnosis? Because there are a lot more barriers than for someone who's thinking about making changes in their activity before cancer diagnosis related to their cancer. They may be more tired. They may have side effects like neuropathy or lymphedema. In addition to all the things that Dr. Ford talked about, cancer creates a lot of economic uncertainty for people. And that can contribute to not thinking that you've got the resources to be able to make these healthy lifestyle changes. So I think there's a lot of work to be done both in the messaging and then having the services available to people to make it easier for people to choose healthier foods, to have the ability to exercise in a safe place. We have a long way to go to really make these things be accessible to our patients. JACQUELYNE GADDY: Thank you, Dr. Ligibel. Dr. Ford, you have talked about this during this conversation. And you have previously mentioned this as far as your research is concerned. As we consider the solution, because that's the biggest part, right? We can talk about the problem all day, and I think we tend to do that a lot in research. But what is more important and most important in my eyes are what are we going to do about it? As we think about all of the things that Dr. Ligibel just mentioned, what are the parts from a structural racism standpoint that are lacking, that you think A, is a problem-- so we need to identify it-- and then also, as we transition into the last part of this conversation is, what are we going to do about it? MARVELLA FORD: That's a really great question, because that's really the ultimate question, right? What are we going to do about it? And so I think that you and Dr. Ligibel have alluded to the fact that we want to make sure that the interventions are successful, these physical activity interventions. And so that means starting with where the patients are. If we are working with a patient population that already was struggling financially before a cancer diagnosis, we have to recognize the impact of that on their lives of the cancer diagnosis, on their economic stability after. And even people who had really great jobs before a cancer diagnosis, depending on where they worked, they may or may not have the benefits that would continue to sustain them over time, over the course of the cancer treatment. So their lives may take a drastic shift as well. And so I think that what we want to do is recognize what the patients are going through on a daily basis. And it would be wonderful to be able to offer at our cancer centers, people come for treatment. Can we do physical activity at the cancer centers? I know some are starting to do different types of exercise. But this would be something that they could bring their children to, they could bring their families so they wouldn't have to worry about child care. I know our cancer center at one point offered Middle Eastern dancing, or belly dancing. And it was just great. People could bring their kids. I participated. Even before my own breast cancer diagnosis, I participated. And it really helped the women to regain mobility and use of their arms, being able to raise their arms over their heads after a breast cancer treatment. And so it really-- I think the exercise could be tailored to the needs of cancer patients as they recover. And as they continue to go through treatment and recover, you can tailor the specific types of exercise to their needs. Most of our cancer centers have some type of wellness facility. And so I know that at our wellness center, we have a physician, Dr. Jennifer Harper, who started a physical activity program for breast cancer survivors. And it's gone on for, I think, at least five years. And so it's really great if we can build on the resources that we have in our centers, and our cancer centers, out in the community. If we partner with local schools, have gyms. A lot of them open up after hours to the community members so they can bring their children and everyone can exercise together. But we could bring in people with training with cancer survivors to work on physical activities that are specific to certain types of cancer to help improve outcomes for those cancer types just by partnering with local schools. So I think there are a lot of things that we could do, making use of existing resources in our communities, doing a lot of partnerships, partnering with fire departments, partnering with people in the community who can become champions and can help drive it. JACQUELYNE GADDY: Thank you for that, Dr. Ford. And lastly, Dr. Ligibel, we talk about-- in the Black community, a common thing that we mention is the Brown tax. But then when we consider the intersectionality of the Brown tax with those that are obese and that stigma that's associated with it. Lastly, what do we do to try to address that stigma? Because I think patients come in, they're already fearful about their diagnosis. And then some are fearful because the color of their skin. And now they're obese as well. How do we tackle that as providers and trainees? JENNIFER LIGIBEL: That is a phenomenal question. And there are many data that show that people with obesity are less likely to seek medical care. They're diagnosed with cancers at a later stage. And a lot of that is due to that feeling of, I don't really want to engage with the system. I don't feel good when people are talking to me about my weight. And I think this is a place where we really need some concentrated training. There are many subspecialties where this is already being worked upon. And I think that this is, again, something that as an oncology community, we need to think about how to treat our patients with respect and create an environment where people feel comfortable. Because therapeutic partnership with your cancer provider is so important, that people have that sense of being cared for. And I think this is really something that we can work on together. JACQUELYNE GADDY: Dr. Ligibel and Dr. Ford, it's been a pleasure working with you before this and during this. I want to thank you both for taking time to speak with me today. And I want to thank you for joining us for this episode of the ASCO Social Determinants of Health Series. To keep up with the latest episodes, please click Subscribe. Let us know what you think about this series by leaving a review or by simply emailing us at professionaldevelopment@asco.org. Thank you. [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: Thank you for listening to this week's episode of the ASCO e-learning weekly podcast. To make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

Own Your Voice: Cultivating Voices of Impact
EP 48: Strength & Weakness Are Born From the Same Wound.

Own Your Voice: Cultivating Voices of Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 10:42


Hear from two Middle Eastern womxn who put a pen to paper to find and own their voices. Authors, Sahar Paz and Farida D. join forces to wake you up to the privilege of your freedom and the burdens of the patriarchy.    ABOUT SAHAR PAZ Sahar Paz is a communications strategist, professional speaker, and CEO of Own Your Voice Strategy Firm which provides comprehensive branding services for clients ranging from social thought leaders to globally recognized healthcare innovators. Since she launched her first company at the age of 13 she has accrued over 2 decades of leadership, communication, and management experience. From reconstructing corporate branding strategies for global businesses to activating personal brands for pioneering leaders, or serving as a keynote speaker at Fortune 500 companies, Sahar's ongoing mission is to ensure that organizations, companies, and individuals can efficiently hone and use their voice to reach their goals; while remembering the third bottom line - community.    ABOUT FARIDA D. Farida D. is an Arab gender researcher and poet, studying Arab women's everyday oppressions for over a decade. Through the process, she broke up with her hijab and set all of her high heels on fire. Farida has been interviewed by BBC Radio London. Her poems are strolling all over social media, and have been shared by renowned artists including Janne Robinson and Willow Smith. She may be reached for correspondence at: farida-d@outlook.com, or on Instagram at: @farida.d.author  

The Commercial Break
EP107: Colonel Clap

The Commercial Break

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 68:17


Bryan shares with Hoadley his love for the Chicago Cubs, Harry Caray, WGN Radio and The 7th Inning Stretch. tHen he shares his disdain for Conor McGregor's slaughter of the Wrigley Tradition of singing Take Me Out! Finally, the gang reviews a government produced movie from the 1940's warning soldiers of STD's, loose women and the danger of unclean sex. It's an eye-opening film that shows the backwards attitudes toward women, sex and movie making! LINKS:Want a TCB limited edition collectible sticker? Each series sticker is limited and first come, first serve. Click HERE to find out how!Or send a text or voicemail to 661-Best-2-Yo (1.661.237.8296)Watch this episode on YoutubeTCBTV-minusSponsorStreamlight Lending By SunTrust Bank (Use Code TCB for additional interest savings)DBSAlliance For Mental Health HelpMagic Spoon (Use Code TCB)FUM (Use Code TCB) Smokeless Pipe for Smoking SesationMEMPHO Music Fest (Oct 1st-3rd 2021)Castbox is the TCB partner for the Mempho Fest showsSubscribe to The Commercial Break Podcast Youtube ChannelNew Episodes on Tuesdays and now Fridays everywhere!Text or leave us a message: 1-(661)-BEST-2-YO  |  (1-661-237-8296)

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Baseball and BBQ
Baseball and BBQ Episode 103: Erik Sherman, Author of Two Sides of Glory and Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich, Restaurateurs and the Authors of Chasing Smoke

Baseball and BBQ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 86:27


Episode 103 features an outstanding author of numerous baseball themed books and a visit with two wonderful restaurateurs and cookbook authors from across the pond. Erik Sherman writes exceptional baseball books.  Whether the books are about a specific player or a specific team, Erik provides wonderfully unique perspectives which baseball fans will enjoy.  His latest project will be a fine addition to your library.  In Two Sides of Glory:  The 1986 Boston Red Sox In Their Own Words, Erik provides a glimpse into something rarely seen.  Frequently, books are written about the winning teams, but how often does one have the chance to read about the losing team and learn of the individual players feelings as well as finding out about things happening with their lives.  All that and much more is in Two Sides of Glory.  The 1986 Boston Red Sox lost game six to the New York Mets in an unforgettable and devastating fashion and then proceeded to lose game seven and had to watch as the New York Mets celebrated and prevented them from winning their first World Series in 68 years.  The team was made up of some of the most well-known and talented players to ever wear their team's laundry and the stories and lesser known facts will make this an interview you will enjoy about a book you will not be able to put-down until the last page.  Enjoy part one and look forward to part two.Sarit Packer and Itamar Srulovich are a wife and husband team who opened their first Middle Eastern themed restaurant, Honey & Co in London, England in 2012.  Additionally, they are the authors of three cookbooks.  Their newest London restaurant is Honey & Smoke and their latest cookbook, filled with incredible recipes and beautiful photos is Chasing Smoke:  Cooking Over Fire Around The Levant.  We begin with a quick lesson on what is meant by the Levant and then get into a discussion of their lives which began in Israel and eventually brought them to London where they now provide their customers with delicious food at their two restaurants and one specialty grocery store.  The book takes the reader on a journey which includes their favorite cities as they collected recipes, stories, and the best of culinary culture along the way. The book is organized into five ingredient-led chapters (fruit and vegetables, fish and seafood, birds, lamb and other meats, and bread and unmissables).  If you have been wondering what else is possible to make over a live fire then this is the cookbook for you.  Despite the five-hour time difference, Sarit and Itamar managed to find the time to charm us as we spoke of everything, including their special relationship which works extremely well as they are a delightful force to be reckoned with.       We conclude the show with the beautiful song, "Baseball Always Brings You Home" from the musician, Dave Dresser and the poet, Shel Krakofsky.We recommend you go to Fifth & Cherry, https://fifthandcherry.com for wonderful cutting boards and http://www.baseballbbq.com for grill tools and clothing for barbecue and baseball fans and the Pandemic Baseball Book Club, https://www.pbbclub.com  to find many of the wonderful books we have featured as well as some additional swag.If you would like to contact the show, we would love to hear from you.Call the show - (516) 855-8214Email - baseballandbbq@gmail.comTwitter - @baseballandbbqInstagram - baseballandbarbecueYouTube - baseball and bbqWebsite - https://baseballandbbq.weebly.com Facebook - baseball and bbq

The Intelligence
Clubs seal: China's view as alliances multiply

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 23:19


Leaders of “the Quad” are meeting in person for the first time; drama from the AUKUS alliance still simmers. Our Beijing bureau chief discusses how Chinese officials see all these club ties. As Chancellor Angela Merkel's time in office wanes, we assess Germany's many challenges she leaves behind. And the sweet, sweet history of baklava, a Middle Eastern treat gone global.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Clubs seal: China's view as alliances multiply

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 23:19


Leaders of “the Quad” are meeting in person for the first time; drama from the AUKUS alliance still simmers. Our Beijing bureau chief discusses how Chinese officials see all these club ties. As Chancellor Angela Merkel's time in office wanes, we assess Germany's many challenges she leaves behind. And the sweet, sweet history of baklava, a Middle Eastern treat gone global.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Daily Signal News
After US Pullout From Afghanistan, Joel C. Rosenberg Sees Alliances Shift in Middle East

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 29:58


Involvement in the Middle East has been a large part of U.S. foreign policy for generations. President after president has had to take the multifaceted and complex web of alliances and relationships in the Middle East into account as they navigated policy in the region.But after President Joe Biden withdrew U.S. forces from Afghanistan in neighboring south Central Asia, the balance of power in the Middle East underwent a major shift. America's departure from the region resulted in a number of important geopolitical ramifications and strategic reorientations.Joel C. Rosenberg, an American-Israeli communications strategist and author of the new book "Enemies and Allies: An Unforgettable Journey Inside the Fast-Moving & Immensely Turbulent Modern Middle East," has spent years learning the ins and outs of Middle Eastern politics.His new book includes interviews with Middle Eastern leaders, including Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and long-time Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, to get their views on the future of the Middle East with a less-present United States.One point of concern is Iran. The Saudis "see Iran the way Israel sees Iran, which is, the people are great, the leadership is evil, and the leadership is trying to build nuclear weapons and the missiles to deliver them," Rosenberg says.Rosenberg joins "The Daily Signal Podcast" to discuss his new book and the implications of America's withdrawal from Afghanistan, as well to explain the ongoing realignment between Arab states and Israel against Iran.We also cover these stories:House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress' Democratic leaders have agreed on a framework to pay for their $3.5 trillion spending bill.The Biden administration announces it will prohibit the Border Patrol from using horses in Del Rio, Texas, in response to images of agents on horseback appearing to abuse Haitian refugees—which wasn't the case.The administration begins reimbursing Florida school officials who had their pay docked for refusing to enforce Gov. Ron DeSantis' ban on mask mandates. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Jeremiah Show
SN8 | Ep409 - Sharon Eliashar | Rubi Ate The Fig - Singer-Guitarist + Marc Mann - Keyboards, Guitar

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 75:37


The next installment of The Mike Gormley Interviews Music Series... Mike steps behind the curtain with the band, Rubi Ate The Fig. Our Special Guests today is Sharon Eliashar is the Writer, Singer, Guitarist, and the Founder of RUBI ATE THE FIG, and Marc Mann, Keyboards, Guitar. "Born in Jerusalem, I was raised in the Desert of Palm Springs and spent the summers in Jerusalem with my huge Sephardic family, a family that has been there for over 500 years. I wrote my first song when I was 8, learned how to play guitar at 13, sang in the school choir, and excelled in acting." At 16, I dropped out of High School, (and popular music), and went to College. I became obsessed with Jazz Fusion: Mahavishnu, Chick Corea, Weather Report, to name a few. I would sneak into the local bar just to see Danny Montgomery play drums in his Jazz fusion group; Danny now plays with Rubi Ate the Fig. While getting my degree in Pure Math from U.C. Berkeley I played in the Javanese Gamelan, studied classical Indian singing, and classical guitar. I began studying Dumbeq, Arabic drum, with Polly Tapia Ferber who plays with Rubi Ate the Fig. Polly introduced me to the odd Ome rhythms, complexities, and grooves of traditional Arabic and Turkish music. This was a huge turning point for me as a writer and is the foundation for my music writing for Rubi Ate the Fig. I met Marc Mann (Concert for George, ELO, Oingo Boingo) who took an interest in my music and my synthesis of Rock and Middle-Eastern music. I formed Rubi Ate the Fig in 2013, compromising of my all-Ome favorite musicians, whom I now write for. We had our first show in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in 2013. Marc Mann and I co-produce Rubi Ate the Fig, and it is this collaboration that truly realizes the vision of Rubi Ate the Fig. Ali Paris, from Palestine, is our newest addition, playing the Qanun, a Middle-Eastern plucked zither." https://www.rubiatethefig.com

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed
A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 62:58


A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night is a unique take on the vampire mythos. Ana Lily Amirpour had written a dozen screenplays but wasn't getting any traction with getting them made. That's when she had the idea for her Iranian vampire story. The script came easily and was something she could make in the small town of Taft CA on an ultra-low budget. Watching the film, though, Amirpour clearly had a vision and was able to bring it to screen. The film is hypnotic, dark, full of mood, and surprisingly romantic. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Horror Debuts series with Amirpour's 2014 film A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night. They don't say much in Amirpour's film, but we have a lot to say about it. It's an interesting film in its simplicity and pacing. Combing through reviews, it seems a good number of people find issue in the slow pace and long takes. Even Pete initially reacted this way. But this film has a way of sticking with you. Both of us found the film to be one that lingers, and in the end, we both ended up big fans of Amirpour's vampire story. Is it the fact that it's horror-lite? Or perhaps that we connected with the romance, which Amirpour herself talks about as being like in a John Hughes film? Regardless, it's a bit hypnotic spending time in this film and one we'd return to readily. The black-and-white cinematography by Lyle Vincent paired with Amirpour's story as well as the soundtrack fully immerse us in this town of Bad City. It helps that Sheila Vand plays such a compelling vampire, stalking the streets in her chador and on her skateboard. And we're intrigued by the larger messages Amirpour puts forth in the film, even if she's not overtly trying to make comments on these things. Things like the oppression of women in Iran and other Middle Eastern countries. Addiction. Social isolation. Depression. Social status. Even the way we drain the land of its oil like vampires on the Earth is emphasized over and over again with the shots of the oil pumpjacks moving up and down. But it's not a message movie. Amirpour includes those elements as themes to look at and think about, but we think she's really focused on the love story and these two lost souls trying to find a connection in a dark town. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night is really a love story. That connection between Arash, played by Arash Marandi, and Vand's vampire (called simply The Girl) is the beating heart in this dark, cold movie. The scenes the two of them have together – at the street light, in her place, and at the power plant – create strong moments that are some of the more unforgettable moments in cinema. We found a strong connection to this film. It's one we'll likely jump back into sooner rather than later to reconnect with Arash and The Girl. We have a great conversation about Amirpour's film A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night. Check it out and tune in to this week's show. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

P40 Ministries
Exodus 23:1-9 (From Creation) - How the Law Points to Jesus - With Guest Speaker Stephanie Rousselle

P40 Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 28:05


Today Stephanie and Jenn talk about the Law and how everything in it connects directly to Jesus.  If you're a spiritual foodie looking for a flavor explosion in your journey with God, the Gospel Spice Podcast is your new secret ingredient. Join Stephanie Rousselle and her occasional guests to taste and see that the Lord is good! Join thousands listening from 120 countries and discover that the entire Bible is seasoned with exotic Middle Eastern spiritual spices long lost to our twenty-first-century Western palate. Listen to the Gospel Spice Podcast - one of the top rated Christian podcasts - available wherever you listen to podcasts! Listen now    

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia
394: Four Weeks down Colombia's Magdalena River

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 54:49


An exhilarating travelogue for a new generation about a journey along Colombia's Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. An American writer of Argentine, Syrian, and Iraqi Jewish descent, Jordan Salama tells the story of the Río Magdalena, nearly one thousand miles long, the heart of Colombia. This is Gabriel García Márquez's territory—rumor has it Macondo was partly inspired by the port town of Mompox—as much as that of the Middle Eastern immigrants who run fabric stores by its banks. Following the river from its source high in the Andes to its mouth on the Caribbean coast, journeying by boat, bus, and improvised motobalinera, Salama writes against stereotype and toward the rich lives of those he meets. Among them are a canoe builder, biologists who study invasive hippopotamuses, a Queens transplant managing a failing hotel, a jeweler practicing the art of silver filigree, and a traveling librarian whose donkeys, Alfa and Beto, haul books to rural children Tune in for an enjoyable conversation with the author and buy his book! https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/676218/every-day-the-river-changes-by-jordan-salama/

Writ Large
1001 Nights

Writ Large

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 30:56


Humans love stories. And no collection of stories is more beloved worldwide than the Middle Eastern folk tales known as One Thousand and One Nights. The original collection only contained about 40 stories. It was compiled into a manuscript sometime between the 8th century and the 14th century during the Islamic Golden Age. The stories were made popular in the West by the French translator Antoine Galland who got a hold of this original manuscript in the 1690s. Galland began translating and publishing these stories in French. They were an instant hit. But some of the most popular stories, such as Aladdin and Ali Baba didn't appear in that original manuscript.  Paulo Lemos Horta is an associate professor of literature at New York University Abu Dhabi. He is the author of Marvellous Thieves: Secret Authors of the Arabian Nights See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod.

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Bill Walton, Victoria Coates and Sam Faddis

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 53:00


BILL WALTON, Chairman, Resolute Protector Foundation, Host, The Bill Walton Show, Senior Fellow, Discovery Institute's Center on Wealth, Poverty and Morality, @billwaltonshow Bill Walton talks about Evergrande's troubling future: China is not going to let a Lehman Brothers happen within their borders Walton: The Chinese Communist Party is racing against the demographic clock Hong Kong as "another Chinese city" as the region undergoes its first “Patriot Elections” How is the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission responding to extensive Chinese influence within American capital markets? VICTORIA COATES, Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Security Policy's Middle East and North Africa Department,  President, USAGM's Middle East Broadcasting Networks, Inc., former Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Middle Eastern and North African Affairs, National Security Council, Author, "David's Sling: A History of Democracy in Ten Works of Art," @VictoriaCoates Victoria Coates: Iran has signaled that they will only enter the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action again so long as the U.S. relaxes all its sanctions against the Islamic Republic Coates: “You can't have a good faith negation with a partner that doesn't have a good faith word to give” Coates: This would be quite the moment to play hardball and pressure the Iranian regime into abandoning its nuclear program Europe's coming energy shortage is affecting the continent's lofty climate change goals Victoria: Don't put your energy security for an entire continent in the hand of Vladimir Putin The Biden administration blames “price gougers” for the rising gas prices, refusing to acknowledge America's apparent lack of energy independence since President Trump left office  SAM FADDIS, Former Clandestine Operations Officer, CIA, former Congressional Candidate, Editor, ANDMagazine.com, Author, “Beyond Repair: The Decline and Fall of the CIA,” @RealSamFaddis How close is Iran to "getting the bomb?" Sam Faddis: “The Biden administration is in the process of surrendering to all these enemies of the United States, not confronting them” Faddis conveys that the Biden administration has not backed away from potentially giving conditional aid to the Taliban Faddis: We just transported the Taliban into the 21st century in terms of communications Faddis: Stanford, like many of America's preeminent educational institutions, has taken vast quantities of money from the Chinese Communist Party 

Spectator Radio
The Edition: who's afraid of rising wages?

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 44:34


In this week's episode: is Brexit to blame for the rise in blue-collar wages? With labour shortages driving wages up, many have blamed Britain's removal from the single market. However, this week in The Spectator, Matthew Lynn argues that shocks and price signals are how the free-market economy reorganises, and that we are experiencing a global trend just like America and Germany. Simon Jenkins, columnist for the Guardian, joins Matthew to discuss. (00:45) Also this week: the British Medical Association has dropped its opposition to assisted dying, but is euthanasia really a dignified and painless process? Dr Joel Zivot asks this question in The Spectator magazine, drawing upon his own experience as an expert witness against the use of lethal injection in America. Dr Jacky Davis, radiologist and chair of the Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying, disagrees. Davis, who pushed the motion causing the BMA to change its position, calls claims that assisted dying is a painful process 'unscientific shroud-waving', a claim she debates with Dr Zivot this week. (13:43) And finally, Non-Fungible Tokens are selling at extortionate prices online, and are proudly hanging on the virtual walls of many. But can they really be considered art? Jack Rivlin writes about his own experience of purchasing NFTs in this week's Spectator. He is joined by Nima Sagharachi, director of Middle Eastern, Islamic and South Asian Art at Bonhams. (30:20) Hosted by William Moore Produced by Sam Holmes and Oscar Edmondson

The Edition
Payday: who's afraid of rising wages?

The Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 44:34


In this week's episode: is Brexit to blame for the rise in blue-collar wages? With labour shortages driving wages up, many have blamed Britain's removal from the single market. However, this week in The Spectator, Matthew Lynn argues that shocks and price signals are how the free-market economy reorganises, and that we are experiencing a global trend just like America and Germany. Simon Jenkins, columnist for the Guardian, joins Matthew to discuss. (00:45) Also this week: the British Medical Association has dropped its opposition to assisted dying, but is euthanasia really a dignified and painless process? Dr Joel Zivot asks this question in The Spectator magazine, drawing upon his own experience as an expert witness against the use of lethal injection in America. Dr Jacky Davis, radiologist and chair of the Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying, disagrees. Davis, who pushed the motion causing the BMA to change its position, calls claims that assisted dying is a painful process 'unscientific shroud-waving', a claim she debates with Dr Zivot this week. (13:43) And finally, Non-Fungible Tokens are selling at extortionate prices online, and are proudly hanging on the virtual walls of many. But can they really be considered art? Jack Rivlin writes about his own experience of purchasing NFTs in this week's Spectator. He is joined by Nima Sagharachi, director of Middle Eastern, Islamic and South Asian Art at Bonhams. (30:20) Hosted by William Moore Produced by Sam Holmes and Oscar Edmondson

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin
Afghanistan: What Happens Next? (with Karen J. Greenberg, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, Renee Montagne and Gaisu Yari)

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 55:49


It's 20 years after 9/11—what have we learned? In May, when U.S. and international troops began to withdraw from Afghanistan, feminists and Afghanistan experts warned of the brutal impact that would likely be felt by women and minorities with the return of the Taliban and in the vacuum of leadership. They were right.  The Taliban have announced their provisional government, which does not include a single woman. What does this mean for national security? The safety of women and girls? What are the geo-political dynamics yet to be sorted?     Helping us sort out these questions and set the record straight are special guests: Karen Joy Greenberg, expert on national security, terrorism and civil liberties and the director of the Center on National Security. Her latest book is Subtle Tools: The Dismantling of American Democracy from the War on Terror to Donald Trump. Greenberg's work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Nation, The National Interest and Mother Jones, among others.  Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, award-winning author and adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. She is the author of The Daughters of Kobani and Ashley's War, and writes regularly on Afghanistan's politics and economy, entrepreneurship in fragile states, the fight to end child marriage, and issues affecting women and girls for publications including the New York Times, Financial Times, Fast Company, Christian Science Monitor and CNN.com.  Renee Montagne, NPR correspondent and host. From 2004 to 2016, Montagne co-hosted NPR's "Morning Edition," the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Montagne has made 10 extended reporting trips to Afghanistan, where she has traveled to every major city, from Kabul to Kandahar. She has profiled Afghanistan's presidents and power brokers, while also focusing on the stories of Afghans at the heart of their complex country: schoolgirls, farmers, mullahs, poll workers, midwives and warlords.Gaisu Yari, a human rights defender from Afghanistan and survivor of child marriage who holds a master's degree in human rights from Columbia University and a bachelor's in Middle Eastern and gender studies from the University of Virginia. Yari is a writer and active speaker on women's issues in Afghanistan and worked with the government of Afghanistan as a commissioner to the Civil Service Commission of Afghanistan, as well as with national and international organizations. The focus of her expertise is in human rights and gender justice. She has extensive knowledge and professional experience working in both the U.S. and Afghanistan.   Rate and review “On the Issues with Michele Goodwin" to let us know what you think of the show! Let's show the power of independent feminist media. Check out this episode's landing page at MsMagazine.com for a full transcript, links to articles referenced in this episode, further reading and ways to take action.Tips, suggestions, pitches? Get in touch with us at ontheissues@msmagazine.com. Support the show (http://msmagazine.com)Support the show (http://msmagazine.com)

The 41 Files
The impact of 9/11 on the Islamic community, educators

The 41 Files

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 13:48


After 9/11, the country unified to heal from the tragedy, but some were not included in that unity. Some Muslim and Middle-Eastern people living in the U.S. experienced an increased amount of hate crimes and violence against them after 9/11.  Educators are doing what they can to teach their students why such prejudices are wrong, but it's a challenge when those students weren't even born when 9/11 happened. In the third episode of KSHB 41 News' five-part podcast mini-series about the 20th anniversary of 9/11, digital producers Casey Murray and Katharine Finnerty will hear from Dr. Laeeq Azmat, Platte County High School teacher Zach Keith and more about 9/11's impact on the Islamic community, as well as how educators are teaching 9/11 to students who didn't experience the life-changing event firsthand. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Biblical Mind
Narrative of Place: Why Historical and Geographical Context Matters (Cyndi Parker)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 32:20


In seminary, Dr. Cyndi Parker of Narrative of Place became frustrated with the lack of focus on understanding the lived experience of ancient people in the Bible. She decided to go to Israel for a full year to understand the physical context of the biblical world—to experience the seasons, to see when the grass grows, to feel the hot Middle Eastern sun, to set foot on the soil. Sitting and reading is so different from putting your feet on the ground in Israel. Join us this week as Cyndi shares about maps, the Middle East, and the importance of place for the student of Scripture. Show notes: 0:00 Cyndi shares about desiring deeper, tangible, real-world experiences 3:55 Archeological digs 5:21 Seminary, self-diagnosis, and the desire for Scripture 8:34 Entering an Asian context 12:07 The power of places 16:51 "Israel-Overwhelming Symptom" 19:52 Narrative at the forefront of Scripture 24:21 Engaging with the land from wherever you are 29:38 What pushed Cyndi into the theology of place Show notes by Dominique LaCroix Credits for the music used in TBM podcast.

The Bowery Boys: New York City History
#371 A Visit to Little Syria: An Immigrant Story

The Bowery Boys: New York City History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 61:18


Just south of the World Trade Center district sits the location of a forgotten Manhattan immigrant community. Curious outsiders called it "Little Syria" although the residents themselves would have known it as the Syrian Colony. Starting in the 1880s people from the Middle East began arriving at New York's immigrant processing station -- immigrants from Greater Syria which at that time was a part of the Ottoman Empire.  The Syrians of Old New York were mostly Christians who brought their trades, culture and cuisine to the streets of lower Manhattan. And many headed over to Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn as well, creating another district for Middle Eastern American culture which would outlast the older Manhattan area. Who were these Syrian immigrants who made their home here in New York? Why did they arrive? What were their lives like? And although Little Syria truly is long gone, what buildings remain of this extraordinary district? PLUS: A visit to Sahadi's, a fine food shop that anchors today's remaining Middle Eastern scene in Brooklyn. Greg and Tom head to their warehouse in Sunset Park to get some insight on the shop's historic connections to the first Syrian immigrants.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I'm with RJ
Concentrated Creations: Hashing Things Out with Sam Nobel of Axiom Hash (S4-EP01)

I'm with RJ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 45:52


Welcome back to another season of the I'm With RJ podcast! This week, join RJ Falcioni for Episode 1 of Season 4, featuring Sam Nobel of Axiom Hash. On this episode, we're talking about all things hashish with the founder of Axiom, a Los Angeles-based California cannabis company that recently won top prize at Kushstock 2021. From his roots in Iran and Israel, Sam has brought the Middle Eastern tradition of using hashish and cannabis to celebrate life to California through his extensive career in the medical and adult use markets. Since the passing of California's Adult Use Recreational laws, Nobel has established Axiom as a manufacturer at the forefront of hash product research and development and despite his growing success, Nobel is quick to point out the is a student of the many hash masters including the late Frenchy Cannoli, to whom Nobel gives immense credit and respect throughout the episode. Nobel and his team have launched a number of products ranging from a so-called "Flower Bomb" to the impressive hash wrap which is a preroll that replaces the paper with several grams of potent hashish.RJ and Sam also discuss how Axiom puts a strong emphasis on healthy consumption of cannabis products and the importance of finding new ways of increasing both popularity and accessibility of healthier and more healing-focused sku's. Nobel's approach is unconventional but the success Axiom is finding in the California market is proving Sam's approach is effective and one to take note of. If all this exciting talk about interesting ways to consume cannabis has caught your attention, sit back, relax, take hit from your favorite bong and join us for a captivating and enlightening episode of the I'm with RJ Show featuring our guest Sam Nobel of Axiom Hash!Connect with us:imwithrj.comInstagramTwitter Connect with Sam Nobel:axiomhash.comInstagram

Policy 360
Ep. 127 Inside Military 'Training Villages'

Policy 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 33:51


Most Americans have no idea that there are elaborate pretend Iraqi and Afghan villages scattered around the United States – on US military bases. The villages are designed to look real. There are people in them - many of the people were born in the Middle East and immigrated to the U.S. They now play pretend versions of themselves, in pretend Middle Eastern villages, in the very real forests and deserts of the U.S. Christopher Sims has been photographing the villages, and he joins Duke Sanford Dean Judith Kelley to discuss his work. Sims is a new faculty member at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. He also serves as the Undergraduate Education Director at Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. Credits/Transcript: https://policy360.org/2021/09/08/inside-military-training-villages/

Beautiful Soul Sunday
Protect Who's In Your House

Beautiful Soul Sunday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 33:02


Did you know that in Middle Eastern culture, whenever you were going to stay in someone's house, the host of that house was expected to protect you at all cost? God offers that same protection to His children and we also have that same responsibility, when it comes to protecting our children, by combating the enemy both spiritually and naturally. Listen in as I talk about using both weapons to fight against the enemy and his tactics. I pray that you will be blessed as you listen to today's show. ~Dr. Lynn --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/drlynn-goebel/support

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Victoria Coates, Jeff Nyquist and Bill Walton

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 52:55


VICTORIA COATES, Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Security Policy's Middle East and North Africa Department,  President, USAGM's Middle East Broadcasting Networks, Inc., former Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Security Advisor for Middle Eastern and North African Affairs, National Security Council, Author, "David's Sling: A History of Democracy in Ten Works of Art," @VictoriaCoates Victoria Coates talks about the world's reaction to the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan: Our allies around the world are in a state of “shocked disbelief” Victoria Coates: No more nation building - Although many Americans and the people of the countries they are trying to help desire the infrastructure necessary to operate a functional government, i.e. education, a just legal system, it is not always, “ours to give” Coates: The international development complex, since the 1960s, has operated under the pretense that all aid must be non-conditional Coates: “The enemy of my enemy is NOT my friend when he is a terrorist” JEFF NYQUIST, Writer, Epoch Times, Author, “Origins of the Fourth World War and The New Tactics of Global War” and “The Fool and His Enemy,” JRNyquist.blog, @JRNyquist Jeff Nyquist: Were 100,000 plus people really airlifted out of Afghanistan? U.S. government personnel on the ground in Kabul: Planes were leaving nearly empty BILL WALTON, Chairman, Resolute Protector Foundation, Host, The Bill Walton Show, Senior Fellow, Discovery Institute's Center on Wealth, Poverty and Morality, @billwaltonshow Despite what some critics have said about the Biden administration's catering to Beijing, U.S. officials continue to monitor both Chinese and American capital flows between both nations How much should we trust the word of George Soros when it comes to protecting American investors from Xi Jinping's China? Bill Walton: Investors tend to act under the assumption that governments are rational and always try to grow wealth - Xi is doing the exact opposite

New Books Network
Arvind Sharma, "The Ruler's Gaze: A Study of British Rule Over India from a Saidian Perspective" (HarperCollins, 2018)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 47:50


Edward Said's Orientalism (1978) is a seminal work in the field of postcolonial culture studies. It critiqued Western scholarship about the Eastern world for its patronizing attitude and tendency to view it as exotic, backward and uncivilized. Arvind Sharma, longstanding professor of comparative religion at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, now takes up the Palestinian academic's groundbreaking ideas - originally put forth predominantly in a Middle Eastern context - and tests them against Indian material. He explores in an Indian context Said's contention that the relationship between knowledge and power is central to the way the West depicts the non-West.Scholarly and accessible, The Ruler's Gaze: A Study of British Rule Over India from a Saidian Perspective (HarperCollins, 2018) throws fresh light on Indian colonial history through a Saidian lens. Dr. Pankaj Jain is a Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies at FLAME University, where he is heading the Indic Studies Initiative in the FLAME School of Liberal Education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Arvind Sharma, "The Ruler's Gaze: A Study of British Rule Over India from a Saidian Perspective" (HarperCollins, 2018)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 47:50


Edward Said's Orientalism (1978) is a seminal work in the field of postcolonial culture studies. It critiqued Western scholarship about the Eastern world for its patronizing attitude and tendency to view it as exotic, backward and uncivilized. Arvind Sharma, longstanding professor of comparative religion at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, now takes up the Palestinian academic's groundbreaking ideas - originally put forth predominantly in a Middle Eastern context - and tests them against Indian material. He explores in an Indian context Said's contention that the relationship between knowledge and power is central to the way the West depicts the non-West.Scholarly and accessible, The Ruler's Gaze: A Study of British Rule Over India from a Saidian Perspective (HarperCollins, 2018) throws fresh light on Indian colonial history through a Saidian lens. Dr. Pankaj Jain is a Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies at FLAME University, where he is heading the Indic Studies Initiative in the FLAME School of Liberal Education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

The Quicky
What Is Sharia Law?

The Quicky

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 17:55


Since the Taliban regained control in Afghanistan, there has been grave concern for women and children who were grossly mistreated during the militant group's last rule, during which they implemented strict Sharia law, but what exactly is it? The Quicky speaks to an expert in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies to find out where Sharia Law comes from, its different interpretations, and why the brutality of the Taliban is not for the vast majority Muslims a genuine reflection of their faith or beliefs. CREDITS  Host/Producer: Claire Murphy Executive Producer: Siobhán Moran-McFarlane Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri Guest: Dr Raihan Ismail - ARC DECRA Fellow & Senior Lecturer in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at the Australian National University in Canberra. Subscribe to The Quicky at... https://mamamia.com.au/the-quicky/ CONTACT US Got a topic you'd like us to cover? Send us an email at thequicky@mamamia.com.au Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Paradigms
Jef Stott & Mah Ze Tar – Zikr Project

Paradigms

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 59:12


Jef Stott and Mah Ze Tar have created Zikr Project, a 4-EP (so far!) cycle of music that explores inner space, love and connection, through the fusion of Middle Eastern music with modern instruments and arrangements.  The first two EPs … More ... The post Jef Stott & Mah Ze Tar – Zikr Project appeared first on Paradigms Podcast.

3 Cops Talk - Rebuilding Community Trust
43: A New Model of Police Officer Recruiting with Sarah Shendy

3 Cops Talk - Rebuilding Community Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 70:30


On this week's episode we speak with Sarah Shendy, the Director of the Ohio Office of Law Enforcement Recruitment. We discuss how her unique perspective as a Muslim American, community service-oriented police officer and trainer helped her to obtain one of the most important positions in modern policing. She also explains how the State of Ohio is taking a proactive approach to recruiting and retaining quality police officers.  Resources/Links/Websites:LER::Office (ohio.gov)https://youtu.be/pnBG7LMtnOMAbout Sarah: For over 11 years, Sarah has served as an officer with the Copley, Ohio Police Department. With this agency, she facilitated the D.A.R.E. program for grades 6th through high school. She has earned both a bachelors and master's degree in criminal justice focused on global issues and juvenile justice. Due to her cultural and religious knowledge and background in Muslim and Middle Eastern populations, she also served as a Terrorism Liaison Officer.In 2012, Sarah designed and facilitated a training for law enforcement officers and other public service employees on more effective ways to interact with Middle Eastern populations. This course includes a large segment on the Muslim religion, and continues to be utilized as a training resource here in Ohio, and replicated in other states.In 2014, she was one of sixteen members elected by former Attorney General Mike DeWine to serve as a panelist evaluating the training, certification, and advancement of law enforcement officers in the State of Ohio. She served as a Mental Health First Aid instructor and co-chair the Attorney General's Task Force on Criminal Justice and Mental Health. Currently, Sarah serves as the Director of the Ohio Office of Law Enforcement Recruitment. 

San Diego Magazine's Happy Half Hour
From Madison Avenue to Margaritas: Meet Ian Tenzer, Puesto's New R&D Chef

San Diego Magazine's Happy Half Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 57:26


Welcome back to Happy Half Hour! We are sorry, the audio quality this week isn't fully up to par. You can blame David for being in Las Vegas for a heavy metal concert. This week our special guest is Ian Tenzer, the executive research and development chef at Puesto Mexican Artisan Kitchen & Bar. Ian joined the company last fall, which started in La Jolla and now serves its popular tacos and micheladas at nine locations in Southern California. Ian moved here from New York, where he worked with acclaimed chef Daniel Humm for several years and as sous chef at Eleven Madison Park, which has three Michelin stars and was named the World's Best Restaurant in 2017. In his current role, Ian creates new menu items for all of Puesto's locations, which he calls a “dream position,” and he's working on making their operations completely environmentally sustainable. We chat with Ian about what it really means to be a “zero-waste” restaurant and how he's doing it, what it was like to cook at Eleven Madison Park, and the new fall/winter menu we can expect at Puesto. He also shares details about their newest restaurant, Marisi, which will open in La Jolla early next year. And if you want to experience more of Ian's cooking, he'll be at a new local chef dinner series at the Estancia La Jolla Hotel on September 14. In Hot Plates, Tahini is expanding its shawarma restaurant in Kearny Mesa, and is also opening a new Middle Eastern coffee and dessert shop. Chula Vista Brewery is opening its second location soon in Eastlake; the new tasting room will also feature Texas barbecue from Oak and Anchor BBQ. In case you missed it, a local chef based in San Marcos is competing on Christina Tosi's new Netflix show, Bake Squad. We also have a call for pitches for an upcoming issue of San Diego Magazine—tune in to find out how you can contribute if you have a story to share with us! In Two People, $50, Ian's recommendation is the Spam musubi from Leilani's Cafe in Pacific Beach (which I was thrilled to hear!). Troy says to try the lamb meatball with ras el hanout (a North African spice mix) and naan at Arlo in Mission Valley. Marie's pick this week is the shrimp tempura udon at Musashiya in Kearny Mesa. Thank you for listening! As always, we want to hear from our listeners. Need a restaurant recommendation? Is there a guest you want us to book on the show? Let us know! You can call us at 619-744-0535 and leave a voicemail, or if you're too shy, you can email us at happyhalfhour@sdmag.com. See you next week!

Andrew Talks to Chefs
Episode 175: Zach Engel (Galit--Chicago, IL); Scott Varricchio (Citrus Grillhouse--Vero Beach, FL) on enduring COVID

Andrew Talks to Chefs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 96:04


On Andrew's (second) recent book-research trip to Chicago, a chance encounter with Galit restaurant's Zach Engel led to a pod sitdown. Zach shares what it was like to grow up the son of a rabbi in Florida, to zero in on MIddle Eastern food in jobs with Philly's Mike Solomonov and New Orleans' Alon Shaya, as well as time cooking in Israel, before putting down roots in Chicago.And in the Line-Up, our news and commentary segment, friend of the pod Scott Varricchio of Citrus Grillhouse in Vero Beach, Florida, joins us to discuss his recent brush with, and recovery from, COVID (despite being fully vaccinated) and shares his on-the-ground thoughts from one of the most challenged and divided states in the union where the pandemic response is concerned.In our jobs-of-the-week segment, we share some of the great positions our sponsor Brad Metzger Restaurant Solutions (BMRS) is currently looking to fill.  (Andrew Talks to Chefs listeners are encouraged to reach out to BMRS at the special, dedicated email address created just for you at ATC@restaurant-solutions.com.)Andrew Talks to Chefs is sponsored in part by meez; please check out this revolutionary new interactive recipe database and tool for professional chefs and cooks.Andrew Talks to Chefs is a fully independent podcast and no longer affiliated with our former host network; please visit and bookmark our official website for all show updates, blog posts, personal and virtual appearances, and related information.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
8/20/21 Trita Parsi on the True Drivers of Middle East Instability

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 28:34


Scott interviews Trita Parsi about his paper concerning the intervention of Middle East powers over the last decade. Parsi and his coauthor Matthew Petti found that, contrary to the picture often painted of one malign actor driving all the instability, there are really six Middle Eastern countries engaging in a lot of foreign intervention. Iran, which is currently the U.S. foreign policy establishment's favorite villain, is no more interventionist than the other five. And that most instability in the modern Middle East can be traced back to the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Finally, Parsi talks about the Iran Nuclear Deal, which he says was gravely threatened when Biden dragged his feet at the beginning of his presidency.  Discussed on the show: “No Clean Hands: The Interventions of Middle Eastern Powers, 2010-2020” (Quincy Institute) “How to Make Iran Trust a New Nuclear Deal” (Foreign Policy) Trita Parsi is the president of the National Iranian American Council and the author of Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy. Parsi is the recipient of the 2010 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Follow him on Twitter @tparsi. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Scott Horton Show - Q & A Shows
8/20/21 Trita Parsi on the True Drivers of Middle East Instability

Scott Horton Show - Q & A Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 28:34


Scott interviews Trita Parsi about his paper concerning the intervention of Middle East powers over the last decade. Parsi and his coauthor Matthew Petti found that, contrary to the picture often painted of one malign actor driving all the instability, there are really six Middle Eastern countries engaging in a lot of foreign intervention. Iran, which is currently the U.S. foreign policy establishment's favorite villain, is no more interventionist than the other five. And that most instability in the modern Middle East can be traced back to the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Finally, Parsi talks about the Iran Nuclear Deal, which he says was gravely threatened when Biden dragged his feet at the beginning of his presidency.  Discussed on the show: “No Clean Hands: The Interventions of Middle Eastern Powers, 2010-2020” (Quincy Institute) “How to Make Iran Trust a New Nuclear Deal” (Foreign Policy) Trita Parsi is the president of the National Iranian American Council and the author of Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy. Parsi is the recipient of the 2010 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Follow him on Twitter @tparsi. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
8/20/21 Trita Parsi on the True Drivers of Middle East Instability

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 28:34


Scott interviews Trita Parsi about his paper concerning the intervention of Middle East powers over the last decade. Parsi and his coauthor Matthew Petti found that, contrary to the picture often painted of one malign actor driving all the instability, there are really six Middle Eastern countries engaging in a lot of foreign intervention. Iran, which is currently the U.S. foreign policy establishment's favorite villain, is no more interventionist than the other five. And that most instability in the modern Middle East can be traced back to the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Finally, Parsi talks about the Iran Nuclear Deal, which he says was gravely threatened when Biden dragged his feet at the beginning of his presidency.  Discussed on the show: “No Clean Hands: The Interventions of Middle Eastern Powers, 2010-2020” (Quincy Institute) “How to Make Iran Trust a New Nuclear Deal” (Foreign Policy) Trita Parsi is the president of the National Iranian American Council and the author of Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran and the Triumph of Diplomacy. Parsi is the recipient of the 2010 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Follow him on Twitter @tparsi. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Babylon Bee
Christian Comedy, Eating Bacon, and Performing at Prisons | The Nazareth Interview

The Babylon Bee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 49:41


On The Babylon Bee Interview Show, Kyle and Ethan talk to stand-up comedian Nazareth. They talk about performing on Zoom, finding Jesus, and being Middle Eastern. Nazareth has been a stand-up for over 25 years. He started his comedy career working with the likes of Chris Rock, Adam Sandler, and Kevin James. Once he found Jesus, Nazareth committed his life to Christ and quickly became one of the top Christian comedians in the country. He has written a book entitled Hope in 24 Hours. Check out his website for when Nazareth will be performing near you.  Kyle and Ethan find out about Nazareth's views on loving your neighbor and why we need a new website to help us choose our homes. Nazareth talks about what led him to Christ while working as a stand up comedian at the Los Angeles Improv. Once he came to Christ, Nazareth speaks on where God led him and how he has become one of the top Christian comedians in the country. Kyle and Ethan try throwing out topics to Nazareth to see if he can make anything funny.  In the Subscriber Portion, Kyle and Ethan find out who Nazareth's comedy heroes are. They talk about the strangest places Nazareth has performed comedy. Kyle and Ethan get Nazareth's worst bombing and worst show stories. They end the interview with the ever glorious 10 questions with an impassioned call to Jesus by Nazareth. Nazareth offers his email address if anyone wants to ask any questions about coming to Jesus: Naz@nazarethusa.com. 

New Books Network
Sara Reguer, "Winston S. Churchill and the Shaping of the Middle East, 1919-1922" (Academic Studies Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 70:11


In what ways was the course of twentieth-century Middle Eastern history shaped by the immediate post-World War I years at the dawn of the Mandatory Period? Winston S. Churchill and the Shaping of the Middle East, 1919-1922 (Academic Studies Press, 2020) examines the key developments in Iraq, Palestine and the Aegean as they were coped with by Winston S. Churchill, who served as Secretary for War and Air and as Colonial Secretary during 1919-1922. Author Sara Reguer depicts the diplomatic relationship between Churchill and the Zionist movement, the formation of a Middle East Department in the Colonial Office, the dangers posed by the Bolsheviks in the post-Russian Revolution moment, and the threat to British interests posed by Mustafa Kemal (Ataturk) of Turkey in a new light to stress the unique role in diplomatic history played by Winston Churchill as a creative, nuanced and sophisticated individual situated in the right place at the right time. Ari Barbalat holds a PhD in International Relations from the University of California in Los Angeles. He lives in Toronto with his family. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
Understanding the Psychological Impacts of Leaving Afghanistan, Part 2: Afghan Americans

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 37:20


Understanding the Psychological Impacts of Leaving Afghanistan, Part 2: Afghan Americans An interview with Sara Stanizai, LMFT, on how Afghan Americans are responding as the US leaves Afghanistan. Curt and Katie talk with Sara about her experience as an Afghan American therapist, looking at the misconceptions, lack of knowledge, and bias that can harm Afghan American clients. We look at clinical best practices for immigrants to the US, as well as some of the history and cultural norms of the country, the uniqueness of the experience, and the importance of finding primary sources to understand what is really going on. Sara also shares ideas for what we can do to support the Afghan people in Afghanistan and the diaspora at this time. It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Sara Stanizai, LMFT Sara Stanizai, LMFT (she/her) is a licensed therapist, clinical supervisor, and the owner of Prospect Therapy, a queer- and trans-affirming therapy practice based in Long Beach, CA, with a special focus on serving first-generation American and immigrant communities. A queer first-gen herself, Sara's clinical and professional work focuses on serving the Afghan diaspora, specifically, fellow Afghan-American women, and bicultural communities in general. She runs a weekly Afghan-American women's group and will be offering this free of charge in the coming weeks to meet the mental health needs of her community.  In addition to running her group practice, she is on the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Bisexual Task Force, a 501c3 organization that champions education, advocacy and visibility for the bi+ communities of greater Los Angeles. She is a certified cognitive therapist through the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and holds an advanced certificate in transgender affirming therapy from Widener University. She completed her MA in Clinical Psychology from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology and her undergraduate degree at Mount Holyoke College.  In this episode we talk about: Sara's experience being an Afghan American, especially since 9/11; as well as her response to the US withdrawal from Afghanistan Afghan Americans: the displaced among the displaced The real issues that folks in Afghanistan are facing, separate from the perspective of western cultural and the differences in the Afghan American experience Historical context for Afghanistan and the memories of Afghan Americans that shape their views: Culture, art, progressive, beautiful, diverse Not feeling Afghan enough or American enough The value of hospitality and how Afghanistan will always welcome Afghan Americans How Islam intertwines (but is not equivalent) to the Afghan culture Modesty and values and the bias toward Muslim women who wear headscarves Bias and misperceptions that can negatively impact clients The complexity of Islam and how it can be perceived both as beautiful and nature-loving as well as dangerous and militant The challenge to identity being an Afghan American The danger of pity coming into the therapy room The importance and nuance of educating yourself outside of the therapy room, while also encouraging the client of sharing their own experience. Not: What does this mean? Instead: What does this mean to you? The Afghan culture requires offering 3 times before determining that the answer is no Collectivism and the importance of family Impact of intergenerational trauma and military involvement in a home country Seeking out primary sources, with a focus on Afghan voices as the experience is truly unique Avoid sensationalized headlines and images Challenging what has been “truth” especially when looking at these sensationalized stories Ways of healing and clinical practice that are better aligned to these clients Prayer and healing within safe community spaces Considerations on scheduling session around prayer time and understanding fasting The lack of language for what is being experienced Offering connection, even when you don't know what to say The focus on trying to get family and friends out of Afghanistan, constantly watching the news Ideas for what you can do to support the people of Afghanistan The importance of legal support, translation services, and advocacy at this time The support group for Afghan women that Sara runs Our Generous Sponsor: Buying Time, LLC Buying Time is a full team of Virtual Assistants, with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support, customer service, and email management to marketing and bookkeeping. They've got you covered. Don't know where to start? Check out the systems inventory checklist which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated asap. You can find that checklist at http://buyingtimellc.com/systems-checklist/ Buying Time's VA's support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting, email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly. With a full team of VA's it gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available. Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need - https://buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation/ Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Sara's website: Prospect Therapy Sara's Instagram: Prospect Therapy Sara's group for Afghan Women Literacy and Love Hand to Hand Sadaqah group Instagram - ideas of how to take action from Sara Article from New York Times: How to Help Afghan Refugees and the Relief Effort   Relevant Episodes: Invisible and Scrutinized Iran, The News, and Our Clients   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group Get Notified About Therapy Reimagined Conferences   Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide is sponsored by Buying Time.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Buying Time is a full team of virtual assistants with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. from basic admin support customer service and email management to marketing and bookkeeping, they've got you covered. Don't know where to start, check out the system's inventory checklist, which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated ASAP. You can find that checklist at buying time.llc.com/systems-checklist   Curt Widhalm  00:31 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Announcer  00:34 You're listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:50 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast that deals with All Things therapists and the things that show up in our office and in our continuing conversation around the world events happening in Afghanistan, and our reactions. And as we've continued to do throughout our podcast history of trying to bring in very timely episodes to help our community. We had spoken yesterday with Rob Bates about working with military members. And we are also very fortunate to have one of our very close friends from the show. Sara Stanizai is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and owner of Prospect Therapy talking about working with Afghan Americans and people from the community of people who have personal ties to Afghanistan, whether familial or friends. And helping us to be able to work in the healing process for this community as this very deeply and troubling time for them is coming out. And we're just so thankful for the expertise and the opportunity to have this discussion here. Today's thank you for joining us, Sara.   Sara Stanizai  02:13 Thanks for having me.   Katie Vernoy  02:14 There's some some things to talk about today. And, and so I want to just open this space. And the first question that we ask all of our guests is Who are you? And what are you putting out to the world?   Sara Stanizai  02:26 I'm a lot of things. I'm glad to be here. And I'm glad to have this conversation. It is a very weird time. But you know, a lot of the organizers that I'm in communication with reminded us to take every opportunity and say yes to the interviews and make sure that this issue gets accurate visibility. And we hear from people who are affected by it. Like  Curt said, when he introduced me, my name is Sara Stanizai I'm a licensed therapist, and I run a group practice based out of Long Beach, California, we focus on serving the queer and trans community as well as first generation Americans like myself. Over the past almost two years, I have focused more on serving the African American community, my family's from Afghanistan, my sister and I were both born here, born in West LA. But both of my parents were born and raised there and came, you know, in 79, escaping something similar to what's going on now. But I think, you know, it's also true that we haven't really seen anything like this. So what I put out into the world is my goal is to really help people understand and accept all the different parts of their identities. And for myself, my relationship with the Afghan part of my identity has been, you know, a lifelong process. And so I'm really happy that I get to help others on that same journey as well.   Katie Vernoy  04:02 I started watching your video on your website around accepting your identity as an Afghan American and how hard that has been for you. What do you feel comfortable sharing about that now?   Sara Stanizai  04:15 Yeah, it's really interesting. I am comfortable sharing about it, which in itself is testament to how I've kind of integrated that as part of myself. But I work with a lot of African Americans now and we're all at different parts of that process. There are some common themes such as, there's so much mystery around Afghanistan and people didn't know what it was that never heard of it. Many people don't understand Islam in general. And that was hard to. It was hard to kind of be the only one that a lot of people knew. But many times that's actually preferable because then when people did become aware Around 911. And now after this, their understanding and the associations they make with a when it's done are misinformed often or, you know, there's a whole spectrum. But it's we have had to kind of choose between either being invisible or being hyper visible for terrible things that have nothing to do with it. So, you know, I work with immigrants and children of immigrants, people come from all over the world, but the Afghan experience is very specific, because, you know, I refer to us as the displaced among the displaced, because we come from a place that it's almost as soon as our families left it, it almost, it feels very inaccessible. And I do also want to point out the fact that, you know, I was born and raised in the US, I do come from a very westernized culture, people are always surprised, at how, frankly, like, educated I am, and but I have tattoos and but I I like to think I have cute style, but   Katie Vernoy  06:03 you definitely have cute style, let's like, straighten that out right now, you definitely have cute..   Sara Stanizai  06:12 But people are often surprised by that. And it's true, I think, you know, we in the diaspora have very specific experience that is even removed from what's happening in Afghanistan, and I think we owe a lot of respect and deference to the people who do still live there, you know, probably had opportunities to leave and chose not to run away and leave a home that they have known their whole life. Just one example, you know, people are very excited to see, of course, you know, resistant to the Taliban, or, or, you know, people doing things that are very dangerous and risky. But that's not how everyone feels, I don't want to stand because there's been fighting and war for so long that, you know, it's easy for me to go to the protest this weekend. And, you know, that's not lost on me, I want to and I feel proud to and I can't not do that. However, I have an immense amount of privilege doing that, where I think our responsibility in the diaspora is to amplify Afghan voices as much as possible, not just Afghan American, or Afghan Canadian, or any other immigrant voices   Curt Widhalm  07:26 is part of this mystery for many of us in the West, around Afghanistan, that it's a place that for the entirety of my lifetime has been a place of conflict, very confusing, and not, it's a country that's not set up in the same way that many of us here in the West really conceptualize things. And I think it might help our audience a little bit to talk about Afghanistan, even before the US occupation and operations over there. Of a little bit more of what some of these generations of people from Afghanistan, Afghan Americans are facing in this very transformative change, not just here in the last week, but really over the last 40 years.   Sara Stanizai  08:17 Yeah, you're talking about the Afghanistan that my dad and mom would tell me about when we were growing up. that exists, you know, only in their memories, and Afghanistan is not a perfect place. It there was and has always been corruption in the government Find me a government that doesn't have corruption, there is racism and intolerance with among different tribes and communities within Afghanistan there have been lots of imperfect things. But what I remember, what I grew up hearing about was a very I guess I'll use the word modern. I don't know why I need to like point that out. But just a really beautiful society. Both of my parents, you know, my parents met and fell in love at Kabul University. I see pictures of them. My mom also had a really great sense of style. I really think it's an Afghan thing. To make sure we look good. I went to a protest last two weekends ago definitely saw very nice handbags. I was like, Yes, I'm among Afghans like this. We always make sure we look at but you know, my mom would tell me that she was obsessed with Elizabeth Taylor and the Beatles and also Afghan culture and music as well. My dad in many places in the country and actually came here twice. The first time he came as a Fulbright scholar and lived in Seattle. So he did a year of high school in Seattle, actually, with the Vonnegut those running, which is wow, favorite story. And he went back but then when my parents married then they came shortly after that, as well. So a very progressive, open society similar to many other places around the world, really beautiful tons of art and culture, and tons of history. What a lot of what I often tell my clients and the people I work with their concern is, I don't feel Afghan enough. And I don't feel American enough. I don't speak the language. I don't feel connected to my culture. I didn't think that was allowed, and no one really encourages where I grew up. And so we have, we're stuck in this in between place. And what I remind people is that it is never too late. Afghanistan always welcomes us. Our culture always welcomes us. That's a defining characteristic of Afghan culture is hospitality. It's super annoying when you're like, a 12 year old, and everybody's offering you food multiple times. And you're like, Okay, I cannot eat anymore, but it is very rude. I think a lot of children of immigrants have that experience. But hospitality and generosity is a hallmark of Afghan culture. And that also applies to us that our our Motherland, and our culture always welcomes us, no matter how long it takes. So I grew up understanding Afghanistan as a place full of ancient culture, some really good looking jewelry, really strong fighters, and just a very diverse, beautiful place. And that place doesn't seem to exist right now.   Katie Vernoy  11:35 Seems like there has been such a huge transformation of the perception of Afghanistan. And you mentioned September 11. I, we've got a couple of other conversations that are relevant that will we'll link in the show notes that I think provide we have one that's about Iran, and one that's about the MENA culture generally. But I think it's it's something where when you talk about this, and each time you kind of, well, I don't know why I need to say modern or I don't know why I need to say it this way. And it seems like there is a perception. And this is kind of a different take on or what therapists get wrong question, because we asked that for most folks, but it seems like there is this misperception and this deep seated bias that has plagued Afghan Americans, at least since September 11, if not, prior to that. So can you talk a little bit about that?   Sara Stanizai  12:24 Absolutely. That's a really good point. I think there's also a misconception to something that is very intertwined with Afghanistan, which is Islam. You kind of can't, they're not the same thing, but you can't talk about one without the other. And of course, just like any community, there is a spectrum of how devout people are, how conservative people are, what cultures they choose to continue, you know, and that's always people's choice. I think people in the West love to latch on to these sensationalized out of context, images and swoop in with savior savior ism about well, we have to liberate people from their own culture. And I've been thinking about this a lot like, the whole modesty thing about people wearing headscarves or wearing modest clothes. Like, we were all cheering when Billy Eilish was doing it on the cover of whatever magazine and her political statement about wearing baggy clothes when nobody can objectify her body. But when all countries have women do it, it's apparently Oh, poor things. Anyway, that's a side note. that's a that's a blog post in the making. But I think there has been, it's we, unfortunately, we we suffer from this either complete invisibility and mystery, or that's not my concern, or that's over there. Or just this really distilled, stereotypical highlighting of things that may or may not even be part of our culture, some of those things are part of our culture, and there's nothing wrong with them, many of those things are not. And I had a conversation with a client who is really exploring Sufism, and mysticism and other aspects of Islam, which my dad is a scholar and will take any opportunity to teach me slash lecture me about. So I grew up with a very peaceful, merciful beautiful, like nature based version of Islam. That is very, I mean, I just have warm fuzzy feelings about it all the time. And I know my peers did not. So it's for me personally, it's really hard to wrap my head around the idea of Islam as some sort of oppressive scare, you know, God fearing like any sort of, there's a spectrum you can be very conservative about certain things but that has never been part of my experience and not part of a lot of people's experience. And so I think I do feel this obligation to say like, you know, not all Muslims. Because I'm sort of it's either there's no idea of who we are. Or I have to overcompensate for these negative ideas about who we are. And we, politically, culturally, socially, have never been able to define ourselves to other people. Right? As long as I've been alive.   Curt Widhalm  15:32 Normally, during an episode like this, we'd ask some question around what are some cultural considerations that working with a specific population like Afghan Americans would be? And it seems like you're answering that question for us as far as providing a lot of open space and let somebody define what what it is because our ideas might be very much entrenched in kind of what we've seen, and especially for those of us who really only paid attention to Afghanistan from American occupation sort of perspective. I don't know how to answer this without kind of asking the same question anyway. In addition to clients being able to define what their Afghan identity is, are there some cultural considerations that therapists should be aware of when working with people from this community as far as their approach to mental health treatments? and things that therapist can be prepped with?   Sara Stanizai  16:40 Yeah, that's a great question. You're asking me this today. And what's top of mind for me right now is, don't feel sorry for us. Please don't bring pity into the therapy room, we can feel it from a mile away. And it's condescending we'll say, That's number one. There are some things that apply to working with any sort of immigrant community from anywhere, which is definitely educate yourself outside of the therapy room, understand some basic history, vocabulary, you know, political, religious, cultural players, just so that you have a frame of reference at all. But then, yes, it's okay. In therapy, when you're working with anyone, I think, to let your client educate you about their own personal experience, but not about not having them be a representative and educate about the experience of their country or their culture as a whole. And that's a different, that's a pretty specific, it's a nuanced thing to do. Which is, rather than saying, what does that mean? I'll say, what does that mean for you, for example, also understanding the like I said, for example, generosity, and hospitality is a huge part of Afghan culture. So, you know, most of us, you know, grew up, were born and raised here. So it's not a huge cultural shift, but understanding that that might be what they're experiencing at home. Or if you do if you are working with an immigrant, a recent immigrant even to understand the power structure that we talked about the privilege in the therapy room is always there with someone who is very deferential or polite. It's going it's going to take you there's this thing and Afghan culture, you have to always offer three times. And so you might think you're saying, well, I asked them and they seem fine with it, you know, you may have to double check, or triple check, just to make sure that the person is comfortable. If there's something else that they want to tell you. Again, I'll say that, that would more apply to someone who's closer to Afghanistan, but it is something that I see with my family all the time. And again, the the collectivism and the obligation to family, the importance of honor and pride, I wouldn't necessarily say it's as much about, we do love being boozy. We do care about like financial success. And you know, but it's all in service of respect and honor for our family, that there's a lot of pressure to not exclusively, but to have a strong connection to your community through your cousin, your hundreds of cousins that everybody has, or, you know, every Afghan knows every other Afghan basically. So to not shy away from that, like I did for a long part of my life. So those are some things that kind of come to mind when I think about what you would need to know if you were working with an Afghan American point.   Katie Vernoy  19:51 You mentioned kind of doing some research and kind of the Google search as well as you know, kind of informed research. If this is someone's Google Search. If this is the beginning of their Google search, are there things that you think that therapists should know when working with an Afghan American client or topics that they may want to plug into their search engine that we can help them with right now?   Sara Stanizai  20:15 They will definitely want to read more about the impact of intergenerational trauma and military involvement in their home country. They will definitely want to seek out primary sources, basically, so people who are Afghan or Afghan American, there are a lot of, you know, we have many sister cultures, but there is nothing else like being from Afghanistan. Yes, the US has done this in many other countries. But it is, there are many parallels, but it's not the same. So just saying like, Oh, well, I had a Middle Eastern client or I had an Egyptian client, or That's great. That's their experience will be completely different from ours. So just making sure you hear as much as you can from actual Afghans and Afghan Americans, to keep on the lookout for sensationalized headlines and images, and to really understand, to challenge your own biases. You know, I think I'm still learning history as well. I'm by no means an expert on anything other than my own experience. But I think when people do, it doesn't take very much digging to realize, whoa, a lot of the things that I was told or I just assumed to be true, actually have nothing to do with I want to thank Oh, I think it's pretty eye opening for people.   Curt Widhalm  21:37 Oftentimes, there are healing practices or, or ways of healing that people from various cultures embrace that we are woefully not even taught to think about and ask, in our cross cultural practices. Are there any unique things to consider as part of this grieving process, part of this healing process that made me things that we would encourage, if we are working with clients who are Afghan American right now?   Sara Stanizai  22:12 That feels like a pretty tough question to answer? How do we cope with something on this scale? As you were asking me, I was remembering that prayer is pretty healing for a lot of people, not for everybody. Some people are not religious. But I think the ritual and the act of prayer is really healing for people. Being in community spaces. So making sure that, you know, if you're not Afghan as the therapist, you might say, like, of course, I'm here to support you, in my way, but do you have connection? Do you have safe connection to people that do accept you and that you feel comfortable with, and it's not always accessible to people, a lot of people, my you know, when I was growing up, I went to a pretty progressive, friendly mosque. But I was rebellious, I just like, hated it, I just, it was very boring, I never wanted to go. But if I did have that, that would be one of the first places I would go. But that's not the case for everybody. So that's something to ask about. You may or may even affect the time of day that you have your session. If someone is devout, and they're praying five times a day, your session May, you may need to just make sure your session time doesn't interfere with prayer time. And also remembering that for many Muslims, fasting is an act of devotion, and it can be very healing and cleansing for people and it can give a sense of I don't want to say control, it can give a sense of agency and at a time when everything feels out of control.   Katie Vernoy  23:54 What is it... What is it important for those of us who are not African American to make sure that we're checking in on and for us to know about the experience over this past week? And an honestly for much longer than that, but what is it important that we're aware of that maybe we don't know as a non Afghan Americans?   Sara Stanizai  24:20 What I've been thinking several times this week is that there isn't there doesn't seem to be language for what we're experiencing. It is it feels very fundamental and it feels painful on a large on a scale that I can't it's really hard for me to even grasp myself, let alone describe that there's, it's, it's new, it's brand new, it's well, it's not new, but it's very present. It's fresh, and it feels like people are reaching out and saying I didn't know What to say, but I wanted to say something. And those messages are helpful. And it's hard for me to I kind of go back and forth, because people are reaching out and saying, Well, what can I do. And part of me is like, thanks for asking, I am in the midst of a lot of things right now between trying to make sure that my family is safe and alive. And some of them are seeking emergency visas, some of them do not want to leave, I'm, I'm looking at my phone all day making, just waiting for them to have service to. So I can just hear from them to make sure that they are alive. So you may want to do a Google search and just look for fundraisers, look for advocacy efforts, there are scripts laid out for people to contact people in the government to make sure that visas do get approved and that refugee are welcomed. There is that really exciting fundraiser for the rescue missions. And it's got $5 million, or something, which is pretty badass, which is like, it's amazing. I wish I could just like see who that pilot is, which is great. But there are also millions of people who either don't want to, or are not able to leave. And, you know, I said this earlier, I don't think people should. You don't have to be American to deserve aid. You don't need to be a refugee to deserve aid. So I really encourage people to give to the efforts that are on the ground that are staying in front of Stein, who are really handing food and clothes and water and medicine to people who don't have those resources.   Curt Widhalm  26:43 Are there any particular organizations that you would encourage our listeners to look at supporting?   Sara Stanizai  26:49 Yeah, there are so many literacy and love is one organization, although I heard that they recently paused their donations until the banks open, but check with them hand to hand. So DACA group is another organization that has been in Afghanistan, since before this, and their hand to delivering supplies to people. I think there are a lot, Instagram is lit right now. So there are a lot of financial donations that people can make. There are organizations throughout the country, throughout the US that are coordinating airport pickups, and hotel vouchers. And you know, if you have a bag of clothes, you're taking to Goodwill, you know, they're taking everything because people are showing up with nothing. I would also really encourage anybody who has access to legal services, if you are a lawyer, you don't have to be an immigration lawyer, really helping people understand their just the basic visa paperwork will be very, very helpful. People are overwhelmed and a phone call. And a plan will help people a lot. Attending protests and just showing up and being visible is really, really helpful because that leads to media exposure, and then that leads to people deciding that it's worth it, but it looks good for them to say something about when it's done. So we'll take it. There are so many, making sure that you are either letter writing or phone calling or emailing members of Congress to make sure that people are able to come in expanding the process that it's pretty limited about what people are qualifying for right now. Half of my family qualifies, there are some people who may not also anybody who is a Farsi speaker or a pesto speaker. You don't have to be a lawyer, you don't have to know how to do anything. If you can do translating services. All of these are ways that people can help. So I think if you want, you can definitely look, look on my Instagram, but there are a ton of Instagram, Instagram accounts that have been doing this activism for a long time. We're glad that people are paying attention to it. Now. It's a little frustrating that people think this is brand new or that they're suddenly interested, but we'll take it Hey, well, we'll take it. And the other thing I would say is, you know, we're so organized and we're still activated right now. I'm myself personally, I'm even new to this, but it feels like home I mean, it just feels like whenever I see all these other African people I'm like it just it feels like I've always been here. So I would really encourage people like to get involved. You don't have to earn your way in you don't have to qualify you don't have to be like welcomed in like we Afghans love allies and we love welcoming people. So that will be really helpful. Definitely check out a lot of the organizers who were coming together on social media. And if you have any questions you can always just ask   Katie Vernoy  29:58 before we close up because I think this is an important conversation that needs to remain out there. There needs to be support given all those things. But before we close up, are there any... Are there any, any additional points that we need to make? Are there anything? Is there anything else that our modern therapist needs to know?   Sara Stanizai  30:18 No, I don't know. I'm tired.   Curt Widhalm  30:23 Even on that now, when we were first responding to this news, Katie and I, and the balance between wanting to share this message and hating this message, while also knowing that people like Sarah are responding in a time of very, very complex feelings, and not always knowing kind of the best balance that we can bring as hosts of this show. And it's with a tremendous amount of gratitude and respect for Sarah and all of the other people going through a time of existential crisis and just complicated feelings around so many things that we hear you that you're tired. We're, here we're trying whatever it is that we can even in perfectly to help with everything. And for you to show up, and share your story, share what you're going through in order for the rest of us to be able to step in, so that way, hopefully, you can get some rest, and you can get some resolution, and know that our modern therapist community is grateful for you and your time and willing to step up. And that's our call to action for our community here is find what you can do. It might be time, it might be action, it might be money. But there are a lot of people going through some very, very complicated feelings right now. And always, whenever you can step up and do what you can. Yeah, we will include some links in our show notes to the organizations that Sara has suggested. And as well as her practice, which I do want to give you an opportunity to let people know where to find you and your practice.   Sara Stanizai  32:37 Oh my gosh, that's right. I didn't even mention my women's group. Yep. It is the best. It was the best when I started it, it is the best every time I run it. It is more timely and needed now than ever. But we have been meeting. Oh my gosh, this sounds like something I probably don't want to puton the air, like we have been meeting online and secret. These Afghan women, we were toying with the idea of putting together a retreat, and we were like, oh, where can we go do it and somebody was like, they're never gonna let 12 Afghan women on the same flight ever. So we laughed at it. Nobody else laughs when I tell that story, because they're like, I don't know if I'm allowed to laugh about it. But it was. But yeah, we have been meeting in a peer support group, I run a shorter six week version of it. And then I run a three to four month version of it. So we're actually wrapping up one group now. And so when I run it again, when I get my life together and wrap this group up, I'm going to be offering it free of charge. And that's for any Afghan women. You don't have to be in California, you don't have to be in the United States. You just have to be awake at the time that we offer the group. And I'm putting the details together now. But I'm anticipating there'll be a pretty big need. And it's just one of the joys of my life. To run this group, I make sure that I speak to every single group member first to kind of matchmake the right people in the right group. So everybody feels comfortable and safe and is challenged a little bit but not too much. I love running groups, and we get lit like it is everybody is so happy when they sign on to group. First everybody checks if you know their cousin or family members in the group, which I don't think has happened yet. But then everybody realizes how much we have in common how much our stories parallel. They're like, I didn't realize that you could be Afghan and blank like every other thing that we are and it's really really healing and beautiful and now more than ever. It's it's been a gift for myself to be able to kind of give to this to my community. But also for me to heal because nobody else gets it. And so when we, you know, this week when we've been having sessions with my one on one clients as well, it's just been, nobody else gets it. And so it's been very I feel really grateful that this has been put in place that I put these in place by me. I did it, but but I'm really grateful that I have it now.   Katie Vernoy  35:26 So where can people find about the group about your practice? Like, what what, what are the actual contact info there?   Sara Stanizai  35:33 Yes. The best place is our website, which is prospecttherapy.com. That's also my Instagram handle, which is prospect therapy. That's me, I run that account. It's not some company. So if you message me there, I will answer, but you can find all of our information on our website, and information about our group about therapy, about everything that we're offering. Those are the two best places to look.   Katie Vernoy  35:58 And any final thoughts?   Sara Stanizai  36:01 Thanks for having me. It was nice to talk to you two.   Curt Widhalm  36:04 We will include all those links in our show notes at mtsgpodcast com. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy and Sarah Stanizai.   Katie Vernoy  36:14 Thanks again to our sponsor, buying time buying   Curt Widhalm  36:17 times VA support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems website, admin and hosting email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve by ensuring that your back office runs smoothly with the full team of vas gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available.   Katie Vernoy  36:45 Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need. That's buyingtimellc.com forward slash book dash consultation once again, buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation.   Announcer  37:01 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Big Kat Lounge
SHIMANI Smart Skincare Talks with Stacy Pavlova

Big Kat Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 29:08


Welcome to the Big Kat Lounge Podcast Episode 55 with Stacy Pavlova

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Prof Vrinda Narain: uncertain times for Afghan women

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 22:42


Concerns are high for the women of Afghanistan following the Taliban's swift takeover of the Middle Eastern country.  Professor Vrinda Narain says women were subjected to persistent human rights violations under the Taliban's brutal rule between 1996 and 2001 and, despite claims they've changed their stance on women's rights, the Taliban's efforts to commit thousands of women to sexual slavery demonstrate quite the opposite.

Minority Reportz Podcast
I WANTED TO GET AWAY FROM THE NAME MY OLD MAN GAVE ME SO I CAME UP WITH A STAGE NAME-Antonio Leon (Actor) Ep.65

Minority Reportz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 80:00


Mona invites her co-star from The Rookie on ABC, Antonio Leon, to discuss why he chose the name Antonio Leon even though he's Persian, Hollywood's perspective on Middle Eastern actors and growing up without a dad.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL FOR ALL THE LATEST INTERVIEWS WITH THE HOTTEST ARTISTS AND CHANGE MAKERS. If you enjoyed our podcast, please SUBSCRIBE ON APPLE PODCAST AND LEAVE A 5 STAR WRITTEN REVIEW. FOLLOW USYOUTUBE: @MonaShaikhComedianFACEBOOK: @MonaShaikhComedianINSTAGRAM: @monascomedyTWITTER: @monascomedyWEBSITE: www.minorityreportz.comLISTEN & SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY PODCAST. NEW EPISODE EVERY WEEK ON SPOTIFY, ITUNES AND Apple Music and all major streaming services.***MINORITY IS THE NEW MAJORITY***

Aria Code
Crisis in the Kremlin: Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov

Aria Code

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 33:43


Perhaps no opera better reflects the questions and contradictions at the heart of Russian history than Modest Mussorgsky's historical epic Boris Godunov. Based on the play by Alexander Pushkin (considered by many to be one of Russia's greatest writers), it's a meditation on power and legitimacy, and a portrayal of a pivotal period in Russian history -- The Time of Troubles.  When Tsar Ivan the Terrible dies without an heir, Boris Godunov is elected tsar, casting doubt on his legitimacy. He rules well for a few years, but then all hell breaks loose, with a famine, a revolt, and a pretender claiming to be the real tsar. As his country's problems compound, Boris confronts his feelings of powerlessness in the monologue, “Dostig ja vïsshei vlasti.” Host Rhiannon Giddens and her guests explore the nature of power, the question of legitimacy, and how an opera can shine a light on a nation's past as well as its present. The Guests Bass René Pape (A.K.A. “The Black Diamond Bass”) has been singing the role of Boris Godunov for 15 years. Like many of the kings and rulers he's played on stage, he sees Boris as someone who has all of the power but none of the joy. In addition to his velvety voice, Pape is also known for his collection of rubber ducks, and even has one in his own image, the PapeDuck. Dr. Simon Morrison is a professor of music history at Princeton, specializing in Russian and Soviet music. He fell in love with Russian music when he was an undergraduate and wrote his dissertation on the life and work of Sergei Prokofiev. His most recent book is Bolshoi Confidential, a history of the Bolshoi Ballet, and he is currently writing a book on the history of the city of Moscow, which finds him studying 11th century documents written on birchbark. Dr. Shoshana Keller is a professor of Russian, Soviet, Eurasian, and modern Middle Eastern history at Hamilton College. She first became interested in Russia after getting to know the music of Shostakovich and Stravinsky while playing French horn as a kid, and she was fascinated by pictures of Russian onion domes in a social studies class. She loved the Russian language too, but found the grammar devilishly difficult and immersed herself in its history. She has written multiple books, and is working on an experimental mapping project of the nations in Kazakhstan

The Commercial Break
EP93: Fire Up That Cuban!

The Commercial Break

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 57:30


Bryan and Krissy discuss Suicide Squad, Bryan's son following in his mediocre footsteps and the incredible new fashion stylings of Fred Durst. Then Bryan tells Krissy about his last minute invitation to have dinner with Mark Cuban, Falon Fatemi and Maz Jobrani at the Podcast Movement Expo. It's Bryan's brush with fame and, as expected, he blew it! It's a predictable outcome to an unusual day in the life of The Commercial Break podcast. LINKS:Watch this episode on YoutubeTCBTV-minusSponsorFUM (Use Code TCB)MEMPHO Music Fest (Oct 1st-3rd 2021)Subscribe to The Commercial Break Podcast Youtube ChannelNew Episodes on Tuesdays and now Fridays everywhere!Text or leave us a message: +1 (470) 584.8449FOLLOW US:Instagram: @thecommercialbreak @bryangcomedy  @tcbkrissyClubHouse: @bryangreen @tcbkrissyClubHouse: The Commercial Break Club on Clubhouse! (home of live recordings)Twitter: tcbbryanFacebook: The Commercial Break PodcastYouTube: Youtube.com/TheCommercialBreakEmail: info@tcbpodcast.comA Chartable Top 100 Comedy Podcast#1 Trending Comedy Podcast Worldwide! (Chartable)#1 Trending Comedy Podcast U.S.(Chartable)An Apple Top 100 Comedy Podcast Top 1% Downloaded Podcasts, Worldwide (ListenNotes)A Hot 50 Podcast (Podcast Magazine)

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Good Food
Home economics, nonstick pans, Middle Eastern dishes, and fish butchery

Good Food

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 56:35


Chefs Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis pay homage to their Middle Eastern heritage in their sophomore restaurant cookbook, “Bavel.” In a year of hours clocked in the kitchen and embracing DIY projects, journalist Danielle Dreilinger traces the history of the surprising science behind the field of home economics. TASTE editor Anna Hezel weighs in on the benefits of nonstick cookware. Australian chef Josh Niland approaches fish butchery with sustainability and suggestions on how to use every component of a fish. Market correspondent Gillan Ferguson talks about melons with farmer Alex Weiser and Chef Sarah Hymanson of Kismet. Los Angeles Times restaurant critic Bill Addison heads south to Anaheim for Yemeni cuisine.