Podcasts about emea

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Best podcasts about emea

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Latest podcast episodes about emea

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1849: Cloudera - Why Acceleration Shouldn't Run Rampant Without Control.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 17:38


With the announcement of the UK publishing its first AI Strategy - a ten-year plan fit to make the UK an AI Superpower - it will be to businesses' detriment to not capitalize on the power of AI and automation. However, with this rapid shift towards automation, one of the primary areas of value is often overlooked — enabling humans to focus on what matters and strategically control the acceleration. Romain Picard, Vice President EMEA, of the recently acquired multi-billion-dollar enterprise data cloud company Cloudera, believes in a world dominated by robots, chatbots, drones, and other machine learning and artificial intelligence-powered technologies, the power of human touch is still relevant. Romain joins me on Tech Talks Daily to share his insight on why acceleration shouldn't run rampant without control. We also discuss how it is essential that, alongside automation, we form bold strategies that keep our focus on what's essential — human ingenuity. Finally, we talk about the ability automation provides for teams to bring their A-Game more, increase productivity and growth. Maybe now is the time for businesses to reimagine their culture to one that uses automation to its fullest value and celebrates human capabilities at their best

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Global Solutions, Episode 29: Remote Work and Telework Rules in EMEA

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:11


In this episode of our Global Solutions series, Chris Andersen and Andre Appel address laws regarding remote work in Europe, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates that were implemented as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The speakers focus on four issues that might arise in workplaces that have implemented remote work arrangements: (1) how employers and employees agree on teleworking arrangements; (2) whether employers must pay to implement a remote work arrangement, including payment for the necessary equipment to facilitate work from home; (3) employers' workplace safety obligations with regard to employees who work from home; and (4) employee morale issues that might result from teleworking arrangements.

The FTX Podcast - Builders and Innovators in the Cryptocurrency Industry
The FTX Podcast #94 - Michael Cahill Head of EMEA for Jump Trading

The FTX Podcast - Builders and Innovators in the Cryptocurrency Industry

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 50:35


Welcome to episode 94 of the FTX Podcast with special guest Michael Cahill and your host Tristan Yver.Michael is the Head of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa for Jump Trading.

Down The Rabbit Hole
What's Wrong with the Marketing Industry (Ft. Marcus Hemsley)

Down The Rabbit Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 51:40


DTRH Episode 43 What's Wrong with the Marketing Industry Ft. Marcus Hemsley Marcus Hemsley, Founder of Fountain Partnership, and master of evidence-based marketing has an intense debate about what is broken in the marketing industry. Learn the greatest mistakes, how to avoid them, and the best practices to ensure your success. Get the results you deserve by focusing on the outcome. Don't mislead yourself by focusing on the marketing activity itself.    Key Takeaways:  The greatest mistake in marketing is focusing on activity, not outcomes.    "Founder's Disease" is a terminal illness. It's NOT about YOU.    Serve instead of sell when creating your content and messaging.  Speak to your audience as if you're having a face-to-face conversation.    "The biggest mistake in marketing is focusing on activity, not outcomes."  - Marcus Hemsley    About Marcus  With over 12 years of experience as the Founder of Fountain Partnership, Marcus Hemsley specializes in evidence-based marketing that brings the best return on investment for his clients.  Marcus love helping individuals, businesses and organizations achieve their aspirations. It's what drives him. He's passionate about taking bold action on the climate emergency and always keen to talk about solving for it.  Marcus's company, Fountain Partnership is a Google International Award-Winning Digital Marketing Agency. In December 2016, they were awarded Best Search Agency by Google at their Premier Partner Awards in Dublin. In 2017, they won Google's Award for Growing Businesses online in EMEA.    Feel free to connect with Marcus Hemsley or Rob Turley on LinkedIn or follow Rob @RobTurley2 on Twitter!  #DTRHpodcast #Marketing #MarketingStrategy #EvidenceBasedMarketing #DigitalMarketing #DemandGeneration #MarketingSolutions

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan
The Neglected Art of Holding Your Sales Team Accountable

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 47:54


My guest for this episode is Tom Castley, VP EMEA for Outreach. Tom has 20 years of experience supporting sales organisations in Europe's tech space. Prior to outreach.io, Tom was the VP EMEA @ Xactly & more recently the VP EMEA @ Apptio. https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomcastley/ 

Marketplace All-in-One
Don’t count on working from home forever

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:45


From the BBC World Service: Global companies are having to backtrack or delay their return to office plans as the omicron variant continues to spread. Google’s EMEA boss explains why digital skills are so important in the pandemic era. As many offices continue to sit empty after two years, one man in Scotland is looking to capture the sounds of traditional workplaces.

Marketplace Morning Report
Don’t count on working from home forever

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:45


From the BBC World Service: Global companies are having to backtrack or delay their return to office plans as the omicron variant continues to spread. Google’s EMEA boss explains why digital skills are so important in the pandemic era. As many offices continue to sit empty after two years, one man in Scotland is looking to capture the sounds of traditional workplaces.

Talk Microsoft 365
S02E30 - #CollabSummit Interview mit Cosima von Kries

Talk Microsoft 365

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:02


Hallo liebe Talker:innen, wir waren auf der #CollabSummit 2021 in Düsseldorf und haben uns dort viel mit der Community getroffen. Unser letzter Gast der Reihe "Interviews von der Collab Summit 2021" ist Cosima von Kries. Cosima ist viel in der deutschen Community unterwegs, ganz oft auf Meetups zu treffen, wo sie über die Themen #WomenInTech und #MicrosoftViva spricht. Darüber hinaus ist sie bei #Nintex Director für den Bereich Solution Sales in EMEA. In unserem Interview sprechen wir über die Community und wie ihre Leidenschaft zum Saxofon spielen in der Community bekannt geworden ist. Wie immer freuen wir uns über Euer Feedback, gern via Social Media über die unten genannten Kanäle oder LinkedIn. Viel Spaß bei unserem Talk, Michael und Thorsten -------------------------------------------------- Link zu Cosima auf Twitter: https://twitter.com/cosimavk Link zu Cosima auf LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cosima-vonkries/ -------------------------------------------------- Link zum Blog findet ihr hier: https://talkm365.net Auf Twitter unter: @TalkM365 Twitter Michael: @plemich Twitter Thorsten: @thorpick Link zum YouTube-Kanal: https://link.talkm365.net/YouTube -------------------------------------------------- Reference-Links: Music Intro/Outro: Vacation - AShamaluevMusic Music Link: https://soundcloud.com/ashamaluevmusic/vacation Music Background: Inspirational Corporate Ambient - AShamaluevMusic Music Link: https://www.patreon.com/ashamaluevmusic

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast
Episode 186: Céline Laffargue on Role-based Learning to Drive Productivity

Sales Enablement PRO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 18:59


Shawnna Sumaoang: Hi, and welcome to the Sales Enablement PRO podcast, I‘m Shawnna Sumaoang. Sales enablement is a constantly evolving space, and we’re here to help professionals stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices so that they can be more effective in their jobs. Today, I’m excited to have Céline Laffargue from Salesforce join us. Celine, I would love for you to introduce yourself, your role, and your organization to our audience. Céline Laffargue: Thank you Shawnna, I'm very happy to be with you today. I’m Céline Laffargue, I’m a sales enablement leader for all the delivery in Europe, EMEA to be exactly precise, for all the content for our own sales leaders at Salesforce. I joined the company more than four years ago. I started after 20 years in tech as a seller myself, I was a sales leader and a global account manager. I started at Salesforce as an account executive, so a salesperson at Salesforce, and I had the chance and the opportunity to move to enablement, in which I have been working for three years now and I’ve moved from different roles. As you can hear by my voice or maybe by my accent, I’m French, so first I was working with French teams for all the sales, also solution engineers, and all the onboarding for every person at Salesforce France. Now, I’ve got to wider role dedicated to sales leaders, but only for EMEA. SS: Well, I’m extremely honored to have you here. I’d love to dive in. As you mentioned, one of your core responsibilities at Salesforce as you got started in enablement was really around onboarding new hires. From your experience, how does onboarding help amplify sales productivity for new hires? CL: It’s an excellent question, Shawnna, because we know onboarding is key. From the first moment, first minute, first time you’re in a new company, you first need to be really welcomed. I think this is also key to understand the culture of the company. For us at Salesforce, it's something we really focus on a lot. Onboarding is always at stake because we know different people are joining the company, different backgrounds, there are different ways of learning. It’s important to remember this. Today, Salesforce is providing a tremendous platform. Of course, for our customers, but internally we use the platform to train and to onboard all the employees. We have digital content as every company has today, we believe, and we use this platform you may have heard about called Trailhead, which is a public platform where you can be trained on Salesforce. We use our Trailhead, called My Trailhead internally, to train people, to onboard them, to help them understand what their role is in the company. What is the product? How are we organized? Everything is of course accessible for everybody at any place. It's a virtual world today, it’s important to have this ability to do so. We use our tools to train and to onboard everybody. Of course, it depends on what your role is. I mean, role as in if you are an individual contributor or a leader, but also in which business unit you will belong to at the end. We don’t have the same paths of training and learning for someone who is going to be a solution engineer and run demos to customers as for an account executive who would be a seller and needs to understand what the methodology of selling at Salesforce is and how he can, or she can succeed in the role. SS: Absolutely. What would you say are some of the key components to an effective onboarding program? How do you go about delivering onboarding programs to really ensure that there is a consistent experience for new hires, and it really starts to drive towards that consistent performance that you were talking about? CL: So first you asked me about the key component. The key component is really the first thing we do at Salesforce. It’s explaining the culture of the company, our core values. We have four core values and it’s really completely embedded in the DNA of anything we do. The first one is trust, and trust is key to everything we do. It is for customers, but it’s also internally. It’s the trust of people you work with, trust in the fact that you can talk about what’s happening for you and you can make your points. It’s very important. The second one is customer success. Everything is driven for customer success and designed to help this. The third one is innovation, and I think Salesforce has shown year over year how innovative we can be. We try to find every new solution. I believe you heard about the fact that Slack is now a Salesforce company. Embedding a company like Slack makes big changes for our customers, but obviously it does internally too. The last one’s the last but not least value, which is equality. We want equality to be seen at every level of everything we do in the company. We can say we have a fifth core value, which is sustainability. It’s not written in the same way, but it’s also in everything we do because we are a net zero carbon company today and we keep on working on this. First of all, the key component of onboarding is to understand that those values, it’s not just something written on a wall, it’s really something we do and embedded in every action we can do. Then for the onboarding itself and how we can succeed, the best design people already do the job, so it’s really something that we can validate with them because the results you see in the field. I mean, you need to see what’s happening with your customers to see how you grow your business to make sure that what you learn is bringing you value. Obviously, we have the best design depending on the role you have to play in the company. We use, of course, our data because our platform is full of data and we’re able to follow up on every personal journey of learning and onboarding. We have a dedicated webinar for all newcomers and then you be sorted by role. If you are a manager, not a manager, if you are a leader, not a leader, whatever you do, you will have dedicated webinar and dedicated content to absorb and to understand. At the end, we are working on an analytical way of understanding what went well, what didn’t go well, what can we improve. We are running different types of programs and at each program, you can be sure that we ask for feedback. We are very keen to know what is the CSAT of the session, and we ask all the attendees to our trainings to our enablement moment to understand, what can be done differently? What do we need to enhance? Where do you think there is room for improvement for our team for enablement? We want to understand what they’re really looking for to get what the real outcome is that they want. We are very happy because we have very good CSAT coming from the content we deliver today, but we keep on an answering, and we keep on moving forward because we want this to be a great success. SS: Absolutely. It sounds like a very impressive program, and I love the way that you guys really tailor the learning experience and learning journey, I think as you called it, for every new hire. It’s quite impressive. Now, beyond just improving new hire productivity, you had also focused on training as a key lever to drive overall sales productivity. How can training programs reinforce skills and performance expectations? CL: This is exactly the point. We are always trying to find a way to link that what you learn in a program is really driving your day-to-day success and the overall success you can get in a year. I'm talking mostly about sales because this is the population I’m working with; all of my audience is mainly sales and obviously sales leaders today. How do we make sure that it’s linked? We are using lots of tools today. The virtual world opened many new perspectives on this type of usage and apps. We do a lot of simulations, and you use simulations to really have people active during the training. We know that today, just delivering your content when you have a speaker and people listening is not enough. You need to have the interaction, you need to have people involved, and you need to use all the tools you can. Today we use Kahoot to make it fun with quizzes and learning, which is a tool that everybody’s using around the world. We use all the facilitation tools in Google Meet or Zoom because we need to also be able to send a poll to drive people in breakout rooms. We try to use the technology as nice tools to have and nice tools to use to make it more interactive. We use simulation tools to help people to learn by being active. They need to listen, they need to watch videos, they need to answer questions. They will get the results of the questions they ask at the end as a gathering of information we had, and then they can learn because sometimes you need to make mistakes if you want to learn about it and if you want to change the way you’re doing things. Otherwise, it’s very difficult to know that you’re learning something because if you don’t jeopardize what you thought was the right way to do things, you don’t learn a new way of doing. We are in a technology business, and technology business is moving very fast. We change every day. I mean, business is changing every day, so we need to also help our leaders, ourselves, and everybody at the company to make it more in a wider way, but we need everybody to be able to change, to learn differently, and to use all the tools. We really love when people can practice because this is where you really try it out. We do practice with pairs, we try to set up sessions where people can be two, three, or four, and there is a role play with a scenario at the beginning. Everybody will be in a different role, but everybody will go through the role he or she is supposed to have in the company, for instance a sales leader, and practice understanding how questioning can be important, how doing things differently can bring value. This is, I think, where making people active in the way they learn can make a difference and can really bring great learnings, and sometimes a breakthrough. We have feedback from learners who say it’s great because I never thought doing this thing like you told me to or like you explained to us and it’s really making a difference for me today. SS: I think that is phenomenal. Now, you also have a bit of experience yourself from a sales professional background. What are some of the challenges salespeople might experience in applying what they learned in training to day-to-day roles to improve performance, and how can enablement help salespeople overcome these challenges? CL: We hope they are practicing what they learn. This is a very good point. I mean, the biggest part of my life I’ve been a seller, so going through the roller coaster of emotion you can have with a customer when you need to fight for deal. You need to be very bold; you need to be creative; you need to find ways to sell differently. I’ve been there and I can really tell you what Salesforce is offering, and the methodology of sales is tremendous. I say that because I’ve been to different companies, I’ve seen different ways of doing it, and I can really tell you it’s really fantastic. How are we making sure they learn? This is exactly what I was saying before, we ask them to practice in a training session to not be shy to do the same in a real-life situation. When do we do this practicing moment, learning moment, we will ask them, what will you do in real life? This simulation, it’s exactly when you’re a pilot for a plane, you don’t fly a plane the first day you start to train as a pilot, you go through a simulation. This is exactly the same. We tell them to use a simulation but do it like it’s a real-life decision you’re making. It’s a big difference because if you take the simulation on saying, oh, it’s a simulation, I don’t care, you won’t get a lot out of it. If you really see the simulation as a point where I can do and try things that I’m not really sure that I can do in the real life because I will be taking a risk, this is wonderful because you practice differently. You are bolder in the decisions that you make and then you can see the result. Sometimes the result is not the one you want it or the one you expected. It can be good, or it can be bad, but at the end you’ve tried, and you learn because you’ve tried. SS: I love that approach. Now, how do you ensure salespeople have the right resources and content to continue learning and reinforcing their knowledge beyond just the initial training events that you provide? CL: We are working at Salesforce, specifically the global enablement team is working on a basis of what we call a 2-2-2 model. I will explain what it means. We will, as per any company, every quarter you need to achieve a quota, you need to do some a different type of business. I won't explain to you how the business is working, but ever quarter we apply the 2-2-2 method saying we only give an element of training on no more than two days during the two first weeks of the two first months of the quarter in order to have free time for ourselves and our teams to close deal sand be with customers at the end of each month. Of course, the last months of the quarter must be focusing on customers, on closing, and on deal-making and not enablement. What we do during those two days, we assign automatically some content to people depending on their role, global content for the company. I will give you an example, which is the corporate pitch Salesforce is providing to customers, to the world is something we work on every year. Everybody needs to go through the corporate pitch, and this is something for the whole company, for instance as an example. On the other hand, personalized content for sellers. If I can give you an example, we ask them at the beginning of the year, the beginning of the year at Salesforce is February 1, we will have revised new content to offer. We are currently working on them, about, for instance account planning. All the sellers will have to go through a training, so virtual training, exactly what I was talking about, simulations and quizzes and questions you will ask, and they will do the training about account planning at the beginning of the year. Why? Because it’s the first quarter of the year and you need to build a strategy that you want to deploy to your customers. This is how we make sure the content is really personalized and is also I would say time personalized, meaning we don’t do the same with our customers at the beginning of a new year as we do know in the first quarter of the year, which is focusing on closing the deals. SS: Absolutely. That makes 100% sense. Now, just to close us out Céline, this has been a fantastic conversation. I’d love to understand from you with productivity being one of the key goals for your onboarding and training programs, what are some of the ways that you measure how productive salespeople are and the impact of your programs on that productivity? CL: For the productivity, first we did tremendous work and the global enablement team worked on the new methodology that we started a year ago. By using this new methodology, we were able to reduce onboarding ramp up time. We moved from around five or six months to something closer to three or four months to really get everything you need to know, and you need to learn. I will always say the best way to learn is to go into the field, to see the customer, and to do it. Practicing is the only way to learn. You can make mistakes, but that’s fine because you have tools, you have assets, you have everything available for you to know exactly what you should do at each step with your customer. This methodology is a fantastic foundation for everybody to understand and to learn. Of course, first we can see the productivity and time it takes to be enabled and to understand. Then we will also have very dedicated tools for following a customer opportunity. Then we use scorecards, which can help us to see exactly, what are the questions you need to ask to your customer? What are the key points or the key meetings you need to have to move forward the stage on your opportunity? If you don’t do it, we can see that using the scorecard can really help the account executive and their sales leaders to have a great vision of where they stand with the opportunity and what are the next actions that they need to take to make it a success and to win the deal at the end. This is also very visible because we know today by using this kind of scorecard, it’s times three on capacity of winning the deal and it’s more deals won at the end. We are able to see that by using the data and this is why Salesforce is so fantastic, which is the fact that everything is embedded in our platform. All the information is in the same place. It’s a single source of truth and it’s moving forward every day because people or the teams are adding activities, information, and they feed the information in the platform. That’s why and that’s how we can have great data dashboards and vision of the result. SS: I think that’s phenomenal. Céline, thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate you joining us and speaking to our audience. CL: Thank you so much. I’m very honored to be with you. Also, I the hope that many people will be interested to know more about Salesforce. SS: To our audience, thanks for listening. For more insights, tips, and expertise from sales enablement leaders, visit salesenablement.pro. If there’s something you’d like to share or a topic you’d like to learn more about, please let us know. We’d love to hear from you.

GATEMERI
#REDIFFUSION- Sandrine Chauvin: Directrice de la rédaction EMEA & Amérique Latine LinkedIn - Savoir cultiver sa propre forêt

GATEMERI

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 41:33


#REDIFFUSION Pour ce nouvel épisode, j'ai le plaisir de recevoir Sandrine Chauvin, Directrice de la rédaction Linkedin pour l'Europe, le Moyen Orient, l'Afrique et l'Amérique Latine. Pour préparer ma conversation avec Sandrine, j'avais demandé à mes auditeurs de me remonter leurs questions sur le réseau social Linkedin qui a beaucoup évolué ces dernières années et c'est ce sujet dont on traite dans la première partie de l'épisode: Comment se créer un réseau efficace sur Linkedin? Comment asseoir sa crédibilité et son expertise? Quels réflexes doit-on avoir pour une recherche d'emploi efficace? Quels sont les contenus à privilégier? Sandrine nous donne des conseils concrets avant de revenir sur son parcours si riche. J'ai voulu rencontrer Sandrine car elle incarne le modèle de l'intrapreneur: à chaque fois qu'elle arrive dans une entreprise elle crée des projets de A et Z et elle nous donnera des conseils pour réussir ses projets intrapreneuriaux. J'ai beaucoup aimé mon échange avec Sandrine qui fait preuve d'une humilité et d'une détermination rares mais je ne vous en dis pas plus et vous laisse découvrir ma conversation avec Sandrine ChauvinRéférences: Linkedin de Sandrine Podcast "Le profil de l'emploi" Recommandations de lecture Le Petit Prince - Antoine de Saint Exupéry Let's keep in touch! Si le podcast vous plait le meilleur moyen de me soutenir c'est de me laisser un avis 5 étoiles sur Apple Podcast pour aider les autres à découvrir le podcast, ça me donnera un coup de boost donc n'hésitez pas :) Pour me poser des questions ou suivre les actualités de Gatemeri c'est par ici: Réseaux sociaux: Instagram, Linkedin, Facebook Site internet: www.gatemeri.com S'inscrire à la Newsletter

Silicon Alley
94: The Ultimate Fundraising Pitch Tool | Nic Mahaney, OpenScout & OnePager

Silicon Alley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 49:59


94: In The Ultimate Fundraising Pitch, Nic Mahaney (@nicmahaney), a NYC-based founder, joins host William Glass to discuss what it is VCs truly want to see in a pitch. Nic shares his entrepreneurial journey and how one business actually led him to discover a much-needed product in the Venture Capital space. A fun wide-ranging conversation that dives deep into entrepreneurship and fundraising. Follow the Silicon Alley podcast wherever you listen to podcasts. __ Visit SiliconAlleyPodcast.com to become a guest and sign-up for the newsletter. Follow on: - Instagram: http://bit.ly/SIliconAlleyIG - LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/SiliconAlleyLI - YouTube: http://bit.ly/SiliconAlleyYouTube Our Sponsors: Ostrich helps you go from being one of the 92% of people who fail to achieve their financial goals to one of the few who does. 80% of Ostrich members are on track to achieve thief financial goals. Sign up for free at https://www.getostrich.com About Nic Mahaney: After studying Finance at Georgetown, Nic started his career in Product at i-Comm Connect, a telecommunications startup, as employee #5. At i-Comm, Nic led the product team and headed global partnerships for EMEA before they were acquired in early-2020. Shortly after, Nic, Adam, & Jack built Open Scout as an open-sourced venture scout network on college campuses around the world, where they found a huge problem in how information about startups was shared with investors - so they built OnePager! Website: https://onepager.vc LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/nmahaney Twitter: @nicmahaney Silicon Alley is a Financial Glass Production --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/silicon-alley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/silicon-alley/support

Talk Talent To Me
JP Morgan Head of EMEA Tech Recruiting, Paul Humphreys

Talk Talent To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 30:01


In this episode of Talk Talent To Me, we are joined by Paul Humphreys, J.P. Morgan's Technology Recruitment Manager for all of EMEA. Paul has truly done it all, from studying politics to starting his own recruitment agency, to heading up jobs at Sky and Amazon, and finally settling on a prestigious position at J.P. Morgan. In our conversation, we discuss the pros and cons of working for a global company with larger resources, what cohort hiring is, and why it's such a big focus for Paul, as well as what he believes the standard industry practice should be when dishing out application rejections.  Key Points From This Episode:   Paul Humphrey details his career trajectory from studying politics to working for J.P.Morgan. What appealed to Paul about working for J.P. Morgan despite having no experience in finance. What he is responsible for within the company. The pros and cons of working for a global company with resources versus a startup. What cohort hiring is and why it's currently number one on Paul's agenda. Paul's intentions for the future of recruitment within J.P.Morgan. Why hiring managers should be educated to screen candidacy in, rather than screening out. The opportunity for internal mobility at J.P. Morgan and how they look at both the internal and external market. The process by which existing J.P. Morgan employees are considered for other roles. Where Paul feels the firm could improve in terms of recruitment. Which kinds of mobility are the most and least common within J.P. Morgan. Why Paul believes that giving detailed and honest feedback when a candidate's application is rejected should be standard industry practice.   Tweetables: “As a recruiter, what's always been the most interesting part of the career is trying to wrap my head around, firstly, technology, and then secondly, the business, and to understand how technology is valuable to that business and the role that it plays.” — Paul Humphreys [0:07:27]   “Speed is important in talent acquisition. The speed with which you can bring a candidate through a process [and] the speed with which you can respond to your client's needs.” — Paul Humphreys [0:11:29]   “There is no such thing as a bad candidate. It's about matching candidates with your requirements and also the reverse, whether your opportunity matches what a candidate is looking for.” — Paul Humphreys [0:16:16]   “Our role as recruiters is to try and ask challenging questions to the clients and make sure that they're really assessing internal and external candidates in a similar way.” — Paul Humphreys [0:21:48]   “To shift that focus away from one-off interactions with candidates to a more open and constructive dialogue, that would be a great achievement.” — Paul Humphreys [0:29:23]   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   Talk Talent to Me Paul Humphreys on LinkedIn J.P. Morgan Hired

VALORANTING
Episode 81: ACEND, ENVY, SENTINELS, and more may lose millions? RIOT Skin Money Questions!

VALORANTING

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 145:43


The Champions Skins making money for teams was a solid idea, but things get rather messy when the question of who should get the money from the sales start being asked. Do players deserve a lion's share of it, or do organizations have the right to claim it all? (skip to 2:13:38 for the discussion about it) If this week's show is any indication, the offseason is going to be an absolute topsy turvy time of roster upheavals. Teams big and small are making splashes, T1 shifting players, Fnatic getting rid of coaches while 100Thieves promotes them. Nitro and Patiphan return to their old games and Pyth ends up.... in Singapore? What? We also take a long look at the upcoming 2022 season joined by Team Liquid's analyst @Howsthebacon9 which brings us a lot of fear and trepidation of the setup in NA because it look a bit bleak while EMEA has some real cool stuff happening, and who knows maybe Yoru will finally be changed for the better by the time the January signup dates for next season roll around! Live on Twitch (http://www.twitch.tv/dnpeek) every Tuesday at 2pm EST. Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/dnpeek), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dnpeek/), and check out our website (https://www.dnpeek.com/).

TP Talks - PwC's Global Transfer Pricing podcast
Episode 79: Special Edition – TP in the oilfield services industry (Part 2)

TP Talks - PwC's Global Transfer Pricing podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 21:43


In this TP Talks episode, Lauren Dangelmayr (Principal, Transfer Pricing - PwC US), Hamish McElwee (Partner, Transfer Pricing - PwC Australia), Szymon Wlazlowski (Transfer Pricing - Energy, Utilities and Resources Leader for EMEA), Ivan Williams (Partner, Transfer Pricing -  PwC Canada), and Thushara Corea (Director,Transfer Pricing - PwC Canada) discuss the oilfield services industry, focusing on planning related to leasing and IP, ESG, as well as pragmatic approaches to transfer pricing documentation.Support the show (https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/tax/transfer-pricing.html)

#WorkBold Podcast
How Twitter's Office Portfolio Supports WFA

#WorkBold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:08


Tracy Hawkins, Vice President of Real Estate & Workplace and Remote Experience at Twitter joins Bold Founder Caleb Parker for the fourth episode of Season 6 to discuss how Twitter is supporting its employees through its work from anywhere policies. Tracy is one of the leading voices on LinkedIn and Twitter about the #FutureOfWork. In this episode the two talk about company culture, creating environments where people feel taken care of, and workplace choice. Tracy shares some interesting insights on how Twitter has embraced remote work and how they approach that with their global teams to ensure everyone feels supported and connected to Twitter's culture no matter where they choose to work. Tracy shares her insights on how their real estate portfolio is evolving and what the future of work innovation looks like at Twitter. Connect with Tracy Hawkins on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracy-hawkins-5b303326/  Connect with Caleb Parker on LinkedIn  https://www.linkedin.com/in/calebparker/ If you have any questions or feedback on this episode, email podcast@workbold.co   Value Bombs: I've become a big fan of yours on social media. You're one of the leading voices in the future of work conversation on LinkedIn and Twitter, obviously often engaging in healthy debate and sharing how Twitter is evolving beyond hybrid working in the workplace. - Caleb We like to call them work from home because remote kind of makes it sound like there's a centre of gravity, and those folks were on Mars somewhere. - Tracy I would say the biggest learning for us is definitely that flexible work is here to stay, that it's not a perk anymore. It's an expectation for employees. - Tracy Company culture isn't about brick and mortar and offices. It's about common values, clear goals and showing you're inclusive... It's all part of making people feel an equal part of the company. - Tracy And it's been this debate about return to office or versus work from home or work from anywhere, but that's not the debate. It's about choice versus no choice. - Caleb The biggest thing that you can do to make your work from anywhere at work from home policy, a success is to make sure that your execs are on board and that they're doing it too. - Tracy It's not about ping pong tables in the offices anymore. You know, it's about what are we doing for our employees to make them feel like human beings and to make them feel like they're cared about. - Tracy  Resources: Twitter #WorkBold ranked in top 1% of business podcasts TSK Documentary Shout Outs: Dave Cairns Jack Dorsey  About Tracy Hawkins Tracy has been active in all aspects of corporate real estate and facilities management for over 15 years. Her skills encompass, project management, design, and construction, leasing and transactions, workplace operations, and the remote experience, leading corporate real estate teams in the film, fashion and technology sectors. Tracy has been leading Twitter's real estate teams for the last eight years, leading their EMEA and APAC real estate and workplace teams. She moved from Dublin, Ireland to San Francisco in 2014 to head up their design and construction team during a period of explosive growth, which ultimately led to her returning from maternity leave to assume leadership of their global real estate and workplace team in March of 2016.  Now Tracy is now responsible for all workplaces at Twitter, be that in an office or remote. Her goal is to ensure their employees have the choice and agility to do their very best work, regardless of geography. Tracy's married to Grant, and they have a five-year-old daughter. She's on the board of Blue Bear School of Music and the Twitter Foundation.  Tracy has been an active member of CoreNet for over 10 years, both in London and the Bay area. Follow Tracy Hawkins on Twitter About Caleb Parker https://www.linkedin.com/in/calebparker/ Caleb Parker is an American entrepreneur in London, and Founder of Bold (acquired by Newable/NewFlex in 2019).He believes in "challenging the status quo" and is a champion for entrepreneurial and innovative thinking.Caleb has served as founder, Board member, advisor, investor and consultant to numerous startups and small businesses, and has a keen focus on innovation and technology, with interests in the MICE market, Space-as-a-Service, and the future of work.Caleb has been a guest lecturer, speaker, and moderator for topics such as entrepreneurship, the sharing economy, the future of work and commercial real estate at academic institutions and large corporations. He regularly takes the stage at numerous trade conferences as keynote speaker, MC, host or facilitator.Earlier in his career, Caleb was named one of Savannah, Georgia's “40 under 40” business leaders" in 2006 after launching two successful small businesses in the city's booming hospitality industry. A year later he moved to Washington, DC to join the The Regus Group DC management team. In 2009, Caleb co-founded a flexible workspace consulting firm where he brokered flexible workspace and advised businesses on agile working strategies.Caleb is one of the first licensed commercial real estate agents to speak on the flexible working trends and the rise of flexible workspace, and has been quoted in numerous publications. Timestamps [3:21] Interview begins [5:30] Tracy explains Twitters remote work policy and how Twitter work hard to make sure that the work from home population have access to company culture [14:20] Tracy talks about why companies should embrace work from anywhere and hybrid working practices [16:20] Tracy talks about how flexible working has helped Twitter's recruitment across social media channels [18:50] Tracy explains how work from anywhere will impact on Twitter's real estate portfolio [23:15] Tracy talks about the role hospitality plays in the office and the future of work innovation [27:40] Caleb asks how other companies can move to work from anywhere policies [29:00] Caleb asks his quickfire round questions Sponsors Headline Sponsor: TSK TSK creates inspiring workplaces for some of the world's biggest brands across the UK and Ireland, They've been working for 25 years to deliver the best employee experiences and the vision of their clients. Not only do they create great places to work, TSK share workplace content every week from the latest data to inspiring spaces they've designed and built. You can read their latest insights at www.tskgroup.co.uk or check out their LinkedIn and Instagram pages to become a follower, fan and friend. Fortune Favours the Bold Bold merges property management & Space-as-a-Service to drive asset value and help office customers grow faster. Now part of NewFlex (www.workbold.co)  Future Proof Your Portfolio with NewFlex NewFlex delivers and manages a range of branded solutions for every type of building, in every type of location, for every type of occupier. Including the flexibility to develop your own brand. All enabled by flexible management contracts where we are invested in making money for you. (www.newflex.com) Launch Your Own Podcast A Podcast Company is the leading podcast production company for brands, organizations, institutions, individuals, and entrepreneurs. Our team sets you up with the right equipment, training, and guidance to ensure you sound amazing. (https://www.apodcastcompany.com) Subscribe to the #WorkBold Podcast https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/workbold-podcast-6868874680095277056 

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast
Major central banks' tolerance of higher inflation has reached the limit: The Global Markets FX Week Ahead Podcast

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 14:47


The BoE, ECB and Fed have all provided hawkish policy updates over past week. It has been clear that combating upside risks to inflation has become the most immediate policy concern, especially for the BoE and Fed. In contrast, the BoJ understandably continues to sound more relaxed over inflation risks. Lee Hardman, Currency Analyst, discusses the implications for the FX market and remaining risks to watch out for over the holiday period with Simon Mayes, Director of MUFG's Global Customer Marketing Group for EMEA in London. Disclaimer: www.mufgresearch.com (PDF)

Die Boss - Macht ist weiblich
Angelika Gifford, EMEA Vizepräsidentin bei Facebook

Die Boss - Macht ist weiblich

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 61:37


Oft blicken die Gästinnen bei "Die Boss" zurück auf eine Krise, Angelika Gifford steht genau jetzt mitten im Sturm: Die hochrangige Facebook-Managerin spricht mit Gastgeberin Simone Menne über die schweren Vorwürfe gegen den Konzern, berichtet von schlaflosen Nächten. Und sie erzählt, welche Reaktionen sie vor Jahren auf ihren Wunsch nach einem Sabbatical bekam, und warum sie früher lauter "kleine Angies" einstellte und das heute nicht mehr tun würde.Eine Produktion der Audio Alliance. Gastgeberin: Simone Menne. Redaktion: Sarah Stendel, Sarah Klößer. Mitarbeit: Alissa Großkopf.Produktion: Aleksandra Zebisch.Unsere allgemeinen Datenschutzrichtlinien finden Sie unter https://art19.com/privacy. Die Datenschutzrichtlinien für Kalifornien sind unter https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info abrufbar.

TP Talks - PwC's Global Transfer Pricing podcast
Episode 78: Special Edition – TP in the oilfield services industry (Part 1)

TP Talks - PwC's Global Transfer Pricing podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 21:59


In this TP Talks episode, Lauren Dangelmayr (Transfer Pricing Principal, PwC US), Hamish McElwee (Transfer Pricing Partner, PwC Australia), Szymon Wlazlowski (Transfer Pricing - Energy, Utilities and Resources Leader for EMEA), and Ivan Williams (Transfer Pricing Partner, PwC Canada) discuss the changing regulatory environment around the world and the impact on the oilfield services industry.  The speakers also discuss the controversy environment and how companies in the industry are managing risk.Support the show (https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/services/tax/transfer-pricing.html)

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan
From Belfast kid to VP EMEA @ Oracle

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:52


My guest for this episode is Paul McCartan, VP of Application Sales EMEA @ Oracle. Paul joined Oracle in 1994 and has worked his way from, Support analyst (1994) - Account Manager (1999) - Sales Operations Director (2002) - Snr Director EMEA Sales (2005) - VP Sales (2012) - VP Demand Generation (2015) to VP Application Sales EMEA (2019) Connect with Paul - https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-mccartan-a75276/ 

Coffee with Crane
Overcoming supply chain challenges in the EMEA region

Coffee with Crane

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 6:53


Tune in and listen to Crane Worldwide Logistics' experts talk over diverse Logistics and Supply Chain topics. In this episode, we hear from Crane Worldwide Logistics' Regional Vice President of Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, Jason Stretton! He'll share views from the past year, look ahead into the new year, and give us a glimpse at how EMEA will continue to grow.

VALORANTING
Episode 80: ACEND CHAMPIONS! Defeating Gambit and what went wrong with Team Liquid!

VALORANTING

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 153:34


This week on VALORANTING it's time for Champions! Hold on a minute checks notes.... Champions for a third straight week?!? Alright if you say so, I guess we do have to spend a bunch of time getting MitchMan back on the cast finally to gloat about how great EMEA is with Acend's victory over Gambit. We recap all of the matches in the playoffs to see just how KRU managed to bulldoze the competition all the way into the Semifinals, how Cloud9 and Team Liquid both disappointed in the end, and why Team Secret just might have all the ingredients to be next year's KRU surprise. Thanks to @aEvilcat and @RyanCentral for providing their insights into the matchups, with the fantastic matches and Riot's commitment to building up just a spectacular looking stage, we're all hyped about finally getting crowds to next year's tournaments! Live on Twitch (http://www.twitch.tv/dnpeek) every Tuesday at 2pm EST. Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/dnpeek), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dnpeek/), and check out our website (https://www.dnpeek.com/).

Value Inspiration Podcast
How creative still remains a mystery to many – and why that's holding us back in many ways

Value Inspiration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 48:26


This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to help us maximize the impact behind all our creative decisions, and my guest is Anastasia Leng, Founder, and CEO of CreativeX.Early in her career, Anastasia gained experience in brand strategy at Interbrand, spent 5+ years at Google, where she worked on every ad tech and analytics product, led entrepreneurship efforts in EMEA, and was responsible for early-stage partnerships for Google Voice, Chrome, and Wallet.In 2012 she co-founded Hatch, one of Time Magazine's Top 10 Startups to Watch in New York and one of four most innovative retail companies.Today, she's the Founder & CEO of CreativeX, an automated creative excellence platform used by the world's most loved brands. The company is on a mission to advance creative expression through the clarity of data. And that inspired me, and hence I invited Anastasia to my podcast. We explore what's holding companies back in their growth because they're guessing what works/what doesn't work in relation to their creative efforts. Anastasia shares how she solved this problem internally first, and how investors then made them aware of the size of this problem globally. She explains how this triggered a major pivot and the effort and determination it took to get to Product-Market-Fit. Finally, she shares some of the secrets she learned in turning her company into a remarkable growth story.Here are some of her quotes:We make a lot of promises and have a lot of efforts to try and do things like be responsible citizens as brands to promote different people of all different colors and orientations. And yet, when we look at the content we put out, we don't always tell that story. And I think part of it is because it has become very, very difficult to analyze content at that scale and in an objective way. We can help o even get an initial pulse check as to how you're doing on things that don't even relate to marketing performance. What is the message you're really sending, I think is the broader question. And how do we help you figure out whether or not the messages that you are really sending actually are in line with the brand values and the things that you would like to be sending?During this interview, you will learn four things:Why having an honest perspective about how your company is really running is key. Staying in that bubble and thinking you've got everything together will just make the mess bigger. Why we're often the biggest obstacles in our own way Make the big bets. Think ‘what's the worst that can happen and push forward.' Your reflection will tell you ‘why didn't I do this sooner'Why success often starts by cutting things down to the coreFor more information about the guest from this week:Anastasia LengWebsite CreativeX See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Working It
Say goodbye to the weekend

Working It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 16:40


Spreading your working hours over five, six or seven days is now an option for thousands of employees at Arup, a global design and engineering company, based in London. In this episode, Isabel talks to Diane Thornhill, Arup's HR director for Emea, about the company's “Work Unbound” seven-day work week experiment in Australia and the UK. Diane talks about the importance of senior leaders ‘leaving loudly' themselves. That means signalling publicly that it's OK to step away from the desk and take flexible time off.But how does a seven-day work week affect teams' communication and collaboration? And do people really want to be able to work all the time? Isabel chats to the FT's Emma Jacobs, who has written on Arup, about the perks and pitfalls of an always-on work week. Plus, the importance of transparency - in a flexible workplace, it's vital to be open with our teams about where and when we are working. Is that always a good thing?We love to hear from you: email us at workingit@ft.com or Isabel directly at isabel.berwick@ft.com. Follow @isabelberwick on Twitter or Instagram.Mentioned in the podcast: Emma's article on Arup's seven-day work week https://www.ft.com/content/1405cb93-6625-4834-ac07-09e4062e7aa7Arup's own website https://www.arup.com/news-and-events/arups-new-hybrid-work-model-allows-6000-uk-employees-to-choose-their-working-daysThe FT's Sarah O' Connor on the mysterious decline of our leisure time https://www.ft.com/content/9df289b9-d425-49e6-899f-c963b458625fPresented by Isabel Berwick. Editorial direction from Renée Kaplan. Assistant producer is Persis Love. Sound design is by Breen Turner, with original music from Metaphor Music. Produced by Novel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

JSA Podcasts for Telecom and Data Centers
JSA TV Europe Interview - Educating the Next Generation of Data Centre Masterminds

JSA Podcasts for Telecom and Data Centers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 18:18


Sitting down with JSA Europe, Andrew Stevens, president and CEO of CNet Training, on the current state of the data centre market skills and how the next generations are being geared up for a digital future. He also discusses how CNet Training helping with that by providing communications based education and training across the entire US, EMEA and AsiaPac regions. The education is the most comprehensive available to the Digital Infrastructure Industry including specifically the Data Centre Sector and includes the award-winning CNCI, CNIT, CNIDP, CDCTP, CDCDP, CDCMP, CDCEP, CDCAP and CDCSP qualifications and culminates in our Masters Degree in Data Centre Leadership & Management. SUBSCRIBE to JaymieScottoTV for the latest Telecom News: https://www.youtube.com/JaymieScottoTVHOMEPAGE: http://www.jsa.netLIKE JaymieScottoTV on FACEBOOK:  https://www.facebook.com/JaymieScottoandAssociatesFOLLOW JaymieScottoTV on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/jsatv

The PRovoke Podcast
Being Human In A Tech-Enabled World: Leadership

The PRovoke Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 55:41


Being Human in a Tech-Enabled World is a four-part video series from PRovoke Media in partnership with AxiCom, on how different aspects of life and work – as humans and communicators – have changed since we were thrust into a virtual and hybrid world and how they might change again in the future, via the power of technology. This fourth and final episode features AxiCom president of Europe Kate Stevens and Shane Ryan, global executive director of the Avast Foundation – which advocates for digital citizenship and inclusive, respectful and safe online experiences – in conversation with PRovoke Media's EMEA editor, Maja Pawinska Sims. The trio look at the challenges and reality of leading businesses and agencies in such tumultuous times: how does leadership steady the ship and navigate forward, and build a working environment that will survive the longhaul and not be a short term fix?

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan
Stefan Zorn: Head of Sales EMEA @ Andor Technology

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 55:30


My guest for this episode is Stefan Zorn, Head of Sales EMEA @ Andor Technology. Prior to his current role, Stefan was a Sales Manager @ Thermo Fisher for 6 years.  Connect with Stefan - https://www.linkedin.com/in/stefanzorn/ 

The Hacking HR Podcast
The Hacking HR Podcast - Episode 342

The Hacking HR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 17:11


Interview with Sudhir Singh – Sudhir is a Board Member at NHRA. He is a strategic driver, trusted partner, and an action biased leader with 20 years of global HR experience. He has built and led global teams across Americas, EMEA & APAC for over 10 years. He loves working in fast paced and complex business environments. Most of his experience has been with the growth stage startups and mid-sized private/public organizations.

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS
teissTalk: Vendor diversity - onboarding and offboarding security vendors

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 44:30


This is the audio-only version of our twice weekly cyber security talk show, teissTalk.  Join us twice a week for free by visiting www.teiss.co.uk/talk On this episode, we focus on the following news story;Online Payment Fraud Surges by 208% Ahead of Black Fridayhttps://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/online-payment-fraud-black-friday/ The panel discussion is titled “Vendor diversity - onboarding and offboarding security vendors”https://www.teiss.co.uk/teisstalk/vendor-diversity-onboarding-and-offboarding-security-vendors/ This episode is hosted by Geoff White https://www.linkedin.com/in/geoffwhitetech/  Our Guests areTee Patel, vCISO, Iron Oak Securityhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/teepatel/ Alan Jenkins, Advisor, Security Architecturehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/alanjenkins/ Dawid Kowalski, Senior Technical Director, EMEA, FireMonhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/dawidkowalski

Reorg Ruminations
EMEA Core Credit: Restructuring Proposals From Lowen Play, Amigo

Reorg Ruminations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 15:02


Each episode of Reorg's biweekly EMEA Core Credit podcast series features a deep dive on issues and companies in the distressed and high-yield space. This week, we take a look at new restructuring proposals from German gaming group Lowen Play and U.K. consumer lender Amigo. If you are not a Reorg subscriber, request access here: go.reorg-research.com/Podcast-Trial.

Hey Salespeople
How To Avoid Getting Lost in Translation With Frances Arville

Hey Salespeople

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 23:48


Frances Arville is an EMEA sales manager for G2, a company that helps buyers make smarter software decisions based on authentic peer reviews. In this episode, Frances talks about the challenges of being an American salesperson in Europe and how to overcome cultural barriers in an international environment. Visit Salesloft.com for show notes and insights from this episode.

VALORANTING
Episode 79: SENTINELS & ENVY UPSETS! VALORANT Champions Group Stage Review!

VALORANTING

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 159:56


Let's be real, Group stages for Champions has been absolutely wild. Sure sure, the EMEA squads of Gambit, Liquid, Acend, and surprisingly Fnatic has all made it out as #1 seeds, but they everyone dropped maps or showed weaknesses while doing so. NA has struggled (RIP Sentinels and Envy), but that means that we finally have smaller regions representing in the playoffs. Well, all except Korea with Vision Strikers getting bounced out, someone please make sure Achilios and Paperthin are doing alright out there ok? Live on Twitch (http://www.twitch.tv/dnpeek) every Tuesday at 2pm EST. Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/dnpeek), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/dnpeek/), and check out our website (https://www.dnpeek.com/).

Screaming in the Cloud
Building a User-Friendly Product with Aparna Sinha

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 42:53


About AparnaAparna Sinha is Director of Product for Kubernetes and Anthos at Google Cloud. Her teams are focused on transforming the way we work through innovation in platforms. Before Anthos and Kubernetes, Aparna worked on the Android platform. She joined Google from NetApp where she was Director of Product for storage automation and private cloud. Prior to NetApp, Aparna was a leader in McKinsey and Company's business transformation office working with CXOs on IT strategy, pricing, and M&A. Aparna holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford and has authored several technical publications. She serves on the Governing Board of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).Links: DevOps Research Report: https://www.devops-research.com/research.html Twitter: https://twitter.com/apbhatnagar TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: You know how Git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else.Corey: That's all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best ways I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's Git-based workflows mean you don't have to play slap-and-tickle with integrating arcane nonsense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as Git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for Pets startup, to global Fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them—because you don't have to; they get why self-service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y dot com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We have a bunch of conversations on this show covering a wide gamut of different topics, things that I find personally interesting, usually, and also things I'm noticing in the industry. Fresh on the heels of Google Next, we get to ideally have conversations about both of those things. Today, I'm speaking with the Director of Product Management at Google Cloud, Aparna Sinha. Aparna, thank you so much for joining me today. I appreciate it.Aparna: Thank you, Corey. It's a pleasure to be here.Corey: So, Director of Product Management is one of those interesting titles. We've had a repeat guest here, Director of Outbound Product Management Richard Seroter, which is great. I assume—as I told him—outbound products are the ones that are about to be discontinued. He's been there a year and somehow has failed the discontinue a single thing, so okay, I'm sure that's going to show up on his review. What do you do? The products aren't outbound; they're just products, and you're managing them, but that doesn't tell me much. Titles are always strange.Aparna: Yeah, sure. Richard is one of my favorite people, by the way. I work closely with him. I am the Director of Product for Developer Platform. That's Google Cloud's developer platform.It includes many different products—actually, 30-Plus products—but the primary pieces are usually when a developer comes to Google Cloud, the pieces that they interact with, like our command-line interface, like our Cloud Shell, and all of the SDK pieces that go behind it, and then also our DevOps tooling. So, as you're writing the application in the IDE and as you're deploying it into production, that's all part of the developer platform. And then I also run our serverless platform, which is one of the most developer-friendly capabilities from a compute perspective. It's also integrated into many different services within GCP. So, behind the title, that's really what I work on.Corey: Okay, so you're, I guess, in part responsible for well, I guess, a disappointment of mine a few years ago. I have a habit on Twitter—because I'm a terrible person—of periodically spinning up a new account on various cloud providers and kicking the tires and then live-tweeting the experience, and I was really set to dunk on Google Cloud; I turned this into a whole blog post. And I came away impressed, where the developer experience was pretty close to seamless for getting up and running. It was head and shoulders above what I've seen from other cloud providers, and on the one hand, I want to congratulate you and on the other, it doesn't seem like that's that high of a bar, to be perfectly honest with you because it seems that companies get stuck in their own ways and presuppose that everyone using the product is the same as the people building the product. Google Cloud has been and remains a shining example of great developer experience across the board.If I were starting something net new and did not have deep experience with an existing cloud provider—which let's face it, the most valuable thing about the cloud is knowing how it's going to break because everything breaks—I would be hard-pressed to not pick GCP, if not as the choice, at least a strong number two. So, how did that come to be? I take a look at a lot of Google's consumer apps and, “This is a great user experience,” isn't really something I find myself saying all that often. Google Cloud is sort of its own universe. What happened?Aparna: Well, thank you, first of all, for the praise. We are very humble about it, actually. I think that we're grateful if our developers find the experience to be seamless. It is something that we measure all the time. That may be one of the reasons why you found it to be better than other places. We are continuously trying to improve the time to value for developers, how long it takes them to perform certain actions. And so what you measure is what you improve, right? If you don't measure it, you don't improve it. That's one of our SRE principles.Corey: I wish. I've been measuring certain things for years, and they don't seem to be improving at all. It's like, “Wow, my code is still terrible, but I'm counting the bugs and the number isn't getting smaller.” Turns out there might be additional steps required.Aparna: Yes, you know, we measure it, we look at it, we take active OKRs to improve these things, especially usability. Usability is extremely important for certainly the developer platform, for my group; that's something that's extremely important. I would say, stepping back, you said it's not that common to find a good user experience in the cloud, I think in general—you know, and I've spent the majority of my career, if not all of my career, working on enterprise software. Enterprise software is not always designed in the most user-friendly way; it's not something that people always think about. Some of the enterprise software I've used has been really pretty… pretty bad. Just a list of things.Corey: Oh, yeah. And it seems like their entire philosophy—I did a bit of a dive into this, and I think it was Stripe's Patrick McKenzie who wound up pointing this out originally, though; but the internet is big and people always share and reshare ideas—the actual customer for enterprise software is very often procurement or a business unit that is very organizationally distant from the person who's using it. And I think in a world of a cloud platform, that is no longer true. Yeah, there's a strategic decision of what Cloud do we use, but let's be serious, that decision often comes into play long after there's already been a shadow IT slash groundswell uprising. The sales process starts to look an awful lot less like, “Pick our cloud,” and a lot more like, “You've already picked our cloud. How about we formalize the relationship?”And developer experience with platforms is incredibly important and I'm glad to see that this is a—well, it's bittersweet to me. I am glad to see that this is something that Google is focusing on, and I'm disappointed to admit that it's a differentiator.Aparna: It is a differentiator. It is extremely important. At Google, there are a couple of reasons why this is part of our DNA, and it is actually related to the fact that we are also a consumer products company. We have a very strong user experience team, a very strong measurements-oriented—they measure everything, and they design everything, and they run focus groups. So, we have an extraordinary usability team, and it's actually one of the groups that—just like every other group—is fungible; you can move between consumer and cloud. There's no difference in terms of your training and skill set.And so, I know you said that you're not super impressed with our consumer products, but I think that the practice behind treating the user as king, treating the user as the most important part of your development, is something that we bring over into cloud. And it's just a part of how we do development, and I think that's part of the reason why our products are usable. Again, I shy away from taking any really high credit on these things because I think I always have a very high bar. I want them to be delightful, super delightful, but we do have good usability scores on some of the pieces. I think our command line, I think, is quite good. I think—there's always improvements, by the way, Corey—but I think that there are certain things that are delightful.And a lot of thought goes into it and a lot of multi-functional—meaning across product—user experience and engineering. We have end-developer relations. We have, sort of this four-way communication about—you know, with friction logs and with lots of trials and lots of discussion and measurements, is how we improve the user experience. And I would love to see that in more enterprise software. I think that my experience in the industry is that the user is becoming more important, generally, even in enterprise software, probably because of the migration to cloud.You can't ignore the user anymore. This shouldn't be all about procurement. Anybody can procure a cloud service. It's really about how easily and how quickly can they get to what they want to do as a user, which I think also the definition of what a developer is changing and I think that's one of the most exciting things about our work is that the developer can be anybody; it can be my kids, and it can be anyone across the world. And our goal is to reach those people and to make it easy for them.Corey: If I had to bet on a company not understanding that distinction, on some level, Google's reputation lends itself to that where, oh, great. It's like, I'm a little old to go back to school and join a fraternity and be hazed there, so the second option was, oh, I'll get an interview to be an SRE at Google where, “Oh, great, you've done interesting things, but can you invert a binary tree on a whiteboard?” “No, I cannot. Let's save time and admit that.” So, the concern that I would have had—you just directly contradicted—was the idea that you see at some companies where there's the expectation that all developers are like their developers.Google, for better or worse, has a high technical bar for hiring. A number of companies do not have a similar bar along similar axes, and they're looking for different skill sets to achieve different outcomes, and that's fine. To be clear, I am not saying that, oh, the engineers at Google are all excellent and the engineers all at a bank are all crap. Far from it.That is not true in either direction, but there are differences as far as how they concern themselves with software development, how they frame a lot of these things. And I am surprised that Google is not automatically assuming that developers are the type of developers that you have at Google. Where did that mindset shift come from?Aparna: Oh, absolutely not. I think we would be in trouble if we did that. I studied electrical engineering in school. This would be like assuming that the top of the class is kind of like the kind of people that we want to reach, and it's just absolutely not. Like I said, I want to reach total beginners, I want to reach people who are non-developers with our developer platform.That's our explicit goal, and so we view developers as individuals with a range of superpowers that they've gained throughout their lives, professionally and personally, and people who are always on a path to learn new things, and we want to make it easy for them. We don't treat them as bodies in an employment relationship with some organization, or people with certain minimum bar degrees, or whatever it is. As far as interviewing goes, Corey, in product management, which is the practice that I'm part of, we actually look for, in the interview, that the candidate is not thinking about themselves; they're not imposing themselves on the user base.So, can you think outside of yourself? Can you think of the user base? And are you inquisitive? Are you curious? Do you observe? And how well do you observe differences and diversity, and how well are you able to grasp what might be needed by a particular segment? How well are you able to segment the user base?That's what we look for, certainly in product management, and I'm quite sure also in user experience. You're right, on engineering, of course, we're looking for technical skills, and so on, but that's not how we design our products, that's not how we design the usability of our products.Corey: “If you people were just a little bit smarter slash more like me, then this would work a lot better,” is a common trope. Which brings us, of course, to the current state of serverless. I tend to view serverless as largely a failed initiative so far. And to be clear, I'm viewing this from an AWS-centric lens; that is the… we'll be charitable and call it pool in which I swim. And they announced Lambda in 2015; that's great. “The only code you will ever write in the future is business logic.” Yeah, I might have heard that one before about 15 other technologies dating back to the 60s, but okay.And the expectation was that it was going to take off and set the world on fire. You just needed to learn the constraints of how this worked. And there were a bunch of them, and they were obnoxious, and it didn't have a learning curve so much as a learning cliff. And nowadays, we do see it everywhere, but it's also in small doses. It's mostly used as digital spackle to plaster over the gaps between various AWS services.What I'm not seeing across the board is a radical mindset shift in the way that developers are engaging with cloud platforms that would be heralded by widespread adoption of serverless principles. That said, we are on the heels here of Google Cloud Next, and that you had a bunch of serverless announcements, I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you might not agree with my dismal take on the serverless side of the world?Aparna: Well, I think this is a great question because despite the fact that I like not to be wishy-washy about anything, I actually both agree and disagree [laugh] with what you said. And that's funny.Corey: Well, that's why we're talking about this here instead of on Twitter where two contradictory things can't possibly both be true. Wow, imagine that; nuance, it doesn't fit 280 characters. Please, continue.Aparna: So, what I agree with is that—I agree with you that the former definition of serverless and the constrained way that we are conditioned thinking about serverless is not as expansive as originally hoped, from an adoption perspective. And I think that at Google, serverless is just no longer about only event-driven programming or microservices; it's about running complex workloads at scale while still preserving the delightful developer experience. And this is where the connection to the developer experience comes in. Because the developer experience, in my mind, it's about time to value. How quickly can I achieve the outcome that I need for my business?And what are the things that get in the way of that? Well, setting up infrastructure gets in the way of that, having to scale infrastructure gets in the way of that, having to debug pieces that aren't actually related to the outcome that you're trying to get to gets in the way of that. And the beauty of serverless, it's all in how you define serverless: what does this name actually mean? If serverless only means functions and event-driven applications, then yes, actually, it has a better developer experience, but it is not expansive, and then it is limited, and it's trapped in its skin the way that you mentioned it. [laugh].Corey: And it doesn't lend itself very well to legacy applications—legacy, of course, being condescending engineering-speak for ‘it makes money.' But yeah, that's the stuff that powers the world. We're not going to be redoing all those things as serverless-powered microservices anytime soon, in most cases.Aparna: At Google Cloud, we are redefining serverless. And so what we are taking from Serverless is the delightful user experience and the fact that you don't have to manage the infrastructure, and what we're putting in the serverless is essentially serverless containers. And this is the big revolution in serverless, is that serverless—at least a Google Cloud with serverless containers and our Cloud Run offering—is able to run much bigger varieties of applications and we are seeing large enterprises running legacy applications, like you say, on Cloud Run, which is serverless from a developer experience perspective. There's no cluster, there is no server, there's no VM, there's nothing for you to set up from a scaling perspective. And it essentially scales infinitely.And it is very developer-focused; it's meant for the developer, not for the operator or the infrastructure admin. In reality in enterprise, there is very much a segmentation of roles. And even in smaller companies, there's a segmentation of roles even within the same person. Like, they may have to do some infrastructure work and they may do some development work. And what serverless—at least in the context of Google Cloud—does, is it removes the infrastructure work and maximizes the development work so that you can focus on your application and you can get to that end result, that business value that you're trying to achieve.And with Cloud Run, what we've done is we've preserved that—and I would say, actually, arguably improved that because we've done usability studies that show that we're 22 points above every other serverless offering from a usability perspective. So, it's super important to me that anybody can use this service. Anybody. Maybe even not a developer can use this service. And that's where our focus is.And then what we've done underneath is we've removed many of the restrictions that are traditionally associated with serverless. So, it doesn't have to be event-driven, it is not only a particular set of languages or a particular set of runtimes. It is not only stateless applications, and it's not only request-based billing, it's not only short-running jobs. These are the kinds of things that we have removed and I think we've just redefined serverless.Corey: [unintelligible 00:17:05], on some level, the idea of short-lived functions with a maximum cap feels like a lazy answer to one of the hard problems in computer science, the halting problem. For those not familiar, my layman's understanding of it is, “Okay, you have a program that's running in a loop. How do you deterministically say that it is done executing?” And the functional answer to that is, “Oh, after 15 minutes, it's done. We're killing it.” Which I guess is an answer, but probably not one that's going to get anyone a PhD.It becomes very prescriptive and it leads to really weird patterns trying to work around some of those limitations. And historically, yeah, by working within the constraints of the platform, it works super well. What interests me about Cloud Run is that it doesn't seem to have many of those constraints in quite the same way. It's, “Can you shove whatever monstrosity you've got into a container? You can't? Well, okay, there are ways to get there.”Full disclosure, I was very anti-container; the industry has yet again proven to me that I cannot predict the future. Here we are. “Great, can you shove a container in and hand it to some other place to run it where”—spoiler, people will argue with me on this and they are wrong—“Google engineers are better at running infrastructure to run containers than you are.” Full stop. That is the truism of how this works; economies of scale.I love the idea of being able to take something, throw it over a wall, and not have to think about the rest of it. But everything that I'm thinking about in this context looks certain ways and it's the type of application that I'm working on or that I'm looking at most recently. What are you seeing in Cloud Run as far as interesting customer use cases? What are people doing with it that you didn't expect them to?Aparna: Yeah, I think this is a great time to ask that question because with the pandemic last year—I guess we're still in the pandemic, but with the pandemic, we had developers all over the world become much more important and much more empowered, just because there wasn't really much of an operations team, there wasn't really as much coordination even possible. And so we saw a lot of customers, a lot of developers moving to cloud, and they were looking for the easiest thing that they could use to build their applications. And as a result, serverless and Cloud Run in particular, became extremely popular; I would say hockey stick in terms of usage.And we're seeing everything under the sun. ecobee—this is a home automation company that makes smart thermostats—they're using Cloud Run to launch a new camera product with multi-factor authentication and security built-in, and they had a very tight launch timeline. They were able to very quickly meet that need. Another company—and you talk about, you know, sort of brick and mortar—IKEA, which you and I all like to shop [laugh] at, particularly doing the—Corey: Oh, I love building something from 500 spare parts, badly. It's like basically bringing my AWS architecture experience into my living room. It's great. Please continue.Aparna: Yeah, it's like, yeah—Corey: The Swedish puzzle manufacturer.Aparna: Yes. They're a great company, and I think it just in the downturn and the lockdown, it was actually a very dicey time, very tricky time, particularly for retailers. Of course, everybody was refurbishing their home or [laugh], you know, improving their home environment and their furniture. And IKEA started using serverless containers along with serverless analytics—so with BigQuery, and Cloud Run, and Cloud Functions—and one of the things they did is that they were able to cut their inventory refresh rate from more than three hours to less than three minutes. This meant that when you were going to drive up and do some curbside pickup, you know the order that you placed was actually in stock, which was fantastic for CSAT and everything.But that's the technical piece that they were able to do. When I spoke with them, the other thing that they were able to do with the Cloud Run and Cloud Functions is that they were able to improve the work-life balance of their engineers, which I thought was maybe the biggest accomplishment. Because the platform, they said, was so easy for them to use and so easy for them to accomplish what they needed to accomplish, that they had a better [laugh] better life. And I think that's very meaningful.In other companies, MediaMarktSaturn, we've talked about them before; I don't know if I've spoken to you about them, but we've certainly talked about them publicly. They're a retailer in EMEA, and because of their use of Cloud Run, and they were able to combine the speed of serverless with the flexibility of containers, and their development team was able to go eight times faster while handling 145% increase in digital channel traffic. Again, there are a lot more digital channel traffic during COVID. And perhaps my favorite example is the COVID-19 exposure notifications work that we did with Apple.Corey: An unfortunate example, but a useful one. I—Aparna: Yes.Corey: —we all—I think we all wish it wasn't necessary, but here's the world in which we live. Please, tell me more.Aparna: I have so many friends in engineering and mathematics and these technical fields, and they're always looking at ways that technology can solve these problems. And I think especially something like the pandemic which is so difficult to track, so difficult with the time that it takes for this virus to incubate and so on, so difficult to track these exposures, using the smartphone, using Bluetooth, to have a record of who has it and who they've been in contact with, I think really interesting engineering problem, really interesting human problem. So, we were able to work on that, and of course, when you need a platform that's going to be easy to use, that's going to be something that you can put into production quickly, you're going to use Cloud Run. So, they used Cloud Run, and they also used Cloud Run for Anthos, which is the more hybrid version, for the on-prem piece. And so both of those were used in conjunction to back all of the services that were used in the notifications work.So, those are some of the examples. I think net-net, it's that I think usability, especially in enterprise software is extremely important, and I think that's the direction in which software development is going.Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access to anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers! Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor. List and see all SSH servers, kubernetes clusters or databases available to you. Get instant access to them all using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open source and a pleasure to use.Download Teleport at https://goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.Corey: It's easy for me to watch folks—like you—in keynotes at events—like Cloud Next—talk about things and say, “This is how the world is building things, and this is what the future looks like.” And I can sit there and pick to pieces all day, every day. It basically what I do because of deep-seated personality problems with me. It's very different to say that about a customer who has then taken that thing and built it into something that is transformative and solves a very real problem that they have. I may not relate to that problem that they have, but I do not believe that customers are going to have certain problems, find solutions like this and fix them, and the wrong in how they're approaching these things.No one sees the constraints that shape things; no one shows up in the morning hoping to do a crap job today unless you know you're the VP of Integrity at Facebook or something. But there's a very real sense of companies have a bunch of different drivers, and having a tool or a service or a platform that solves it for them, you'd better be very sure before you step up and start saying, “No, you're doing it wrong.” In earlier years, I did not see a whole lot of customer involvement with Cloud Next. It was always a, “Well, a bunch of Googlers are going to tell me how this stuff works, and they'll talk about theoretical things.”That's not the case anymore. You have a whole bunch of highly respectable reference customers out there doing a whole lot of really interesting things. And more to the point, they're willing to go on record talking about this. And I'm not talking about fun startups that are, “Great, it's Twitter, only for pets.” Great. I'm talking banks, companies where mistakes are going to show and leave a mark. It's really hard to reconcile what I'm seeing with Google Cloud in 2021 than what I was seeing in, let's say, five or six years ago. What drove that change?Aparna: Yes, Corey, I think you're definitely correct about that. There's no doubt about it that we have a number of really tremendous customers, we really tremendous enterprise references and so on. I run the Google Cloud Developer Platform, and for me, the developers that I work with and the developers that this platform serves are the inspiration for what we do. And in the last six or seven years that I've worked in Google Cloud, that has always been the case. So, nothing has changed from my perspective, in that regard.If anything, what has changed is that we have far more users, we have been growing exponentially, and we have many more large enterprise customers, but in terms of my journey, I started with the Kubernetes open-source project, I was one of the very early people on that, and I was working with a lot of developers, in that case, in the open-source community, a lot of them became GKE customers, and it just grew. And now we have so many [laugh] customers and so many developers, and we have developed this platform with them. We are very much—it's been a matter of co-innovation, especially on Kubernetes. It has been very much, “Okay, you tell us,” and it's a need-based relationship, you know? Something is not working, we are there and we fix it.Going back to 2017 or whenever it was that Pokemon Go was running on GKE, that was a moment when we realized, “Oh, this platform needs to scale. Okay, let's get at it.” And that's where, Corey, it really helps to have great engineers. For all the pros and cons, I think that's where you want those super-sharp, super-driven, super-intelligent folks because they can make things like that happen, they can make it happen in less than a week, so that—they can make it happen over a Saturday so that Pokemon Go can go live in Japan and everybody can be playing that game. And that's what inspires me.And that's a game, but we have a lot of customers that are running health applications. We have a customer that's running ambulances on the platform. And so this is life-threatening stuff; we have to take that very seriously, and we have to be listening to them and working with them. But I'm inspired, and I think that our roadmap, and the products, and the features that we build are inspired by what they are building on the platform. And they're combining all kinds of different things. They're taking our machine learning capabilities, they're taking our analytics capabilities, they're taking our Maps API, and they're combining it with Cloud Run, they're combining it with GKE. Often they're using both of those.And they're running new services. We've got a customer in Indonesia that's running in a food delivery service; I've got customers that are analyzing the cornfields in the middle of the country to improve crop yield. So, that's the kind of inspiring work, and each of those core, each of those users are coming back to us and saying, “Oh, you know, I need a different type of”—it's very detailed, like, “I need a different type of file system that gives me greater speed or better performance.” We just had a gaming company that was running on GKE that we really won out over a different cloud in terms of performance improvements that we were able to provide on the container startup times. It was just a significant performance improvement. We'll probably publish it in the coming few months.That's the kind of thing that drives it, and I'm very glad that I have a strong engineering team in Google Cloud, and I'm very glad that we have these amazing customers that are trying to do these amazing things, and that they're directly engaging with us and telling us what they need from us because that's what we're here for.Corey: To that end, one more area I want to go into before we call this a show, you've had Cloud Build for a little while, and that's great. Now, at—hot off the presses, you wound up effectively taking that one step further with Cloud Deploy. And I am still mostly someone with terrible build and release practices that people would be ashamed of, struggle to understand the differentiation between what I would do with Cloud Build and what I would do with Cloud Deploy. I understand they're both serverless. I understand that they are things that large companies care about. What is the story there?Aparna: Yeah, it's a journey. As you start to use containers—and these days, like you said, Corey, containers, a lot of people are using them—then you start to have a lot of microservices, and one of the benefits of container usage is that it's really quick to release new versions. You can have different versions of your application, you can test them out, you can roll them out. And so these DevOps practices, they become much more attainable, much more reachable. And we just put out the, I think, the seventh version of the DevOps Research Report—the DORA report—that shows that customers that follow best practices, they achieve their results two times better in terms of business outcomes, and so on.And there's many metrics that show that this kind of thing is important. But I think the most important thing I learned during the pandemic, as we were coming out of the pandemic, is a lot of—and you mentioned enterprises—large banks, large companies' CIOs and CEOs who basically were not prepared for the lockdown, not prepared for the fact that people aren't going to be going into branches, they came to Google Cloud and they said that, “I wish that I had implemented DevOps practices. I wish that I had implemented the capability to roll out changes frequently because I need that now. I need to be able to experiment with a new banking application that's mobile-only. I need to be able to experiment with curbside delivery. And I'm much more dependent on the software than I used to be. And I wish that I had put those DevOps practices.”And so the beginning of 2021, all our conversations were with customers, especially those, you know you said ‘legacy,' I don't think that's the right word, but the traditional companies that have been around for hundreds of years, all of them, they said, “Software is much more important. Yes, if I'm not a software company, at least a large division of my group is now a software group, and I want to put the DevOps practices into play because I know that I need that and that's a better way of working.”By the way, there's a security aspect to that I'd like to come back to because it's really important—especially in banking, financial services, and public sector—as you move to a more agile DevOps workflow, to have security built into that. So, let me come back to that. But with regard to Cloud Build and Cloud Deploy is something I've been wanting to bring into market for a couple of years. And we've been talking about it, we've been working on it actively for more than a year on my team. And I'm very, very excited about this service because what it does is it allows you to essentially put this practice, this DevOps practice into play whereas your artifacts are built and stored in the artifact repository, they can then automatically be deployed into your runtime—which is GKE Cloud Run—in the future, you can deploy them, and you can set how you want to deploy them.Do you want to deploy them to a particular environment that you want to designate the test environment, the environment to which your developers have access in a certain way? Like, it's a test environment, so they can make a lot of changes. And then when do you want to graduate from test to staging, and when do you want to graduate to production and do that gradual rollout? Those are some of the things that Cloud Deploy does.And I think it's high time because how do you manage microservices at scale? How do you really take advantage of container-based development is through this type of tooling. And that's what Cloud Deploy does. It's just the beginning of that, but it's a delightful product. I've been playing around with it; I love it, and we've seen just tremendous reception from our users.Corey: I'm looking forward to kicking the tires on it myself. I want to circle back to talk about the security aspect of it. Increasingly, I'm spending more of my attention looking at cloud security because everyone else has, too, and some of us have jobs that don't include the word security but need to care about it. That's why I have a Thursday edition of my newsletter, now, talking specifically about that. What is the story around security these days from your perspective?And again, it's a huge overall topic, and let's be clear here, I'm not asking, “What does Google Cloud think about security?” That would fill an encyclopedia. What is your take on it? And where do you want to talk about this in the context of Cloud Deploy?Aparna: Yeah, so I think about security from the perspective of the Google Cloud Developer Platform, and specifically from the perspective of the developer. And like you said, security is not often in the title of anybody in the developer organization, so how do we make it seamless? How do we make it such that security is something that is not going to catch you as you're doing your development? That's the critical piece. And at the same time, one of the things we saw during 2020 and 2021 is just the number of cyberattacks just went through the roof. I think there was a 400 to 600% increase in the number of software supply chain attacks. These are attacks where some malicious hacker has come in and inserted some malicious code into your software. [laugh]. Your software, Corey. You know, you the unsuspecting developer is—Corey: Well, it used to be my software; now there's some debate about that.Aparna: Right. That's true because most software is using open-source dependencies; and these open-source dependencies, they have a pretty intricate web of dependencies that they are themselves using. So, it's a transitive problem where you're using a language like Python, or whatever language you're using. And there's a number of—Corey: Crappy bash by default. But yes.Aparna: Well, it was actually a bash script vulnerability, I think, in the Codecov breach that happened, I think it was, in earlier this year, where a malicious bash script was injected into the build system, in fact, of Codecov. And there are all these new attack vectors that are specifically targeting developers. And whether it's nation-states or whoever it is that's causing some of these attacks, it's a problem that is of national and international magnitude. And so I'm really excited that we have the expertise in Google Cloud and beyond Google Cloud.Google, it's a very security-conscious company. This company is a very security-conscious company. [laugh]. And we have built a lot of tooling internally to avoid those kinds of attacks, so what we've done with Cloud Build, and what we're going to do with Cloud Deploy, we're building in the capability for code to be signed, for artifacts to be signed with cryptographic keys, and for that signing, that attestation—we call it an attestation—that attestation to be checked at various points along the software supply chain. So, as you're writing code, as you're submitting the code, as you're building the containers, as you're storing the containers, and then finally as you're deploying them into whatever environment you're deploying them, we check these keys, and we make sure that the software that is going through the system is actually what you intended and that there isn't this malicious code injection that's taking place.And also, we scan the software, we scan the code, we scan the artifacts to check for vulnerabilities, known vulnerabilities as well as unknown vulnerabilities. Known vulnerabilities from a Google perspective; so Google's always a little bit ahead, I would say, in terms of knowing what the vulnerabilities are out there because we do work so much on software across operating systems and programming languages, just across the full gamut of software in the industry, we work on it, and we are constantly securing software. So, we check for those vulnerabilities, we alert you, we help to remediate those vulnerabilities.Those are the type of things that we're doing. And it's all in service of certainly keeping enterprise developers secure, but also just longtail an average, everybody, helping them to be secure so that they don't get hacked and their companies don't get hacked.Corey: It's nice to see people talking about this stuff, who is not directly a security vendor. But by which I mean, you're not using this as the fear, uncertainty, and doubt angle to sell a given service that, “We have to talk about this exploit because otherwise, no one will ever buy this.” Something like Cloud Deploy is very much aligned with a best practices approach to release engineering. It's not, strictly speaking, a security product, but being able to wrap things that are very security-centric around it is valuable.Now, sponsors are always going to do interesting things at various expo halls, and oh, yeah, saw the same product warmed over. This is very much not that, and I don't interpret anything you're saying is trying to sell something via the fear, uncertainty, and doubt model. There are a lot of different areas that I will be skeptical hearing about from different companies; I do take security words from Google extremely seriously because, let's be clear, in the past 20 however many years it has been, you have established a clear track record for caring about these things.Aparna: Yeah. And I have to go back to my initial mission statement, which is to help developers accelerate time to value. And one of the things that will certainly get in the way of accelerating time to value is security breaches, by the nature of them. If you are not running a supply chain that is secure, then it is very difficult for you to empower your developers to do those releases frequently and to update the software frequently because what if the update has an issue? What if the update has a security vulnerability?That's why it's really important to have a toolchain that prevents against that, that checks for those things, that logs those things so that there's an audit trail available, and that has the capability for your security team to set policies to avoid those kinds of things. I think that's how you get speed. You get with security built in, and that's extremely important to developers and especially cloud developers.Corey: I want to thank you for taking the time to speak to me about all the things that you've been working on and how you view this industry unfolding. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and how you think about these things, where can they find you?Aparna: Well, Corey, I'm available on Twitter, and that may be one of the best ways to reach me. I'm also available at various customer events that we are having, most of them are online now. And so I'll provide you more details on that and I can be reached that way.Corey: Excellent. I will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:38:43]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Aparna: Thank you so much. I greatly enjoyed speaking with you.Corey: Aparna Sinha, Director of Product Management at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. And that sentence needed the word ‘cloud' about four more times in it. And if you've enjoyed this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a loud angry comment telling me that I just don't understand serverless well enough.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS
teissTalk: Mapping AI to your security posture and avoiding overlooked threats

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 49:37


This is the audio-only version of our twice weekly cyber security talk show, teissTalk.  Join us twice a week for free by visiting www.teiss.co.uk/talk On this episode, we focus on the following news story;Cybersecurity experts warn of A.I.'s drawbacks in combating threatshttps://fortune.com/2021/11/09/cybersecurity-experts-ai-threats/ The panel discussion is titled “Mapping AI to your security posture and avoiding overlooked threats”https://www.teiss.co.uk/teisstalk/mapping-ai-to-your-security-posture-and-avoiding-overlooked-threats/ This episode is hosted by Jenny Radcliffe https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenny-radcliffe-the-people-hacker-%F0%9F%8E%A4%F0%9F%8E%A7%F0%9F%A7%A0-85ba1611/  Our Guests areEdward Tucker, Chief Information Security Officer, Co-founder of Email Auth, Byte and Human Firewallhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/tuckeredward/ Martyn Booth, Chief Information Security Officer, Euromoney Institutional Investorhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/martynwb/ Samantha Humphries, Head of Security Strategy, EMEA, Exabeamhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/safesecs

IoT For All Podcast
Edge AI and its Benefits | NeuTigers's Dr. Adel Laoui

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 28:18


This week, Neutigers Founder and CEO Dr. Adel Laoui joins us to discuss everything companies need to know about edge AI. Adel shares the benefits of edge AI over traditional AI, including its increased capacity for security in particularly vulnerable industries like healthcare, and where it has the greatest potential to grow.To round out the episode, Adel shares some of his experiences applying edge AI in the real world, including NeuTigers' recent solution CovidDeep. He speaks to what the solution is, how it's currently being used, and how this model extends to other use cases NeuTigers is building for.Dr. Adel Laoui is an International Senior Executive that has more than 20+ years' experience in R&D interfacing between Life sciences and Technologies across US, EMEA and APAC. He is co-founder and CEO of NueTigers, a global leader in Edge Artificial Intelligence, bringing the transformative power of machine learning to help companies solve the world's biggest health, energy, productivity, and security challenges.Interested in connecting with Adel? Reach out to him on Linkedin!About NeuTigers: NeuTigers is a leading-edge company that is revolutionizing the application of state-of-the-art Artificial Intellectual Property from Princeton University. It specializes in solving healthcare and IoT problems using a unique energy/latency-efficient AI technology platform that can port intelligent services to diverse hardware platforms from sensors to mobile devices and cloud servers.Key Questions and Topics from this Episode:(01:02) Intro to Adel(02:52) Intro to NeuTigers(11:03) Can you share any use cases?(14:16) Especially given your involvement in the medical industry, what's your approach to security?(19:35) What is Edge AI? What're the benefits?(23:20) In what industries do you see edge AI making the biggest impact?(25:01) Is there any news you can share at NeuTigers?

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport
#318: GoDaddy und Team Deutschland – Ein Marathon im 100 m Sprint

Sports Maniac - Digitale Trends und Innovationen im Sport

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 36:04


"Wie baut man heute eine digitale Präsenz auf?" Diese Frage stellt sich der Sport und seine Athlet*innen. Die Antworten kennt GoDaddy. Der Website und Domain-Anbieter ist Gast der dritten Folge des "Mit Feuer und Flamme" Podcasts der Deutsche Sport Marketing (DSM). Wir stellen fest: Diese Digital-Partnerschaft macht Team Deutschland fit für das Online-Business. Paul Ashcroft, Vice President EMEA bei GoDaddy, gibt gemeinsam mit Host Marei Lops Einblicke in die noch frische Zusammenarbeit, die einem Marathon im Sprinttempo gleicht. Du erfährst, wie Elisabeth Seitz und Anna Seidel vom GoTeam für ihre Karriere nach der Karriere in  Contentproduktion und digitalem Marketing gecoacht wurden. Denn in jedem Athlet und jeder Athletin steckt ein kleines Unternehmen. Die Gesprächsthemen im Überblick: So macht GoDaddy Team Deutschland fit für das Online-Business Erfolgreiche Aktivierungen mit Anna Seidel & Eli Seitz Rückblick Olympische Sommerspiele in Tokio Welche Kampagnen in Peking 2022 zu erwarten sind Was zu einer Steigerung der Markenbekanntheit geführt hat Highlights der Zusammenarbeit Im Rahmen der Kooperation zwischen der Deutschen Sport Marketing und Sports Maniac werden die ersten vier Episoden des Podcasts auch im Sports Maniac Podcast zu hören sein. Wenn ihr "Mit Feuer und Flamme" auch zukünftig hören möchtet, dann abonniert den Podcast am besten direkt auf Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Deezer und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. Shownotes: Shownotes unter: https://sportsmaniac.de/episode318 Alle Infos zum „Mit Feuer und Flamme“ Podcast gibt es hier: https://maniacstudios.com/mit-feuer-und-flamme-dsm Vernetze dich mit Marei Lops und Paul Ashcroft auf LinkedIn Alles zur Deutschen Sport Marketing (DSM) gibt es auf der Website und auf LinkedIn Alle Infos rund um die Partnerschaft mit GoDaddy findest du hier Hier geht's zu den Videos vom GoTeam: https://www.youtube.com/c/GoDaddyDeutschland Meine Buchempfehlungen: https://sportsmaniac.de/books  Mehr zu unserer Podcast-Agentur Maniac Studios: https://maniacstudios.com Du willst einen Podcast starten oder als Partner im Sports Maniac Podcast werben? Hier anfragen: https://danielspruegel.com Abonniere den Sports Maniac Podcast auf Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Deezer, Soundcloud oder TuneIn Abonniere das Weekly Update: https://sportsmaniac.de/weekly-update Bewerte den Sports Maniac Podcast: https://sportsmaniac.de/bewertung Kostenfreie Facebook-Gruppe: https://sportsmaniac.de/community FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/sportsmaniacDE INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/danielspruegel TWITTER: https://twitter.com/DanielSpruegel LINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/company/sports-maniac Mein Podcast-Equipment: https://sportsmaniac.de/meinsetup

Sales Rehab
#33 Prospecting 401 & Sales Mindset with Alex Alleyne

Sales Rehab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 30:38


Every prospect requires different attention, strategy, and care... just like every sales person must understand how they work as well. Dive in to this podcast with me and get some GOLD coming from this amazing Elite Sales Professional Alex Alleyne! 2X LinkedIn Top Voice / Award winning Software Sales Professional & Mentor, currently working as a Regional Sales Manager, EMEA at Lacework. He has elite status is founded on having delivered over $30M in ARR for the world's most disruptive organisations along with teaching, coaching and mentoring individuals all over the globe around best in class sales execution. If you want to be mentored by Alex or learn more about him, visit his website: www.alexalleyne.com Or follow him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexalleyne/ He is amazing and I was blessed to have him on my podcast!

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast
Fresh COVID uncertainty and hawkish Fed prove a volatile combination for FX markets: The Global Markets FX Week Ahead Podcast

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 7:33


FX volatility has continued to pick up over the past week as market participants await further clarity over the potential impact on the global economy from the new COVID variant. The uncertainty should make DM central banks more cautious over tightening policy in the near-term. However, the Fed has signalled that it plans to speed up tightening at their next FOMC meeting. Lee Hardman, Currency Analyst, discusses the implications for the FX market with Martin Viohl, Director of MUFG's Global Customer Marketing Group for EMEA in London. Disclaimer: www.mufgresearch.com (PDF)

Market Matters
Collateral Insights: Triparty Pledge and the Leading Drivers

Market Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 17:13


In recent years, several drivers, including capital constraints and innovative solutions to mobilize previously hard-to-fund assets, have led to an increase in the popularity and growth in pledge across the triparty marketplace.   In this Collateral Insights episode, Graham Gooden, EMEA head of Collateral Services Product, O'Delle Burke, APAC head of Collateral Services Product and Russell Pudney, sales executive representing the Collateral Services business, discuss the background to pledge, comparison versus title transfer, growth in Asia and what to expect next.

Workday Podcast
How EMEA Companies are Accelerating Digital Transformation.

Workday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 11:18


On this episode of the Workday Podcast, Carolyn Horne, Workday's president for the EMEA region, joined Steve Dunne to talk about how organisations in Europe have seized the moment and grasped the nettle of digital change.

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan
Coaching Winning Sales Teams w/Tom Castley

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 47:56


Tom Castley, VP EMEA for Outreach has 20 years of experience supporting sales organisations in Europe's tech space. Prior to outreach.io, Tom was the VP EMEA @ Xactly & more recently the VP EMEA @ Apptio. https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomcastley/  Links mentioned in the show; https://www.thelionsbarbercollective.com/barbertalk/  https://uk.movember.com/team/2399769

Business of Apps
#89: The big transitions in the app industry with Patrick Mareuil, Managing Director EMEA at Airship

Business of Apps

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:47


To say that we live in the time of change would be a big understatement. Pick up any area of your life and you can find a substantial change there. Many changes were caused or accelerated by COVID-19 last year. In the mobile app industry specifically, a titanic shift was caused by the notion of privacy, the safety and ownership of people's digital information. Questions such as “How people can protect their online data?”, “Should they let companies use their data, – even anonymized – for generating profit for those companies?” – today all these questions are being heavily debated all the time. In this episode, we want to help brands to better understand this new environment and to do so we've invited Patrick Mareuil,

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast
COVID unleashes turmoil – what's next for the markets? The Global Markets FX Week Ahead Podcast

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 14:43


The massive risk-off move in the financial markets today could have meaningful global repercussions for investors. This week, Derek Halpenny, Head of Research for Global Markets and International Securities, discusses the implications of the latest upturn in COVID risks with Simon Mayes, Director of MUFG's Global Customer Marketing Group for EMEA in London. Can the surge of the yen continue, and what does FX positioning and monetary policy expectations tell us about possible FX moves ahead? Listen to find out. Disclaimer: www.mufgresearch.com (PDF)

The Recruiting Brainfood Podcast
Brainfood Live On Air - Ep135 - Recruites Switching Industry Verticals - A Guide

The Recruiting Brainfood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 72:50


SWITCHING INDUSTRIES: A GUIDE FOR RECRUITERS   The agility of recruiters is one of the main reasons why we are resilient during times of change. Switching industry focus is one of those skills which makes most sense in the present moment as industries rise and fall with the shift to remote, the change in work habits, the change in people's priorities.   Is there a technique or system for doing this? What is the best way to switch an industry? Can we develop a framework?   - What industries are rising, which are falling? - How to make the switch - Big Bang or by increments? - How to accelerate through the change - What are some common errors of those who make the switch? - What are the problems with NOT making a switch?   All this and more in Brainfood Live on Air. We are with senior recruiters who are experts in employer branding and candidate UX -  Alla Pavlova, Recruiter (Riot Games), Christine Ng, Head of Talent & Media (Quantum Motion), Vanessa Raath, Founder (Talent Hunter) & Katrina Hutchinson-O'Neill, CEO (Join Talent)   Episode 135 is supported by our buddies Join Talent Join Talent is EMEA's fastest growing embedded talent solution provider. We deliver a market-leading and super-agile boutique Project RPO solution for scaling businesses - supporting with hiring demand in tech, product, digital, design, commercial/GTM & corporate vacancies.   If you're a recruiter looking to join a rocketship - you should Join Talent

Happier At Work
84: Creating a happier working environment with Stefan Tonnon

Happier At Work

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 61:21


Welcome back to Happier at Work! This week's episode features a podcast debut appearance from an HR business leader who specialises in implementing transformational systems and initiatives within an organisation to create a high-performing and happier working environment. ‘'When things go really, really bad, the value systems keep everything together and keep the happiness, and we lift each other up. That's what you want to do in real life. That's what you want to do in a company. That's what you want to do as a human being.'' – Stefan Tonnon. In conversation with Aoife is Stefan Tonnon, the vice president of HR for EMEA at Insight. With over 25 years of experience, Stefan will share insights throughout the discussion on the importance of HR, creating a happier working environment, and living and growing within a values-based culture. Main points covered throughout include:  Introduction to Stefan Tonnon.  Why company values are important?  Aligning the core values of hunger, heart, and harmony.  The power of business communication and listening to understand.  The sense of belonging at work.  Receiving sponsorship and guidance from the top.  Leadership styles in business.  Building trust and psychological safety at work.  Cultivating kindness in the workplace.  Tips for creating a happier working environment.  The benefits of workplace empowerment.  What makes Stefan Happier at Work. Is Imposter Syndrome standing in your way? Beat the imposter with Aoife's 6-week online course Imposter to Empowered. For further details, visit http://www.impostersyndrome.ie/impostertoempowered THE LISTENER'S SAY: Have a topic in mind that you would love for Aoife to explore on future podcasts? If so, please connect with Aoife via the links below and let her know. Connect with Stefan Tonnon: http://www.linkedin.com/in/stonnon Connect with Happier at Work host Aoife O'Brien: http://www.happieratwork.ie http://www.linkedin.com/in/aoifemobrien http://www.twitter.com/HappierAtWorkHQ http://www.instagram.com/happieratwork.ie http://www.facebook.com/groups/happieratworkpodcast

Reorg Ruminations
EMEA Core Credit: Funds Eye Telecom Italia, Marks and Spencer

Reorg Ruminations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 9:10


Each episode of Reorg's biweekly EMEA Core Credit podcast series features a deep dive on issues and companies in the distressed and high-yield space. This week, we take a look at potential bids for Telecom Italia and Marks and Spencer. If you are not a Reorg subscriber, request access here: go.reorg-research.com/Podcast-Trial.

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF
#91 - Richard Lightbound - Disruptive Innovation, ROBO Scores & Investing in AI

Opto Sessions: Stock market | Investing | Trading | Stocks & Shares | Finance | Business | Entrepreneurship | ETF

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:35


Richard Lightbound is EMEA & Asia CEO of ROBO Global, an index advisory and Research company helping investors capture the unique opportunities presented by Robotics, Artificial intelligence, and Healthcare technology. Each of those themes within the Disruptive Innovation landscape is represented by a ROBO Global index, and cumulatively those indices have accrued close to $5bn worth of assets tracking them. We discuss how the company's strategic advisory board - made up of best-in-class researchers & PhDs - identifies new investment opportunities, which subsectors are currently on ROBO's radar, & how the team uses ‘ROBO scores' to gauge a stock's investment merit. Enjoy!Thanks to Cofruition for consulting on and producing the podcast. Want further Opto insights? Check out our daily newsletter: https://www.cmcmarkets.com/en-gb/opto/newsletter------------------Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results.CMC Markets is an execution-only service provider. The material (whether or not it states any opinions) is for general information purposes only and does not take into account your personal circumstances or objectives. Nothing in this material is (or should be considered to be) financial, investment, or other advice on which reliance should be placed. No opinion given in the material constitutes a recommendation by CMC Markets or the author that any particular investment, security, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person.The material has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research. Although we are not specifically prevented from dealing before providing this material, we do not seek to take advantage of the material prior to its dissemination.CMC Markets does not endorse or offer opinions on the trading strategies used by the author. Their trading strategies do not guarantee any return and CMC Markets shall not be held responsible for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein. for any loss that you may incur, either directly or indirectly, arising from any investment based on any information contained herein.

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs
Accelerating Transition: Carbonomics

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 21:01


Part 2 of our special miniseries: Host Kara Mangone and Michele Della Vigna, head of Natural Resources Research in EMEA discuss the role capital markets, public policy, and technology will play in moving toward a sustainable future.

Women Power Podcast with Wafa Alobaidat
GoDaddy Arabia's GM Selina Bieber On How To Digitalize Your Startups

Women Power Podcast with Wafa Alobaidat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:43


In this insightful episode with Selina Bieber, we dive deep into unpacking the rise of one of the biggest online web hosting companies in the world. Selina shared GoDaddy's journey along with her own impressive career trajectories within the organization and how her input and experience has helped scale the company into becoming one of the most affluent globally. Selina is an inspiring figure with over a decade of experience in digitalizing and strategizing startups. She has been at the helm of GoDaddy's launch and go-to-market strategy development for several new markets across the EMEA region. With her focus on enablement and empowerment for regional businesses and entrepreneurs, the GoDaddy brand has grown in the MENA region under her leadership. Listen to her episode now!Based between Dubai and Istanbul, Selina Bieber is the General Manager of GoDaddy Middle East and Africa,  leading GoDaddy's brand and business growth in these exciting markets. Before joining GoDaddy,  Selina headed up media relations across Europe for a large-scale energy project headquartered in  the Netherlands, and spent close to seven years in Turkey managing the communications activities  for a range of foreign clients including Facebook, VeriSign Inc. and Euler Hermes, and leading  marketing communications for infrastructure giant Makyol A.Ş at the beginning of her career.

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast
Lockdown fears return to Europe hitting regional currencies: The Global Markets FX Week Ahead Podcast

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 15:25


Market participants are becoming more fearful of downside risks to growth in Europe. The latest COVID wave has already prompted policymakers to re-tighten restrictions. It joins the energy price shock, geopolitical tensions with Russia and the developing currency crisis in Turkey on the list of worries for European investors. In contrast, the US economy has regained upward momentum and the Fed's communication is turning more hawkish. Lee Hardman, Currency Analyst, and Michael Owen, MUFG's Head of Global Client desk for EMEA in London, discuss the market implications of last week's events, adding a long USD/CZK trade idea to reflect these risks. Disclaimer: www.mufgresearch.com (PDF)

The Tech That Connects Us
5G is more than just a buzzword! François Duchêne - VP Wireless Solutions EMEA at Casa Systems

The Tech That Connects Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:16


With over 20 years' experience in telecommunications, Francois has been at the cutting edge of next-generation technologies throughout his career. We talk with Francois about OpenRAN, Private networks and 5G, as well as what the future hold for Casa Systems (and some bits about hiking and boats thrown in!).