PRI: Arts and Entertainment

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This podcast features pieces on music, books, film, television, and other arts from some of PRI's most popular programs. It will take you to all corners of the world, and to the undiscovered corners of your own community, highlighting all of the arts along the way.

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    • Nov 26, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 5m AVG DURATION
    • 487 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from PRI: Arts and Entertainment

    Different cultures understand "thank you" in different ways, says professor of language

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021

    "Thank you" can be perceived as an expression of gratitude, or as transactional or even as distancing, depending on where you are in the world. Elaine Hsieh — a professor at the University of Oklahoma, where she studies language and culture — explained the various nuances to The World's host Marco Werman.

    How the Beatles inspired a rock revolution in Argentina

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021

    The birth of Argentine rock coincided with a turbulent time in Latin American history when many countries fell under military dictatorships. 

    This UK activist is pushing to end single-use plastics in menstrual products

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021

    This past week, UK environmental activist Ella Daish traveled to Switzerland and marched a giant tampon — which is a striped, blue and green tampon sculpture that stands more than 6 feet tall — to Procter & Gamble's European headquarters in Geneva. She said she wanted to “return” the plastic applicators to the company.

    Brazil's COVID vaccination campaign picks up thanks to a 1980s public health mascot

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021

    After a slow start, more than 73% of Brazilians have gotten the jab. Many Brazilians credit the unexpectedly successful campaign in part, to Zé Gotinha, a beloved cartoon character. 

    Meet the 11-year-old on a mission to clean up the Seine

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021

    Raphael has dedicated his free time to fishing waste out of the Seine in Paris using a magnetic rod. He's already managed to pull out 7 tons of waste including electric bikes, scooters, scrap metal and cellphones. 

    Musician Weedie Braimah lets the djembe speak for itself

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021

    In “The Hands of Time,” Weedie Braimah and his band fuse hip-hop, folkloric music and jazz. The new album tells two stories: that of the djembe and Braimah's journey to it.

    'Born into Blackness': A new book centers Africa in the expansive history of slavery

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021

    Major aspects of the trans-Atlantic slave trade from an African perspective have gotten erased throughout time. Howard French set out to illuminate a more expansive understanding in a new book called, "Born in Blackness: Africa, Africans, and the Making of the Modern World, 1471 to the Second World War."

    Multilingual liaisons are ‘cultural brokers' for refugee students in this Vermont school district 

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021

    English language learning programs in US schools have seen tidal changes in recent years, but perhaps nowhere as much as Burlington, Vermont.

    Bosnia faces the most serious crisis since the Balkans War, analyst says

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021

    Jasmin Mujanović, a Bosnian political analyst and author, says leaders of Republika Srpska, a territory within Bosnia and Herzegovina, has intended to unravel peace established under the Dayton Accords for over 15 years.

    Professional tree planting: 'It's a combination between industrial labor and high-intensity sport'

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021

    Filmmaker and photographer Rita Leistner, who started planting trees professionally over 20 years ago, says the work is "brutal." Her new film, "Forest for the Trees," documents the hard labor and sense of community fostered among Canada's professional tree planters.

    This teen climate activist is blazing a new path to raise environmental awareness in China

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021

    Teen climate activist Howey Ou is considered China's Greta Thunberg, taking to the streets to speak out about climate change. But in a country where speaking up comes with big risks, Ou's path is often a lonely one.

    A new memoir by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei honors his father's poetry and politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


    Chinese political dissident and artist Ai Weiwei has published a new book called "1000 Years of Joys and Sorrows." He took the time to discuss with The World's Carol Hills what it was like growing up as the son of a dissident poet.


    ‘Without our territory, we are nothing': Violence against Indigenous peoples spikes in Brazil

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021

    At the COP26 summit on Monday, Brazil promised to fight climate change and committed to ending illegal deforestation by 2028. But many are wary of environmental promises from President Jair Bolsonaro as forest destruction spikes under his administration.

    Thailand legalizes kratom, a mild narcotic leaf

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021

    For much of the pandemic era, bars in Thailand have shuttered, eviscerating the country's food-and-beverage sector. But the legalization of kratom caught many by surprise, and now, some bar owners are hoping the drug can keep their businesses alive.

    Gil Scott-Heron 'was first and foremost an activist,' fellow poet says

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021

    Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee Gil Scott-Heron had a profound influence on many aspiring poets including Malik al-Nasir and his band, Malik and the OGs. Nasir joined The World's host Marco Werman to talk about his lifelong connection with Scott-Heron recounted in his new book, "Letters to Gil."

    Haunted India: A new ghost compendium features 700 creatures from A to Z

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021

    A new book called “Ghosts, Monsters and Demons of India,” co-produced by publisher Rakesh Khanna, explores the wide array of fantastical beings believed to have haunted India for centuries.

    A new law in France aims to protect indie bookshops against outsized Amazon competition

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021

    Amazon often offers cheap books with fast and free delivery options, making it hard for independent bookstores to compete. The new law regulating delivery fees will put a bit more power back into the hands of indie shops.

    A new law in France aims to protect indie bookshops against outsized Amazon competition

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021

    Amazon often offers cheap books with fast and free delivery options, making it hard for independent bookstores to compete. The new law regulating delivery fees will put a bit more power back into the hands of indie shops.

    Sudanese protester to military: ‘Our numbers are too big to be ignored'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021

    "They can't kill us all," says Dalia Abdel-Moneim, a Khartoum resident who took to the streets among thousands of other Sudanese protesters in defiance of the military coup.

    Sudanese protester to military: ‘Our numbers are too big to be ignored'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021

    "They can't kill us all," says Dalia Abdel-Moneim, a Khartoum resident who took to the streets among thousands of other Sudanese protesters in defiance of the military coup.

    Protests erupt across Sudan against military coup

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021

    Tensions came to a critical point on Monday when armed forces detained Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, Cabinet Affairs Minister Khalid Omer Yousif and other top civilian leaders.  

    Protests erupt across Sudan against military coup

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021

    Tensions came to a critical point on Monday when armed forces detained Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, Cabinet Affairs Minister Khalid Omer Yousif and other top civilian leaders.  

    In China, jump roping is a popular competitive sport. Skill level also affects kids' grades.

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021

    In China, where classrooms can have upwards of 40 students, jump rope is a relatively inexpensive sport. It doesn't take up much space so it's become a popular measure of student fitness. And it's not just a requirement — it impacts your final grade. 

    In China, jump roping is a popular competitive sport. Skill level also affects kids' grades.

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021

    In China, where classrooms can have upwards of 40 students, jump rope is a relatively inexpensive sport. It doesn't take up much space so it's become a popular measure of student fitness. And it's not just a requirement — it impacts your final grade. 

    Netflix hit ‘Squid Game' exposes the growing resentment between rich and poor, psychiatrist says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021

    The new Netflix psychological thriller series "Squid Game" is intense and brutal — but it's also fiction. Why does it have such far-reaching impact around the world? Psychiatrist Jean Kim discusses the history of the Koreas and how it affects today's popular culture with The World's host Marco Werman.

    Netflix hit ‘Squid Game' exposes the growing resentment between rich and poor, psychiatrist says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021

    The new Netflix psychological thriller series "Squid Game" is intense and brutal — but it's also fiction. Why does it have such far-reaching impact around the world? Psychiatrist Jean Kim discusses the history of the Koreas and how it affects today's popular culture with The World's host Marco Werman.

    Foragers in Catalonia embrace a new mushroom-hunting season after last year's strict lockdown

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021

    This year, mushroom-hunting season is more anticipated than ever after last year's strict quarantine measures kept most people in their own municipalities for the entire winter. The tradition is particularly strong in the northeast region of Catalonia. 

    Foragers in Catalonia embrace a new mushroom-hunting season after last year's strict lockdown

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021

    This year, mushroom-hunting season is more anticipated than ever after last year's strict quarantine measures kept most people in their own municipalities for the entire winter. The tradition is particularly strong in the northeast region of Catalonia. 

    Delgrès founder pays tribute to his family's Guadeloupean roots through music

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021

    Pascal Danaë, who founded the band Delgrès, often draws inspiration from his Guadeloupean roots and his parents' immigrant and working-class background. The group's latest album is "4 a.m.," the time when most factory workers, like his father, wake up to start their long day.

    Delgrès founder pays tribute to his family's Guadeloupean roots through music

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021

    Pascal Danaë, who founded the band Delgrès, often draws inspiration from his Guadeloupean roots and his parents' immigrant and working-class background. The group's latest album is "4 a.m.," the time when most factory workers, like his father, wake up to start their long day.

    How the West's obsession with fast fashion compounds an environmental nightmare in Ghana

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021

    As the West continues to mass produce cheap clothes, a lot of it ends up barely worn, donated or in a landfill. In Ghana, the deluge of worn-out fashions has overwhelmed the West African country's infrastructure and poses huge environmental threats to its coastlines.

    How the West's obsession with fast fashion compounds an environmental nightmare in Ghana

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021

    As the West continues to mass produce cheap clothes, a lot of it ends up barely worn, donated or in a landfill. In Ghana, the deluge of worn-out fashions has overwhelmed the West African country's infrastructure and poses huge environmental threats to its coastlines.

    In France, intensive crash courses for immigrants on French values leave many feeling like outsiders

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021

    New residents in France must take mandatory classes to learn how to integrate into French society. But immigration and integration are hot-button issues in upcoming elections, and not everyone agrees on what it means to be French.

    In France, intensive crash courses for immigrants on French values leave many feeling like outsiders

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021

    New residents in France must take mandatory classes to learn how to integrate into French society. But immigration and integration are hot-button issues in upcoming elections, and not everyone agrees on what it means to be French.

    Novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah: ‘Colonialism and its consequences are still with us'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021

    Nobel novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah joined The World's host Marco Werman to talk about what motivates him to continue to explore the ongoing consequences of colonialism in his literary works — and the power of literature to help us understand the plight of the other. 

    Novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah: ‘Colonialism and its consequences are still with us'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021

    Nobel novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah joined The World's host Marco Werman to talk about what motivates him to continue to explore the ongoing consequences of colonialism in his literary works — and the power of literature to help us understand the plight of the other. 

    Biden proclaimed Oct. 11 Indigenous Peoples' Day. But Spain still honors Columbus as part of its National Day.

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021

    The holiday celebrates Spanish national pride. But many scholars say it marks the start of one of the biggest genocides in history.

    Biden proclaimed Oct. 12 Indigenous Peoples' Day. But Spain still honors Columbus as part of its National Day.

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021

    The holiday celebrates Spanish national pride. But many scholars say it marks the start of one of the biggest genocides in history.

    Biden proclaimed Oct. 11 Indigenous Peoples' Day. But Spain still honors Columbus as part of its National Day.

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021

    The holiday celebrates Spanish national pride. But many scholars say it marks the start of one of the biggest genocides in history.

    Nobel winner Abdulrazak Gurnah brings dignity to stories of colonial dispossession, colleague says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021

    The world has discovered the magic that lies at the heart of Abdulrazak Gurnah's project, says Bashir Abu-Manneh, head of the English department at the University of Kent, where he and Gurnah have taught together for many years.

    Nobel winner Abdulrazak Gurnah brings dignity to stories of colonial dispossession, colleague says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021

    The world has discovered the magic that lies at the heart of Abdulrazak Gurnah's project, says Bashir Abu-Manneh, head of the English department at the University of Kent, where he and Gurnah have taught together for many years.

    Nobel Peace Prize is 'a testament to how truth prevails,' Rappler journalist says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee has given the Nobel Peace Prize to journalists for the first time since 1935. Sofia Tomacruz, who works at Rappler with one of this year's two winners, Maria Ressa, joined The World's host Marco Werman to discuss the significance of the announcement.

    Nobel Peace Prize is 'a testament to how truth prevails,' Rappler journalist says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee has given the Nobel Peace Prize to journalists for the first time since 1935. Sofia Tomacruz, who works at Rappler with one of this year's two winners, Maria Ressa, joined The World's host Marco Werman to discuss the significance of the announcement.

    Behind in polls, Bolsonaro bolsters his base with far-right rhetoric from the US

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021

    Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro's ties with America's far-right movement deepen as Brazilian conservative groups expand their global connections.

    Behind in polls, Bolsonaro bolsters his base with far-right rhetoric from the US

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021

    Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro's ties with America's far-right movement deepen as Brazilian conservative groups expand their global connections.

    The University of Liverpool new master's makes a whole degree of Beatlemania

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021

    The Beatles degree dives into the band's shifting perceptions over more than half a century, and how it's affected other sectors such as tourism. Holly Tessler, the professor who founded the program, joined The World's host Marco Werman to explain more about what the degree entails.

    The University of Liverpool new master's makes a whole degree of Beatlemania

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021

    The Beatles degree dives into the band's shifting perceptions over more than half a century, and how it's affected other sectors such as tourism. Holly Tessler, the professor who founded the program, joined The World's host Marco Werman to explain more about what the degree entails.

    Winegrowers in France experiment with hybrid grape varieties to combat climate change

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021

    The country anticipates a nearly 30% overall loss in output compared to 2020. The culprit: a severe late frost, followed by heavy rains which fueled mildew. These extreme weather conditions were made more likely by climate change, experts say. 

    Winegrowers in France experiment with hybrid grape varieties to combat climate change

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021

    The country anticipates a nearly 30% overall loss in output compared to 2020. The culprit: a severe late frost, followed by heavy rains which fueled mildew. These extreme weather conditions were made more likely by climate change, experts say. 

    A new doc highlights Paulo Freire's early vision of 'education as a tool for transformation' filmmaker says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021

    "A is for Angicos," a new documentary by filmmaker Catherine Murphy, looks back at the pioneering work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire.

    A new doc highlights Paulo Freire's early vision of 'education as a tool for transformation' filmmaker says

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021

    "A is for Angicos," a new documentary by filmmaker Catherine Murphy, looks back at the pioneering work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire.

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