Podcasts about Natural history

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Study of organisms including plants or animals in their environment

  • 1,275PODCASTS
  • 2,624EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 19, 2022LATEST
Natural history

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Best podcasts about Natural history

Show all podcasts related to natural history

Latest podcast episodes about Natural history

Cultivating Place
The Magical Botanicals of Flora Forager, with Bridget Beth Collins

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:30


IN the spirit of May, this week we're headed out in the garden, or down the block, or up the trail for some planty wonder and magic in the company of Bridget Beth Collins – the creative force, glittering vision, and imagination behind the botanical art of Flora Forager. Bridget is a gardener, a mother, and an artist who often brings all three of her life roles together in her work. She founded the Instagram feed and custom artistry known as Flora Forager in the 2000-teens and has since been the author of three books – The Art of Flora Forager, the Flora Forager ABCs, and most recently the Flower Fairy Journals. Bridget joins us this week from her home and garden in Seattle, Washington to share more about the importance of looking at the world through glittering (flowery) eyes. Listen in! 170617-123_480x480.jpg Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Citation Needed
The Bone Wars

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:03


The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur Rush,[1] was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope (of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh (of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and the destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival's reputation and cut off his funding, using attacks in scientific publications. Our theme song was written and performed by Anna Bosnick. If you'd like to support the show on a per episode basis, you can find our Patreon page here.  Be sure to check our website for more details.

Straight From The Cutter's Mouth: A Retina Podcast
Episode 343: Journal Club including discussion of fibrates for DR, natural history of ERM, COVID-19 and vascular occlusions, Google searches and Teprotumumab

Straight From The Cutter's Mouth: A Retina Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Drs. Nicholas Farber, M. Ali Khan, and Safa Rahmani join for a journal club discussion of four recent publications in major ophthalmology journals:Fibrates and Diabetic Retinopathy (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/2790668)Natural History of Epiretinal Membranes (https://www.ophthalmologyretina.org/article/S2468-6530(22)00087-2/fulltext#%20)COVID-19 and Vascular Occlusions (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2790988)Google Searches for Thyroid Eye Disease and Teprotumumab (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/article-abstract/2791596)Financial Disclosures: Dr. Sridhar is a consultant for Alcon, Allergan, Dorc, Genentech, and Regeneron. Dr. Khan, Dr. Farber, and Dr. Rahmani have no relevant disclosures.You can claim CME credits for many podcast episodes via the AAO website. Visit https://www.aao.org/browse-multimedia?filter=Audi

Moment of Um
What is the flavor of root beer?

Moment of Um

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 6:10


A lot of people like root beer! But it's kind of hard to describe, right? It's really got a unique taste. We asked Ashley Rose-Young, a historian from the Smithsonian's Museum of Natural History, to help explain exactly what the flavor of root beer is, and share a little of the history behind this yummy drink.  Got a question that's poppin' around your brain? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we'll help get to the root of the issue.

Cultivating Place
Getting GardenFit, with Madeline Hooper and Jeff Hughes

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 57:02


Any gardener and their muscles, bones, joints, and ligaments know that gardening is a full-contact sport (or religion), this week we're joined by Madeline de Vries Hooper and Jeff Hughes, the founders of GardenFit, a new PBS series focusing on a holistic approach to fitness and taking care of your body while you take care of your garden, because as Madeline and Jeff believe: your body is your best garden tool. Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR ROB MOIR - Ocean River Institute

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:24


Dr. Moir is an educator, scientist, and activist with a proven history of institutional management and marine policy success. Dr. Moir has been a leader of citizen science and efforts to clean up Salem Sound and Boston Harbor, as president of the advocacy organizations Salem Sound Harbor Monitors, Salem Sound 2000 and later Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, and through his appointment by the Secretary of Interior to the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. He was formerly Curator of Natural History at the Peabody Essex Museum, Curator of Education at the New England Aquarium and Executive Director of the Discovery Museums in Acton, Massachusetts. Dr. Moir was awarded a Switzer Environmental Fellowship from the Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation, and the James Centorino Award for Distinguished Performance in Marine Education by the National Marine Educators Association. He was Sea Education Association's first assistant scientist to work consecutive voyages of the R.V. Westward. Dr. Moir has a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies and a Masters of Science and Teaching from Antioch New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire and certificate of studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole. - www.oceanriver.org For Your Listening Pleasure all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network with our compliments, visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv. The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - for more information visit http://www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR ROB MOIR - Ocean River Institute

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:24


Dr. Moir is an educator, scientist, and activist with a proven history of institutional management and marine policy success. Dr. Moir has been a leader of citizen science and efforts to clean up Salem Sound and Boston Harbor, as president of the advocacy organizations Salem Sound Harbor Monitors, Salem Sound 2000 and later Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, and through his appointment by the Secretary of Interior to the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. He was formerly Curator of Natural History at the Peabody Essex Museum, Curator of Education at the New England Aquarium and Executive Director of the Discovery Museums in Acton, Massachusetts. Dr. Moir was awarded a Switzer Environmental Fellowship from the Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation, and the James Centorino Award for Distinguished Performance in Marine Education by the National Marine Educators Association. He was Sea Education Association's first assistant scientist to work consecutive voyages of the R.V. Westward. Dr. Moir has a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies and a Masters of Science and Teaching from Antioch New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire and certificate of studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole. - www.oceanriver.org For Your Listening Pleasure all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network with our compliments, visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv. The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - for more information visit http://www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR ROB MOIR - Ocean River Institute

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:25


Dr. Moir is an educator, scientist, and activist with a proven history of institutional management and marine policy success. Dr. Moir has been a leader of citizen science and efforts to clean up Salem Sound and Boston Harbor, as president of the advocacy organizations Salem Sound Harbor Monitors, Salem Sound 2000 and later Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, and through his appointment by the Secretary of Interior to the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. He was formerly Curator of Natural History at the Peabody Essex Museum, Curator of Education at the New England Aquarium and Executive Director of the Discovery Museums in Acton, Massachusetts. Dr. Moir was awarded a Switzer Environmental Fellowship from the Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation, and the James Centorino Award for Distinguished Performance in Marine Education by the National Marine Educators Association. He was Sea Education Association's first assistant scientist to work consecutive voyages of the R.V. Westward. Dr. Moir has a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies and a Masters of Science and Teaching from Antioch New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire and certificate of studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole. - www.oceanriver.orgFor Your Listening Pleasure all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network with our compliments, visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv.The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotvThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - for more information visit http://www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com

The Best of The 'X' Zone Radio/TV Show with Rob McConnell
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR ROB MOIR - Ocean River Institute

The Best of The 'X' Zone Radio/TV Show with Rob McConnell

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:25


Dr. Moir is an educator, scientist, and activist with a proven history of institutional management and marine policy success. Dr. Moir has been a leader of citizen science and efforts to clean up Salem Sound and Boston Harbor, as president of the advocacy organizations Salem Sound Harbor Monitors, Salem Sound 2000 and later Save the Harbor/Save the Bay, and through his appointment by the Secretary of Interior to the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. He was formerly Curator of Natural History at the Peabody Essex Museum, Curator of Education at the New England Aquarium and Executive Director of the Discovery Museums in Acton, Massachusetts. Dr. Moir was awarded a Switzer Environmental Fellowship from the Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation, and the James Centorino Award for Distinguished Performance in Marine Education by the National Marine Educators Association. He was Sea Education Association's first assistant scientist to work consecutive voyages of the R.V. Westward. Dr. Moir has a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies and a Masters of Science and Teaching from Antioch New England Graduate School in Keene, New Hampshire and certificate of studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole. - www.oceanriver.orgFor Your Listening Pleasure all the radio shows available on The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network with our compliments, visit - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv.The ‘X' Zone Broadcast Network Shows and Archives - https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotvThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - for more information visit http://www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com

Good Reading Podcast
Caroline Petit on an epic love story across three continents in 'The Natural History of Love'

Good Reading Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 15:24


Carolina Fonçeca is a lonely sixteen-year-old girl confined to a remote Brazilian sugar plantation in the 1850s. Her life changes when the French explorer, naturalist and diplomat, the Count de Castelnau stumbles out of the Amazon rainforest, delirious and near death. With a head full of Balzac and dreams of Parisian life, she nurses him back to health and makes the decision to follow him back to Paris as his lover. What Carolina doesn't know is that François has a wife and son back in France. The Natural History of Love is a meticulously researched work of historical fiction based on the lives of the Count de Castelnau and Carolina Fonçeca. From their first meeting in the Brazilian jungle to the Salons of Paris and eventually to Federation-era Melbourne, and against the backdrop of a time when Darwin's theories were transforming society, this is a fascinating story, masterfully told. In this episode Gregory Dobbs chats to Caroline Petit about recreating a grand love story from dusty files and letters, the collision between religion, black magic and the natural sciences, and giving a voice to a remarkable woman silenced by the annals of 19th century history.

First Voices Radio
05/08/22 - Edgardo Krebs

First Voices Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 56:47


Edgardo Krebs was born and raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He studied social anthropology at the University of Oxford in England. Edgardo's main topic of interest is the history of anthropology in Argentina. He did fieldwork among the Tatsimo of southern Madagascar, and in Tierra del Fuego, following the diaries of Sir Baldwin Spencer. He conducted several research trips to the Gran Chaco. Harpers Magazine, The Washington Post, and The Times Literary Supplement have published his work, which has also appeared in several scholarly journals and books. Edgardo's book on the first film adaptation of Richard Wright's 1950 film Native Son, which was shot in Buenos Aires with Wright himself playing the lead role, appeared in Spanish. Edgardo was the executive producer of the film's restoration. Edgardo is now working on the biography of Alfred Métraux, one of the pioneers of Gran Chaco ethnography. Edgardo is a Research Associate at the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Tiokasin and Edgardo discuss "Landmark Napalpí Massacre trial begins in Argentina, 98 years after Indigenous Killings," an article that was published in The Buenos Aires Times on April 20, 2022. The article opens with this sentence: "Almost 100 years after police officers and settlers in Argentina mowed down hundreds of Indigenous people protesting living and working conditions on cotton plantations, a landmark trial has opened in Chaco Province to finally secure some form of accountability."Production Credits:Tiokasin Ghosthorse (Lakota), Host and Executive ProducerLiz Hill (Red Lake Ojibwe), ProducerMalcolm Burn, Studio Engineer, Radio Kingston, WKNY 1490 AM and 107.9 FM, Kingston, NYTiokasin Ghosthorse, Audio EditorLoye Miller, Final Audio EditMusic Selections:1. Song Title: Tahi Roots Mix (First Voices Radio Theme Song)Artist: Moana and the Moa HuntersAlbum: Tahi (1993)Label: Southside Records (Australia and New Zealand)(00:00:15)2. Song Title: Tree of Life (lead vocals by Don Amero)Song Length: 03:14Artist: Indian CityAlbum: Here & Now (2017)Label: Rising Sun Productions, Inc., Winnipeg, MB, Canada(00:31:10)3. Song Title: Tiny HandsSong Length: 03:04Artist: Quantum TangleAlbum: Shelter As We Go (2017)Label: Coax Records, Calgary, AB, Canada(00:35:05)4. Song Title: Spring to ComeSong Length: 03:07Artist: Digging RootsAlbum: We Are (2009)Label: Digging Roots(00:37:45)5. Song: Some Kind of HellSong Length: 03:34Artist: BurnstickAlbum: Kîyânaw (2019)Label: Burnstick(00:41:08)6. Song Title: Reap and SowSong Length: 05:14Artist: One Way SkyEP: Soul Searcher (2021)Label: Akimel Records(00:44:57)7. Song Title: Star PeopleSong Length: 03:54Artist: Indian CityCD: Code Red (2021)Label: Rising Sun Productions, Inc., Winnipeg, MB, Canada(00:53:23)AKANTU INSTITUTEVisit Akantu Institute, an institute that Tiokasin founded with a mission of contextualizing original wisdom for troubled times. Go to https://akantuinstitute.org/ to find out more and consider joining his Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/Ghosthorse.

The Whalenerd‘s Podcast
Episode 109: Special Guest Chase Dekker

The Whalenerd‘s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 61:20


In Episode 109 We had a special guest Chase Dekker. Chase was born and raised in Monterey, CA. He attended college in Washington at Western Washington State University where he studied Organismal Biology & Zoology. After college he lived in Jackson Hole, Wyoming with daily access to Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. He now calls the Monterey area home, but has traveled the world guiding photography trips for many years. You can regularly find him out with Sanctuary Cruises in Moss Landing, CA and his photography has been published all over the place including the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington DC.

The Institute of Black Imagination.
E47.David Zilber: A Fermenter's Guide to the Universe.

The Institute of Black Imagination.

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 99:39


Today's episode is with Chef, Fermenter, Food Scientist, Photographer, and New York Times best-selling author David Zilber. David is the former Director of Fermentation for “NOMA” Copenhagen; known as one of the most coveted restaurants on the planet, and co-author of the New York Times best-selling book, “The Noma Guide to Fermentation”. In this episode, he shares how the power of a nudge can unlock a world of unlimited possibilities, and trusting biological processes beyond instant gratification.   We explore David's multicultural upbringing growing up in Toronto, Canada, along with topics that range from connecting fermentation to everyday life, how photography allows him to tether his curiosity for science and fermentation, and ultimately how he's been able to bloom in the midst of chaos. David's story is one filled with invaluable gems and speaks to the power of leaning into curiosity.  Things mentioned https://www.theworlds50best.com/the-list/1-10/Noma.html ("NOMA", Copenhagen restaurant) https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/ (James Webb Space Telescope) https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/what-is-the-hubble-space-telecope-58.html (Hubble Space Telescope) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrange_point (Lagrange point) What to read https://bookshop.org/books/the-noma-guide-to-fermentation-including-koji-kombuchas-shoyus-misos-vinegars-garums-lacto-ferments-and-black-fruits-and-vegetables/9781579657185 (The Noma Guide to Fermentation: Including Koji, Kombuchas, Shoyus, Misos, Vinegars, Garums, Lacto-Ferments, and Black Fruits and Vegetables) by David Zilber and René Redzepi https://davidzilber.medium.com/inbetweeners-78b194dbb3f8 (Inbetweeners: On the meaning of (re)mediation in mycelial and human worlds) by David Zilber https://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/ferm-excerpt/ (Why Fermentation Is So Important To One Of The World's Best Restaurants) https://bookshop.org/books/essays-in-love/9781531871918 (Essays in Love) by Alain de Botton https://bookshop.org/books/the-dawn-of-everything-a-new-history-of-humanity/9780374157357 (The Dawn of Everything) by David Graeber and David Wengrow https://bookshop.org/books/living-planet-the-web-of-life-on-earth-9780008477868/9780008477820 (The Living Planet) by David Attenborough https://bookshop.org/books/on-the-origin-of-evolution-tracing-darwin-s-dangerous-idea-from-aristotle-to-dna/9781633887053 (On the Origin of Evolution: Tracing 'Darwin's Dangerous Idea' from Aristotle to DNA) by John Gribbin and Mary Gribbin https://bookshop.org/books/a-natural-history-of-the-future-what-the-laws-of-biology-tell-us-about-the-destiny-of-the-human-species/9781541619302 (A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us about the Destiny of the Human Species) by Rob Dunn  https://bookshop.org/books/the-anthropocene-reviewed-essays-on-a-human-centered-planet-9780593412428/9780525556534 (The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays on a Human-Centered Planet) by John Green https://bookshop.org/books/being-a-human-adventures-in-forty-thousand-years-of-consciousness-9781250855404/9781250783714 (Being a Human: Adventures in Forty Thousand Years of Consciousness) by Charles Foster What to listen to https://open.spotify.com/track/0jNTJSaktLVy8iAi7KY2zB (Too Hot) by Kool & The Gang https://open.spotify.com/track/0nyrltZrQGAJMBZc1bYvuQ (Get Up Offa That Thing) by James Brown https://open.spotify.com/track/2grjqo0Frpf2okIBiifQKs (September) by Earth, Wind & Fire Who to follow Follow David Zilber on https://www.instagram.com/david_zilber/ (IG @david_zilber) You can also find his photography https://www.instagram.com/d_c_j_z/ (here). This conversation was recorded on February 3rd, 2022. Host https://www.instagram.com/dario.studio/ (Dario Calmese)  Producer https://www.instagram.com/carmendharris/ (Carmen D. Harris)   Production Assistant: https://www.instagram.com/holly_woodco/ (Coniqua...

Fundação (FFMS) - [IN] Pertinente
EP 57 | CIÊNCIA | De onde viemos?

Fundação (FFMS) - [IN] Pertinente

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 54:31


AVISO: este episódio vai trazer revelações extraordinárias. Prepare-se para saber que realmente somos todos provenientes dos macacos, todos viemos de África e, meus caros senhores e senhoras, em definitivo fiquem saber que não existem raças puras: todos somos uma enorme miscelânea genética.Mas talvez haja outras perguntas que lhe passem pela cabeça: somos em exclusivo descendentes dos Australopitecos? Desde quando somos mesmo ‘nós'?Num episódio que mais parece um filme policial, onde se misturam a religião, o suspense e, sim, o sexo (!), Inês Lopes Gonçalves e Paulo Gama Mota levam-nos a um passeio por todos os milhares e milhões de anos que justificam o simples facto de… você existir. REFERÊNCIAS E LINKS ÚTEIS:LIVROS:Svante Paabo – O Homem de Neanderthal.https://www.almedina.net/o-homem-de-neandertal-em-busca-dos-genomas-perdidos-1571842780.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjwma6TBhDIARIsAOKuANxkiSgIlmEzpl9Rocc4OCP9fsP5KufipMhgL4X6t_YnzOk8KLU2ck4aArdOEALw_wcB Yuval Harari – Sapiens.https://www.wook.pt/livro/sapiens-historia-breve-da-humanidade-yuval-noah-harari/19278255 Chris Stringer – The origin of our species.https://www.fnac.pt/The-Origin-of-Our-Species-Chris-Stringer/a1184217?gclid=Cj0KCQjwma6TBhDIARIsAOKuANzfR6qPyrYcheyqECZoA9ZH6EsG4IgZqLPrYBB_p9JWIvkr_fMkZN4aApyrEALw_wcB&origin=google_pla_livro VÍDEOS:Simples e didático sobre a nossa evolução desde a separação com a linhagem que deu origem aos chimpanzés actuais:Our family tree (7 milhões de anos) – American Museum of Natural History https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZv8VyIQ7YUAncient DNA – Eske Willerslev – Director do laboratório de geo-genetics em Copenhagahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzGfGNlDV7s BIOSINÊS LOPES GONÇALVESInês Lopes Gonçalves é uma pessoa, função que acumula com as de radialista, locutora e apresentadora de televisão. Na rádio é actualmente uma d'As Três da Manhã da Rádio Renascença, na televisão é a anfitriã do talk show Traz Pr'á Frente, na RTP e RTP Memória.Fez rádio na Antena 3, foi apresentadora do 5 Para a Meia Noite na RTP e desde 2017 que é uma das caras do Festival da Canção. O seu percurso começou na informação como jornalista na Rádio Renascença, passou pela Sport Tv, Canal Q, e colaborou com as revistas Time Out, Sábado e semanário Expresso.  PAULO GAMA MOTAPaulo Gama Mota é biólogo, doutorado pela Universidade de Coimbra, Professor Associado do Departamento de Ciências da Vida da FCTUC e investigador do CIBIO. Investiga o comportamento animal e a compreensão das suas causas evolutivas, incluindo a comunicação animal e selecção sexual. É docente em áreas relacionadas com a evolução e a evolução do comportamento. Mantém um grande interesse pela comunicação de ciência, tendo sido Director de vários museus e responsável pelo projecto e Director do Museu da Ciência da Universidade de Coimbra (2006-2015). Comissariou várias exposições de ciência e coordenou vários projectos de ciência cidadã, sempre com a preocupação de aproximar os cidadãos da ciência. 

The European Skeptics Podcast
TheESP – Ep. #324 – The sky is green with purple elephants

The European Skeptics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 59:58


Russia takes post-truth to new levels Mostly bad news this week, but on the bright side we have The Skeptic's Guide soon to come out with their new book The Skeptic's Guide to the Future (pre-order it now!) and the upcoming European Skeptics Congress in Vienna. See you there! This week we celebrate Sir David Attenborough‘s 96th birthday and we take a look at Pope Francis and his dealings with the other “Pope”, Patriarch Kirill, also known as Putin's altar boy. Then we go through some news: RUSSIA: Russian long-term recruitment programme disguised as education INTERNATIONAL: Measles is the new-old threat UKRAINE: The fake news factory on this side of the fence… SPAIN: Families in despair over IM Academy: ‘The crypto-sect has kidnapped our children' INTERNATIONAL: Hepatitis cases cause for concern – and the disinformation factory keeps rolling SWEDEN: Macchiarini trial started this week – Procecution says surgery was experimental, cruel, and against all science and evidence UK: GCSE in Natural History announced and brings hope for environmentalism Pontus gets really angry with Putin's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov this week and hands him a hard Really Wrong Award. There's also a “Bonus Bad Award” to the Russian propaganda machine that implies that Swedes are Nazis. Enjoy! Segments: Intro; Greetings; TWISH; Pontus Pokes The Pope; News; Really Wrong; Quote And Farewell; Outro; Out-Takes;

Cultivating Place
In Honor of Mother's Day - Theodora Park, Charleston, SC with David Rawle

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 57:36


David Rawle is the founder and force (with contribution and support from his wife, Carol Perkins, and a wide variety of community members in Charleston, SC), behind Theodora Park, a public park in Charleston - designed and cared for (with financial and care planning for the long haul) in a way that is reminiscent of the very best of private gardens: it is open, it is both lively and tranquil, it is filled with beautiful seasonal (native and non-native) plants, it offers places to sit, to play, to splash as well as to gather; it offers artful views representative of and inviting for the entire community - residents and visitors alike - human and more-than-human alike. Theodora Park was opened in 2015 and is dedicated to the memory of David's mother - Theodora. Happy Mother's Day to all mothering souls and spaces - may all of our gardens, public and private, be welcoming, nurturing – shall we say mothering - places for all. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Arizona has destinations for natural history lovers

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022


It's National Travel and Tourism Week, which is a great time to start planning your next vacation. Becky Blaine, the Deputy Director for the Arizona Office of Tourism, joins Lisa Dent on Chicago’s Afternoon News to talk about what makes Arizona a true natural wonderland. Find your itinerary at www.letsseeaz.com. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon […]

The First Time
S5 Ep162: Kate and Katherine catch up + FEATURED BOOK The Natural History of Love (Caroline Petit)

The First Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 38:20


This episode Kate and Katherine catch up and talk about all the stuff, including Alice Walker's journals, Jennifer Egan's new novel The Candy House, Sentimental Garbage podcast (again) and The Writers Room podcast, (not the Charlotte Wood one [also excellent] the one that's about the writing of the TV series And Just Like That.)   The Featured Book segment is brought to you by Affirm Press and we talk to author Caroline Petit about her new book The Natural History of Love.  Check out show notes for this episode on our website www.thefirsttimepodcast.com or get in touch via Twitter (@thefirsttimepod) or Instagram (@thefirsttimepod). Don't forget you can support us and the making of Season Five via our Patreon page. Thanks for joining us!

Cultivating Place
Color in & Out of the Garden, Watercolor Practices for Painters, Gardeners, & Nature Lovers

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 54:24


In preparation for May and Mother's Day here in the US, we're in conversation with Lorene Edwards Forkner, a gardener, a writer, a cook, a mother, a daughter, the garden columnist for the Seattle Times, and known as gardener cook on-line. Lorene joins CP this week to share more about her artistic garden-based daily practice for the last four years, which has resulted in the new book: Color in and Out of the Garden, Watercolor Practices for Painters, Gardeners, and Nature Lovers, out now from Abrams Press. The practice and the book are invitations to lean into her own mission statement in life, seen primarily through the lens of the garden: "look closely, with great heart”. A good blessing for all mothering souls in the world. Join us! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

RadioCIAMS
SAPIENS Talk Back: Looking Forward Looking Back

RadioCIAMS

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 66:47


The Archaeology Centers Coalition and RadioCIAMS present “SAPIENS Talk Back”: eight conversations with students and scholars that expand upon the insights of Season 4 of the SAPIENS podcast entitled “Our Past is the Future.” In the final episode of our series, we look back on both the SAPIENS series and the conversations we have had here on SAPIENS Talk Back in order to look ahead to the future of archaeology. Our guests this episode represent new professional organizations that are pushing the discipline of archaeology in consequential new directions: Dr. Ayana Omilade Flewellen, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Riverside and co-founder and current president of the Society of Black Archaeologists (SBA); Dr. Sara Gonzalez, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington and Curator of Archaeology at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, and a co-founder of the Indigenous Archaeology Collective (IAC); and Dr. Lewis Borck, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at New Mexico Highlands University and a founding member of the Black Trowel Collective. You can support the Black Trowel Collective microgrants program at blacktrowelcollective.wordpress.com and follow them on Twitter @BlackTrowel. To join the SBA, go to societyofblackarchaeologists.com and follow their work on Twitter @SbaArch. You can follow the Indigenous Archaeology Collective on FaceBook and Twitter @indigarchs. “SAPIENS Talk Back” was developed in collaboration with the Indigenous Archaeology Collective and the Society of Black Archaeologists, with special help from Drs. Sara Gonzalez, Justin Dunnavant, and Ayana Flewellen. Special thanks also to Chip Colwell and the production team at SAPIENS, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and House of Pod.   This episode was made possible by financial support from Department of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Denver. Hosts Sophia Taborski and Alice Wolff from the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies join graduate student members from the SBA, IAC, and Black Trowel Collective: Ashleigh Thompson (University of Arizona), Elliot Helmer (Washington State University), and Yoli Ngandali (University of Washington) for a conversation on how to reshape the discipline. SAPIENS Talk Back is a production of the Archaeological Centers Coalition. You can find more information about their work at archaeologycoalition.org.  RadioCIAMS is a member of the American Anthropological Association's podcast library. Our theme music was composed by Charlee Mandy and performed by Maia Dedrick and Russell Dedrick. This episode was produced at Cornell University by Adam Smith, with Liam McDonald as engineer and Rebecca Gerdes as production assistant.

City Cast Pittsburgh
What Should The Carnegie Do With Human Remains?

City Cast Pittsburgh

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 24:48


The Carnegie Museum of Natural History has a lot of weird wonders in its collection, but few have plagued management quite like the diorama “Lion Attacking a Dromedary.” It's got a lot of inaccuracies, from the meshing of several Middle Eastern and North African cultures, to placements that reinforce violence, colonialism and misogyny. Modern curators struggle to even call it art — which was also the consensus in 1899 when industrialist Andrew Carnegie first acquired it for his new museum in Pittsburgh from a private collection being sold off in France. But more recently, scientists also discovered it contains human remains, likely acquired from the original taxidermists, who were well-known grave robbers. Museum director Gretchen Baker joins City Cast's Megan Harris to talk about what comes next and what local patrons have had to say about it. Our newsletter is fresh daily at 6 a.m. Sign up here. We're also on Twitter @citycastpgh & Instagram @CityCastPgh!

365 Brothers - Every Day Black Men
Marine Biologist Eric Archer Tests The Bounds of Mastery in All Things

365 Brothers - Every Day Black Men

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 58:02


Raised in Temple Hills, Maryland, just outside of Washington, D.C, a young Eric Archer frequently visited the Smithsonian museums. He fondly remembers standing underneath an iconic (now defunct) whale exhibit at the Museum of Natural History. It left quite an impression. He's now a Marine Biologist based in San Diego where he researches whale family genetics and taxonomy. He also loved visiting the Nation Air and Space Museum. Yep, he's also a pilot. And a 3rd Degree Black Belt. And plays bass. A few of his other hobbies include sailing, kayaking, scuba diving, woodworking, camping and hiking. He also drops a few jokes here and there, so maybe comedian is his next opportunity to test the limits of mastery. Favorite song:  Woman in Chains by Tears for Fears. Favorite words are an elaborated version of this quote from Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching: "Water is fluid, soft and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. This is another paradox: what is soft is strong.”   Instagram @365brothers Are you our next guest? - Let's talk. Support us!   365 Brothers on Patreon.  Special thanks to our earliest and consistent supporters, Sonji Walker, Abigail Gonzalez, William C. Hamilton, Jr. and Shedrick Sanders!!! Check out Alitu for more ease editing, polishing and publishing your podcast. About this podcast: In each episode, a Brother reflects on his life; explores the experience of being a Black man in America; shares his interactions with law enforcement; and answers the signature question "If America was a woman, what would you say to her? You won't find a collection of conversations with Black men like this anywhere else. Hear their wisdom. Be inspired. Host, Rahbin Shyne, is an author, educator, creative and avid half-marathon walker. https://www.linkedin.com/in/365brothers/

In The Moment Podcast
133. Linda Lee with Shin Yu Pai: Meet Town Hall Seattle's Curator-in-Residence

In The Moment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 26:48


As Curator-in-Residence for Town Hall, Linda Lee has been working with Town Hall Seattle since October 2021 to better interpret and display our permanent art collections, as well as develop a longer-term exhibition plan including artwork from the community. In the 133rd episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Program Director Shin Yu Pai interviews Lee about her work as Curator-in-Residence, her collaboration with Urban Artworks to put art on our walls, and exciting opportunities for the public to get hands-on and make murals with us this June. Linda Lee is a Museology graduate student at the University of Washington and aspires to pursue a Ph.D. in Paleobiology after graduation in 2022. Her fields of interest are in Curatorial and Collections Management, with a particular proclivity towards Natural History, Heritage and History museums. Shin Yu Pai is Program Director for Town Hall. She hosts the Lyric World podcast for In The Moment and is developing a podcast with KUOW Public Radio that will launch in June 2022. She's the author of 11 books and a 2022 Artist Trust Fellow. Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

In The Moment podcast
133. Linda Lee with Shin Yu Pai: Meet Town Hall Seattle's Curator-in-Residence

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 26:48


As Curator-in-Residence for Town Hall, Linda Lee has been working with Town Hall Seattle since October 2021 to better interpret and display our permanent art collections, as well as develop a longer-term exhibition plan including artwork from the community. In the 133rd episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Program Director Shin Yu Pai interviews Lee about her work as Curator-in-Residence, her collaboration with Urban Artworks to put art on our walls, and exciting opportunities for the public to get hands-on and make murals with us this June. Linda Lee is a Museology graduate student at the University of Washington and aspires to pursue a Ph.D. in Paleobiology after graduation in 2022. Her fields of interest are in Curatorial and Collections Management, with a particular proclivity towards Natural History, Heritage and History museums. Shin Yu Pai is Program Director for Town Hall. She hosts the Lyric World podcast for In The Moment and is developing a podcast with KUOW Public Radio that will launch in June 2022. She's the author of 11 books and a 2022 Artist Trust Fellow. Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

Big Picture Science
In Living Color (rebroadcast)

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 51:30


The world is a colorful place, and human eyes have evolved to take it in – from vermillion red to bright tangerine to cobalt blue. But when we do, are you and I seeing the same thing?  Find out why color perception is a trick of the brain, and why you and I may not see the same shade of green. Or blue. Or red. Also, platypuses and the growing club of fluorescent mammals, and the first new blue pigment in more than two centuries.   Guests: Paula Anich – Associate Professor of Natural Resources, Northland College Michaela Carlson – Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Northland College Rob DeSalle – Curator at the American Museum of Natural History, and co-author of “A Natural History of Color: the Science Behind What We See and How We See It” Mas Subramanian – Professor of Materials Science at Oregon State University originally aired March 8, 2021 Featuring music by Dewey Dellay and Jun Miyake Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Farming Today
25/04/22 - Natural History GCSE and farming, Kendal College and water

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 11:20


We asked the Department for Education if the new Natural History GCSE will include farming - they told us the focus will be natural history rather than farming...but said "There is a range of content that could be covered - we will work closely with independent experts and a range of stakeholders and exam boards to decide the detailed content.” We speak to one of those bodies about how it could work. Cumbria's Newton Rigg college provided an education in agriculture for tens of thousands of farmers over more than 120 years. But as we reported last summer it closed, much to the disappointment and anger of the local farming community - after Askam Bryan College in York which was running it said it was no long financially viable. But there's been widespread support for another further education establishment, Kendal College, which has taken on teaching the next generation of Cumbrian farmers. And water is an increasingly tricky issue for British farmers, who are getting used to wetter winters and dryer summers. We hear how some are now getting nervous after receiving less rain than normal in April. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio Bristol by Heather Simons

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
#273 Terrorist threats, space debris and natural history

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 38:26


Why has Islamic State launched a new global offensive? Is the US right to ban anti-satellite missile tests? And does the UK need a natural history GCSE? The Week and Olly Mann delve behind the headlines and debate what really matter from the past seven days. With Joe Evans, Kate Samuelson and Alok Jha.

Cultivating Place
Earth Day- Parks for the Nature of Everyone, Olmstead200

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 62:46


In honor of Earth Day on April 22nd, this week, Cultivating Place is in conversation about a person who committed their career to the idea, design, and championing of Parks for the Nature of Everyone. April 26th is the 200th birthday of Frederick Law Olmsted – in celebration and recognition, the National Association for Olmsted Parks is joining with celebration partner locations around the US to host Olmsted200 events, reminding us of the long and valuable legacy of Olmsted – which remains highly relevant for us today. To hear more about Frederick Law Olmsted and his influence on our green spaces to this day, Cultivating Place is joined by Dede Petri, Executive Director of the National Association for Olmsted Parks and John Rowden Senior Director of Bird-Friendly Communities with the Audubon Society. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years, and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Y Life Science
Adventures in Beetle Biodiversity

Y Life Science

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 45:31


This episode features Dr. Gareth Powell, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biology at Brigham Young University and Natalie Saxton, PhD student at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. They discuss their research, adventures doing field work, as well as the vast biodiversity of insects. 

RadioCIAMS
SAPIENS Talk Back: Repatriation And Archaeology

RadioCIAMS

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 46:54


The Archaeology Centers Coalition and RadioCIAMS present “SAPIENS Talk Back”: eight conversations with students and scholars that expand upon the insights of Season 4 of the SAPIENS podcast entitled “Our Past is the Future.” In this episode, we continue the discussion that began in episode 7 of season 4 of the SAPIENS podcast, a conversation that examines “repatriation” and what it means for archaeology. Our guests this episode are Dr. Rachel Watkins, an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at American University and a specialist in African American biohistory, and Dr. Dorothy Lippert, an expert in repatriation and a tribal liaison for the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. “SAPIENS Talk Back” was developed in collaboration with the Indigenous Archaeology Collective and the Society of Black Archaeologists, with special help from Drs. Sara Gonzalez, Justin Dunnavant, and Ayana Flewellen. Special thanks also to Chip Colwell and the production team at SAPIENS, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and House of Pod.   This episode was made possible by financial support from the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA with additional support from the University of Arizona's School of Anthropology. Hosts Ruth Portes and Claire Challancin from the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies join Dr. Wendy Teeter (UCLA), Mina Nikolovieni (Brown University), and Amanda Althoff (Columbia University) for a conversation on how to reshape the discipline. SAPIENS Talk Back is a production of the Archaeological Centers Coalition. You can find more information about their work at archaeologycoalition.org.  RadioCIAMS is a member of the American Anthropological Association's podcast library. Our theme music was composed by Charlee Mandy and performed by Maia Dedrick and Russell Dedrick. This episode was produced at Cornell University by Adam Smith, with Rafael Cruz Gil as engineer and Rebecca Gerdes as production assistant.

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 120: Lichenology - Biodiversity and Evolution of Fungal, Algal Symbiosis (feat. Matthew Nelsen PhD)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 77:56


Today on Mushroom Hour we are joined by illustrious lichen expert Matthew Nelsen PhD. Matthew is a Research Scientist at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Matt's research began in botany, ecology and environmental science and has more recently gravitated towards: (i) the evolution of symbiotic associations; and (ii) the evolution of eukaryotic microbes (fungi and algae), and the roles they have played in shaping terrestrial ecosystems and nutrient-cycling over geologic timescales. Both avenues of his research attempt to link diverse fields and organismal groups. He also has conducted work addressing the timing and evolutionary consequences of ant-plant interactions. Matt thank you so much for joining us on the Mushroom Hour!    TOPICS COVERED:    Fungus & Algae Species Forming Lichen Partnerships    Host Specificity in Lichen Partnerships    Evolutionary History of Lichen    Vascular Plants on Land Before Lichen?!    Challenges of Working on “Big Time”    Process of Lichen Formation, Fungal Phenotypes    Lichen Blurring Species Boundaries    Cleptobiosis    Role in Carbon & Nitrogen Cycles    Lichen as an Ecosystem    Lichen & Air Quality in an Environment    Lichenometry   Analysis of Fungal Coal Formation Hypothesis    Ant Plant Interactions   EPISODE RESOURCES:   Matthew Nelsen Website: https://mpnelsen.com/   Lichen: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichen   Xanthoria parietina (Lichen): https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Xanthoria_parietina   Trebouxia (Lichen Genus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trebouxia   Toby Spribille (Lichen Expert): https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=vPlIL5IAAAAJ&hl=en   Betsy Arnold (Endophyte Expert): http://www.arnoldlab.net/   Article on Fungal Coal Formation Hypothesis: https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.1517943113  Arthrobotrys (Fungal Genus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthrobotrys   Mycoparasites: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/mycoparasites   

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 198: Bean Bag

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 64:00


Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet for a trivia quiz on topics including Classic Television, Natural History, Geography, Architecture, Food, Fantasy Football, Animals, History and more! Round One CLASSIC TELEVISION - Which writer first gained fame with Patterns in 1955, a TV play that was the first television drama to ever be repeated due to popularity, and would later write 92 of the original 156 episodes of the The Twilight Zone? NATURAL HISTORY - Scrotum Humanum was the first what to have a description and illustration in the Natural History of Oxfordshire in 1676? ANATOMY - With a name translating from Latin into English as “little belly”, what is the term for either bottom chamber of the heart? GEOGRAPHY - Kampuchea is an alternative name for what Asian country? ARCHITECTURE - Daniel Burnham is best known for designing what triangular 22-story National Historical Landmark which is located on 5th and Broadway in New York City and was originally known as the Fuller Building? POP MUSIC - The hit song "Take Me Out" by Franz Ferdinand was partially inspired by what 2001 World War II movie? Round Two GARAGE ITEMS - Found in most garages, ethylene glycol is better known as a basic what? FANTASY FOOTBALL - The first private and public fantasy football drafts both occurred during the 1960's in which California city (and were arranged by individuals with financial interests in that city's NFL team)? FOOD - Pigs blood, fat, pearl barley, wheat and oatmeal are ingredients of what type of blood sausage, originating in Great Britain and Ireland? ANIMALS - Pan troglodytes is the scientific name for what social and endangered animal that can be found in the forest of Africa's Congo Basin? CANDY - Opal Fruits was the original name of what candy? FAMOUS SONGS - What song was reportedly Jim Steinman‘s tryout as a lyricist for Andrew Lloyd Webber, was made into a 1996 double-platinum hit by Celine Dion and was covered a decade later as a duet featuring Meatloaf and Marion Raven on Bat Out of hell III? Final Questions U.S. HISTORY - Which prominent figure in US history led the ​​Combahee Ferry Raid in 1863, becoming the first woman to lead a major military operation in the US during the Civil War? RESTAURANTS - Prior to 2013, what restaurant chain was the largest purchaser of kale in the United States? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges April 20th, 2022 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EDT April 21st, 2022 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - OOPS! All Podcast Questions - Ollies Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EDT You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Gil, Brandon, Adam V., Tommy (The Electric Mud) and Tim (Pat's Garden Service) Thank you, Team Captains – Matthew, Captain Nick, Grant, Mo, Jenny, Rick G., Skyler, Dylan, Lydia, Gil, David, Aaron, Kristen & Fletcher Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Trent, Justin M., Robb, Rikki, Jon Lewis, Moo, Tim, Nabeel, Patrick, Jon, Adam B., Ryan, Mollie, Lisa, Alex, Spencer, Kaitlynn, Manu, Luc, Hank, Justin P., Cooper, Elyse, Sarah, Karly, Kristopher, Josh, Lucas Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Issa, Nathan, Sai, Cara, Megan, Christopher, Brandon, Sarah, FoxenV, Laurel, A-A-Ron, Loren, Hbomb, Alex, Doug, Kevin and Sara, Tiffany, Allison, Paige, We Do Stuff, Kenya, Jeff, Eric, Steven, Efren, Mike J., Mike C., Mike. K If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support." Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet for a bonus general knowledge quiz on topics including Birthstones, Sports, Movies, Celebrities, Musicals, 90's Memes and more, exclusively for our supporters!

Intermediate Spanish Stories
E34 El Tiburón del Mioceno

Intermediate Spanish Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 28:54


Nestled in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains near Bakersfield is Sharktooth Hill. First documented by William P. Blake in 1853, Sharktooth Hill is one of the most significant Miocene fossil sites in the world Sharktooth Hill is a middle Miocene marine exposure of the Round Mountain Silt unit of the Temblor Formation. Using magnetic stratigraphy data, the age of this unit is estimated to be around 15.2 and 16 million years old (Prothero et al., 2008). However, above the bone beds, the sediments accumulated in the Temblor Sea at a fast rate, and animal remains were not disturbed by ocean currents. So, occasionally associated specimens of marine animals, such as Cetaceans, Sea Lions, Sea Cows, and Sea Turtles can be found. Examples of these associated specimens can be seen at the Beuna Vista Museum of Natural History.

Big Table
Episode 32: Carole Angier on W.G. Sebald

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 41:41


The Interview:Although he did experience some fanfare in his lifetime, German writer, academic, and novelist W.G. Sebald—Max to his friends and colleagues—died 20 years ago in a car crash near his adoptive home in Norwich, England. He was only 58.His postmodern novels—Vertigo, The Emigrants, The Rings of Saturn and Austerlitz—were written in quick succession in a period of less than 10 years, and they were all published in English translations in less than five years, making him one of Germany's biggest authors, almost overnight. Before his death, Sebald had taught in the British university system for decades, mainly at the University of East Anglia, where he helped found the literary translation department. He really did not begin writing in his signature style—a mix of travelogue, memoir, historical fiction with embedded pictures and ephemera—until middle age, however. Walter Benjamin famously opined that any great writer creates their own genre; Sebald accomplished this with just a brief collection of books. Through his unique, poetic prose style of writing, his books grab hold and immerse readers in a world of memory and loss like no other novelist. Trauma runs through his work and his characters seem so real because, like most fictional creations—at least in part—they are based on real people. Sebald's distinctive style got him into trouble, both when he was alive and certainly posthumously. Some readers have taken issue with his re-purposing of Jewish folks' true-life stories. He has been accused, in some cases, of exploiting these stories for personal gain through novelization. When I first began to read his work, shortly after his death in 2001, I interpreted his work to be an homage to the Jewish lives he chronicled, written by a German who grew up in the shadow, silence, and shame of the horrors of WWII. Sebald's father was a military man—a Nazi officer during the war and a member of the re-constituted German army in the post-war years. Sebald grew up in the beatific surroundings of Bavaria in Germany and had a deep hatred for the Nazi regime and his own family's complicity. The fate of the Jews—and other minorities targeted by the Nazi war machine—is a mournful thread that Sebald tears at throughout all of his novels. He also wrote a nonfiction study of the bombings of German cities, entitled On the Natural History of Destruction.Enter biographer Carole Angier, whose previous books include studies of novelist Jean Rhys and Italian physicist and writer Primo Levi. Angier, who grew up in Canada before returning to the UK, is of Viennese descent. She is also Jewish and roughly the same age Sebald would have been had he lived. It took her seven years to finish Speak, Silence (Bloomsbury, 2021). The title, of course, a nod to Nabokov's famous memoir, Speak, Memory, one of Sebald's favorite books. Angier and I caught up recently to discuss her 600-plus-page doorstopper of a book. One of the reasons I wanted to talk with her about it—apart from my longtime love of Sebald—was to ask for her thoughts on the controversy his work still seems to generate, even 20 years after his death. A great deal of the reviews of Speak, Silence, in the States at least, were hyper-critical of Sebald playing fast and loose with some facts in his fiction. But all great fiction writers pluck characteristics and facts to shape their fictional worlds and, so, while Sebald's use of real photographs and ephemera in his work for visual effect made his narrative style offensive to some, it also made it more potent for others. In this interview, Angier speaks to this subject, and many more.The Reading:For the reading, we pulled audio from an event at the 92nd Street Y from 2001, where Sebald read from his then newest novel Austerlitz. He was tragically killed in a car crash later that year. Music by Tangerine Dream92Y Reading link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccMCGjWLlhY&t=1620s 

Cultivating Place
The Indian Edit, with Nitasha Manchanda

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 56:08


Nitasha Manchanda is a genetic scientist, a mother, a wife, a gardener and the creator and host of a podcast series entitled The Indian Edit – exploring the inspiring lives of women of the Indian diaspora – living everywhere from Boston, where Nitasha now makes her home, to Germany, Canada, and even returned to India. Subtitled conversations with innovators in design, culture, and entrepreneurship, The Indian Edit launched in May of 2018. While the podcast is not plant-focused, as a gardener herself - from a family of scientists (including a beloved botanist aunt) and gardeners - Nitasha‘s perspective as host of The Indian Edit is a beautiful illustration of how we all - from spice company founders to sari designers, to photographers - take the vocabulary of our landscapes and plants of origin into the rest of our lives with us, no matter where we go. For Nitasha, that is building (and growing) a creative bridge back to India. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years, and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Night Sky Tourist
38- Astronomy on Tap with Emily Rice

Night Sky Tourist

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 39:15


Emily Rice, aka DJ Carly Sagan, is an organizer for the international Astronomy on Tap program. She's fun and witty, but she's also super smart! Emily is an Associate Professor of Astrophysics at Macaulay Honors College of the City University of New Yourk. She is faculty in the Physics Ph. D program and a resident research associate in the Deprtment of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. She has a Ph.D in Astronomy & Astrophysics at UCLA and Bachelor's degrees in Physics & Astronomy and German at the University of Pittsbugh. Emily has the super cool job of studying low mass stars, brown dwarfs, also known as failed stars, and directly-images exoplanets…you know, planets that orbit OTHER stars outside our solar system. And she gives presentations on space and science at places like the famous Hayden Planetarium in New York City. Visit NightSkyTourist.com/38 for more information about this episode. LINKS IN THIS EPISODE Astronomy on Tap: https://astronomyontap.org STARtorialist: https://shop.startorialist.com SPREAD THE WORD Help us reach more people by subscribing to the podcast, leaving a review, and sharing it with others. GET TO KNOW US MORE Visit NightSkyTourist.com to read our great blog articles, check out our resource page, and sign up for our newsletters. Our monthly newsletter has content that is exclusive for subscribers. SHARE YOUR QUESTION We want to hear your questions. They could even become part of a future Q&A. Record your question in a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us at NightSkyTourist@gmail.com. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS Email us at NightSkyTourist@gmail.com.

Sausage of Science
SoS 159 - Homo erectus the Scavenger? with Dr. Briana Pobiner

Sausage of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 30:12


Dr. Briana Pobiner is a paleoanthropologist and Education Program specialist at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. She chats with Chris and Cara about her research on the evolution of human diets and the possibility that Homo erectus may have been scavengers instead of hunters. She talks about the issues associated with making broad conclusions about the paleo diet and how academics can contribute to public engagement using the skills acquired doing research. You can learn more about Dr. Pobiner's work at: https://humanorigins.si.edu/about/human-origins-program-team/briana-pobiner You can contact Dr. Pobiner at pobinerb@si.edu and on Twitter @BrianaPobiner Find her most recent research article at https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2115540119 Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association: Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation Website:humbio.org/, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc Cara Ocobock, Website: sites.nd.edu/cara-ocobock/, Email:cocobock@nd.edu, Twitter:@CaraOcobock Chris Lynn, HBA Public Relations Committee Chair, Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, Email: cdlynn@ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly Delaney Glass, Website: dglass.netlify.app/, Email: dglass1@uw.edu, Twitter: @GlassDelaney Alexandra Niclou, Email: aniclou@nd.edu, Twitter: @fiat_Luxandra

Cultivating Place
Saging the World, preparing for CA's Native Plant Week 2022 with Rose Ramirez and Deborah Small

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 58:05


Rose Ramirez is a California native plant gardener, basketweaver, photographer, and educator of Chumash descent; Deborah Small is an artist, photographer, and professor at the School of the Arts at California State University, San Marcos.  In preparation for California Native Plant Week 2022 (April 16 - 23), celebrating the botanical biodiversity of the California Floristic Region, Rose and Deborah join Cultivating Place to share more about their new educational and advocacy initiative, Saging the World, on behalf of California's iconic native white sage, Saliva apiana, sacred to the Indigenous cultures of what is now Southern California and Baja California, Mexico. As part of Saging the World, Rose and Deborah, along with David Bryant of the California Native Plant Society, have coproduced a documentary of the same name, which premieres in LA county on Earth Day, and to which all are invited (tickets required): Saging the World Premiere, Earth Day, Friday, April 22 7 pm - 9 pm, Warner Grande Theatre, 78 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731  The film, created to foster awareness and inspire action for white sage, spotlights the ecological and cultural issues intertwined with white sage, centering the voices of Native advocates who have long protected and cherished this plant. “Saging” has become common in movies, TV shows, social media, and cleansing rituals –people burning sage bundles in the hope of purifying space and clearing bad energy. Instead of healing, the appropriated use of saging in popular culture is having a harmful effect. Indigenous communities have tended a relationship with white sage for thousands of generations. White sage (Salvia apiana) only occurs in southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico. Today, poachers are stealing metric tons of this plant from the wild to supply international demand. The screening will include a panel discussion with Native advocates from the film, as well as a white sage plant giveaway. This Earth Day, go from smudging to seeding as we come together to see plants not just as “resources,” but as “relationships.” The event is sponsored by the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy. Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic Expeditions, Pt. 2

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 38:02


After Shackleton's team abandoned the Endurance to the ice, they faced a harrowing journey over the ice of Antarctica. Meanwhile, the support team aboard the Aurora was also faced with a grueling and treacherous race for survival. Research: LeBrun, Nancy. “Survival! The Shackleton Story.” National Geogrpahic. Via YouTube. 1991. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgh_77TtX5I "Ernest Shackleton, Sir." Explorers & Discoverers of the World, Gale, 1993. Gale In Context: U.S. History, link.gale.com/apps/doc/K1614000271/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=b93f5648. Accessed 14 Mar. 2022. Savours, Ann. “Shackleton, Sir Ernest Henry.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  9/23/2004. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/36034 "Patience and Endurance; Underwater archaeology." The Economist, 12 Mar. 2022, p. 69(US). Gale OneFile: Business, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A696334375/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=e2fe8a81. Accessed 14 Mar. 2022. Falkland Maritime Heritage Trust. “Endurance 22.” https://endurance22.org/ Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Ernest Shackleton". Encyclopedia Britannica, 11 Feb. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ernest-Henry-Shackleton. Accessed 15 March 2022. Tyler, Kelly. “Shackleton's Lost Men.” Shackleton: Voyage of Endurance. Nova. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/shackleton/1914/lostmen.html Roisman-Cooper, Barbara. “Part I: Polar dreams, polar disappointments.” British Heritage. Jun/Jul99, Vol. 20 Issue 4, p32. Roisman-Cooper, Barbara. “Part 2: Polar dreams, polar disappointments.” British Heritage. Oct/Nov99, Vol. 20 Issue 6, p52. Schultheiss, Katrin. “The Ends of the Earth and the “Heroic Age” of Polar Exploration: A Review Essay.” Historically Speaking, Volume 10, Number 2, April 2009, pp. 14-17. https://doi.org/10.1353/hsp.0.0026 Alexander, Caroline. “The Endurance: Shackleton's Legendary Antarctic Expedition.” With the American Museum of Natural History. Knopf. 1998. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

HMSC Connects! Podcast
In Search of Thoreau's Flowers: An Art + Science Conversation with biologist Emily Meineke & Artists Robin Vuchnich & Leah Sobesy

HMSC Connects! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 49:40


Welcome to HMSC Connects! where we go behind the scenes of four Harvard museums to explore the connections between us, our big, beautiful world, and even what lies beyond. For this week's episode host Jennifer Berglund delves into the collaboration behind the upcoming exhibit "In Search of Thoreau's Flowers," opening at the Harvard Museum of Natural History in May. Berglund asks Emily Meineke, Leah Sobsey, and Robin Vuchnich, the artists and scientists behind the multimedia exhibition inspired by the digitized collection of Henry David Thoreau's plant specimens from the Gray Herbarium of Harvard University.

Town Hall Seattle Science Series
176. Jack E. Davis with Deborah Jensen: A Cultural and Natural History of the Bald Eagle

Town Hall Seattle Science Series