Podcasts about Natural history

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Study of organisms including plants or animals in their environment

  • 1,086PODCASTS
  • 2,249EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST
Natural history

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Natural history

Show all podcasts related to natural history

Latest podcast episodes about Natural history

The Story Collider
Hazards: Stories about encountering danger in the field

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:25


Part 1: In his early twenties, Jonathan Feakins goes above and beyond for his job as a West Nile virus mosquito technician Part 2: While working as a coral reef biologist in Panama in 1989, Nancy Knowlton and her young daughter are taken into the custody of the Panamanian military when the U.S. invades. Jonathan Feakins is just some nerd who has tried to spend his life wandering strange places, reading obscure books, doing weird science, petting adorable animals, fighting the good fight, and having wonderful friends. He somehow has a species of earthworm named after him, and once got kicked out of an all-you-can-eat restaurant (for eating all he could eat). He first learned the power of a good story from his grandmother, as she regaled him with tales about her childhood pet crocodile (whose name was Baby), or about the time she (accidentally) cleared out a biker bar with a Swazi bible student named Enoch. You can learn more about his questionable life choices at bookwormcity.com. Nancy Knowlton has been a scientist with the Smithsonian since 1984 and is now a scientist emerita, first in Panama and most recently at the National Museum of Natural History in DC. She's also been a professor at Yale and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where she founded the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. Her work on coral reefs has taken her literally around the world, and she has spent so much time underwater that she long ago lost count of the hours. She has been a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the author of Citizens of the Sea, and was the Editor-in-Chief of the Ocean Portal website. Despite the glut of bad news these days, you can find her @seacitizens talking about #OceanOptimism and #EarthOptimism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Brian Lehrer Show
Brian Lehrer Weekend: Sean Ono Lennon on 'Imagine' at 50; Andy Borowitz on Jane Goodall; Spacing Out With Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:15


Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Sean Ono Lennon, musician and son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, discusses the cultural impact of the song "Imagine," 50 years later (First) | Andy Borowitz, author, comedian, and creator of The New Yorker's “Borowitz Report,” on his recent interview with Jane Goodall (starts around 14:40) | Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, talks about space travel and the need for science education (starts around 28:00). If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here. 

Cultivating Place
Growing Flavor Past & Present, Chef Dave Smoke-McCluskey & Corn Mafia

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:48


This week on Cultivating Place we're in delicious conversation with Chef Dave Smoke McCluskey, founder of Corn Mafia, and a grower/producer of such traditional corn products as Longhouse Selections' hominy, masa, and grits. Based in South Carolina, Dave is an Indigenous foods educator and member of the Mohawk Nation, who invites us all to think about the history of the ingredients in our food, especially those originating from the Native American lands we in the US live on. Dave's belief in the power of flavorful, real food stems from a very basic and lifelong curiosity about his peoples' culinary past and trying to determine not only “What has been lost?”, but also how to re-envision, and imaginatively recreate a more accurate, flavorful, and probable culinary narrative for the past, present, and future. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Book review: New Zealand Seabirds: A Natural History by Kerry-Jayne Wilson

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 4:57


Murray Williams reviews New Zealand Seabirds: A Natural History by Kerry-Jayne Wilson, published by Potton & Burton

Science for the People
#589 Damsels and Dragons

Science for the People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 60:00


We sit down for a whirlwind tour of the entomological world of dragonflies and damselflies with Evolutionary Biologist Dr Jessica Ware, Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Zoology at the American Museum of Natural History. We get a crash-course in what makes these insects unique, how they fly, their life-cycles, and theories for how they got so colourful. And we talk about the importance of diversity in science and entomology, and how EntoPOC helps by providing POC paid memberships to entomological society to make participation, science communication and outreach more inclusive to POCs. Related Links: Jessica Ware's Lab Group EntoPOC

The Brian Lehrer Show
Spacing Out With Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 14:13


Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, a host of the StarTalk Radio podcasts, one of the authors of A Brief Welcome to the Universe: A Pocket-Sized Tour (Princeton University Press, 2021), and the author of Cosmic Queries: StarTalk's Guide to Who We Are, How We Got Here, and Where We're Going (National Geographic, 2021), talks about space travel and the need for science education.

Artpop Talk
Foster W. Krupp and His Dead Petz

Artpop Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 52:57


In this ARTloween episode we are talking about taxidermy with emerging museum student and researcher Foster W. Krupp! We discusses how taxidermy is understood through a museum studies lens and their “creep factor.”  For all of Artpop Talk's resources, click HERE. 

Slightly Foxed
36: Graphic Novels: A Comic Turn with Posy Simmonds & Paul Gravett

Slightly Foxed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:39


The cartoonist, writer and illustrator Posy Simmonds brilliantly captures the ambitions and pretensions of the literary world, and the journalist and curator Paul Gravett has worked in comics publishing for decades. Together they bring graphic novels and comic books to the foreground with the Slightly Foxed team. We draw moral lessons from the Ally Sloper cartoons of the 1870s, glimpse Frans Masereel's wordless woodcut stories of the 1920s, view the pictorial politics of Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo in the 1940s and revisit Art Spiegelman's 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus before taking a closer look at more contemporary works. From a tragicomic summer with Joff Winterhart, nuclear explosions with Raymond Briggs, the shadow of James Joyce with Mary and Bryan Talbot and an Iranian childhood with Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, the discussion moves through panels, frames, splashes and spreads to Posy Simmonds's own methods in bringing literature to life, including crosshatching to Vivaldi. Originally serialized in the Guardian, Posy's Gemma Bovery builds on the bones of Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Tamara Drewe draws from Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, while Cassandra Darke takes inspiration from Dickens's A Christmas Carol. Though rooted in the classics, the devil is in Posy's detail, be it real French coffee pots, the joy of characters' names, such as Kevin Penwallet, and fictional places, such as Tresoddit. We continue our travels off the beaten track with our usual round-up of reading recommendations, and a trip to Gilbert White's House and Gardens in Hampshire, where we view the landscapes that sparked his evergreen classic The Natural History of Selborne. (Episode duration: 44 minutes; 39 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. Ally Sloper: A Moral Lesson, cartoons by Marie Duval and words by Judy's office boy is out of print (4:48) Miné Okubo, Citizen 13660 (6:29) George Takei, They Called Us Enemy (7:25) Jules Feiffer, Passionella and Other Stories is out of print (9:05) Art Spiegelman, Maus (10:37) Mary M. Talbot & Bryan Talbot, Dotter of Her Father's Eyes (12:52) Joff Winterhart, Days of the Bagnold Summer (13:22) Raymond Briggs, When the Wind Blows (15:42) Raymond Briggs, Ethel & Ernest (17:07) Posy Simmonds, Gemma Bovery (17:48) Posy Simmonds, Tamara Drewe (17:48) Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (28:31) Posy Simmonds, Cassandra Darke (29:04) Riad Sattouf, The Arab of the Future (30:24) Alison Bechdel, Fun Home (31:20) Posy Simmonds, Literary Life Revisited Paul Gravett, Posy Simmonds Emma Tennant, Burnt Diaries is out of print (34:20) Robert Macfarlane, The Old Ways (37:28) Our Time, an anthology commissioned by The Lakes International Comic Art Festival (38:29) Laurie Lee, As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. Published in our series of Slightly Foxed Editions, along with Cider with Rosie (39:54) Gilbert White, The Natural History of Selborne (41:24) Related Slightly Foxed Articles & Illustrations Underwear Was Important, Hazel Wood on the cartoons of Posy Simmonds, Issue 15 Cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 16 Inside cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 60 Touched with a Secret Delight, Melissa Harrison on Gilbert White, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, Issue 48 Other Links Posy Simmonds Close Up, Cartoonmuseum Basel, Switzerland. The exhibition runs until 24 October 2021 (2:39) The bd BOUM festival, Blois, France. The festival is chaired by Posy Simmonds and runs from 19-21 November 2021 Gosh! Comics, London, UK (31:58) The Lakes International Comic Art Festival, Kendal, UK (32:08) Thought Bubble, The Yorkshire Comic Convention, Harrogate, UK (32:26) Gilbert White's House & Gardens, Selborne, UK (41:13) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

Cultivating Place
The Greenhorns Envisioning A More Fertile Future, with Severine Von Tscharner Fleming

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:14


As we enter the season of seed saving, of easing into dormancy, beginning to consider next season through the lens of the last season, of forward planning, this week Cultivating Place explores some big thinking for our shared future in conversation with Severine Von Tscharner Fleming, one of the women featured in The Earth in Her Hands, 75 Extraordinary Women Working in the World of Plants. Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Now What? With Carole Zimmer
A Conversation With Neil deGrasse Tyson

Now What? With Carole Zimmer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:29


I first met Neil deGrasse Tyson at a bug eating event at the Museum of Natural History when he was munching on a fried tarantula. You may remember Tyson as the host of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. That was the continuation of a television series that originally starred Carl Sagan, another well-known astrophysicist. Tyson is also the Director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York and he's written more than 17 books. The latest is called A Brief Welcome to the Universe. But when you're talking to Neil deGrasse Tyson, as you'll discover, nothing is brief. “Now What?” is produced with the help of Steve Zimmer, Annika Hoiem and Alex Wolfe. Audio production is by Nick Ciavatta.

Smart People Podcast
Bill Schutt - What We Can Learn from the Heart

Smart People Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:20


Bill Schutt is an Emeritus Professor of Biology at LIU Post and a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History. Bill received his Ph.D. in zoology from Cornell and held a post-doctoral fellowship at the AMNH where he received a Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Grant. He has also published over two dozen peer-reviewed articles.Bill's newest book, Pump: A Natural History of the Heart, is available now!Support the Show - Become a Patron!Help us grow and become a Patron today: https://www.patreon.com/smartpeoplepodcastDonate:Donate here to support the show!

William Ramsey Investigates
Author Bill Schutt discusses his book Pump: A Natural History of the Heart.

William Ramsey Investigates

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 36:53


Author Bill Schutt discusses his book Pump: A Natural History of the Heart. www.billschutt.com https://www.amazon.com/Pump-Natural-History-Bill-Schutt/dp/1616208937

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History is saying goodbye to several beloved exhibits

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 7:32


The Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History is shutting down several beloved bird and animal exhibits next week — some of which have been there for 50 years! Jeff Gray, the curator of visitor experiences and exhibits, talked about how it feels to say goodbye and why the museum is making room for new exhibits.

Cultivating Place
Gardening in Summer Dry Climates, with photojournalist Saxon Holt

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:44


In our second episode focusing on the inspiring beauty of dry gardens and the plants and people who love them, Cultivating Place is joined this week by photo journalist Saxon Holt. The sole photographer on more than 30 garden books, Saxon is also owner of the PhotoBotanic Garden library and director of the Summer-Dry Project. Saxon's most recent book, a collaboration with writer Nora Harlow, is Gardening in Summer-Dry Climates, plants for a lush, water-conscious landscape, published by Timber Press in 2020. The vision of the Summer-Dry Project is that "in the midst of tumultuous climate change, it's all the more important that gardeners be stewards of the land, attuned to the local environment on behalf of all creatures. The Summer-Dry Project provides gardeners in summer-dry climates authoritative plant information and inspiring photos that encourage sustainable garden practices." Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

MilkMaids
Poisonous Plants

MilkMaids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:28


Ready to be scared for spooky season?! Yeah, us too! Lets talk about common plants that will kill both you and your livestock! Poisonous plants are fascinating and terrifying all at the same time. Don't worry, we end the episode on steps you can take to keep your critters safe, so its not all gloom and doom! Our shout out this week goes to TCCAA Community Cannery out of Riverdale,VA! We could not be more excited about their operation. They provide an amazing resource to empower their community to preserve their own food. Donate to their cause at TCCAA | Community Cannery – Tri-County Community Action Agency (tricountyva.org) As always, you can reach us at milkmaidspodcast@gmail.com This week's resources: -‘Plants That Kill a Natural History of the World's Most Poisonous Plants' https://www.amazon.com/Plants-That-Kill-Natural-Poisonous/dp/0691178763 - https://extension.usu.edu/rangeplants/forbsherbaceous/black-henbane - Plants Poisonous to Livestock in Montana and Wyoming (usda.gov) - Fact Sheet: Poisonous Plants For Cattle (beefmagazine.com) -https://extension.sdstate.edu/poisonous-plants-rangelands-hemlock-halogeton-and-buffalo-bur - http://www.angusbeefbulletin.com/extra/2010/06jun10/0610hn_hemlock.html --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/milkmaids/message

New Books in History
David B. Williams, "Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:56


Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound (University of Washington Press, 2021) tells a story about exploitation and a story of hope. Focusing on the life histories of both humans and the natural world, Williams  presents an account of how people and place are connected by demonstrating the transformation of the landscape through geologic, ecological, and cultural lenses. Through conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, and getting out in the field himself, Williams traces how humans have developed their infrastructure around Puget Sound while documenting the human interaction with species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. While addressing critical issues linked to iconic species like salmon and orca, the book works to capture the complexities of ecosystems through in-depth dives into the life histories of rockfish, herring, kelp, and oysters. Williams contends how it is not too late to right the wrongs through responsible action and scientific innovation if we recognize the issues created by a colonial legacy, including social injustice towards native peoples, pollution, and exploitation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
David B. Williams, "Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:56


Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound (University of Washington Press, 2021) tells a story about exploitation and a story of hope. Focusing on the life histories of both humans and the natural world, Williams  presents an account of how people and place are connected by demonstrating the transformation of the landscape through geologic, ecological, and cultural lenses. Through conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, and getting out in the field himself, Williams traces how humans have developed their infrastructure around Puget Sound while documenting the human interaction with species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. While addressing critical issues linked to iconic species like salmon and orca, the book works to capture the complexities of ecosystems through in-depth dives into the life histories of rockfish, herring, kelp, and oysters. Williams contends how it is not too late to right the wrongs through responsible action and scientific innovation if we recognize the issues created by a colonial legacy, including social injustice towards native peoples, pollution, and exploitation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in the American West
David B. Williams, "Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:56


Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound (University of Washington Press, 2021) tells a story about exploitation and a story of hope. Focusing on the life histories of both humans and the natural world, Williams  presents an account of how people and place are connected by demonstrating the transformation of the landscape through geologic, ecological, and cultural lenses. Through conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, and getting out in the field himself, Williams traces how humans have developed their infrastructure around Puget Sound while documenting the human interaction with species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. While addressing critical issues linked to iconic species like salmon and orca, the book works to capture the complexities of ecosystems through in-depth dives into the life histories of rockfish, herring, kelp, and oysters. Williams contends how it is not too late to right the wrongs through responsible action and scientific innovation if we recognize the issues created by a colonial legacy, including social injustice towards native peoples, pollution, and exploitation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

New Books in Environmental Studies
David B. Williams, "Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:56


Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound (University of Washington Press, 2021) tells a story about exploitation and a story of hope. Focusing on the life histories of both humans and the natural world, Williams  presents an account of how people and place are connected by demonstrating the transformation of the landscape through geologic, ecological, and cultural lenses. Through conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, and getting out in the field himself, Williams traces how humans have developed their infrastructure around Puget Sound while documenting the human interaction with species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. While addressing critical issues linked to iconic species like salmon and orca, the book works to capture the complexities of ecosystems through in-depth dives into the life histories of rockfish, herring, kelp, and oysters. Williams contends how it is not too late to right the wrongs through responsible action and scientific innovation if we recognize the issues created by a colonial legacy, including social injustice towards native peoples, pollution, and exploitation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in Geography
David B. Williams, "Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound" (U Washington Press, 2021)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:56


Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound (University of Washington Press, 2021) tells a story about exploitation and a story of hope. Focusing on the life histories of both humans and the natural world, Williams  presents an account of how people and place are connected by demonstrating the transformation of the landscape through geologic, ecological, and cultural lenses. Through conversations with archaeologists, biologists, and tribal authorities, and getting out in the field himself, Williams traces how humans have developed their infrastructure around Puget Sound while documenting the human interaction with species as geoducks, salmon, orcas, rockfish, and herring. While addressing critical issues linked to iconic species like salmon and orca, the book works to capture the complexities of ecosystems through in-depth dives into the life histories of rockfish, herring, kelp, and oysters. Williams contends how it is not too late to right the wrongs through responsible action and scientific innovation if we recognize the issues created by a colonial legacy, including social injustice towards native peoples, pollution, and exploitation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

KERA's Think
The heart is a bloody amazing organ

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:32


Life is marked by the beating of the heart, for humans as well as for the animal kingdom. Bill Schutt is a vertebrate zoologist and a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History, and he joins host Krys Boyd for a fascinating look at what scientists are learning about how the hearts of creatures big and small functional very differently than the human heart. His book is called “Pump: A Natural History of the Heart.”

What's One More
What's One More Science Discussion with Neil deGrasse Tyson?

What's One More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 27:40


Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist, bestselling author, TV host, educator, and world class conversationalist. Neil is the director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Natural History in New York City and host of the successful podcast StarTalk. Get his new book Welcome to the Universe in 3D: A Visual Tour which comes out March 22nd.Neil discusses everything from sci-fi movies to the big bang. He is a fan of free range parenting and talks about how kids can learn through simple home experiments. Plus, how all of us humans are more alike than we think, right down to the molecular level.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books Network
Hannah Turner, "Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation" (UBC Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:40


How does colonialism still shape museums today? In Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation (UBC Press, 2020), Hannah Turner, an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of British Columbia, reveals the complex history of cataloguing museum collections. Using a case study of The Smithsonian, the book details the material practices that underpin the contested collections of the National Museum of Natural History. Turner's research charts the early uses of ledgers and record books, through the use of drawings, card catalogues, and typed records, to computerisation of the collections' records. The analysis has important implications for contemporary debates over repatriation of collections, and the book is powerful illustration of the importance of understanding the long shadow of colonial practices and knowledges on the contemporary institution. Cataloguing Culture is essential reading for practitioners and academics, as well as for anyone interested in the past, and the future, of museums. Dave O'Brien is Chancellor's Fellow, Cultural and Creative Industries, at the University of Edinburgh's College of Art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Hannah Turner, "Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation" (UBC Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:40


How does colonialism still shape museums today? In Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation (UBC Press, 2020), Hannah Turner, an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of British Columbia, reveals the complex history of cataloguing museum collections. Using a case study of The Smithsonian, the book details the material practices that underpin the contested collections of the National Museum of Natural History. Turner's research charts the early uses of ledgers and record books, through the use of drawings, card catalogues, and typed records, to computerisation of the collections' records. The analysis has important implications for contemporary debates over repatriation of collections, and the book is powerful illustration of the importance of understanding the long shadow of colonial practices and knowledges on the contemporary institution. Cataloguing Culture is essential reading for practitioners and academics, as well as for anyone interested in the past, and the future, of museums. Dave O'Brien is Chancellor's Fellow, Cultural and Creative Industries, at the University of Edinburgh's College of Art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Film Florida
Episode 78- Taylor Miller and Ronald Baez, Slamdance Miami

Film Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:52


Film Florida Podcast Episode 78- The Slamdance Film Festival is a showcase for raw and innovative filmmaking that lives and bleeds by its mantra: By Filmmakers, For Filmmakers. Taylor Miller and Ronald Baez from Slamdance Miami talk about the festival, which will celebrate emerging filmmakers from Central and South America, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Florida in an open-air festival experience at the North Beach Band Shell in Miami, October 28-30, 2021. The festival will then continue with a virtual component from October 31-November 7. Taylor O. Miller is an award winning documentary photographer and filmmaker. She studied for her PhD in Communications at the European Graduate School in Sadas Fee Switzerland and is a co-founder and manager of Slamdance Unstoppable and Slamdance Miami. Miller spent 2.5 years as the Director of Photography with Harbor Heights Entertainment filming a docu-series on the city of Detroit. Her work on the series led to an invitation to speak at Google about THIS IS DETROIT which will be released in 2022. Her recent appearances include a panel on Authenticity and Accessibility in Film and Entertainment for NBC Universal as well as being a panelist alongside New York Times Bestseller Francesca Cavallo and Vanity Fair journalist and advocate Marina Coehllo for the Inclusivity in Film Panel at the Not Film Festival in Italy.  Ronald Baez is an Afro-Latinx filmmaker and immersive media artist from Miami, FL. His short films have screened at film festivals and art museums worldwide including HBO's New York Latino Film Festival, the Florida Film Festival, Inside Out Toronto LGBT Film Festival, and the Norton Museum of Art. Several of Baez's projects would go on to be broadcast for television by PBS Stations and distributed online by PBS VOD and Seed & Spark SVOD. Baez's award-winning immersive media projects have opened in exhibition at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), the Florida Museum of Natural History, and the National Association of Broadcasters Conference in Las Vegas (NAB Show). Baez was awarded the NAB Futures Innovator's Award in 2019 for his innovative XR work with South Florida immersive media collective Yellow Wood Immersive. Baez and his partners continue to work with local and national organizations and institutions like National Geographic, the New World Symphony, the University of Oregon, the Ford Foundation, and the Knight Foundation on a variety of ongoing immersive media and film projects. In addition to his work as a filmmaker and immersive media artist, Baez is a founding member of the White Elephant Group, a Miami-based filmmaking collective, and also serves as the Artistic Director of the After School Film Institute, a nonprofit organization mentoring at risk, inner-city students in South Florida.

Cultivating Place
High Style, Dry Gardens with Designer Daniel Nolan

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 59:51


As we near the close of a dry, dry season in the generally dry climates of much of the US west, this week Cultivating Place has the first of a two-episode focus on the inspiring beauty of dry gardens and the plants and people who love them. We start off with some high style in dry gardens with garden designer Daniel Nolan, owner of Daniel Nolan Design and author of Dry Gardens, High Style for Low Water Gardens, published in 2018 by Rizzoli Press, and photographed by Caitlin Atkinson. In the opening to his book, Daniel notes that “some of the most successful gardens are not about human's control over nature, but about how human's respond respectfully to their surroundings.” Daniel's work, which is consistently focused on strong design using as little water as possible, covers regions as wide ranging as Florida, South Carolina, Louisiana, Texas, Arizona, California and the West Coast generally. Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Stuff To Blow Your Mind
Bill Schutt talks "Pump: A Natural History of the Heart"

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:33


In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert chats with Bill Schutt, author of "Pump: A Natural History of the Heart," about the evolution of the heart and the history of humanity's attempt to understand it -- along with a few questions about monsters. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Top Stories from NCPR
Natural Selections: How nature journals put the history in natural history

Top Stories from NCPR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 5:49


(Sep 30, 2021) Martha Foley has never succeeded in keeping a nature journal long-term, but Curt Stager finds them invaluable in his work. He records his observations on paper, but also finds great data through researching the journals of past observers, from Samuel de Champlain to Thomas Jefferson, to ordinary little-known North Country folk. His hint - always put it on paper. Whatever became of all that stuff on your floppy diskettes?

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive
An Introduction to Natural History with Eric Heil: On the Study of Our World Fully Alive

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 40:41


In certain school systems, it is perhaps more common to find students dissecting samples and diagraming abstractions. The boys in the Lower School at The Heights, however, begin their scientific formation not in a lab, among dead specimens, but in nature, among living creatures. Their text book is not full of paper, but of paper's source, trees; for their primary text is the book of nature itself.  In this week's episode, Eric Heil takes us outdoors--so to speak--for a discussion of natural history. With over fourteen years of experience teaching at The Heights, in addition to having spent time as a researcher both for at the Bronx Zoo and the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, Eric offers us thoughts both practical and lofty.  First, Eric explains what natural history is and how it differs from other ways of approaching science at the elementary level. Then, he considers what a typical natural history lesson might look like. Next, Eric expounds the elements of nature journaling, a typical exercise for a natural history class. In particular, he explains John Muir Laws' three step framework for nature journaling:  Explain what you see.  Expound on what the observed reality makes you think of.  Wonder about what you do not yet know.  Lastly, the discussion takes a turn for the transcendental, as Eric considers some of the existential fruits of natural history.   Beyond books and diagrams, and indeed even the boy's own words and sketches, the study of natural history draws students into that mystery which moves those animals they have found. Perhaps this is the reason why natural history has been deemed the most important subject taught in the Valley: the silence that it instills is the beginning of a prayer; indeed, the greatest prayer, which is gratitude.   Show Highlights What is natural history and why does it matter?  Campus as the textbook itself How is a natural history class different from other ways of teaching science at the elementary level?  Jean-Henri Fabre and the importance of direct observation The parts of a typical natural history lesson What is a nature journal and how do you make one? The benefits of studying natural history  How natural history integrates into an education for realism.  Existential goods of natural history  Why is natural history the most important subject taught in the Lower School? Suggested Reading  Handbook of Nature Study by Anna Botsford Comstock A Natural History of North American Trees by Donald Culross Peattie Nature's Events: A Notebook of the Unfolding Seasons by John Serrao Observing Insect Lives by Donald Stokes (and several other Stokes Nature Guides) Keeping a Nature Journal by Clare Walker Leslie and Charles E. Roth Botany in a Day: The Patterns Method of Plant Identification by Thomas J. Elpel Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling by John Muir Laws (and www.johnmuirlaws.com) The Naturalist's Notebook by Nathaniel T. Wheelwright & Bernd Heinrich natureoutside.com nature journal website by Steven Stolper The Forest by Roger Caras The Tree Identification Book by George W. D. Symonds Sketching Outdoors in Autumn by Jim Arnosky Find the Constellations by H. A. Rey (of Winnie-the-Pooh fame) Insects (A Golden Guide from St. Martin's Press) Revised Peterson Field Guide to Birds of Eastern and Central North America, 6th Edition (Peterson Field Guides) Also on The Forum  Webinar: How to Keep a Nature Journal On Nature Journals and Observant Souls “Can I catch it?”: On Handling Wildlife  Reading Recommendations for Keeping a Nature Journal Why We Need Exposure to Nature Nature Deficit Disorder: The Importance of Green Time

The John Batchelor Show
1724: 2/2: HotelMars: The unexpected magic of 2001 then and now. Rob Godwin @ApogeeBooks; David Livingston, SpaceShow.com HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 10:00


Photo: Confirming Predictions.  NASA/JPL/MSSS/ASU/New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 2/2: HotelMars: The unexpected magic of 2001 then and now. Rob Godwin @ApogeeBooks; David Livingston, SpaceShow.com HFN 2001 The Heritage & Legacy of the Space Odyssey (Revised 7th Edition) Perfect Paperback – January 1, 2020 by Frederick I Ordway III (Author), Robert Godwin (Author) https://www.amazon.com/Heritage-Legacy-Space-Odyssey-Revised/dp/1989044085/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=2001+space+odyssey+robert+godwin&qid=1632868177&s=books&sr=1-2

Circulation on the Run
Circulation September 28, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 29:39


This week's episode features a panel discussion. Please join author Harmony Reynolds, editorialist David Newby, and Associate Editors Nicholas Mills and Sandeep Das as they discuss the articles "Natural History of Patients with Ischemia and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease: The CIAO-ISCHEMIA Study, "Outcomes in the ISCHEMIA Trial Based on Coronary Artery Disease and Ischemia Severity," and editorial "Forget ischemia, it's all about the plaque." Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to this week's, September 28th, issue of Circulation on the Run. And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Director of the Poly Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia, and associate editor at Circulation. And this week, listeners, we have an outstanding feature discussion. It's actually forum where we're going to discuss from Dr. Reynolds two papers pertaining to the ischemia trial. One looking really at the functional importance of stress testing, the other looking at the anatomical importance of cardiac CT scanning. We're going to have two of the associate editors along with Dr. Reynolds, each that handled the two papers and also a guest editorialist that will help put the entire paper together. Well, before we get to that, we're going to start and review some of the other papers in this issue. And let's grab a cup of coffee and get started. Dr. Greg Hundley: The first comes to us from Dr. Maliheh Nazari-Jahantigh from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, and it pertains to atherosclerotic plaque rupture. So the necrotic core of an atherosclerotic plaque is partly formed by ineffective efferocytosis, which increases the risk of an atherosclerotic plaque rupture. And in cell biology, efferocytosis comes from the Latin word effero, which means to take to the grave or to bury. And it's really the process by which apoptotic cells are removed by phagocytic cells. And so therefore, it can be regarded as the burying of "dead cells." Now MicroRNAs contribute to necrotic core formation by regulating efferocytosis as well as macrophage apoptosis. We also know that atherosclerotic plaque rupture occurs at an increased frequency in the early morning, indicating that diurnal changes occur in plaque vulnerability. Now all those circadian rhythms play a role in atherosclerosis, the molecular clock output pathways that control plaque composition and rupture susceptibility are unclear. Dr. Greg Hundley: And so these authors investigated this phenomenon. And what they found, interestingly, their results suggest that the molecular clock in atherosclerotic lesions induces a diurnal rhythm of apoptosis regulated by circadian Mer 21 expression in macrophages that is not matched by efferocytosis, and thereby increasing the size of the necrotic core of these plaques. So clinically, the implications are that a macrophage death clock controlled by mer 21 may enhance lesion growth and susceptibility to plaque rupture indicating that the molecular clock can have detrimental effects under pathologic conditions. And additionally, the molecular clock in lesional macrophages may contribute to the circadian pattern of myocardial infarction, which could be a target for preventive measures to limit the mismatch between apoptosis and efferocytosis and thus reduce plaque vulnerability in the early morning. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, our second paper comes to us also from the world of preclinical science, and it's from Professor Thomas Braun from the Max Planck Institute for heart and lung research. And this particular paper pertains to pulmonary hypertension. And as we know, pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, originate from a complex interplay of environmental factors in genetic predispositions and little is known about developmental abnormalities or epigenetic dysregulation that might predisposed individuals to develop pulmonary hypertension or COPD in adults. So these authors screen a cohort of human pulmonary hypertension in COPD patients for changes of histone modifications by immunofluorescent staining. And also, they developed knockout mouse lines targeting cardiopulmonary progenitor cells and different heart and lung cell types. Dr. Greg Hundley: Now molecular, cellular and biochemical techniques were applied to analyze the function of SUV420H1-dependent epigenetic processes in cardiopulmonary progenitor cells and their derivatives. Well, what did they find? So the investigators found that loss of SUV420H1 in cardiopulmonary progenitor cells caused a COPD-like pulmonary hypertension phenotype in mice, including formation of perivascular tertiary lymphoid tissue, and goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells and myofibroblast, impaired alveolarization and maturation of defects of the microvasculature leading to massive ripe ventricular dilation and premature death. Dr. Greg Hundley: Now mechanistically SUV420H1 bound directly to the five prime upstream in regulatory element of Superoxide Dismutase 3 gene to repress its expression and increased levels of the extracellular Superoxide Dismutase 3 enzyme in SUV420H1 mutants increased hydrogen peroxide concentration causing vascular defects and impairing alveolarization. So what can we take away, listeners, from this clinically? Well, the author's findings reveal a pivotal role of histone modifier SUV420H1 in cardiopulmonary co-development and uncover developmental origins of cardiopulmonary diseases. And now these results suggest that this study will facilitate the understanding of pathogenic events causing pulmonary hypertension in COPD and aid the development of epigenetic drugs for treatment of other cardiopulmonary diseases. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, listeners, what else is in, we call it, the mail bag, but some of the other articles in the issue? Well, doctors Varricchi and Wang exchanged letters regarding the prior article, the role of IgE FcεRI in pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. And our own Sara O'Brien highlights articles from our circulation family of journals. Professor Ross has a Research Letter regarding the effects of walnut consumption for two years on lipoprotein subclasses among healthy elders findings from the WAHA randomized controlled trial. And then finally, Dr. Maurer has a really nice On My Mind piece that raises concerns pertaining to the use of cardiac scintigraphy and screening for transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis. And now listeners, we're going to turn to that forum discussion where we have an author, our associate editors and an editorialist discussing two really important papers from the ischemia trial. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, listeners, we are very excited today to discuss in sort of the forum feature, two papers pertaining to the ischemia trial. And with us this day, we have Dr. Harmony Reynolds from New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York city; two of our associate editors, Dr. Nick Mills from university of Edinburgh in Scotland; and Dr. Sandeep Das from UT Southwestern; and then also an editorialist, Dr. David Newby, who's also University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Welcome to everyone. Dr. Greg Hundley: Harmony, we're going to start with you. And in the first paper, the natural history of ischemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease, can you describe for us a little bit of the context of what shaped this question for you, what hypothesis did you want to test? And then describe for us a little bit your study population and your study design. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Sure. Thanks so much for having me here to discuss these papers. I'm really appreciative of the attention from circulation, and I'm excited for this discussion today. So in this first natural history paper, we were looking at ischemia with non-obstructive corona arteries, INOCA, the kind of thing that used to be called cardiac syndrome X. And we know this is an extremely common problem. It's defined by having signs or symptoms of ischemia and no 50% or greater lesion on coronary imaging. And we also know from prior invasive studies that the mechanisms of this are overwhelmingly microvascular coronary disease and provokable coronary spasm. Some patients prove to be normal and invasive testing, but most will have some objective abnormality. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: We know this problem is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events and with high costs, but what we didn't know was whether the symptoms and ischemia on stress testing are tracking together in these patients. So if we're trying to treat these patients, should we be doing serial stress testing and targeting the medical therapy to ischemia abrogation or should we just be making their symptoms go away? And would this provide any long range insights for us into when we can figure out the symptom are truly ischemic in nature? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: So we decided to use the ischemia trial, and we had a fantastic platform for that in ischemia because, as you know, patients were screened in part for randomization using coronary CT angiography. And even though these patients had moderate or severe ischemia, some had no obstructive coronary disease on that CT coronary angiogram. And those are the patients that we enrolled in CIAO-ISCHEMIA. They had an assessment of angina at baseline, and they had to be symptomatic at some point. They didn't have to be symptomatic at the moment. They were enrolled in CIAO, but they had their stress test generally to evaluate ischemic symptoms. And they had their stress echocardiogram read by a core lab. Importantly, that core lab did not know the result of that CT scan. So they read them like all the other ischemia stress echoes. And then these patients had an angina and ischemia assessment with a repeat stress echo at one year. Dr. Greg Hundley: And what did you find? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: There were a number of interesting findings from this study. The first thing was that the severity of ischemia in the CIAO patients with INOCA was very similar to the ischemia patients who had obstructive coronary disease. So that tells us that the INOCA problem can happen with quite a lot of ischemia, and that had not been as well delineated before. Another finding expected, but we did find that is that there were many more women in the INOCA group, two thirds of our child population was female. And in ischemia, overall, it was closer to a quarter. We found that the symptoms and the ischemia were quite changeable. So at one year, the stress echocardiogram was normal in half of the child participant and only 23% still had moderate or severe ischemia. Angina had improved in 43%, and it worsened in 14%. There was an awful lot of change over one year, but the change in angina and the change in ischemia did not track together. And that was a bit of a surprise to me. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, Nick, I know serving it as an associate editor, you see many papers come across your desk. What attracted you to pushing this paper forward for publication? Dr. Nicholas Mills: Thanks, Greg, and congratulations. Harmony, we love the papers you've been sending from ischemia trial, which genuinely is changing clinical practice all over the world. And it's been great to see the secondary analysis and follow-up papers. So this paper attracted me because it addresses an area where I still don't fully understand in clinical practice, what recommendations to make for my patients and what tests to arrange. As you say, INOCA is more common in women. I think these patients have largely been understudied over many decades, and there remains a lot of uncertainty. I liked it because you had a core lab, blinded core lab analysis with systematic follow up and it was a really well-done study. It reassured me in many ways because it told me that actually a lot of these patients, their symptoms get better, sort of irrespective of what we do. The treatments didn't seem to track within improvements of symptom, nor did the severity of ischemia, and that I think provides a lot of reassurance to our patients who are in this situation. Dr. Nicholas Mills: Of course, there is a group there who continue to have moderate to severe ischemia a year later. And I think this trial helps us understand maybe how we should study this group more, understand the heterogeneity that you've observed in this population in order to really try and resolve that and resolve their ongoing symptoms. But for the majority, four in five patients, they're going to do well and they're going to get better over time. And I think that's an important message from this study. Dr. Greg Hundley: Thank you so much, Nick. Well, Harmony, we're going to come back to you. You have a second paper, the outcomes in the ischemia trial really based on coronary artery disease and ischemia severity. Can you describe for us, again, working us back through, what were some of the constructs that you really wanted to address here? What was your hypothesis? And again, how did this study population maybe differ a little bit in this second paper? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Thanks so much. So this paper tracked outcomes based on the severity of ischemia and the severity of coronary artery disease on the CT coronary angiogram now in randomized patients in the ischemia trial. So all of these had obstructive coronary disease and they were selected for randomization. And the premise of the ischemia trial was partly that we would be able to select patients who might benefit from revascularization and from an invasive strategy really based on how much ischemia they had on the stress test. Moderate or severe ischemia was required for randomization and for entry into the trial, but a core lab read those stress tests independently and independently assessed ischemia. And in some cases, when the site thought there was moderate or severe ischemia, the core lab did not agree. And the core lab independently decided whether it was moderate or severe. So we wanted to understand whether the ischemia severity at the time of trial entry influenced outcomes and influenced the outcomes by randomization treatment assignment. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Similarly, about half of the patient had a CT that was interpretable for the number of vessels disease. And we wanted to understand in the context of all those prior stable ischemic heart disease trials, showing a lot of heterogeneity by the amount of coronary disease, whether in ischemia as well, there would be heterogeneity of the treatment effect based on how much coronary disease you started with. So the ischemia population, and this is almost the entire randomized cohort, but it's important to recognize for the CT analysis that only about three quarters of the patients had CT. They didn't get a CT, if your GFR was too low or if you had known coronary anatomy. And among those Cts, not every CT is perfectly interpretable for the number of vessels disease. These are sicker patients. These are not the super stable patients who have a low prevalence of disease. These were pretty sick, multi-vessel coronary disease patients, and they couldn't always hold their breast all that well. There was a lot of calcification in these. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: So for example, if there was motion artifact in the right coronary artery, we wouldn't be able to quantify the number of vessels disease. And that left us with a cohort of about half of our ischemia population, but that's still a giant cohort of several thousand patients. So that's how our study. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. And what did you find here? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Here, we found that more severe ischemia was not associated with outcomes. Now that does go along with the COURAGE study in which after you adjust for clinical characteristics, ischemia was not associated with outcomes. But still it came as something of a surprise that even severe ischemia was not associated with a higher risk of outcomes than moderate or mild ischemia. We also found that in the coronary disease group, no matter how you measure the severity of coronary disease, the Duke prognostic index, the number of vessels disease, the segment involvement score, the segment stenosis score, all of these measures were very strongly associated with our outcomes, whether it was all cause mortality MI or our composite. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: When it came to treatment effect, we found that the ischemia severity were no relationship to treatment effect. There was no ischemia subgroup in which there appeared to be an advantage with an invasive strategy. But in the coronary disease group, and again taking into account the caveats of not everybody had a CT interpretable for the number of vessels disease, in those with the most severe coronary disease, that's the Duke 6 subgroup. And they had multi-vessel severe disease, either two vessel including the proximal LAD at 70% or three vessels with 70% stenosis. There was no benefit on mortality. But if we looked at the composite endpoint of cardiovascular death or MI, there appeared to be some advantage to the invasive strategy. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Well, Sandeep, similar to Nick, working as an associate editor and meeting weekly, what attracted you to this particular paper? And why did you want to really see it come forward to be published? Dr. Sandeep Das: So first of all, I want to echo Nick's comments that these are great papers, and thanks very much for sending those our way and letting us have sort of first crack at them before they're released to the world. And I also want to comment on the side that Harmony and her team were just absolutely fantastic to work with in this process. From having been on the other side when you get 300 different comments from the editors and reviewers and you respond to them thoroughly and with grace, that's a feat in and of itself. So I want to shout out Harmony and her team for just being fantastic partners, because really we see ourselves as sort of the author's partners in kind of making the paper as good as it can be as the best it can be. Dr. Sandeep Das: So I'll admit upfront, I think it's kind of fashionable for people to say, well, I knew that this was going to show this, I knew this all from COURAGE, and this is not surprising to me. But I'll admit that I was surprised. And so this has been practice-changing for me, so this whole evolution post ischemia. And I really feel like a little bit of an existential crisis because I'm not sure I understand what ischemia means anymore. You ask me five years ago, I would've been very confident that I knew the answer to that. So you know what, really, as soon as this paper crossed our desk, I thought, wow, this is something we want to keep, this is something that's going to be really important to practice of cardiology. It's going to be really important to our readers. It's a great paper from a great group. This is something we want. So really it was never a question of, well, am I interested or am I not? I was interested from reading the abstract. Dr. Sandeep Das: So the question then became what are the real important questions that we need to sort of tease out and help elucidate for the clinician for the reader? And really for me, the question has always been, is there a subset of people where... So in my heart of hearts, I always kind of thought that burden of ischemia, if there was enough burden of ischemia, that it probably did help to revascularize that, right? I definitely practiced that way, right? There was some sort of number where I would start to say, that's a lot of ischemic myocardium and maybe we need to do something about that. Even though I know my intellectual brain says, no, there's no data that supports this, I really kind of thought it was true. And so Harmony and her team put another nail in that coffin here because it doesn't seem to be true, which to me was interesting and different and practice-changing. Dr. Sandeep Das: So the real questions here were sort of to tease out the interaction between anatomic severity, and we've all known that sort of anatomic burden of disease is proportional to adverse outcomes. That's not surprising. But the question then is, can we tease out a group where there may be benefit to revascularization? So there's a real interesting sort of interplay here between degree of ischemia and anatomic burden of disease. And is there a subset with enough of an anatomic burden of disease where you really may be interested in going after that to improve heart outcomes? So that's what I thought this was really fascinating paper. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Well, David, we're going to turn to you next as the editorialist and asking you to sort of put the results of each of these two studies together. One, kind of highlighting for us how functional imaging might be useful to identify whether ischemia is present or not. And then the second study, really defining for us an association between anatomy and outcomes. So putting these all together, could you share your thoughts with us regarding these two papers? Dr. David Newby: Yes. Thank you. So I think that the CIAO-ISCHEMIA is very interesting, isn't it? And those clinicians were often challenged with symptoms versus our objective tests and trying to work out exactly what's going on, and it is. And such an important group as Harmony says, I can't agree more. We have a lot of morbidity here. As Nick said, I think the short term, a lot of the patients do seem to get better with just conservative management is good, but there's a core group that clearly are a problem. And as Harmony highlighted, you've got people with terrible regional wall-motion abnormalities on stress echo and yet no angina, others with no angina with no apparent difficulty on repeat testing. And then you've got a core group that has both, and it is fascinating to try and unpick that. And clearly, the symptoms are not correlating with our tests, and that's not the patient's fault. Dr. David Newby: And very often, no, no, you're wrong, can we say that to the patient? No, no, the patient is right and our tests are wrong, and we've got to work out how best to manage them. And I have a bit of analogy with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy as well, I think is at play here. I mean, here, you've got people with stable pain. We're not coming in as an acute emergency, but they're having regional wall motion abnormalities at times. They're getting a lot of symptoms. And we see similar things with Takotsubo, which is, I suppose, a much more flurry thing. I know that's something close to Harmony's his heart too. Excuse the pun. But this ischemia relationship, these regional wall motion abnormalities with chest pain, particularly in women, is something we really need to get our heads around and understand what's going on. It just reflects our ignorance, I think, of knowing exactly how to manage these patients. Dr. David Newby: And so for me, ischemia testing is about symptoms. It's about working out what's going on with the patient. It doesn't always give us the answer, but I certainly think that the role of ischemia testing is more about the symptoms. Dr. David Newby: And then when it comes to the second paper and outcomes with the ischemia trial, I absolutely was delighted to see those findings. I have to say place to what my prejudice is, I suppose, as someone that's been working with CT. And I suppose the slightly obvious thing is that the more disease you have, the more you will benefit from an intervention. And plaque and the burden of plaque is critical to that because how do you have a heart attack? Well, you have to have plaque, right? And it has to rupture. So the more plaque you have, the more likely you are. And I think that the analysis is again reinforcing what we've learned from some of the imaging trials with PROMIS and SCOT-HEART. Actually, the more plaque you have, the worse you are. Dr. David Newby: And yes, ischemia predicts risk, but ischemia predicts risk through its association with plaque burden, not through ischemia itself. And what I think we're seeing very nicely being played out in ischemia trial is the risk is definitely much stronger for CT than it is for imaging. And that's very clear, and that's exactly what PROMIS found exactly what SCOT-HEART found as well, and it's a rise robust finding. The interaction with the treatment effect that I find also fascinating and again plays to some of the bypass surgery trials that we've seen, bypass surgery tends to prevent spontaneous MIs and, even in some cases, mortality. And we're seeing trends in ischemia for mortality, can't over call them. I'd love to see what happens in 10 years. But I think in terms of the prevention of MIs, I'm putting all my money in one basket, which is the bypass surgery, 25% of course of patients revascularized that way. I don't believe that PCI is going to prevent the myocardial infarction. So I think all my money is in that box. Dr. David Newby: But it's absolutely fascinating data. It is all about the plaque if you're talking about prevention of clinical events downstream. And I think that's where the dichotomy is, scheme is about symptoms and understanding the patient's problems in terms of symptomatic improvement. If you want to improve their long term outcome, it's all about the plaque, understanding the burden of plaque and what you can do to hopefully prevent downstream event. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great. Thank you so much. And so listeners, we're going to ask each of our speakers today in really 20 or 30 seconds to go through and identify what do they think is the next study really to be performed in this space? So Harmony, we're going to start with you and then Nick, Sandeep and then finish up with David. Harmony? Dr. Harmony Reynolds: Thanks. Well, when it comes to INOCA, I would like to see more studies in the vein of CorMicA. So I'd like to see routine invasive testing to define the underlying pathophysiology problem and then targeted medical therapy interventions, and I'd like to see outcome trials. There's one outcome trial going on. It's a challenge because the event rate, though very important and higher than in the general population for sure, is low enough that these trials have to be quite large, and we look at ischemia with a relatively high event rate. And even so it's a stable population and that had to be large, this would have to be even larger. So we're going to need more mechanistic studies in order to lead to the treatment trials that will really influence practice. Dr. Harmony Reynolds: And in terms of the severity of coronary disease, this is a tough one. We felt like ischemia was a lift, and I'm not sure that there will be another huge stable ischemic heart disease trial. But sure, I'd love to see in people selected by CT for their advanced severity of coronary disease, whether an invasive management strategy makes a difference compared to medical therapy. I don't know that we'll see that one come to pass, but you never know. Dr. Greg Hundley: Nick? Dr. Nicholas Mills: Yeah. I agree. We need more mechanistic research, but I'd like to see more non-invasive methods to understand the mechanistic basis of this condition because CorMicA has caught an invasive protocol for a condition, which we know is benign and who most patients get better without any treatment. I would also like to see randomized blinded studies of treatment effects and because there are too many observational on blinded studies here. And I think the outcome has to be patient-focused and symptoms. Dr. Greg Hundley: Sandeep? Dr. Sandeep Das: Yeah. So everything that's been raised so far are fantastic comments and really on point. For me, I think if we can tease out the population that may benefit to get back to Dave's earlier comment that there's possibly not going to be a little humble here, there's possibly a population that has extensive, extensive CVD that could benefit from bypass surgery. And I think that that hasn't really been firmly demonstrated yet, although it's been suggested strongly. So that I think is an interesting study, and I hope that that gets done as a trial, but I can understand that it'd be a giant undertaking. And then the other thing I think is just algorithmic approaches that are driven by anatomical studies like SCOT-HEART and things like that, where we really try to make decisions based on the anatomical approach and pretend like the last 15 years never happened and that we kind are starting fresh with our best approach to how to treat these patients. Dr. Greg Hundley: And finally, David. Dr. David Newby: Yeah. I'm actually going to agree with everybody there, and I'm rooting for this trial actually because that's the one I want to do is look at advanced coronary disease on noninvasive imaging, irrespective of symptoms. And that's the big call actually if you've got no symptoms to put yourself through a bypass, because it's bypass, it's not standing. Bypass, we need. I'd also love to see some substudy coming out of ischemia. I think you're doing them. I hope you are looking at plaque burden and plaque characteristics because I think that's another level of complexity. We're so obsessed with stenosis, actually. And again, even anatomical and ischemia testing plays to that, it's not just about stenosis, stenotic arteries have big plaque burdens, et cetera. And it's not bypassing them, it's bypassing all the nonobstructive plaque and the obstructive plaque that has given you the benefit of revascularization with surgery. So I think you need to think about a really nice cool trial where we can do that trial even in the presence of nonobstructive disease, but big plaque burden, adverse plaque characteristics, and think about bypass. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, listeners, we want to thank Dr. Harmony Reynolds for bringing us these two really informative studies from the ischemia trial, and also our associate editors, Dr. Nick Mills and Dr. Sandeep Das for providing their perspective and our editorialist, Dr. David Newby, who really helped us organize our thoughts and put both of these two studies into great perspective highlighting in the first that functional testing can really help us identify the presence or absence of ischemia. And then our second study highlighting the association between CT coronary angiography and the identification of the anatomic severity of disease with cardiac outcomes. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2021. The opinions expressed by speaker in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.

The Political Theory Review
Episode 91: Mauro Caraccioli - Writing the New World

The Political Theory Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 86:10


A conversation with Mauro Caraccioli about his recent book "Writing the New World: the Politics of Natural History in the Early Spanish Empire" (University of Florida Press).

Conservation Connection
Jon Armbruster: Auburn University | Fish Out of Water | Episode 46

Conservation Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 27:31


Dr. Jon Armbruster is not only the Director of Auburn University's Museum of Natural History, but he is a celebrated ichthyologist (fish scientist) in his own right! He has been on collecting expeditions to some of the most remote rivers in the world, and has personally described and worked with more species of fish than he can count! Listen in to this episode to hear him recount the pet store fiasco that ignited his curiosity for fish morphology, as well as some incredible stories from the field. Click here to check out our nonprofit: https://www.lastchanceendeavors.com

All Of It
Get Lit: 'The Great Mistake' by Jonathan Lee

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 20:19


We air highlights from our September "Get Lit with All Of It" book club event with Jonathan Lee about his novel, The Great Mistake, which centers on the life and murder of Andrew Haswell Green, one of the power brokers of New York City, central to the creation of Central Park, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Natural History, and our partners, the New York Public Library.   Missed the event? Watch it in full here. To find out more about our Get Lit with All Of It book club, and our partnership with the New York Public Library, click here, and follow us on Instagram at @allofitwnyc.

All Of It
Get Lit: Claudi of Pinc Louds Performs

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 19:20


We air highlights from our September "Get Lit with All Of It" book club event with musical guest Claudi of Pinc Louds, a local band who helped keep live music alive in 2020 with frequent concerts in Tompkins Square Park. Claudi joined our event with Jonathan Lee about his novel, The Great Mistake, which centers on the life and murder of Andrew Haswell Green, one of the power brokers of New York City, central to the creation of Central Park, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Natural History, and our partners, the New York Public Library.   Missed the event? Watch it in full here. To find out more about our Get Lit with All Of It book club, and our partnership with the New York Public Library, click here, and follow us on Instagram at @allofitwnyc.

All Of It
Get Lit: Audience Q&A with Jonathan Lee

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 9:19


We air highlights from the audience Q&A portion of our September "Get Lit with All Of It" book club event with Jonathan Lee about his novel, The Great Mistake, which centers on the life and murder of Andrew Haswell Green, one of the power brokers of New York City, central to the creation of Central Park, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Natural History, and our partners, the New York Public Library.   Missed the event? Watch it in full here. To find out more about our Get Lit with All Of It book club, and our partnership with the New York Public Library, click here, and follow us on Instagram at @allofitwnyc.

Alaska Story Project
ASP 16, Jonathan White, "Tides"

Alaska Story Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 63:26


Jonathan White is a writer, surfer, sailor and educator.  His work has been published in Orion, The Sun, Fine Homebuilding, and Natural History.  His first book, Talking on the Water, (Sierra Club, 1993),  explores creativity and the natural world.  It grew out of "Seminars Afloat" with writers Gretel Ehrlich, Ursula Le Guin, and Peter Matthiessen, along with other visionaries, activists and artists, such as poet Gary Snyder, whale biologist Roger Payne, and Gaia hypothesis co-founder Lynn Margulis.His most recent book, Tides, The Science and Spirit of the Ocean, (Trinity University Press, 2017), takes the reader around the world to where the tide is most dramatically at play.  He goes to the arctic, Panama, Chile, Europe, China, and Alaska, among other far corners, to explore the cultural and scientific stories of the tide.  “White goes deep beneath the surface with the grace of a poet,” writes Susan Casey, author of The Wave.  “Be prepared for some serious magic when you read these pages.”Dan and Jonathan discuss:Building a sloop and sailing it offshore in the Atlantic. Surviving a hurricane. Working with innovative theatre director and theorist, Jerzy Grotowski. Founding the “Seminars Afloat” on the schooner Crusader. Aground in Kalinin Bay north of Sitka. Saving the boat, and returning Crusader to ship shape in three days. Beginning research for Tides. Discussing the science, complexity, and intrigue of tidal forces. Stories from visiting the most dramatic tides. His current project in the Sea of Cortez, retracing the 1940 voyage of Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck, from which came The Log from the Sea of Cortez.

Cultivating Place
Planting A Bridge For Our World, With Ernesto Alvarado

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 54:54


Ernesto Alvarado is a Mexican-born, Southern California-based native plant and seed teacher and student. He is currently the Native Plant Nursery Assistant at the Riverside Corona Resource Conservation District where he specializes in seed and native plants for gardening and greater connection to the world around him – and us. While I told you that last week was the second in a two-part series in the sacred and much-needed ritual and ceremony that the seasonal cycles of our plants and gardens – I would say this is a bonus third episode in this vein. I think you will agree. As a native plant and seed teacher and student, Ernesto's greatest hope is to have his work serve as a green and living bridge for people to develop a deeper connection to the life all around them. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Limitless Spirit
Episode 64: His God-centered nature docuseries are disrupting the industry and will enrich your life

Limitless Spirit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 32:59


Dr. Gordon Wilson is an expert on environmental science and biology with a passion to honor God through this science. He is an author, a Senior Fellow of Natural History at New Saint Andrews College, and the host and narrator of the upcoming docuseries “The Riot and the Dance”.  These docuseries have received endorsements from the likes of Kanye West, Kirk Camron and the creator of the series Chosen, Dallas Jenkins.In this episode, host Helen Todd talks with Dr. Wilson about how The Riot and the Dance is disrupting the industry of nature documentaries, why your entire family will absolutely love every episode and how you can become an investor in this enterprise. Support and invest in “The Riot and the Dance” docuseries on the Angel Studios website:https://invest.angel.com/riot To watch the original “The Riot and the Dance” feature length documentary on Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/Riot-Dance-Dr-Gordon-Wilson/dp/B07LCS5VP6 To buy a book “A Different Shade of Green”, by Dr. Wilson on Amazon:https://www.amazon.com/Different-Shade-Green-Biblical-Environmentalism/dp/19476445723:15 Helen and Dr. Wilson talk about “The Riot and the Dance”8:15 Did God design the predatory relationship between animals?14:40 The decision to crowdfund the upcoming docuseries.17:40 What viewers can expect from the docuseries.18:50 Dr. Wilson describes his role in the creative process of the docuseries.20:10 Why Dr. Wilson loves reptiles.24:30 Our impact on the environment and climate.27:35 The status on crowdfunding for the docuseries. After you listen to this episode, go to our host website: www.rfwma.org and find out how World Missions Alliance can help you connect to your greater purpose. If you are interested in becoming a sponsor of the Limitless Spirit Podcast, click below:Support the show (https://rfwma.org/give)            Email us your questions and comments at podcast@rfwma.orgWMA is 501(c)(3), donations are tax deductibleSupport the show (https://rfwma.org/give)

Creatively Christian
Freelance Writing and Trusting in God – Thomas Salerno

Creatively Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 53:44


Today on the Creatively Christian podcast is freelance writer Thomas Salerno. Host Brannon Hollingsworth talks to Thomas about his freelance writing journey, how he uses geek culture to engage new audiences, and why trusting in God is so important when you leap into a new career. Thomas Salerno is a freelance writer, aspiring novelist, bookworm, and all-around nerd born and raised on Long Island, New York. He received a BA in anthropology from Stony Brook University and volunteered for several years as a fossil preparator and collections assistant for the American Museum of Natural History. His writing has been featured in several Catholic online publications such as Word on Fire, Voyage Comics, Aleteia, and Busted Halo. You can follow Thomas on Twitter (@Salerno_Thomas) and find links to all his articles on his website thomasjsalernowrites.com. This episode can also be found on YouTube. Show Notes The following resources were mentioned in the show or are useful resources recommended by the guests. Links might be marked as affiliates, meaning we earn a commission if you buy through the link. A list of Thomas' published articles Credits This show is produced by Theophany Media. The theme music is by Bill Brooks and Andrea Sandefur. Our logo is by Bill Brooks. Our wonderful hosts are Brannon Hollingsworth, Lynn Baber, Andrea Sandefur, and Bill Brooks. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Please Kill this Bug

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 22:21


In the midst of a crisis in pollinator populations, we're being asked to kill spotted lanternflies -- to prevent damage to trees and their spread to agricultural areas upstate. Entomologist Jessica Ware, associate curator in invertebrate zoology at the American Museum of Natural History and president-elect of the Entomological Society of America, talks about this unwanted species and how to help sustain the bugs we need. →NYC Parks information on the Spotted Lanternfly infestation, including how to identify them and what to do if you see them. @BrianLehrer to squish lantern flies attack them from the front, they take off by jumping forward — Jean Haggas (@HaggasJean) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer you could give out the Spotted Lanternfly Hotline 1-888-422-3359. — Sami Plotkin (@samiplotkin) September 22 @BrianLehrer #spottedlanternflies all over Jersey City, so far I've only seen adults. I Squish them when I can pic.twitter.com/HstOMLXo5p — Eileen ferara (@EileenFerara) September 22, 2021 , 2021 Contains info on how to report in several states. https://t.co/ToJKe1F0hN — Bettty (@BetttyBarrr) September 22, 2021 tree of heaven looks like this: pic.twitter.com/NSaxxJz3Ew — Hee Jin Kang (@heejola) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer Saw a spotted fly in a Park Slope west rooftop last week. After admiring it briefly, we stomped it. — Eric Hipp (@eroyhipp) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer I found one on my car at the Short Hills Mall parking lot and squished it, then another one flew on my car and I killed it. Feeling pretty good about getting rid of two I noticed 2 dozen on the tree next to me. Is stomping really effective enough? — Jill Hammarberg (@Hammarspeak) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer join @inaturalist and report spotted lantern fly photos — Paul Cavalconte (@PaulCavalconte) September 22, 2021 I just camped in the DE water Gap. The spotted lantern fly has already become predominant insect in that area. We saw at least 4 per square meter. We killed at least 100. — Babin (@Babin69406647) September 22, 2021 @BrianLehrer I'm a crane operator at port Newark, and I've seen them all over the piers. Clusters of them. We've had to keep our windows closed although we're 14 stories in the air. I've killed at least 30 lol. — OPUSXTRAVELXART (@MauricePorcher) September 22, 2021 My 10 year old son taught me that Trees of Heaven can be ID'ed by smooshing their leaves and smelling them - the leaves smell of burnt peanut butter. We've found & squashed many Lanternflies all over Williamsburg by locating the trees first. — Hee Jin Kang (@heejola) September 22, 2021 I squished one while waiting for the M15 bus on Saturday and felt like an environmental hero for a second — Patrick says “You cant bully a billionaire” 🌹☀️🦷 (@PatrickForNYC) September 22, 2021

Short Wave
Mapping The Birds Of Bougainville Island

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 12:08


In the early 1900s, the Whitney South Sea expedition gathered 40,000 bird specimens for the American Museum of Natural History. The collection is an irreplaceable snapshot of avian diversity in the South Pacific, but is missing key geographic data. To solve this mystery, student researchers dug into field journals to determine where birds from one island came from.

Fitt Insider
101. Ara Katz, co-founder & co-CEO of Seed Health

Fitt Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 36:55


Today I'm joined by Ara Katz, co-founder & co-CEO of Seed Health — a microbial sciences company.    In this episode, we discuss the microbiome and the many ways it impacts well-being. Ara explains Seed's approach to building a platform around studying and commercializing probiotics. And we talk about the differences between wellness, healthcare, and consumer life science.    More from Ara    A serial entrepreneur, advisor and angel investor, Ara Katz has eclectic experience at the intersection of health, tech, environment, media and design.    She founded Seed Health to pioneer applications of microbes for both human and environmental health. Her work encompasses the translation of breakthrough science for a pipeline of probiotic innovations from discovery through commercialization across product, brand, insights, design-thinking, delivery technologies, industrial design, international DTC, new retail strategies, community, fundraising, channel expansion, business development and science communication.    She spearheaded the company's $40MM fundraising to accelerate R+D and accelerate the company's pipeline beyond gut microbiome into microbial applications across dermatology, oral hygiene, pediatrics, women's health, infant health and nutrition. She brought the company carbon negative, to profitability, and led the acquisition of digital health ML company, Auggi.   Ara is also a co-founder of Seed Health's environmental division, SeedLabs, and its first partner biotech company focused on women's health, LUCA Biologics. Their first therapeutic for rUTI enters the clinic in September 2021 followed by interventions for BV and Preterm Birth.    Previously, Ara co-founded mobile commerce startup Spring, where she helped launch ApplePay on iPhone, and has invested in and advised companies across consumer, health and tech such as: RXDefine (TeleMed), C16 Biosciences (Sustainability), MindBodyGreen (Wellness), Mahmee (Maternal Care), Stadium Goods (Consumer / Marketplace), and Unicycle (Ed Tech).    Ara was a Visiting Fellow at the MIT Media Lab, where she helped create the Center for Future Storytelling and CCA's Design Thinking MBA program. She has appeared on numerous podcasts like Rich Roll, Girlboss Radio, Welltodo, Commune and Broken Brain. She has been named in Marie Claire's ‘The New Guard: The 50 Most Influential Women in America,' Business Insider's Silicon Alley ‘Top 100' and ‘36 Rockstar Women in NYC Tech,' Create + Cultivate's ‘100 List for STEM,' and Women We Admire's ‘Top 100 Women CEOs of 2021.' Her work has earned accolades such as Fast Company's World Changing Ideas 2019, 2020, and 2021,TIME's Best Inventions 2018, and a Webby Award for Best Use of Stories in 2020.    She lives in Venice, California with her husband and five-year-old son, Pax (the reason Seed Health exists). She is passionate about the communication of science, the interplay of the environment and physical space, and the connecting of never before connected dots. Lastly, she's the proud owner of several tardigrades who live at Harvard's Museum of Natural History.   More from Fitt Insider   Fitt Insider is a platform for entrepreneurs, executives, and investors redefining the business of fitness and wellness.   From our newsletter and podcast to our industry-specific jobs board, we create content and resources to drive the industry forward. We also invest in early-stage health and fitness companies. For more, visit: https://insider.fitt.co/

Nature's Archive
#30: Dr. Jaret Daniels - Butterflies, Creating Habitat in Overlooked Landscapes, and Leveraging Creative Outreach

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 62:30


My guest today is Dr. Jaret Daniels. Dr. Daniels is a professor specializing in lepidoptera research and insect conservation at the University of Florida, and is curator of Lepidoptera at the  Florida Museum of Natural History. In addition to that, Dr. Daniels is the author of over a dozen books that help connect the general public to butterflies, insects, and gardening for wildlife. These include titles such as Backyard Bugs, Insects and Bugs for Kids, and Native Plant Gardening for Birds, Bees and Butterflies, which is a series of regionally-specific books.In this episode we dive into Dr. Daniels ability to connect with the public, and how he “flips the switch” between academic endeavors and authoring for the general public. We discuss some of his specific books (links in the show notes). And he outlines why creativity is so important for public outreach. Along those lines, he tells us about the butterfly themed beer partnership with First Magnitude Brewing, which even used yeast from a butterfly!Dr. Daniels also discusses some of his conservation activities and successes, including helping to restore the federally listed Schaus' Swallowtail, which only lives in tropical hardwood hammock habitats in southeast Florida. This restoration also involved important efforts from community science (or citizen science) doing hard work monitoring populations in very challenging environments. This butterfly occupies a limited geographic range, meaning it is vulnerable to both habitat loss and storms such as hurricanes. Dr. Daniels discusses the recovery plan and how they intend to make Schaus' Swallowtail populations more resilient.As you know, I love to highlight ways we can make non-traditional spaces more wildlife friendly, and this is a specialty of Dr. Daniels. We hear about how Dr. Daniels worked with the Florida Dept. of Transportation to demonstrate that reduced roadside mowing frequency was a win-win-win for drivers, the department, and insects.And to support homeowners looking to make better plant choices, Dr. Daniels is collaborating to create a wildlife-friendly plant certification program. Additionally, Dr. Daniels reveals some surprising findings from studying attractiveness of various home landscapes in Florida. The short story: plant larger quantities of fewer "good" plants, and you'll create a better habitat than lots of variety, but with only one specimen of each species.You can also find Dr. Daniels on twitter.This was an enlightening discussion on a number of fronts, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Full show notes.Dr. Daniel's BooksBackyard Bugs: An Identification Guide to Common Insects, Spiders, and MoreInsects & Bugs for Kids: An Introduction to EntomologyNative Plant Gardening for Birds, Bees & Butterflies: A series covering the Upper Midwest, Southeast, South (coming soon)Other LinksPlasterer Bees of the Southeast - an iNaturalist project started by the Florida Museum of Natural History looking to gather knowledge and observations about these rare bees. And more about the Plasterer Bee Project from the museum.The Florida Museum of Natural HistoryThe Xerces Society

Curiosity Daily
Monks Meditating After Death and a Marathoning Woolly Mammoth

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 10:51


Learn about the mystery of how Tibetan monks seem to keep meditating after death; and a woolly mammoth that walked VERY far. Thukdam Project scientists still stumped over how deceased Tibetan monks continue to meditate after death by Grant Currin Berman, R. (2021, August 5). The strange case of the dead-but-not-dead Tibetan monks. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/thukdam-study  ‌Burke, D. (2021, July 28). Inside the First-Ever Scientific Study of Post-Mortem Meditation. Tricycle: The Buddhist Review. https://tricycle.org/trikedaily/thukdam-project/  ‌Lott, D. T., Yeshi, T., Norchung, N., Dolma, S., Tsering, N., Jinpa, N., Woser, T., Dorjee, K., Desel, T., Fitch, D., Finley, A. J., Goldman, R., Bernal, A. M. O., Ragazzi, R., Aroor, K., Koger, J., Francis, A., Perlman, D. M., Wielgosz, J., & Bachhuber, D. R. W. (2021). No Detectable Electroencephalographic Activity After Clinical Declaration of Death Among Tibetan Buddhist Meditators in Apparent Tukdam, a Putative Postmortem Meditation State. Frontiers in Psychology, 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.599190  Researchers found a Pleistocene era woolly mammoth that walked far enough to circle the Earth…twice by Cameron Duke  Koumoundouros, T. (2021). An Ancient Woolly Mammoth Trekked So Far, It Could Have Circled The Globe Twice. ScienceAlert. https://www.sciencealert.com/researchers-decipher-the-travel-diary-written-within-a-17-000-year-old-mammoth-s-tusk Wooller, M. J., Bataille, C., Druckenmiller, P., Erickson, G. M., Groves, P., Haubenstock, N., Howe, T., Irrgeher, J., Mann, D., Moon, K., Potter, B. A., Prohaska, T., Rasic, J., Reuther, J., Shapiro, B., Spaleta, K. J., & Willis, A. D. (2021). Lifetime mobility of an Arctic woolly mammoth. Science, 373(6556), 806–808. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abg1134 Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Did That Really Happen?

Horror fans rejoice, because this week we're talking about The Witch! Join us to learn more about what you had to do to get expelled from Puritan communities, ritual uses of baby blood, apples, the Song of Songs, and more!  Content warning: Infanticide Sources: Film Background: Stephen Saito, "Persistence of Vision: Inside the Making of the Witch, a Horror Classic for the Ages," MovieMaker, available at https://www.moviemaker.com/persistence-of-vision-the-witch-robert-eggers/ Kevin Fallon, "The Witch: The Making of the Year's Scariest Movie," Daily Beast, available at https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-witch-the-making-of-the-years-scariest-movie Simon Abrams, "The Witch," Rogerebert.com, available at https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-witch-2016 Song of Songs: NIV Study Bible William Phipps, "The Plight of the Song of Songs," Journal of the American Academy of Religion 42, 1 (1974) Belden C. Lane, "Two Schools of Desire: Nature and Marriage in Seventeenth-Century Puritanism," Church History 69, 2 (2000) Julie Sievers, "Refiguring the Song of Songs: John Cotton's 1655 Sermon and the Antinomian Controversy," New England Quarterly 76, 1 (2003) Expulsion from Puritan Communities: Transcript of the Trial of Anne Hutchinson, 1637: http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/WebPub/history/mckayunderstanding1e/0312668872/Primary_Documents/US_History/Transcript%20of%20the%20Trial%20of%20Anne%20Hutchinson.pdf Nan Goodman, "Banishment, Jurisdiction, and Identity in Seventeenth-Century New England: The Case of Roger Williams," Early American Studies 7, 1 (2009) Ben Barker-Benfield, "Anne Hutchinson and the Puritan Attitude Toward Women," Feminist Studies 1, 2 (1972) James F. Cooper Jr. "Anne Hutchinson and the 'Lay Rebellion' Against Clergy," New England Quarterly 61, 3 (1988) Richard J. Ross, "The Career of Puritan Jurisprudence," Law and History Review 26, 2 (2008) Witchcraft and Baby Blood: Lyndal Roper, Witch Craze Lindemann, Anti-Semitism Before the Holocaust Bucholz and Key, Early Modern England David D. Hall, Witch-Hunting in Seventeenth-Century New England: A Documentary History 1638-1693, second edition (Duke University Press, 1999). https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctv11hph70.6 Lyndal Roper, "'Evil Imaginings and Fantasies': Child-Witches and the End of the Witch Craze," Past & Present 167 (May 2000): 107-139. https://www.jstor.org/stable/651255 Robert Blair St. George (ed.), Possible Pasts: Becoming Colonial in Early America (Cornell University Press, 2000). https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctv1fxmmf.11 Deborah Kelly Kloepfer, "Cotton Mather's "Dora": The Case History of Mercy Short," Early American Literature 44:1 (2009): 3-38. https://www.jstor.org/stable/27750112 Aviva Briefel, "Devil in the Details: The Uncanny History of The Witch (2015)," Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal 49:1 (Summer 2019). Mary Beth Norton, "Witchcraft in the Anglo-American Colonies," OAH Magazine of History 17:4 (July 2003): 5-10. https://www.jstor.org/stable/25163614 Apples: "9 Things You Didn't Know About New England's Favorite Autumn Fruit," NPR (19 September 2014). https://www.wbur.org/radioboston/2014/09/18/apples-boston Rowan Jacobsen, "Apples: A New England History," Harvard Museum of Natural History, YouTube (16 January 2019). https://youtu.be/9C4yTA_hUmE https://www.beaconhillhousehistories.org/blog/blacksstone David Shulman, "Apples in America," American Speech 29:1 (1954): 77-79. https://www.jstor.org/stable/453602 https://www.newportthisweek.com/articles/a-century-of-bountiful-fruit/

AmphibiCast
Episode 56. Natural History of the Pyxie! with Dr. Caroline Lotter

AmphibiCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:58


Have you ever been interested in how Pixie frogs (pyxicephalus adspersus) live in the wild?In this episode I'm joined by Dr. Caroline Lotter of Inkululeko Wildlife Service in South Africa and we talk about the unique lifestyle and conflicts that pixies face in the wild.  There is more to pixies than just their voracious appetites!For more information visit:https:/www.iws-sa.co.za/

Cultivating Place
Seasons Of Our Joy, With Rabbi Arthur Waskow

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 60:36


September, October, and November are traditional harvest celebration months in the Northern Hemisphere from variations on Octoberfests to those around the idea of Thanksgiving. The ancient Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot is celebrated from the full moon on September 20th to September 27th this year, with the Autumnal Equinox occurring on the 22nd. This week on Cultivating Place we enjoy the second of two conversations on the sacred every day and the sacred in the seasonal. We are joined from Philadelphia by Rabbi Arthur Waskow, co-founder of The Shalom Center, which equips activists and spiritual leaders with awareness and skills needed to lead in shaping a transformed and transformative Judaism that can help create a world of peace, justice, healing for the earth, and respect for the interconnectedness of all life. A long-time activist for social and environmental justice, Rabbi Waskow is also the author of Seasons of our Joy, which brings reverent renewal to the ancient agricultural and seasons-based celebrations of the Abrahamic religions. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Every Damn Thing
60. Theodore Roosevelt

Every Damn Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 59:20


Phil and Jake are joined by friend and fellow Ted-head Phoebe Assenza for a deep-dive discussion and ranking of Theodore Roosevelt on the List of Every Damn Thing.If you have something to add to the list, email it to list@everydamnthing.net (or get at us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).Make sure to check out Phoebe's Substack.SHOW NOTES: Phil claims his sister (and recent EDT guest) Alexa Green said dry-cleaning is a mutually-agreed upon lie that holds society together. Phil takes it a step further and claims that laundry detergent might not be real either. He knows for a fact that dryer sheets aren't real. Phoebe disagrees as a laundry-doer in humid and smelly New York.  Phil also says that peanuts should be marketed as the most crunchy form of peanut butter; peanuts become peanut butter once you chew them so they should be sold as a less messy form of peanut butter. Here's the History Vs. Theodore Roosevelt podcast that Jake listened to for show prep. The Strenuous Life is a speech in which T.R. said that “danger, hardship, and bitter toil… win the splendid triumph.” As a sickly kid, Roosevelt's father pushed him to challenge himself physically and it became the cornerstone of Teddy's persona — walking into danger like the Battle of San Juan Hill, choosing a rugged life in the Badlands rather than seeking comfort in New York after the death of his mother and wife on the same night.  William McKinley was assassinated by an anarchist. The guy who tried to assassinate Teddy Roosevelt said McKinley visited him in a dream and told him to do it.   The "Man in the Arena" speech is actually called “Citizenship in a Republic”. Roosevelt was a backer of the Simplified Spelling Board, who pushed to simplify spelling. Grave-robbing was a big deal before someone thought up donating your body to science. The Panama Canal was completed in 1914 (the Suez Canal was completed forty-five years earlier in 1869). Turns out it was actually TR's dad (TR senior) who was one of the founders of the American Museum of Natural History, not TR.  Lamarckian evolution, as we discussed, is a discredited idea of evolution where acquired characteristics are inherited. The classic example is a giraffe. Lamarck explained that a giraffe's neck is long because its ancestors stretched their necks to get leaves and passed the longer necks along to their descendants. ALSO DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:Mount Rushmore * eugenics * William H. Taft * the Rough Riders * The Spanish-American War * the Teddy Bear * bear hunting * Boss Tweed * Boss Nass * Gangs of New York * Leonardo DiCaprio * the U.S. National Parks Service * the Philippine-American War * Jenny McCarthy * Mark Twain * imperialism * Manifest Destiny * white supremacists * white privilege * Hank Williams Jr. * Hank Williams * Shakira * Native American allotment policies * Ice Cube * Barry Bonds * Steve Jobs * Monopoly * Tommy Bahama shirts * Grocery OutletBelow are the Top Ten and Bottom Top items on List of Every Damn Thing as of this episode (for the complete up-to-date list, go here):TOP TEN: Dolly Parton - person interspecies animal friends - idea sex - idea Clement Street in San Francisco - location Prince - person It's-It - food Cher - person Pee-Wee Herman - fictional character Donald Duck - fictional character Hank Williams - person BOTTOM TEN:186. Jenny McCarthy - person187. Jon Voight - person188. Hank Williams, Jr - person189. British Royal Family - institution190. Steven Seagal - person191. McRib - food192. war - idea193. cigarettes - drug194. QAnon - idea195. transphobia - ideaTheme song by Jade Puget. Graphic design by Jason Mann. This episode was produced & edited by Jake MacLachlan, with audio help from Luke Janela. Show notes by Jake MacLachlan, Phil Green & Phoebe Assenza.Our website is everydamnthing.net and we're also on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.Email us at list@everydamnthing.net. 

Futility Closet
358-The Radium Girls

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 30:34


In 1917, a New Jersey company began hiring young women to paint luminous marks on the faces of watches and clocks. As time went on, they began to exhibit alarming symptoms, and a struggle ensued to establish the cause. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll tell the story of the Radium Girls, a landmark case in labor safety. We'll also consider some resurrected yeast and puzzle over a posthumous journey. Intro: Joseph Underwood was posting phony appeals for money in 1833. The earliest known written reference to baseball appeared in England. Sources for our feature on the Radium Girls: Claudia Clark, Radium Girls : Women and Industrial Health Reform, 1910-1935, 1997. Ross M. Mullner, Deadly Glow: The Radium Dial Worker Tragedy, 1999. Robert R. Johnson, Romancing the Atom: Nuclear Infatuation From the Radium Girls to Fukushima, 2012. Dolly Setton, "The Radium Girls: The Scary but True Story of the Poison that Made People Glow in the Dark," Natural History 129:1 (December 2020/January 2021), 47-47. Robert D. LaMarsh, "The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women," Professional Safety 64:2 (February 2019), 47. Angela N.H. Creager, "Radiation, Cancer, and Mutation in the Atomic Age," Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 45:1 (February 2015), 14-48. Robert Souhami, "Claudia Clark, Radium Girls," Medical History 42:4 (1998), 529-530. Ainissa Ramirez, "A Visit With One of the Last 'Radium Girls,'" MRS Bulletin 44:11 (2019), 903-904. "Medicine: Radium Women," Time, Aug. 11, 1930. "Poison Paintbrush," Time, June 4, 1928. "Workers From Factory May Get Federal Honors," Asbury Park Press, June 27, 2021. John Williams, "Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Kate Moore's 'The Radium Girls,'" New York Times, April 30, 2017. Jack Brubaker, "Those 'Radium Girls' of Lancaster," [Lancaster, Pa.] Intelligencer Journal / Lancaster New Era, May 9, 2014. William Yardley, "Mae Keane, Whose Job Brought Radium to Her Lips, Dies at 107," New York Times, March 13, 2014. Fred Musante, "Residue From Industrial Past Haunts State," New York Times, June 24, 2001. Denise Grady, "A Glow in the Dark, and a Lesson in Scientific Peril," New York Times, Oct. 6, 1998. Martha Irvine, "Dark Secrets Come to Light in New History of 'Radium Girls,'" Los Angeles Times, Oct. 4, 1998. Marc Mappen, "Jerseyana," New York Times, March 10, 1991. "Radium Poisoning Finally Claims Inventor of Luminous Paint After Fight to Harness Terrific Force of Atom," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Nov. 25, 1928. "Two of Women Radium Victims Offer Selves for Test While Alive," [Danville, Va.] Bee, May 29, 1928. "Death Agony From Radium," [Brisbane, Qld.] Daily Standard, May 15, 1928. "To Begin Two Suits Against Radium Co.," New York Times, June 24, 1925. "U.S. Starts Probe of Radium Poison Deaths in Jersey," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 19, 1925. Listener mail: Carolyn Wilke, "How Do We Know What Ancient People Ate? Their Dirty Dishes," Atlantic, July 24, 2021. Chris Baraniuk, "The Treasure Inside Beer Lost in a Shipwreck 120 Years Ago," BBC, June 22, 2021. Fiona Stocker, "A Beer Brewed From an Old Tasmanian Shipwreck," BBC, Dec. 7, 2018. Mary Esch, "Taste of History: Yeast From 1886 Shipwreck Makes New Brew," AP News, March 15, 2019. National Collection of Yeast Cultures. "National Collection of Yeast Cultures," Wikipedia (accessed Aug. 29, 2021). "History of Missing Linck," Missing Linck Festival (accessed Sep. 3, 2021). "Missing Linck Festival Arrives … Finally!" The Gnarly Gnome, June 4, 2021. This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Tim Ellis, who sent this corroborating link (warning -- this spoils the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!