Podcasts about immersive

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Best podcasts about immersive

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Latest podcast episodes about immersive

Constructed Futures
Nate Henderson: 3D Interactive Instructions at BILT app

Constructed Futures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 28:17


Check out BILT here: https://biltapp.com/Follow Nate here

Digital Therapeutics Podcast with Eugene Borukhovich
Ep79: Learning Critical Skills Through Immersive Experience: Utilizing VR Therapy for Adolescent Autism Spectrum Disorder

Digital Therapeutics Podcast with Eugene Borukhovich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2023 39:58


In this episode, we hear from Vijay Ravindran, founder and CEO of Floreo. Floreo allows therapy to be more engaging and happen anywhere, assisting people in practicing critical social skills at their own pace through immersive experiences, starting with adolescent Autism spectrum disorder. In this episode, we cover: The founding story of Floreo Market for autism and neurodiversity The child and caregiver experience using Floreo Funding journey and key milestones User and caregiver experience using Floreo Scientific hypothesis and evidence generation journey Scaling virtual reality in healthcare Guest Links and Resources: Connect with Vijay Ravindran on LinkedIn Visit floreovr.com Host Links: Connect with Eugene Borukhovich: Twitter | LinkedIn Connect with Chandana Fitzgerald, MD: Twitter | LinkedIn Connect with YourCoach.health: Website | Twitter Check out Shot of Digital Health with Eugene and Jim Joyce: Website | Podcast App HealthXL: Website | Twitter | Join an Event Digital Therapeutics Podcast would not be possible without the support of leading DTx organizations. Thank you to: > Presenting Partner: Amalgam Rx > Contributing Partners and Sponsors: LSI | Bayer G4A | Lindus Health Follow Digital Health Today: Browse Episodes | Twitter | LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram Follow Health Podcast Network: Browse Shows | LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Japan Experts
How to Have an Immersive Travel Experience with The Better Travel Podcast

Japan Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2023 28:48


How to Have an Immersive Travel Experience with The Better Travel Podcast Free Resource: ⁠⁠⁠⁠T⁠⁠⁠⁠he Complete Japan Travel Guide: the 7 steps to creating your unique immersive experience⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ ⁠⁠⁠⁠ Work with me: ⁠⁠⁠The Uniquely Japan Experience⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ to create a personalised Japan travel itinerary in 6-8 weeks ⁠⁠⁠⁠The Uniquely Japan Tours⁠⁠⁠⁠ through which I'll personally show you around the best of central Japan Connect with me: Join our Facebook Group: ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠JAPAN EXPERTS COMMUNITY⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ to get practical travel advice from locals and experienced travellers Follow me on ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Instagram⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ and ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠Facebook⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ for Japan travel inspiration

Colin Bradley Art Cast
Episode 385: Immersive Landscape Art

Colin Bradley Art Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2023 19:44


In this episode Colin shows the next stage of his landscape picture. We discuss how Colin's landscape art absorbs you into the scene.

immersive landscape art
Immersive Audio Podcast
Immersive Audio Podcast Episode 90 Halina Rice (Electronic Music Production & Performance)

Immersive Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2023 58:19


This episode is sponsored by Innovate Audio. Innovate Audio offers a range of software-based spatial audio processing tools. Their latest product, panLab Console, is a macOS application that adds 3D spatial audio rendering capabilities to live audio mixing consoles, including popular models from Yamaha, Midas and Behringer. This means you can achieve an object-based audio workflow, utilising the hardware you already own. Immersive Audio Podcast listeners can get an exclusive 20% discount on all panLab licences, use code Immersive20 at checkout. Find out more at innovateaudio.co.uk *Offer available until June 2024.* In this episode of the Immersive Audio Podcast, Oliver Kadel and Monica Bolles are joined by electronic music producer and AV artist Halina Rice, from London, UK.  Halina Rice is an ‘immersive first' electronic music producer and AV artist working at the intersection of music, art and technology with her sold-out live shows being described as “part rave, part art-happening.” Creating music that spans from abstract sound design to beat-driven IDM, her performances and installations are often presented in spatial sound in both physical venues as well as metaverse and VR environments. Halina also gives masterclasses and keynotes on the use of spatial sound in immersive performance. Halina talks about the process of producing and preparing material for her live sets, working with L-Acoustic's L-ISA system, and shares practical insights on how performing with a spatial audio array differs from working with traditional playback systems. This episode was produced by Oliver Kadel and Emma Rees and included music by Rhythm Scott. For extended show notes and more information on this episode go to https://immersiveaudiopodcast.com If you enjoy the podcast and would like to show your support, please consider becoming a Patreon. Not only are you supporting us, but you will also get special access to bonus content and much more. Find out more on our official Patreon page - www.patreon.com/immersiveaudiopodcast We thank you kindly in advance! We want to hear from you! We value our community and would appreciate it if you would take our very quick survey and help us make the Immersive Audio Podcast even better: surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3Y9B2MJ Thank you! You can follow the podcast on Twitter @IAudioPodcast for regular updates and content or get in touch via podcast@1618digital.com immersiveaudiopodcast.com

早安英文-最调皮的英语电台
“我上岸啦!”用英文怎么说 ?

早安英文-最调皮的英语电台

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2023 7:59


笔记:immersive /ɪˈmɜːrsɪv/ adj. 沉浸式的,身临其境的 沉浸式的,英文我们可以用immersive来表达。 Immersive experiences are hot right now.沉浸式体验现在很火。 immersive exhibition tour 沉浸式逛展 immersive make up wearing 沉浸式化妆获取节目完整音频、笔记和片尾的歌曲名,请关注微信公众号「早安英文」,回复“笔记”即可。更多有意思的英语干货等着你!

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
VR2000 earphones for immersive gaming and 3D audio experience

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2023 6:35


Plug into the expansive digital world of 3D audio with the Final VR2000 Immerse yourself like never before with Final's new VR2000 earphones - Designed for Victory Final, the Japanese high-end audio specialist, has announced their latest venture into the world of gaming and VR with the new VR2000 earphones. VR2000 earphones For close to five decades, Final has long proven their mastery of all things hi-fi. Starting in 1974 with the development of high-end turntable cartridges, amplifies and CD transports, and more recently moving onto portable audio with their award-winning headphone and earphone models - final's experience and insight is unmatched. With the VR2000 Final has turned its attention to gamers, VR users and the captivating world of ASMR and immersive audio. Using newly designed 'f-Core DU' custom-made dynamic 6mm drivers developed in-house, final has been able to tune the VR2000 to extract every detail from your digital surroundings. Whether playing a first-person shooter, exploring virtual worlds, relaxing to mediative ASMR or listening to a live jazz recording - the VR2000 will transport you into the heart of the action and deliver an experience like never before with no sound going unheard. Hear distant footsteps and gunfire as though you were in battle yourself. Feel every reaction from a stadium full of thousands of spectators. Transport yourself to a 1970's jazz club and hear every note played as though you were there. The Final VR2000 will be available to buy on the 15th of October for 59.99/$69.99/67.99 from Amazon and selected retailers worldwide. A Wealth of Applications Primarily designed for gaming and VR, the VR2000 can also be utilised to get the most out of live recordings, intricate electronic music, ASMR and the latest advancements in Dolby Atmos technology. Unlike typical earphones, the VR2000 has been designed to provide a spatial listening experience with a naturally vast soundstage and the ability to hear each and every sound individually separated with absolute clarity. The VR2000 offers gamers fast-response times and pin-point accuracy to enable swift reactions without dulling instantaneous judgments. Focusing on the response to swift and precise sound is what sets the Final VR2000 apart as gaming earphones. This attention to detail and separation lends itself most effectively to gamers - especially those involved within a competitive domain. The ability to react in-game is heavily reliant on the quality of the audio, and the speed at which users notice sound effects that have been produced for this very reason. The VR2000 is able to separate each sound and simultaneously deliver them accurately, and naturally, within its expansive soundstage. 'f-Core DU' Custom-Made Dynamic Driver With the 'f-Core DU' driver, Final has managed to achieve a quality of sound that is unheard of in this price range. Completely redesigning driver parts such as diaphragms, voice coils, magnets, magnetic circuits, and adhesives, as well as production equipment. The material of the driver front housing is brass, which is less affected by magnetic force and has a higher specific gravity than general aluminium. In order to improve the time response performance of the diaphragm, the voice coil uses 30? ultra-fine CCAW and is assembled with a minimum amount of adhesive to thoroughly reduce the weight of the moving parts. Further developments in housing design have resulted in a uniquely attractive appearance and comfortable fit for the VR2000. Shells made from ABS plastic provides durability, and the OFC cable is covered in a tough and flexible coating with an in-line 3 button control with a high-quality built-in microphone - ideal for online gaming, streaming and taking calls. The VR2000 comes supplied with a number of accessories including a selection of final Type E silicon eartips, earhooks for added support, and a carry pouch for safe storage. Specifications Housing: ABS Driver Type: 6mm 'fCore DU' Dynamic Driv...

LeVar Burton Reads
Immersive Remix: "The Takeback Tango" by Rebecca Roanhorse

LeVar Burton Reads

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2023 41:49


A teenage thief embarks on a mission to reclaim her people's sacred treasures. First published in A UNIVERSE OF WISHES in 2020 in the United States by Crown Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children's Books, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC, New York. Find more from Rebecca at www.rebeccaroanhorse.com.

Hospitality Design: What I've Learned
Maryellis Bunn, Museum of Ice Cream

Hospitality Design: What I've Learned

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2023 45:12


Born in Laguna Beach, California, Maryellis Bunn, founder of the Museum of Ice Cream, was influenced by her artist mother, who shaped her creative mindset. Dubbed the Millennial Walt Disney, Bunn launched the original concept for the Museum of Ice Cream as a pop-up in New York in 2016, and has since transformed it into brick-and-mortar experiential spaces that invite people to slide into a pool made of biodegradable sprinkles or enjoy a cocktail at the pretty-in-pink bar. With standalone museums in New York, Chicago, Austin, and Singapore, Bunn continues to evolve the brand's mission to create spaces that inspire imagination and unite people around something “as simple and beautiful as ice cream,” she says,

The Firefighters Podcast
#262 Safer Smarter Deeper Learning with Dr James Mullins of FLAIM

The Firefighters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2023 81:05


Today I'm speaking with James about Immersive training environments to help prepare those who serve in the first responder community.James is Chief Technology Officer at FLAIM Systems and Founding Researcher constantly finding new ways to enhance our virtual training capabilities for first responders as well as other sectors. As a third-generation firefighter in rural Victoria, Australia, James was uniquely positioned to apply his deep knowledge of advanced engineering principles to solve the problem of increasing and improving training opportunities for firefighters through the development of a world first immersive technology virtual training solution.FLAIM developed the world's first multi-sensory immersive learning solution for firefighters to safely and cost-effectively replicate the stress and uncertainty of real-world emergency situations.We only feature the latest 200 episodes of the podcast on public platforms so to access our podcast LIBRARY with every episode ever made & also get access to every Debrief & Subject Matter expert document shard with us then join our PATREON crew and support the future of the podcast by clicking HERE A big thanks to our partners for supporting this episode.GORE-TEX Professional ClothingHAIX FootwearGRENADERIP INTOLyfe Linez -  Get Functional Hydration FUEL for FIREFIGHTERS, Clean no sugar  for daily hydration. 80% of people live dehydrated and  for firefighters this cost lives, worsens our long term health and reduces cognitive ability.Support the ongoing work of the podcast by clicking HEREPlease subscribe to the podcast on YoutubeEnter our monthly giveaways on the following platformsFacebookInstagramPlease support the podcast and its future by clicking HERE and joining our Patreon Crew

Hoten's Shows
HOTEN Presents - Immersive Radio #012

Hoten's Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2023 57:24


Welcome to the 12th Episode! This week, I'm sharing with you one of my favourite Eps to date, it's organic, instrospective and beautiful , with music from Volen Santir, Hot Tuneik, Paul Arcane, Katzen, and many more, 
I hope you enjoy the experience, relax and get inspired, See you all next week. Tracklist: Volen Sentir - Heimarmene Mariner, Domingo - Azimuth (Juan Deminicis Remix)
 Nicolas Viana - Clear Path Hot TuneiK - Quite Of A Journey
 Gux Jimenez - Dairsu 
 Gorge - Erotic Soul (Crimsen Remix) 
 Alan Cerra - Get Loose
 Taylan - November Rain (Dabeat Remix) 
 Paul Arcane, Leon DeFranco - Perspectives
 Rafael - Salome 
 Katzen - Where I'm Going 
 Bound to Divide & Lovlee - Flying By

Tech It Out
AT&T & Mynd Immersive on VR for aging adults + Moto on a ‘digital detox,' LG goes wireless, and more

Tech It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2023 39:07


It's a packed show today! We first catch up with AT&T and Mynd Immersive to hear about the good work they're doing with virtual reality and seniors. This is incredible work.LG stops by to share the news of its first wireless OLED TV, the M3 Series television – and why this mattersWe learn about taking a ‘digital detox' and how the pair of new moto razr smartphones may be able to helpTech lifestyle expert Carley Knobloch shares some gadget gift ideas ahead of the holidaysI also share a few Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals that has caught my eyeThank you to Visa, Slickdeals and Western Digital for your support on Tech It Out

Immersive Audio Podcast
Immersive Audio Podcast Episode 89 John Henry Dale & Merijn Royaards (Sonic Sphere)

Immersive Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2023 71:22


In this episode of the Immersive Audio Podcast, Monica Bolles is joined by musicians and audio engineers John Henry Dale and Merijn Royaards from Miami, US. John Henry Dale is an immersive media artist, musician and entrepreneur focused on live spatial audio and video performance, based between Miami and New York. He holds an MSc in Digital Composition and Performance from the University of Edinburgh and composes, performs, and produces music across a range of genres from electronica, jazz, funk, Latin, global bass and ambient, to avant-garde and serialist composition projects. He has also worked extensively in the confluence of IT, Web, AV, Live Streaming, and Immersive Media technology at The Regional Arts and Culture Council, New World Symphony, Hive Streaming and Linkedin.  Most recently in July of 2023, he worked with Merijn Royaards and the Sonic Sphere project to help create custom spatial audio mixes in SPAT, Reaper and Ableton Live of selected works for the Sonic Sphere residency at the Shed and also created a personalised spatial audio mix and listening session for Mike Bloomberg and Marina Abramovic. John Henry performed his live music for his “In Viridi Lux” spatial audio performance project inside the Sonic Sphere as part of a 2023 Miami Individual Artist grant funded by the National Endowment for The Arts and the Miami-Dade Cultural Affairs Department. Merijn Royaards is a sound architect, researcher, and performer guided by convoluted movements through music, art, and spatial studies. The interaction between space and sound in cities with a history/present of conflict has been a recurring theme in his multimedia works to date. His 2020 awarded doctoral thesis explores the state-altering effects of sound, space, and movement from the Russian avant-garde to today's clubs and raves. He is one part of a critical essay film practice with artist-researcher Henrietta Williams and teaches sound design for film and installation art at the Bartlett School of Architecture. JH and Merijn talk about the evolution of Sonic Sphere as a concept, playback system and performance space. They talk about the practical aspects of crafting and experiencing different spatial audio content within the spherical structures. This episode was produced by Oliver Kadel and Emma Rees and included music by Rhythm Scott. For extended show notes and more information on this episode go to immersiveaudiopodcast.com/episode-89-john-henry-dale-merijn-royaards-sonic-sphere/ If you enjoy the podcast and would like to show your support, please consider becoming a Patreon. Not only are you supporting us, but you will also get special access to bonus content and much more. Find out more on our official Patreon page - www.patreon.com/immersiveaudiopodcast We thank you kindly in advance! We want to hear from you! We value our community and would appreciate it if you would take our very quick survey and help us make the Immersive Audio Podcast even better: surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3Y9B2MJ Thank you! You can follow the podcast on Twitter @IAudioPodcast for regular updates and content or get in touch via podcast@1618digital.com immersiveaudiopodcast.com

Le choix de France Bleu Périgord
L'exposition "Tintin, l'aventure immersive" aux Bassins des Lumières à Bordeaux jusqu'au 7 janvier 2024

Le choix de France Bleu Périgord

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2023 18:16


durée : 00:18:16 - L'exposition "Tintin, l'aventure immersive" aux Bassins des Lumières à Bordeaux jusqu'au 7 janvier 2024 - C'est une aventure immersive qui vous attend jusqu'au 7 janvier 2024 aux Bassins des lumières à Bordeaux. Plongez dans l'univers de Tintin.

Consult ROI
Limitless Arena: An Immersive Journey with Legends

Consult ROI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2023 43:40


In this extraordinary episode of the Consult ROI podcast, we relive an unforgettable experience at the Limitless Arena event. Our host, Camron Bodily, takes you on a captivating journey through the wisdom shared by an incredible lineup of legends. From the indomitable spirit of David Goggins to the profound insights of Gary Vaynerchuk, the memory-boosting expertise of Jim Kwik, the motivation from Ed Mylett, the financial wisdom of Codie Sanchez, the real estate mastery of Pace Morby, and so much more, this event was a treasure trove of knowledge. We revisit the electrifying talks of Tim Grover, Andy Frisella, Russell Brunson, Eric Thomas, Heavy D Sparks, Keaton Hoskins, Andy Elliott, Dan Fleyshman, and many others who graced the stage. These luminaries shared their invaluable experiences and wisdom, leaving us inspired and motivated. Join us as we relive the highlights of the Limitless Arena event. This episode is your backstage pass to an unforgettable gathering of exceptional minds. Discover the insights, the passion, and the drive that continue to propel us toward limitless possibilities. --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/consult-roi/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/consult-roi/support

Welcome to the Metaverse
This Is The Immersive Technology Company That Disney, Warner Bros, Paramount and Universal All Call First - Conversation with Sol Rogers - Global Director of Innovation at Magnopus

Welcome to the Metaverse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2023 43:09


Magnopus are one of Hollywood's best kept secrets. They are the guys that everyone calls (WB, Paramount, Disney, Pixar, Universal, Amazon Studios) when they need a technology solution for something that's never been done before.  Their incredible work spans across virtual production for the Lion King, to Real Time Environment buildouts for Westworld, an immersive concert for Maddison Beer, a Blade Runner 2049 VR Experience, the Dubai Expo Cross-Reality Experience - the list is absurdly impressive. It's also rare that you get someone who has so much experience building in this space, with so much foresight for the future AND can also explain it simply if you're new. Sol did exactly that with lots of very helpful actionable and practical advice. It was an absolute pleasure to have him on the show. I would highly recommend you follow him and his team on the following links! Connected Spaces Platform : https://www.magnopus.com/csp Magnopus on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/company/magnopus/ Sol Rogers on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/solrogers/ Sol Rogers on Twitter : https://twitter.com/SolRogers As always, thanks for listening. You can reach out to me on Twitter https://twitter.com/luke_franks or LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/luke-franks-b8b509118/

Salmon Podcast
James Turrell ศิลปินผู้ใช้แสงสี พื้นที่ และอารมณ์ผ่านงาน Immersive | Arttrovert EP116

Salmon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2023 46:46


สืบเนื่องจากทริปญี่ปุ่นของบีมหว่องที่ไปเดินดูงานในศูนย์ศิลปะแห่งชาติโตเกียว จนไปเจอเข้ากับ Raemar, Blue (1969) ผลงานของเจมส์ เทอร์เรลล์ Installation Artist ชาวอเมริกัน แล้วรู้สึกสนใจเป็นพิเศษ จนต้องกลับไปตามดูผลงานชิ้นเก่าๆ ของเขาว่ามีอะไรบ้าง เอพิโสดนี้ เราชวนมาตามบีมหว่องไปฟังเรื่องราวและผลงานของเทอร์เรลล์ จากคนที่ได้ใบอนุญาตนักบินตั้งแต่อายุ 16 ก่อนจะไปเรียนต่อด้านจิตวิทยา แล้วยังกลับมาเป็นศิลปินอีก การได้ทำหลายอาชีพ และเดินทางไปในพื้นที่ต่างๆ กัน จะมีผลต่อการสร้างงานของเขาอย่างไรบ้าง และทำไมการชมงานของเทอร์เรลล์ในพื้นที่แบบ Immersive จึงส่งผลเป็นพิเศษต่ออารมณ์ อย่างที่นายเม้งได้ไปพบเจอ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

immersive james turrell
Sacred Playgrounds Podcast
The Case for the Christ Hike

Sacred Playgrounds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2023 38:28


Have you taken a walk through the life of Jesus?  Have you brought your campers through an experience like this in a way that puts them in the story?Immersive experiences have power, especially in the context of camp spaces already so experiential in nature. Bringing The Story to life is an honor, and we have an opportunity to make a connection between Jesus' story and our own, and that of our campers.What kind of spaces and experiences does your camp create to immerse campers in the narrative of God's story? Share in the comments!Our #StatoftheWeek is around camper financial support. Feel free to download and add your own link, QR code, or messaging around supporting your campership programs before you share.DOWNLOAD THE #STATOFTHEWEEK GRAPHICSSupport the showCome help camp thrive with us on Facebook, Instagram, or at sacredplaygrounds.com.

Noon Business Hour on WBBM Newsradio
McDonald's/Crocs - Illinois Holiday Destinations & Immersive Travel

Noon Business Hour on WBBM Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2023 28:19


McDonald's is teaming up with Crocs for exclusive shoes inspired by the fast food chain's iconic mascots, discovering statewide attractions where festive magic sparkles and living like a local while traveling abroad.

The Creative Insider
0134 The Realities of a Creative Career:Money, Passion, and Design w/Sofia Hagen

The Creative Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2023 113:09


Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4NYf7uMqN4Hjgj4iREYiMg/join Join the real insiders on our page: https://www.patreon.com/thecreativeinsider In this episode we had an open conversation with Sofia Hagen. She is co-founder of HagenHinderdael a design office based in London, specialized in Immersive experience design and 3D Printed objects. She shared openly about her exprience at big firms like Zaha Hadid and Heatherwick studio. We spoke openly about Money, Carrer, Being a woman, starting a company and much more. If you want to connect with her: https://hagenhinderdael.com/projects/ https://www.instagram.com/so.hagen/ Time Stamps:(00:00:00) Intro(00:04:04) Moving to London at Zaha Hadid(00:10:23) Leaving stararchitecture(00:16:14) Starting a company in the UK(00:24:51) Generating profit with your business(00:34:13) The partnerships at the studio(00:36:27) Design philosophy of Sofia Hagen(00:45:25) The story with the Wolf of Wallstreet(00:54:52) Her Business Model(00:58:45) Promoting your work in creative ways(01:04:08) Process of creating the models(01:07:59) How much money do you make as a solo(01:14:10) The reality of working at famouse offices(01:30:14) Work-life balance as a solopreneur(01:36:12) How are you seen as a woman in design(01:41:48) What is her mission and motivation(01:46:49) What inspires her

3 Books With Neil Pasricha
Page 52: An immersive children's book every adult should read

3 Books With Neil Pasricha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2023 3:00


Pages are pulled from Chapters of 3 Books. Page 52 comes from Chapter 5 with Gretchen Rubin, author of 'The Happiness Project' and podcaster behind 'Happier'. To listen to the full chapter: https://www.3books.co/chapters/5 To get the 3 Books email: http://www.3books.co/3mail To join our community: Follow @neilpasricha on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, & YouTube

Voices of VR Podcast – Designing for Virtual Reality
1319: Preview of 40 Raindance Immersive 2023 Indie VR Art, Music, Game, Narrative, & Live Experiences

Voices of VR Podcast – Designing for Virtual Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 78:16


Raindance Immersive is back with 40 independent VR experiences across eight categories of Immersive World, Immersive Experience, Immersive Art Experience, Immersive Music Experience, Immersive Narrative, Immersive Game, and two new categories of Short Film of VR and Music Video of VR, which are 2D films that are shot within virtual reality. 75% of this year's selection has some connection to a social VR platform with 28 connected to VRChat with single experiences in EngageXR and Resonite (i.e. the spiritual successor to NeosVR. I had a chance to catch up with the co-curators of Raindance Immersive of Mária Rakušanová and Joe Hunting to get a rundown and sneak peak of all 40 experiences at this year's selection that runs online in VRChat from November 4th to December 3rd. Nearly all of the screenings are free (everything aside from the gaming selection) with free sign-ups for live performances, guided tours, and screenings listed on their website. Raindance is at the forefront of curating the trends that are at the bleeding edge of virtual culture and the best-in-class of worldbuilding, live performances, and musical experiences within these VRChat and social VR environments. It's always great to hear more about how they curate this festival by being deeply in tune with the VRChat community and actively participating in events throughout the year to build relationships and create a creative deadline for immersive artists, worldbuilders, and storytellers to share their latest works. I can highly recommend checking out this year's selection, particularly the immersive world selection and be sure to drop by one of the screenings of films that were shot within VR chat as that's a new and exciting trend. I get a bit more historical context in this development from Hunting as he shares some of the early film festivals in VR, and selections of 2D films shot in VR that he curated starting in 2020. Phia's The Virtual Reality Show Film Fest featured a selection of 14 films shot in VRChat on February 25th, 2023, which led to the founding of a VRChat filmmaker Discord and provided a catalyst for collaboration and knowledge sharing with other VRChat-based filmmakers. Hunting provides a bit more context as to how the community got to that point, and why it was the perfect time for the VRChat filmmaker community to self-organize and for Raindance to expand their selection this year to feature these 2D films. Raindance Immersive runs for a few more weeks until December 3rd, 2023, and so be sure to check out RaindanceImmersive.com for more information for how to check out this year's selection. This is a listener-supported podcast through the Voices of VR Patreon. Music: Fatality

Gensler Design Exchange
From Stores to Stories: Immersive Experience and the Future of Retail

Gensler Design Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 26:34


As consumers seek more meaningful connections in a digital world, brands are looking to immersive experiences to better engage audiences. Listen as we explore the growing trend of immersive experiences and how designers can help realize new frontiers. 

The Near Memo
GMaps Immersive directions, Citations & Local Search, The GBP new small business attribute

The Near Memo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 26:29


Google Maps from useful to bloat?Google Maps continues to add new features and functionality and as it has become a primary search engine for Google and its forward facing brand it has included so much functionality that it suffers from extreme bloat. The new immersive directions exemplifies the problem. but Maps is a deep moat and it is very difficult for others to challenge.  Citations and their value to Local Search: In the past, citations from directories were crucial for local businesses, especially those without a significant inbound link footprint or a website. These third-party profiles often served as the only source of validation for Google to categorize and recognize the existence of these businesses. At that time, Google had fewer signals to rely on for local businesses, such as a less developed native review feature and a smaller corpus of reviews. This context made citations in directories like Yellow Pages, City Search, and Yelp significantly valuable, as they were well-ranked in Google's organic algorithm and helped propel the mentioned businesses in search rankings.However, the landscape has shifted considerably. Nowadays, most businesses have claimed their Google Business Profiles and provide information directly to Google. A larger percentage of these businesses have their own websites with inbound links. This development diminishes Google's reliance on third-party directories for data validation, which was a significant role these directories played a decade ago. Furthermore, the authority and trust in many of these non-Yelp directories have declined, making citations in them less impactful for local SEO. The current strategy emphasizes identifying and targeting sites that rank for desired keywords, as these are more likely to draw clicks and direct customers. This shift highlights the need for local businesses and agencies to adapt their SEO strategies, focusing more on building a robust online presence and less on broad directory listings. Google's New  Small Business Attribute: Helpful or Performative ?This attribute aims to make it easier for consumers to discover small businesses online when shopping for products. Google defines a small business as an entity not part of a franchise, with fewer than $10 million in revenue and less than ten locations. However, there's a debate over this definition, as it excludes franchisees, who constitute a significant portion of small businesses in the U.S. Google plans to infer small business status from various signals and also allows businesses to affirmatively apply for the attribute.From a marketing perspective, this development is significant yet somewhat limited in its potential impact. The attribute is expected to help small businesses be discovered more easily, serving as a modifier or a long-tail tool in certain search contexts. However, there are concerns about the actual effectiveness of this feature in driving substantial exposure for small businesses. Critics argue that if Google were genuinely committed to enhancing small business discovery, this attribute would be more prominently integrated, such as in Google Shopping or as a filter in search ads. As it stands, the attribute may have a limited impact, appearing sporadically and possibly unnoticed by users. This suggests that, while beneficial, the attribute's impact on small business visibility and marketing might be more symbolic than substantial.The Near Memo is a weekly conversation about Search, Social, and Commerce: What happened, why it matters, and the implications for local businesses and national brands.near memo ep 134Subscribe to our 3x per week newsletter at https://www.nearmedia.co/subscribe/

Sharp Tech with Ben Thompson
Waiting for Immersive ChatGPT, ChatGPT and the Consumer Challenge, OpenAI's Enterprise vs. Consumer Balancing Act

Sharp Tech with Ben Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 67:01


The possibilities of a universal chatbot for the future, the challenges for any new consumer tech company trying to match the scale of incumbents, and the strategic questions facing OpenAI as its leadership allocates resources and considers a move into hardware.

The Future of What
Episode #218 — Dolby's Christine Thomas Talks Dolby Atmos & Immersive Audio

The Future of What

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2023 13:26


While some say nothing quite captures the experience of listening to music performed in-person, new technologies are bringing unparalleled levels of immersion to the music listening experience. Enter Dolby Atmos, an immersive audio format which debuted for movies more than a decade ago that is now available across music services on 2.5 billion devices. In our latest podcast, Dolby's Head of Music Industry Relations, Christine Thomas discusses the evolution of the company's immersive audio efforts and how it gives artists the ability to deliver their music to audiences in an exciting new medium!

The Nonintuitive Bits
Exploring Media Laws, Cryptography and Immersive Games

The Nonintuitive Bits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2023 58:41


- They touched on issues with Amazon Live streaming- Unpacked societal labeling as seen in the is movie "Barbie"- Talked about celebrities like Will Ferrell, Ryan Gosling, and Margot Robbie- They compared "Barbie" with "South Park" highlighting their multiverse themes- Explored the influence of 'woke mob' in Hollywood- Delved into Elon Musk's statement on Twitter censorship during the Joe Rogan show- Underlined the need for laws defining 'reasonable efforts' in the balance between labeling bans and civil rights- Dissected freedom of speech and the role of platforms like Facebook and Twitter- Discussed the differences between newspapers and social platforms- Covered the applications of media laws to new and traditional media- The conversation then went onto the balance between corporate moderation and unrestricted freedom- Warned of the potential dangers of company moderation limiting diverse thoughts- Brought up U.S decisions regarding censorship, and the use of "AllSides" for diverse U.S politics- Reviewed the book "Cryptonomicon", shedding light on WWII, mathematics, and cryptography- The hosts recalled personal encounters with crypto analysis- Dug into challenges and excitement of deciphering "Cryptonomicon", including reader's thoughts- Gave kudos for the immersive gaming experience in "Alan Wake 2"- Analyzed the cross-over narratives in games such as the Elite Dangerous series, Horizon Zero Dawn, and Sony's Star Wars franchise- Reviewed the books "The Art of Thinking Clearly", and "Serial Fun", which delve into biases and game development respectively- Explored AI services for writing book narratives and summaries- Celebrated reaching roughly 500 listeners per episode in the first month of the seasonJoin the conversation in our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/T38WpgkHGQ

Immersive Audio Podcast
Immersive Audio Podcast Episode 88 Dave Marston & Matt Firth (BBC R&D)

Immersive Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2023 57:05


This episode is sponsored by Innovate Audio. Innovate Audio offers a range of software-based spatial audio processing tools. Their latest product, panLab Console, is a macOS application that adds 3D spatial audio rendering capabilities to live audio mixing consoles, including popular models from Yamaha, Midas and Behringer. This means you can achieve an object-based audio workflow, utilising the hardware you already own. Immersive Audio Podcast listeners can get an exclusive 20% discount on all panLab licences, use code Immersive20 at checkout. Find out more at innovateaudio.co.uk *Offer available until June 2024.* In this episode of the Immersive Audio Podcast, Oliver Kadel and Monica Bolles are joined by the members of the BBC R&D Audio team Dave Marston and Matt Firth from the United Kingdom. We talk about the Next Generation Audio for Live Event Broadcasting, covering aspects such as immersion, interactivity, personalisation and workflows featuring cutting-edge codecs and metadata for Audio Definition Model (ADM), Serial ADM (S-ADM), and OSC-ADM. This episode was produced by Oliver Kadel and Emma Rees and included music by Rhythm Scott. For extended show notes and more information on this episode go to https://immersiveaudiopodcast.com/episode-88-dave-marston-matt-firth-bbc-rd/ If you enjoy the podcast and would like to show your support, please consider becoming a Patreon. Not only are you supporting us, but you will also get special access to bonus content and much more. Find out more on our official Patreon page - www.patreon.com/immersiveaudiopodcast We thank you kindly in advance! We want to hear from you! We value our community and would appreciate it if you would take our very quick survey and help us make the Immersive Audio Podcast even better: surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3Y9B2MJ Thank you! You can follow the podcast on Twitter @IAudioPodcast for regular updates and content or get in touch via podcast@1618digital.com immersiveaudiopodcast.com

The Digital Deep Dive With Aaron Conant
Gen Alpha and Immersive Commerce

The Digital Deep Dive With Aaron Conant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2023 35:36


Michael Zakkour is the Founder and Chief Strategist at 5 New Digital, a consultancy that advises clients on strategy, structure, implementation, and transformation in the digital realm. Michael has over 20 years of experience in eCommerce, specializing in digital transformation, data science, the China/APAC market, digital commerce, and new retail strategy. He is also the Founder and Managing Director of China BrightStar, LLC. As an author and speaker, Michael has been interviewed by The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, NPR, the BBC, and many other media outlets. In this episode… Younger generations like Gen Alpha interact with commerce brands by balancing physical and digital interactions, playing video games like Fortnite and Roblox while socializing with friends. This online and offline integration has initiated a new retail class, where brands must amplify the shopping experience to reach younger audiences. How can you leverage immersive and experiential commerce to excel in the new digital age? With consumers becoming disinterested in two-dimensional shopping experiences, traditional eCommerce is underperforming. According to digital thought leader Michael Zakkour, eCommerce's pervasive presence has led consumers to desire more meaningful interactions. Immersive commerce integrates live streams, shoppable videos, virtual environments, and avatars to create engaging and pragmatic experiences. Capitalizing on modern retail requires identifying top-performing digital tools and channels and developing a video commerce strategy involving streaming and live shopping videos with real-time purchasing options.  Tune in to the latest Digital Deep Dive episode as Aaron Conant welcomes Michael Zakkour, the Founder and Chief Strategist at Five New Digital, back to the show to discuss leveraging immersive commerce to engage younger generations. Michael shares actionable steps for success in the new digital realm, the importance of interactive video content, and how to optimize your budget for experiential commerce.

Learn Spanish | SpanishPod101.com
Level 1 Spanish: Immersive Practice #15 - Practice Asking the Price of Something

Learn Spanish | SpanishPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2023 2:03


practice asking the price of something with your teacher, Víctor Trejo.

Barriers to Entry
Sarah DiLeo, Studio Co-Director, Digital Experience Design, Gensler

Barriers to Entry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2023 54:31


Immersive design: by Gensler. This week we welcome one of the leaders of a rapidly growing practice area from one of the world's most noteworthy architecture & design firms, Gensler. In a can't-miss conversation, Sarah DiLeo, our first guest who can claim to be both a member of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and a licensed pilot, goes deep with the gang into how a leading immersive media practice is thinking about technology, talent, inclusive design, and more. All this while we lose Bobby to the vortex of the internet, attempt to transform Sarah into a Swiftie, and reveal Andrew's ideal location for podcast listening. You'll want to immerse yourself in this one. Connect with Sarah DiLeo on LinkedIn! Moments to check out:  (5:43) Connecting emerging practice with ongoing client requirements (16:19) Designing the 'Metaverse' vs Immersive design (24:48) Creating inclusive, immersive design (30:43) Applying AI and emerging tech for inclusive design (34:23) Building teams that work on the leading edge Connect with our hosts on LinkedIn; Bobby Bonett Tessa Bain Andrew Lane References and resources: Gensler Gensler Digital Experience Design Gensler Research Library Gensler blog: Strategies for Immersive Design Gensler blog: Driving Inclusivity in Digital Content Swiftie Meow Wolf Sphere Las Vegas Disney Imagineering Yayoi Kusama's Obliteration Room Related and Referenced BTE Episodes: Patti Carpenter (Metaverse / Trends) David Schwartz (Immersive Design)   Discover more shows from SURROUND at surroundpodcasts.com.  This episode of Barriers to Entry was produced and edited by Wize Grazette and Rob Schulte. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Immersive Audio Podcast
Immersive Audio Podcast Episode 87 Lorenzo Picinali (Imperial College London)

Immersive Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2023 47:31


This episode is sponsored by Innovate Audio. Innovate Audio offers a range of software-based spatial audio processing tools. Their latest product, panLab Console, is a macOS application that adds 3D spatial audio rendering capabilities to live audio mixing consoles, including popular models from Yamaha, Midas and Behringer. This means you can achieve an object-based audio workflow, utilising the hardware you already own. Immersive Audio Podcast listeners can get an exclusive 20% discount on all panLab licences, use code Immersive20 at checkout. Find out more at innovateaudio.co.uk *Offer available until June 2024.* In this episode of the Immersive Audio Podcast, Oliver Kadel is joined by the academic and researcher at Imperial College - Lorenzo Picinali from London, United Kingdom. Lorenzo Picinali is a Reader at Imperial College London, leading the Audio Experience Design team. His research focuses on spatial acoustics and immersive audio, looking at perceptual and computational matters, as well as real-life applications. In the past years Lorenzo worked on projects related to spatial hearing and rendering, hearing aids technologies, and acoustic virtual and augmented reality. He has also been active in the field of eco-acoustic monitoring, designing autonomous recorders and using audio to better understand humans' impact on remote ecosystems. Lorenzo talks about the breadth of research initiatives in spatial audio under his leadership of the Audio Experience Design group and we discuss the recently published SONICOM HRTF Dataset developed to improve personalised listening experience. This episode was produced by Oliver Kadel and Emma Rees and included music by Rhythm Scott. For extended show notes and more information on this episode go to https://immersiveaudiopodcast.com/episode-87-lorenzo-picinali-imperial-college-london/ If you enjoy the podcast and would like to show your support, please consider becoming a Patreon. Not only are you supporting us, but you will also get special access to bonus content and much more. Find out more on our official Patreon page - www.patreon.com/immersiveaudiopodcast We thank you kindly in advance! We want to hear from you! We value our community and would appreciate it if you would take our very quick survey and help us make the Immersive Audio Podcast even better: surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3Y9B2MJ Thank you! You can follow the podcast on Twitter @IAudioPodcast for regular updates and content or get in touch via podcast@1618digital.com immersiveaudiopodcast.com

Inside Influence
Paul Zak returns to unpack the science of Immersion and how to cultivate happiness

Inside Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2023 83:08


Do you struggle to immerse yourself in something (anything) without a buzz, ding or vibration pulling you out of your train of thought? If we struggle to pay attention to even the things we care about - how as influencers, leaders and communicators - can we cut through long enough to create real and lasting impact.Today's Guest Paul Zak is a neuroscientist, public speaker and author who has spent the last two decades looking into what our brains crave - and how we can use those cravings to build experiences that actually change our minds. Paul is a Professor of Economics, Psychology and Management at Claremont Graduate University. His TED Talk ‘Trust, morality and oxytocin' has had almost 2 million views and he has been invited to speak at NATO Supreme HeadQuarters, Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Harvard University to name but a few. His most recent book: ‘Immersion: The Science of the Extraordinary and the Source of Happiness', is based on 20 years of research into exactly why our brains hunt for the extraordinary - and how we can use this knowledge to create amazing experiences for our customers, employees and audiences.LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-zak-91123510/You'll LearnWhy understanding what makes an Immersive experience holds the key to designing messages, movements and marketing that significantly changes people's behavior.The five essential steps of persuasion. Including how to ‘Open Hot' by starting any piece of persuasive communication in a way that literally changes the blood chemistry of your audience.Why ‘fun' is always a better motivator than ‘fear'. Although fear may motivate us in the short term, it's fun (or positive emotion) that continues to motivate long after the fear has disappeared.Finally, how to use the science of Immersion to lead a better, deeper and more enriching life - and why this has become Paul's dedicated focus for the next 10 years. This is Paul's second time on the podcast. Since the first I've enjoyed many email conversations together on how the science he pioneered has changed the lives – and business outcomes – of tens of thousands of people across the world.However, where our connection became deeper, is our shared passion for what science and technology can do to help us pause. Paul's work is a powerful beacon of light in that direction.References and links mentionedMy new ebook The Influencer Codehttp://getimmersion.com/If you liked this episode, you might also enjoyGay HendricksThanks for tuning into this week's episode of the Inside Influence Podcast! Please head over to iTunes, subscribe to the show, and leave an honest review. Don't forget to hop on my website juliemasters.com and download my new ebook. The Influencer Code or become an insider by signing up to my newsletter. Influencer Code or become an insider by signing up to my newsletter. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

CE Pro Podcast
CE Pro Podcast #151: The ‘Audio Guys' Dig into RP22 Immersive Audio Guidelines

CE Pro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2023 48:15


Following a successful CEDIA Expo 2023 in which home audio – particularly immersive audio – was front-and-center on the show floor, it was time to talk surround sound with our “Audio Guys” regulars on the latest CE Pro Podcast.Joined by CE Pro All-Star Band keyboard player Steve Haas, who is a nationally recognized acoustician in the residential and commercial audio markets, along with the CE Pro Podcast resident audiophiles Steve Silberman, director of sales, West for Savant, and Paul Bochner, owner and president of Electronic Concepts, the trio dove into several immersive audio related topics.

Five Years Time
Immersive Journey Through Italy: Tips, Tales, and Unforgettable Adventures

Five Years Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2023 67:20 Transcription Available


Imagine sipping on Fizzante, a bubbly Italian carbonated water, and munching on olives focaccia, a savory Italian snack, as we transport you to the mesmerizing landscapes of Italy. Fresh off our dreamy Italian adventure, we're brimming with stories, travel tips, and enjoyable moments that we can't wait to share with you. Expect a close look at our Airbnb stays, an in-depth video review of our itinerary, a peek into each city we visited, and the challenges and joys of traversing Italy with a sprightly three-year-old in tow.Ever wondered how to plan a perfect Italian holiday? We've got you covered! From booking flights to leaving the daily itinerary open-ended for spontaneous exploration, we share how we crafted an unforgettable Italian escapade. Our style is far from the typical tourist itinerary, we believe in waking up each day with an open heart for new adventures. Tune in for an immersive journey and pick up practical tips to plan your own Italian adventure. Adventure awaits, andiamo!FYT Spotify PlaylistSubscribe onYoutubeThank you for listening

Full Dive Gaming: a Virtual Reality Podcast in VR
NEW Mixed Reality Mode for Quest 3: Drop Dead the Cabin

Full Dive Gaming: a Virtual Reality Podcast in VR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2023 30:07


VR Podcast talking about Quest 3 VR Game: Drop Dead the Cabin that is now Quest 3 enhanced and has an MR or Mixed Reality Mode!!!CHECK IT OUT HERE: https://www.oculus.com/appreferrals/jaybratt/4691479430874595/About the CabinAn immersive love letter to classic 1980s horror, Drop Dead: The Cabin boasts high-pressure combat alongside survival and roguelite elements. Difficult by design, no two runs are ever the same as objectives, encounters, key locations, and pickups are remixed with each playthrough. You can team up and work closely with a friend to dispatch as many zombies as possible, or split up to tackle multiple objectives. Through it all, you'll die—a lot—as you develop your skills and gain experience to perfect your escape. Home Invasion Mode'Drop Dead: The Cabin - Home Invasion,' our groundbreaking mixed reality mode that is poised to redefine the horror MR gaming genre. Prepare to be immersed in a spine-tingling experience like never before as the line between your physical space and a nightmarish world of zombie chaos blurs. This innovative feature transports the classic zombie invasion into the heart of your home, unleashing an adrenaline-pumping battle for survival that promises thrills for all. Press kit: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/16ZFEgbSiJZgoxZC5zPZo569Uwpt0ZQ9C?usp=drive_link Discord: https://soulassembly.com/cabinWebsite: https://soulassembly.com/0:00 Quest 3 MR Game: Drop Dead0:42 What is Drop Dead VR??2:11 Game is HARD!3:43 What's the Game Loop?5:24 Death is a PART of it!6:15 Single or Multiplayer?7:50 MIXED REALITY MODE is OUT!!10:34 Quest 3 AND OTHERS??11:37 MR is IMMERSIVE, but Tough to Make12:44 More Immersive THAN VR??14:51 How BIG Can I Go??17:40 What OTHER GAMES??19:00 Is this THE MR GAME to DEMO??21:48 MR Multiplayer??23:40 Depth Sensor Updates26:10 What DIDN'T we cover??28:00 What are WE PLAYING??This week's podcast was made in partnership with Asterion Products. Get 5% off the Aura headset or any other order $19.99 or more with the code FULLDIVE at https://www.asterionproducts.com Welcome to the Full Dive Gaming podcast, bringing a weekly dive of all the news, discussion, and insights you need for VR gaming! Each week, we release NEW EPISODES on all Your Favorite major platforms: Spotify, Apple, Google... etc. SUPPORT US: -https://www.patreon.com/fulldivegamingJoin The Discord Server: -https://discord.gg/VWGcT3GLISTEN TO FULL EPISODES:-SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1BhFGZWRhobzEVsQ9csjhA?si=O_Zo3xtuS7eFJz5jNzbwdw-APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/full-dive-gaming-podcast/id1513469932-GOOGLE PODCASTS: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5jYXB0aXZhdGUuZm0vZnVsbGRpdmVnYW1pbmc%3D-OVERCAST:https://overcast.fm/itunes1513469932/full-dive-gaming-podcast-TUNEIN: http://tun.in/pjRQF-PODCHASER: https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/full-dive-gaming-podcast-1199646-RADIOPUBLIC: https://radiopublic.com/full-dive-gaming-podcast-8jyN49FOLLOW US:-Twitter: https://twitter.com/FullDiveGaming -Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fulldivegaming/EMAIL US:Business Inquiries...

The Nishant Garg Show
#248: Kyle Niedrich — Deconditioning Religious Beliefs, Creating Meaning through Identity Crisis and a Purposeless Life

The Nishant Garg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2023 65:57


Join me at my "⁠Rite Of Passage Retreat"⁠ - An Immersive 2-day retreat to guide you from living off the stresses of your mind into thriving from the wisdom of your soul. Get your ticket. Ticket Sales are open only until Nov 5th at midnight CST. If you have questions, email me. If you can't afford the ticket price, email me, and let's chat and see what we can do. If you think this retreat isn't right for you, please help me in spreading the word among people whom you know will benefit. Guest: Kyle Niedrich He went to Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis where he received his doctorate in physical therapy. Kyle and Jamie are 7th-generation Mormons (members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).In April 2022, they corrected their families' religious traditions by transitioning out of Mormonism, pioneering a new path to self-actualization. Since that time, he started the Chrew Transformation Podcast. Its purpose is to connect people with coaches, therapists, and other survivors who have escaped their religion, cult, or other abusive relationships. He recently completed the Life Purpose Institute coaching certification. His coaching expertise is focused on guiding people on their fitness journey. He believes obtaining optimized physical fitness will lead to an improvement in every other aspect of one's life.  Sign up link: https://nishantgarg.me/pod/retreat For questions, contact me: https://nishantgarg.me/contact/ Connect with Nishant: ⁠Facebook⁠ | ⁠Instagram⁠ | ⁠LinkedIn⁠ | ⁠Twitter

Immersive Audio Podcast
Immersive Audio Podcast Episode 86 Daniel Higgott & Luke Swaffield (Innovate Audio)

Immersive Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2023 45:07


This episode is sponsored by Innovate Audio. Innovate Audio offers a range of software-based spatial audio processing tools. Their latest product, panLab Console, is a macOS application that adds 3D spatial audio rendering capabilities to live audio mixing consoles, including popular models from Yamaha, Midas and Behringer. This means you can achieve an object-based audio workflow, utilising the hardware you already own. Immersive Audio Podcast listeners can get an exclusive 20% discount on all panLab licences, use code Immersive20 at checkout. Find out more at innovateaudio.co.uk *Offer available until June 2024.* In this episode of the Immersive Audio Podcast, Oliver Kadel is joined by theatre sound designer and engineer at Autograph Sound - Luke Swaffield and co-founder and lead developer at Innovate Audio Daniel Higgott from London, United Kingdom. Dan and Luke talk about the world of theatre sound and immersive live events and the fast adoption of spatial audio which offers creative opportunities and the need for innovative solutions. This episode was produced by Oliver Kadel and Emma Rees and included music by Rhythm Scott. For extended show notes and more information on this episode go to https://immersiveaudiopodcast.com/episode-86-daniel-higgott-luke-swaffield-innovate-audio/ If you enjoy the podcast and would like to show your support, please consider becoming a Patreon. Not only are you supporting us, but you will also get special access to bonus content and much more. Find out more on our official Patreon page - www.patreon.com/immersiveaudiopodcast We thank you kindly in advance! We want to hear from you! We value our community and would appreciate it if you would take our very quick survey and help us make the Immersive Audio Podcast even better: surveymonkey.co.uk/r/3Y9B2MJ Thank you! You can follow the podcast on Twitter @IAudioPodcast for regular updates and content or get in touch via podcast@1618digital.com immersiveaudiopodcast.com

To The Macks
Seed talk #155 | Are College Sports In Trouble, Immersive Sports Betting, & AI Coaching

To The Macks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2023 41:54


Sports Discussion:Will NIL money cripple college athletics?Sports Technology:Immersive sports gambling powered by Genius SportsWhoop releases an AI fitness coach to better your everyday life

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP
The Future of Learning & Development and AI at Work: "TCB"

Coffee Break with Game-Changers, presented by SAP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2023 56:10


In the world of knowledge, we aim high, ChatGPT we queried, seeking to fly. “Hello,” we said, reaching for the sky, Tell us of AI and learning, and don't be shy. In Business Learning's future, AI's great might, Personalized paths and data shining bright. Chatbots aiding learners, day and night, Immersive tech for skills, a promising sight. Microlearning, assessments that grow, AI's smart recognition, a bright tomorrow. Languages bridged, barriers low, Ethics and inclusion, our AI motto. From movies, wisdom in characters we find, Yoda, Morpheus, with insight unlined. *** Yoda in Star Wars: “Always pass on what you have learned.” *** Morpheus in The Matrix: “I can only show you the door. You're the one that has to walk through it.” Kirsten Boileau, Jeremy Kestler, Sarah Goodall, and Ann Cushman combined, Guide us through learning, for our digital mind. Join Bonnie D. for The Future of Business L&D and AI: TCB, We'll share, predict, unpack Tune in and see.

Skip the Queue
Philanthropic thinking for funding of new projects, with Rhiannon Hiles

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2023 51:03


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, Founder of Rubber Cheese.Download the Rubber Cheese 2022 Visitor Attraction Website Report - the first digital benchmark statistics for the attractions sector.If you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends on 20th December 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.beamish.org.uk/https://www.linkedin.com/in/rhiannon-hiles-4469784/ Rhiannon Hiles is Chief Executive of Beamish, The Living Museum of the North.Rhiannon leads the talented team of staff and volunteers, and is responsible for strategic development and operations at the award-winning County Durham open air museum, which brings the region's history to life.With over 30 years' experience in the culture sector, Rhiannon has extensive curatorial, commercial, operational and development expertise, combined with a great passion for museums, heritage and the North East.Working with national and international museum colleagues, Rhiannon is at the forefront of leading open air and independent museum practice, focused on sharing ideas, knowledge and supporting talent and progression across the sector.Rhiannon has a background in architectural and design history and an MA in Museum Studies specialising in social, rural and folk life studies and was an antique dealer and museum volunteer early on in her career. Her professional experience includes the prestigious Oxford Cultural Leaders Programme, SPARK Association Independent Museums (AIM) senior leaders programme, appointment to the board of the Association of European Open Air Museums, North East Chamber of Commerce Council member, National Museum Directors' Council, Museums Association, Association of Leading Visitor Attractions, and the Association of Independent Museums. She has been a school governor and is currently a Museums Association mentor and Director of the Melrose Learning Trust.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. On today's episode, I speak with Rhiannon Hiles, CEO of Beamish Museum. We talk about wiggly careers and finding opportunities that use all of your skills. We also discuss philanthropic thinking and how to use this approach to support the funding of new projects. If you like what you hear, you can subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue. Kelly Molson: Rhiannon, it's lovely to have you on the podcast today. Thank you so much for coming on. I'm very excited that we've got Beamish back on, if I'm honest. So I know that we've had lovely Matthew Henderson, one of your past colleagues, came on not too long ago and talked about creative ideas for driving commercial income. Kelly Molson: But I've recently experienced Beamish, which I'm sure we'll talk about later on in the podcast. So I'm really tough to it's lovely. Rhiannon Hiles: It's a pleasure to be here. I've been dying to talk to you as well. So this is great. We had that initial conversation, didn't we? And so to be talking to you again today, it's brilliant. Kelly Molson: Well, hopefully you still feel like that after I've asked you these icebreaker questions. Let's start. Okay, I want to know what's the worst gift that you've ever received but you had to try really hard to kind of be grateful for. Rhiannon Hiles: Well, I used to have a black and white collie when I was growing up. We had a small holding and we always had collies. And I had my favourite collie was called Woody. I loved Woody. Woody came everywhere with me, black and white. And I was out somewhere once and I said, "Oh, she looks a bit like a badger." When they asked me what she looked like. And then people kept giving me badger stuff all the time. And my house was getting full and full. I was a student at the time and had a student house that's full of badger things. And I was always very polite because I was brought up to always say, "Thank you. Thank you very much for the present." Inside I was going, "Not more badger things."Rhiannon Hiles: And when I eventually thought I was moving and I thought, I'm going to put all those badger things in a box and take it to a charity shop, and I did that. Kelly Molson: And somebody would have loved that big box of badger rubbish, wouldn't they? Rhiannon Hiles: Somebody. Kelly Molson: You get this if you've got a sausage dog as well. So we used to have a sausage dog. The minute you have one of them, everyone thinks that you are a dachshund mad and you're not. You've just got a dachshund. But they buy you everything that I've got so much stuff with dachshund. I don't know if the person that bought me is listening to this. I've got like makeup bags with dachshunds on I've been bought, like, shopping bags and things like that. And I'm like, "Yeah, she's cool and all that, but I don't need to dress myself in dachshunds and paraphernalia". For now, anytime that anyone buys me anything rubbish, I'm going to put it in the badger box. Right. I love that. Kelly Molson: Okay, well, this is definitely not going to be badgers, but if you had to pick one item to win a lifetime supply of, what would you pick? Rhiannon Hiles: It's not really very sustainable and everyone who knows me will be like, "You are." It sounds so vain, mascara. Kelly Molson: Oh, yeah. No, I'm with you. Rhiannon Hiles: Sorry.Kelly Molson: No, don't apologise. Mascara would absolutely be on, like, my desert island diffs. If I was put if I was sent away somewhere, I would need not Desert Island Discs. What am I talking about? If I was on a desert island and I could take one thing, I want my mascara.Rhiannon Hiles: When I was pregnant and packing, you packed the bag, ready to go to hospital, and I was like, "Have I got everything in?” And I was like, “Have I got mascara in?" And everyone's like, "You will not want that or need it." And I was like, "I will." And to be fair, I'm not actually certain that I did care, but I was safe because it was in there. Should I need it? Kelly Molson: Yeah, at the time. Things like that are really important. Are they? Have you ever had the fake eyelashes put on so you don't have to bother with it? Rhiannon Hiles: Oh, not to that degree. When I was a teenager, I was a goth and I thought I was Susie Sue. So this is 1983. And I really thought I was Susie Sue. And I'd spent ages studying the way she had her ticks and her eyeliner and her eyebrows. So I spent ages perfecting that and I couldn't get the eyelashes to work in the corners to what I wanted. So probably from Superdrug or the Equivalent in 1983, because I can't remember where it was in Durham. I'd snuck in with my pocket money and I bought these stick ones to go along the top. They didn't stay on for very long. Rhiannon Hiles: I've never had the ones that people actually have physically put in, but then when I see people and maybe one of them's come out, I'm like, it looks a bit odd. Stick with your own eyelashes. Kelly Molson: I can't do the put them on yourself. I'm not very good with stuff like this at all. I'm not very good with makeup, but mascara is my go to because.. Rhiannon Hiles: That's easy, isn't it? Opens up your eyes, away you go.Kelly Molson: All you have to play like a new woman. But I have had the ones that someone puts in professionally before, which were amazing, but the only downside is when you decide that you don't want them any, have them taken off. Your own eyelashes look so rubbish. That you look a bit like an alien because you've got not enough lashes, because you had loads before with the extra on. So, yeah, little tip for you, everyone. You'll look like an alien.Rhiannon Hiles: I'll remember that. Kelly Molson: Right. What is your unpopular opinion for us? Rhiannon Hiles: I listen to your podcasts and I love hearing what people's unpopular opinions are. And I listened to the one with Bernard Donoghue and the other two brilliant chaps, and one of them had nicked my unpopular opinion and now I don't want to share it because they didn't nick it, because they didn't know that I was going to do it. But I used to live in the museum, I used to live in Beamish, and it was brilliant. At the end of the day, when visitors weren't there, it was amazing. Kelly Molson: Oh, this is what Paul said. Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah. Kelly Molson: Kelly said that the best thing about the attractions is when people aren't there. Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah. Now, like, during the day, I would never think that or say that, because I love being amongst all the people, but when I lived in the museum, when everyone went, when the trams went, when it was deadly quiet, it was like yet another place, and it was like, "Wow, this is amazing now." And it was so different when the people weren't there. But I have to say that, for me, is an unpopular opinion, because, obviously, visitor attractions work when they're full of people. And although I used to think, I think, “Oh, it's so lovely at nighttime, or when everyone's gone”, but then when it went into lockdown into COVID, it made me sad when the people weren't there. So then my unpopular opinion kind of shifted. A very simple unpopular opinion is that I really don't like mushy peas. Kelly Molson: I'm with you. I don't like peas of any form at all. No, I'm absolutely this might not be so unpopular because I've got, like, a group of friends that are pea haters like me, and I have passed it on to my little girl as well, which I'm trying to yeah, I know she's not great. She's really good with fruit, not good with veg, and I'm trying to kind of retract that a little bit, but she's heard me say peas and make the face and now she's like, “Peas, yucky mummy.” Yeah. I'm trying to get her to go back, but I draw the line. There's no way I'm having mushy peas in my mouth. Rhiannon Hiles: And I think it's like the husky bit. Sometimes they're not really mushed and there's still a bit of husky pea shell in and I'm like, I don't like it. Kelly Molson: It's actually turning my stomach, thinking, well, let's see, whose side of the coin are you on? Are you on the pea lovers side or the pea haters? Come and join us on the haters side. Rhiannon Hiles: Vote now. Kelly Molson: Right, I want to know a little bit about your background, because I know that you've been at Beamish for quite a while. But what did you do prior to that? Rhiannon Hiles: When I was at school, I was really into horse riding, I had ponies and I set my sights from about the age of ten, probably to be a riding instructor. And so I was determined that's what I was going to do. But I was always a very good artist and I used to love drawing buildings and animals, not always in the same picture, but I loved the shape of buildings and I was just very interested in them. And I used to travel quite a lot with my grandparents and we used to always visit museums on the continent in particular. We used to go to open air museums loads and I just loved them. We always went in the summer, really loved them. But I still thought, I want to be a riding instructor, just want to visit those museums and have fun. Rhiannon Hiles: And then as I went through school, you flick around, don't you, a bit, when you're in school? Because I love drawing, I love sketching clothes. And I was a bit of a gothy punk when I was a teenager, and I used to make my own clothes. But I also was really into how the interiors of buildings looked. But I continued to ride horses and I did train to be a riding instructor, but I soon discovered there's no money in that unless you've got really wealthy parents with your own riding school and everything. So I continued to ride, still love horses, but knew I just went on a bit of a quest and I did quite a lot of commissions of drawings whilst I was studying, while I was doing art at college, and then I went on to do architecture and design at university. Rhiannon Hiles: And while I was at university, I met some people who said, "Have you ever thought about studying this and have you ever thought about doing some work in museums? And what about open air museums?". And I thought, "Well, I've always visited them, and I love them." So I started doing some voluntary work in museums and at the same time supplementing my living by buying and selling antiques. So I was antiques dealer for a while, which is good fun, actually. I quite enjoyed doing that, but I wasn't the greatest antiques dealer because I was more interested in the history of the things than the money that I was making from them. Sometimes I'd be like, "Do you know where this is from? And I just want to buy it". I was like, "But it's really interesting."Rhiannon Hiles: So I love doing that and I think it did give me a really good grounding. So I would really like scrabble around and things. I would go into skips and get stuff out and I'd sometimes knock on people's doors and I'd say, "You've got this really interesting table in the skip, can I have it?". Sometimes I would just pass a skip and go ask paper, put it in my car, and then I'd do them up. And one of my mum's friends used to buy and sell student housing in Durham, and she used to get me to help her to get the houses ready. And she'd say to me, "I'm going to leave you.". This is in, like 1987, 88. She'd leave me with a hammer and she'd say, can you knock out that set pot in the corner? Rhiannon Hiles: And when I come back, I'll just take you home, no PPE or anything. I'll stand there with the hammer thinking I was like, I was 18, I was like, I'll just hit it everywhere. But funnily enough, I think that gave me quite a good understanding of the ins and outs of older buildings. And I just really knew that I wanted to be involved with telling the stories of people who might have lived in those older buildings. So when I started doing that voluntary work, I did it in a museum in Durham first, which is brilliant, great grounding. It was the Oriental Museum in Durham. There's loads of work in their stores. And then my uncle's friend was a curator at Beamish, and my uncle said, "Give Jim a ring, see if you can get some voluntary work at that Beamish."Rhiannon Hiles: So I rang that Beamish up and I said, "Could I get some voluntary work?" And it kind of started from there, and I thought when I went, I was like, I've always visited here. Didn't really cross my mind you could work here. And I just kind of loved it right from the start. I became immersed. I found a picture of me recently when I'm a bit older. I'm 21 by then, and it's just before I started working at the museum, because it's when I was doing my undergraduate degree, and I'm like, I'm in one of the cottages and I've got all my glass stuff on and I think I'm dead cool. I've got my camera, but I can tell in my face that I was like I'm like, "Wow, I'm in the opening.”Kelly Molson: This is amazing.Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah. So I think I had a bit of a, like, I don't know, was I going to be a horse rider, was I antique stay there, was I an artist? But then when I went into open air museums, I just knew I just had this fire in my belly, whatever you want to call it. I was like, this is where I need to be and this is what my quest is. This is where I want to lead one of these I want to be responsible for one of these fantastic places. Kelly Molson: Oh, my God, what an incredibly wiggle. I love that. So I really like hearing about where people I think the skills that people have and how they then apply them into the roles that they've ended up in. I was so shocked when you said about antiques, because I love that. I love nothing better than a Sunday morning mooch around a vintage shop or just like, scouring charity shops for any kind of bargain that I can find. And I was like, "She's literally living my life. That's amazing. I'd love to do that job.”Rhiannon Hiles: I think, briefly, because I used to go so a friend of mine who was at university with, he said, "Well, if you're dealing in antiques, why don't we set up together? Why don't we get a van together? Have you got any money?". And I loaned 500 pounds off my mum and I said, "I'll give you it back." I don't think I ever did. And we bought this really tatty van, bearing in mind this is, like, in the late 1980s, and we used to do, like, Newark. We used to go up to Isntonton in Edinburgh near the airport. We used to go around the country doing all the really big antique spares and camp and sell our goods really early in the morning to the dealers and then all the public would come in. Rhiannon Hiles: And then I started to be like, semi all right at it. And a friend of mine had a pub with a little what had been a shop attached to the pub in York, and she asked me if I wanted to sell some of my antiques in that little shop attached to the pub. So I did that for a little bit and then I thought, I think it's not quite working for me, there's something not quite right. And it was because I wanted to tell the stories of the things. So I enjoyed doing it and I learned lots doing it, but I wanted to be a curator, basically, and I hadn't clicked at that point. And then when it did click, I was, "It's clicked. That's what I'm going to do."Kelly Molson: And then you stayed at Beamish and you've just progressively worked your way through all of these different roles, up to CEO now. Rhiannon Hiles: I know. That's amazing. Kelly Molson: It is amazing. But you hear that quite a lot, don't you, where people, they find the place and then they stay there because it's got them basically, it's just got them hooked. And I totally understand this about Beamish. Were talking about this just before we hit record, but I visited Beamish a couple of months ago and had such an emotive reaction to the place. It's an incredible experience. It's the first living museum that I've ever been to. I knew what to expect, but I didn't know what to expect, if that makes sense. I knew what was there and I knew what was going to happen and how were going to experience the day, but I was not prepared for how completely immersive it is and how emotional I got, actually, at some of the areas. Kelly Molson: So can you just give us an overview of Beamish for our listeners that haven't been there. What is Beamish? Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah, I think you've described it really well there about it being immersive and emotional. So those elements will perhaps occur for the visitor. They might not. It depends what people want to get out of their visit. But you and I were talking about how increasingly, as we have more living memory that we represent in the museum, that people will have emotive responses. And I think that goes back to one of the founding principles of why Beamish was originated. So our first director, Frank Atkinson, in the 1950s and 60s had traveled around Europe looking at different types of social history museums. He was a social history curator and he'd come across open air museums in Scanson, in Stockholm, in Malhagen, in Lilyhammer. Rhiannon Hiles: And he was just mesmerised by how they told the stories of the people of the locality in a meaningful way that represented the normality, the ordinary, the typical, rather than being the high end stories of lords and ladies in aristocracy. And he wanted to recreate something similar back in the north of England because he had seen disappearing stories and communities and lives. And he foresaw that there would be more of that disappearing as he foresaw that coal mines would begin to change or close. And people laughed at him sometimes when he said things like, "I want to recreate a slag heap of coal.". They went, "Why would you do that? There's lots." And he said, "Because there won't be any soon." And he was right. Rhiannon Hiles: So the reasoning behind the creation of Beamish was to tell the stories of the rural, the industrial, the social history of the people of the north of England in a similar way to those that are told about the fork life, which is the lives of the people that you see in museums on the continent. So that's what inspired Frank. And Frank's founding principles have stayed strong throughout the museum's ups and downs. And I've seen ups and downs across the years. The 27, 28 years that I've been at Beamish, I've seen lots of ups and downs. But if ever I'm thinking, what should I do next? I always think, what does the visitor want and what would Frank think? And I don't always agree with what Frank would think. Sometimes I think," Would I agree with Frank?". But I always have those two things. Rhiannon Hiles: I think, what would Frank think and what does the visitor need to see now? And I was watching there's a YouTube film called The Man Who Was Given the Gasworks, which is about Frank and his ideas. It was filmed in the late 1960s and it's really funny to watch, very BBC when you watch it, but it tells you a lot about where the ideas came from. But some of the things that he's talking about and the people that he's meeting in Scanson in the continent and he's interviewed by Magnus Matheson as a very young man, which is quite interesting. They still ring true and they still have this philosophy that all school children would visit from the locality to their open air museum. Rhiannon Hiles: And that's still a strength that's still very important to myself, but also to our museum, but also to other open air museums that I know. So Beamish kind of evolved as a concept, and then Frank found a site to build this big open air site which would tell the story of the people of the north of England. He was shown lots of different sites around County Durham. And the story goes, and I've talked to his son about this, and his son says, "I think that's what dad did." His son's about the same age as me. So he wasn't born when Frank had this idea, but apparently he got to where you come in at the car park underneath the Tiny Tim theme hammer. Rhiannon Hiles: The story is that when Frank arrived there and the trees hadn't grown up at that point, that he looked down across the valley and turned to the county officer who was saying, "Do you want this site?". And said, "This is it. This is where I'm going to have a museum of the people of the north." He said it was the bowl and the perimeter with the trees, so it could be an oasis where he could create these undulations in the landscape and tell the stories through farming, through towns, through different landscapes, through industry, through transport. He did at one time have a bizarre idea. Maybe it wasn't bizarre to flood the valley and tell the history of shipbuilding. I'm kind of pleased that didn't happen. Kelly Molson: Yeah, me too. It's really spectacular when you do that drive in as well, isn't it? I got this really vivid memory of kind of parking my car, walking across to the visitor centre and you kind of look down across the valley and the vastness of the site, the expanse of it is kind of out in front of you and it is just like, "Oh." You didn't quite grasp how big that site is until you see it for the first time. It is really impressive. Rhiannon Hiles: It is. And actually, I'm taking trustees, our new board of trustees. I'm taking them on a walkabout. And that's one of the key things. You just explained it perfectly. I'm going to use your quote tomorrow morning. I'm going to say, this is the Kelly Molson view, because I'm taking them to that point and I'm going to say, "Look across the vastness of the museum and the woodland. We look after all the woodland, all the footpaths through the woodland.". So it's the immediacy of where the visitor comes into the museum is more than that. And so I think we are a visitor attraction and we are self sustaining, but we're sustaining environmentally as well, in terms of what we do, looking after all that woodland and farmland as well. And I think that there's a lot more still that the museum has left to do. Rhiannon Hiles: I think it's almost like it will continue to evolve and change. There'll be ever changing. Someone who I know, who runs a museum on the continent, I was saying to them, "What are you going to develop next?". And they've done a lot of development very quickly and they get some very good funding, which is brilliant for them, but they have to stop developing because their site is so small, they can't develop any further. They're in the middle of a city and they represent an old town and their site is constrained by its size. And they said, "We're very jealous of Europe Beamish, because you've got so much space.". Kelly Molson: Just carry on. Well, the self sustaining thing is actually it's part of what we're going to talk a little bit about today. So think it was last season we had Matthew Henderson, come on, who was the former head of commercial operations there, and he talked quite a lot about creative ideas for driving commercial income. So all of the amazing things that Beamish have done to really kind of expand on the Beamish brand. I mean, I'm sitting here today and in front of me I've got Beamish sweets, I've got a tin of lovely Beamish jubilee sweets sitting in front of me. And Matthew talked a lot about the things that you did during lockdown and how to kind of connect with the audience when you couldn't be open, but just expand on that whole kind of product base that you have. Kelly Molson: And that was something that I was super interested in when I came to visit Beamish as well. Because your gift shop is phenomenal, absolutely phenomenal. But all the way around the sites as well, the things that you can buy we talked about that immersive experience, but you can buy products where the packaging of those products, it hasn't just been created. It's been created from things that were in use and used as kind of branding back in the 50s and back in the18 hundreds. And that is just amazing. I guess I want to kind of just talk about Christmas. So we're on the run up to Christmas now, aren't we? Rhiannon Hiles: We are. Kelly Molson: I want to talk a little bit about how you drive revenue at what is often considered quite a quieter time of year for attractions because you've got quite a good process of doing that. Is that part and parcel of the hard work that you did during the pandemic to get these products developed? Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah. So just prior to the pandemic, Matthew and I, and Matthew talked to you about this. We had started to think about how we would turn the museum into a really good profit centre without us looking like were selling the collections, because obviously you've got to be really careful, we're a designated museum and all the rest of it. There are really easy ways to do that without it being a barrier. And we came up with all these sort of ideas and then went into pandemic, into the pandemic, and it sped it all up for us. The things which we've been thinking about, would we do it or would we not? We just said, "Look, we're going to do it because what else have we got to lose?". And Matthew did talk to you about that. Rhiannon Hiles: So we entered into this, what are we going to be doing? What are we going to replicate? Who are we going to work with? What are the things we've already got? And Matthew had been working on, for example, the monopoly, he'd been working on that just prior to the pandemic. We just sold out of that during the pandemic because everyone was at home and wanted to buy board games. So we had thought, everything will sit on the shelves, but it didn't, it flew out. We didn't have an online shop, but then we suddenly did, like, overnight and so we talked about having an online shop and were sort of getting there and then went into pandemic and like a lot of folks, it just sped everything up. It really did. Rhiannon Hiles: So some of the work which we've been doing, which was taking us quite a lot of time, I think the pandemic silver lining and people talk about the negatives and the positives of the pandemic. The silver lining for our retail and our product ranges was that it really allowed us to move swiftly through ways of helping the museum to be self sustaining through our immersive sales. When you were in the museum, you'd have been on the town street and we have stalls in there. It's a market town, you would expect to see stalls outside. And all of the products on there are all Beamish products and they've been made either in the museum or they've been made by local suppliers who then are only selling through us. Rhiannon Hiles: Our ice cream is produced by a local ice cream maker, but the method and the flavours are only sold at Beamish. You can't get them anywhere else. So it's bespoke to us, but I'm thinking about how we move us into the next phase, which is all those things which we only sell. For me, there's a lot more that we can do in terms of we've talked about brand licensing, things like that, but in terms of the Beamish reach. So during lockdown, the Harrods of the North, Fenix contacted us and said, "Can we sell Beamish products?". And were like, "Yeah, Fenix have rung us up.". We were like, "Fenix are on the phone, we're so excited.". And we thought, "We're going to sell through Fenix.". Rhiannon Hiles: But for me, that's the start of what we can do with our brand name becoming a high street name, but a high street name that has got some gravitas behind it. So I would want to make sure that we didn't sell ourselves out, we'd want to place ourselves in appropriate places, if that makes sense. So what I wouldn't want to see is that our brand became lessened because we'd maybe chosen the wrong partner or whatever that happened to be. But I think that the Beamish Museum brand is strong and I think it could stand on its own, two feet as a brand, not just at Fenix, and it does at Fenix, so that's brilliant. But elsewhere as well. Rhiannon Hiles: And I've got some conversations lined up with folks to do with High Streets and how we can link up and partner with High Streets locally and perhaps that grows and develops as well, but also in terms of what we can do through our online sales, because we've lessened our impact there, I think. But that's probably because the items which people were buying at home during the lockdown, they can now go out and get, they can come into the museum and buy and they want that in the museum experience. But I think there's other things that we could do, like we have a lot of enamel signs and posters. We wouldn't need to hold all that stock in the museum. Rhiannon Hiles: We can work with companies who can then just download that and then sell that, rather than us having to say we have this massive space where we just hold loads of stock. And for any museum, that's a challenge. Where do you store things, let alone where do you store shop stock as well? So I think at this stage we're on the cusp of something quite exciting, but we don't know what it is yet. But we've got showed Jamiejohn Anderson round, he's a good friend of ours, he's the director of commercial at National Museums Liverpool and he's brilliant. I use him as a bit of a mentor. He's great and I was walking around with him and he's done work at Warner in the past with the Butterbeer and all the can. What can we do? Rhiannon Hiles: There's just so much lists and lists of things that you could brand license and you could sell and that would bring that in. Kelly Molson: Does that make it harder, though, to make those decisions about what you do? Because there's so much it's so much that you could do. There's not an obvious kind of standout one, there's just vast reams of things that you could do.  Rhiannon Hiles: It is. And we've got a commercial manager who took over after Matthew left and she's brilliant and she's still in touch with Matthew. They talk a lot about how we would move this forward and which product comes first. And our collections team are really excited. I mentioned just now about the post, the railway posters and the enamel signs that we have. People would love those. And the collections team are like, "We need to do those first because they're brilliant and they're easy and we could do them.". So it does make it hard. And everybody has their own version across the museum about what they think we should do first. So, yeah, it is tricky. And we've just dipped our toe in. And there's other sides of things. Rhiannon Hiles: When we enter into our accommodation, which will be the first time we've done this at the museum, we've done overnight camping at the museum for a while, and that's really successful. But to have our own self catering accommodation is coming on next year. And I would like to feel that if you're staying in one of those cottages that the soap, the welcome pack, the cushion, whatever that is, that you would be able to get that, but that it's bespoke to us. But you will be able and it's not at a ridiculous price either, that it's accessible to people, but that people will be able to get those items should they wish to. Kelly Molson: This was something that was really exciting to me when I came to visit. Well, there's two facets to this. One that was were taken round a I want to say it was a 1940s. It might have been the 19 hundreds, actually. So forgive me if I've got this completely wrong, but there's an artist's house, 1950s house. Sorry, I've got it completely wrong. I said 40. So were taking around the artist house, and what struck me is how the design and the interior design of that house, how similar it is to things that I see now. So interior design is a bit of a passion of mine. It's something that I spend hours scrolling at, looking at, on Instagram. But there were things that were in that house that are now back in fashion. Kelly Molson: So things, they just come full circle, don't they, with design? And so that was really interesting to me. And I remember at the time having a conversation and saying, "I'd buy that wallpaper that was on the wall. I would buy that wallpaper. I would buy that rug that they've got, that throw that was across the bed.". And it was just like, "Yeah, I absolutely would do that.". I know so many other people that would do that as well, who really want that authentic look in their house. I mean, this is a 1930s house that I live in, but I would love to have more kind of authentically 1930s elements to it. Art deco, mirrors, et cetera. Kelly Molson: And you can kind of imagine that not only being popular with the people that come and visit, but actually extending that into, well, interior designers that are styling other people's homes. They haven't necessarily been to Beamish, but they know that they can get this incredible thing from Beamish because they know how authentic that's going to be. And then that translated into Julian telling me about the overnight stays. And I was like, "But I want to stay here now, I could stay potentially in this room.". How amazing would that be? That would really fulfill my interior design passions completely. So that's the next step for you? Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah, it is. It was the number one thing that came out of the market research that we did with people when were looking, just before we launched Remaking Beamish over ten years ago now. When went out and asked people what they would like to do, what's the most important thing to you? They all went, we want to stay in the museum. We want an Immersive, we want to be in it. So we thought, well, okay, we can do that. We thought about where that might be and it went through lots of different sort of ideas as to what it would be. It was going to be a hotel. And then we thought, "Is that going to work? Is it a hotel?". And then we had some buildings which had been unused and weren't part of any future development plan. Rhiannon Hiles: A beautiful row of workers cottages and some stabling and courtyard up Apocalypse, which were outside of the main visitor area with already a courtyard, stabling and cart shed. So I thought, "Well, let's do it there.". Talked to the lottery. They were over the moon with that idea, because it's more environmentally sustainable, because they're existing buildings, brings more of the existing museum into the public realm and it gives us an opportunity to use areas which, to be honest, how would we do something with them going forward, but also enables people to stay in the museum. So a night at the museum, literally be it's going to be phenomenal. There's so many people saying, "I want to be the first tester of the first one that's open.". There's like a massive queue of people who want to come and be the first to stay. Kelly Molson: I want to add my name to the list. I don't need to be the first. Put me on the list. What an amazing experience. I mean, you've lived in the museum, so you've actually done this yourself. But yeah, I just think to be able to extend your visit to do that would be phenomenal, because I know that you're building a cinema at the moment as well. So come in. Come for some dinner to the cinema. Rhiannon Hiles: Exactly. Kelly Molson: Stay overnight. Rhiannon Hiles: Exactly. And we had some European museum friends across. We run a leadership program across the continent and ourselves, myself, Andrew and some others in Europe, and some of them were over last week and we did a lovely dinner for them up at Popley. And I didn't know if you got time to go up to Popley when you visited. It's beautiful up there. It is magical up there. And we have this young lad, he's been a trainee chef and he's brilliant. He loves historical recipes, he loves preparing in the old style. But to make it edible, to make it something which can then be eaten in a venue. And he spent ages thinking about what we would eat and how we would describe it. And it was beautiful. Rhiannon Hiles: And as the light was going down, I thought, "This is what's going to be like for those folks who were going to be staying just across there, just right near Popley.". So I started thinking about all the ways we could make additional revenue. People will want to pay for this. They'll want to pay to have Connor come in and do them a period dinner while they're staying. There's so many other additional add ons that we can attribute to the overnight stay, should people wish to. I think that the list is endless. You've mentioned the cinemas, cinema nights, there's music, there's dance, different experience of different cuisine as well. I think there's so much that people will get from the overnight stay. Not least that you're going to be inside an exhibit staying overnight, which is really exciting in itself, isn't it? Kelly Molson: It is magic when you think about it. And I think what's nice is the way that you talk about that. There's so much opportunity, but it's the opportunities that people want. You do a lot of work about, we're not just selling things for the sake of it. What does our audience really want? And you ask them and you get their feedback from them, which is absolutely vital. Something that you mentioned as well was the lottery. So you spoke to the National Lottery about funding for what you were doing, which is brilliant, because one of the things that we said we'd talk about today was, I always struggle to pronounce this philanthropic thinking. Rhiannon Hiles: Philanthropic thinking? Kelly Molson: Philanthropic thinking. I had to say that slowly, so I got it out right. So we know what philanthropy is, we talk about it. It's charitable works that help others as a society or as a whole. What does philanthropic thinking mean to you? And how do you use this approach to support the funding of new projects? Because that's vital for you, isn't it? Rhiannon Hiles: It is, absolutely is. It's vital and we can and need and should do much more of it. And it's something which I'm exploring further. We have got a new Chief Operating Officer, we've got a new board, and I've talked to them about this and how this will help the museum to prosper for the future for our people. It'll allow us to invest in some of the what I would see as perhaps enough of us might say as core activity. So our learning program, our health and wellbeing program, our environmental sustainability. But to me, those are the things which make Beamish. They're the things which are about our communities and about our people. Rhiannon Hiles: So if we can have partners who will invest in us to work on those strong elements of what makes Beamish then that will help us substantially because that will enable those programs to grow, to develop, to add value to people's lives. While we can then use our surplus that we make through our secondary spend, through our admissions to put into those things which people don't find as interesting. And I don't like the word when people say, "Oh, it's not sexy.". But people don't find toilets that interesting. But if you don't have good toilets in a visitor attraction, if your entrance is clunky, if the admissions and if you're walking around and everything looks a little bit like it looks a bit tired. Rhiannon Hiles: So I think that all those things which are so fundamental to enhance the visitor operation but need to have that money spent on them, will be able to be spent on because we will have developed those other relationships. And I've seen really good examples just recently that have made me feel that there's a lot of opportunity out there. The Starling Bank has been sponsoring the whole summer of fun activity for National Trust. There's the wonderful philanthropic giving from a foundation to English Heritage to fund their trainees and apprentices. That's amazing. Kelly Molson: That is amazing, isn't it? I've read about this numerous times now and I just think, one, it's a fantastic opportunity for people that are going to be involved, but what an incredibly generous thing to do. So those traditions don't die out? Rhiannon Hiles: No, not at all. And I just feel that when there's more and more competition for less and less grants and foundations, which I get, and I understand that there's no point just sitting around feeling sorry for yourself on your laurels because all that will end up in is blah. And I've been in the museum where the museum sat on its laurels and expected things to happen and expected people to come and it didn't. And it had a downturn and you've got to be proactive. You've got to be the one who goes out there and talks to people and expresses what you can do, that you're a leading light. Rhiannon Hiles: We're seen as a leading light in the north of England and that's because of the work that we do with our communities and the fact that we are a little bit we'll take risks, we're entrepreneurial and we're always thinking about how we can improve the museum, improve the offer and also be there for our people. Because fundamentally that's what we're about. Right at the beginning of this conversation, were talking about unpopular opinions and how when nobody was there, I was like, "Oh, it's quite nice." But then during COVID when nobody was there, it was awful because that's not what the museum is about. The museum is fundamentally there for people. People are what brings it to life. The hug, the buzz. It's about all of that dialogue that happens on a day to day basis and that's so important. Rhiannon Hiles: And I think we already have folks who get really excited by what we offer. The Reese Foundation who are from an engineering firm, which is in Team Valley, already fund our STEM working program, because they get that. They get the work that we do. So that is an element of already successful pocket giving that we've had in the museum and I want to do more of that. We've got opportunity over the next period to really turn that around. And I think when you talk to Funders now, they expect a proportion of that to be happening. The Arts Council are talking to us about how you can be more philanthropic or work with philanthropic partners. And so even before were thinking or aware that they thought like that, we'd already had that in our mind, that's how we would work going forward. Rhiannon Hiles: And I think that it isn't just about taking money, it's about having that relationship with the partner and showing how what they've invested in. And generally it'll be something that means something to them and that's why they've made that decision to do that. So if you can show back to them we've been working with a brilliant social enterprise locally called the Woodshed at Sacrosant, which is about getting young lads and lasses who aren't in mainstream education as they come out of skill, or maybe for them, it's not working. And they have done great work together and we have been doing work with them back in the museum. Rhiannon Hiles: So those 1950s houses that you went into, they've done some of the woodwork inside there and they did the pitch and put golf and then they came along to the opening of the 1950s and two of the lads came up, they were like, "I like, you yelling. ". And I said, "I am. How are you doing?". They said, "I feel like this might be what you would call it, a graduation.". And I was like, "It's my last weekend.". And I thought, "Oh, it's exciting.". For him, it's also sad. But he said he was moving on to get another placement with a joiner. And I was like, "That's brilliant.". Another lad's gone on to do Stonemason up at Raby Castle. So it opens up pathways, it opens up journeys, it has so much benefit. Kelly Molson: Oh, goodness, do you know what? That's so weird because that kind of goes full circle to what were talking about at the beginning, doesn't it? And you had all these different skills and then you brought them together and actually they all fitted really well into the museum sector. You've just done the same with these kids who have now got these skills and they're going to take them back into the heritage space. That's amazing. Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah, it's dead exciting. And sometimes people say to me, you're opening up opportunities, people are coming along and learning, and then they move on. And I'm like, "That's okay, that's absolutely fine.". If they come and learn here, and if there is something for them here, that's brilliant. If there's not, or for whatever reason they choose to go elsewhere, they're taking that skill set and they're still contributing to the economy, to their community, and that is brilliant. So I never look at it as kind of like, "Oh, why is that?". I look at it as like, "That is a real opportunity for them", for the museum and for the economy, for the region as well, for the visitor attraction. Kelly Molson: Ultimately, with that in mind, that you want to get more people on board is a big part of your role actually going out and talking to organisations about what Beamish is? And if they don't know about you already, I'm sure that you are incredibly well known around Durham, but you have to go out and engage with those organisations to kind of see where those connections can be made. Have you got like, a targets list of..Rhiannon Hiles: I want to go and talk to. Kelly Molson: In front of these people and have these conversations, but I guess that's a creative element of what you do, isn't it, is making those connections and kind of looking and seeing how you fit with them? Rhiannon Hiles: Yeah, it absolutely is. And I think there's other elements which are really critical for museums, for charities, for the sector, with regards to how those conversations can better enabled and how businesses can feel more comfortable in then donating or becoming part of. So some friends of mine who are in Denmark, it's very usual for big money making businesses, when they get to a certain threshold, they've got no choice. It's a government responsibility that you then have to choose a charity or a museum or a culture sector organisation that you give money to. So my friend Thomas, who runs a brilliant museum, has had a lot of his developments funded directly through a very big shipping company, who I probably won't be able to say now, but a huge shipping company fund their development, basically. Rhiannon Hiles: And I was like he's like, "Oh, does this happen for you?". And I was, "No."Kelly Molson: We have to go and hunt these people down. Rhiannon Hiles: I was, like, brilliant. Could you imagine? Look, but for me, Bernard's brilliant because he can get in there into cabinet and he's a lobbyer and I think there's some additional work that we as individuals in the sector can do. So I've talked to Andrew at Blackcountry about this and what our responsibility is to help to change policy. And if nothing else, if you're part of that change and if you are able to voice how that will then impact on people's lives, then that is so important and so critical. It just depends on different parties approaches to what that impact on lives means, I suppose. Rhiannon Hiles: But at the moment, with all the parties conferences going on at the moment, we've got the ideal opportunity to go along and listen, but also to have a little pointer in there and say, “Don't forget, and this is how important we are.”Kelly Molson: That's a skill, isn't it, in itself? I can remember a conversation with Gordon Morrison from ASVA. Sorry, formerly from ASVA. He's now ACE, when we talked during the pandemic and he talked a lot about how he'd kind of taken some learnings from Bernard in the sense that Bernard, he's quite strong politically and he's a really good campaigner. And Gordon said that they were skills that he'd had to learn. He wasn't a lobbyer, it wasn't his natural kind of skill set. And I think it's really interesting that you said that, because that might not necessarily be your natural skill set either, but it's something that you've now got to kind of develop to be able to shape policy, because if there's an opportunity, take it. Rhiannon Hiles: That's right. And it's not my skill set. But when you have a strong desire to see something work through change, and you can spot how that change can come about through having the right conversations, it's who you go to for the right conversations that can also be the skill set. So that can be quite tricky. And when were looking for our new board of trustees and when were looking for a new chair, one of the key things were looking for was somebody who would have that kind of skill set. And we have got that in our new chair. He really does know how to do that. So I constantly feel like, "Where's he going to now and who's he going to talk to next and who's he going to get me linked up with?". Rhiannon Hiles: And that's brilliant and he knows how important that is. But we also know that we have to take it at the right gentle time. Yeah. So he can open doors. And I think that's so important. And our trustees, we've got a really strong set of trustees who can open doors for us. And again, that was deliberate in our approach that we took, to have a very diverse and representative board, to also have board members who can open other doors that we wouldn't normally be opening, because we have a strong set of doors. We open regularly and close regularly. But also the pace of it is so important that all of this is really needed. Because we're an independent museum, we got to make sure that we are self sustaining. Rhiannon Hiles: Our main money comes from what we make on the door, but if we want to develop, we've got to make sure that we continue to get brilliant secondary, spend brilliant revenue. But on the other hand, we've got to make sure that we bring our people with us, whether they're the staff, the volunteers, our visitors. We don't want to be garping so fast that they're not behind us when we worry about Crown. So it's very exciting times. Kelly Molson: Isn't it? Lots of exciting changes happening. Well, look, we can't have this podcast without talking about MasterChef either. Rhiannon Hiles: Oh, yeah, that was brilliant. Kelly Molson: So that's an incredible opportunity. So you're recently on MasterChef, where they came to Beamish. What an opportunity. Rhiannon Hiles: Oh, it was amazing. But the thing was, they said, "You cannot talk about it, you cannot say anything.". So, literally, for months, were like, were dying to say that we've been a MasterChef. And they were like, you can't tell anybody. But I don't know how this managed to keep under wraps, because there was literally over 200 staff and volunteers were eating all the stuff that had been prepared. How they managed to keep that under wraps is beyond me, but at the minute seemed to work. Kelly Molson: How long was it from recording to that going out as well? Rhiannon Hiles: It was from February up until just the recent airing. So that's quite a long time to keep it to yourself. Kelly Molson: Well done that team. Rhiannon Hiles: It was really hard. Like I said, "Julie, when are they showing it because I can't keep it in any longer ", because it's Julie, who you met, who was nope. They've said, "It's tight lit, but it was brilliant.". And it's great for us, for the museum. It was great fun taking part, don't get me wrong. And I was in the local court recently and the lady behind the counter kept looking over and she went, "Are you a MasterChef?". Kelly Molson: I wasn't cooking, but yes. Rhiannon Hiles: Yes. So I think my new quest now, I'd like to be a presenter on Master Chef. I don't want to cook, but I'd quite like to be a presenter. Kelly Molson: Yeah, I could do that. I could do the tasting, not the cooking. The cooking under pressure. It's another level of stress, isn't it? I like to take my time, read the instructions. Rhiannon Hiles: Don't need the pressure. It looked lovely, though. They'd used the school, they'd taken out all the benches that are in the school, in the pit village, and it turned into it looked beautiful. They'd use really lovely. I suppose they wouldn't call them props because they brought them in, but they were in keeping with the school. It looks so lovely. I mean, you probably watched it and that scene of all the staff of volunteers coming in to sit down to their meal, the lovely tables, the bunting they put up. It looked right. It was brilliant. Yeah. They had some interesting takes on some local cuisine as well. Peas Pudding ice cream was one strange one, but got peas in it, Kelly. You don't want it. Kelly Molson: Giving that one a swerve in that one. Right. What book have you got that you'd like to share with our listeners? Rhiannon Hiles: Oh, well, one of our trustees called Rachel Lennon, has written a really brilliant book called Wedded Wife, which is a great book, and I've just started reading it's about the history of marriage, and it's really interesting, so I would certainly advocate that one. I have a favourite book, which I go back to quite regularly, which is a childhood book and perhaps nobody ever would read it, but I love it and it kind of sums up for me what I was like as a child and what I continue to be like as I've gone through my career. It's called Wish For A Pony, and I really wanted a pony when I was between the ages of six and seven, and then I wished my wish came true. And from then on in, I believed that anything I wished for would happen. Rhiannon Hiles: And I still have that kind of strange, I often think I'm just going to wish that to happen, but I think it's not just that, it's holistic. I think if you really want something and you set everything towards it, yes, of course some people might say, but then you potentially set yourself up for great disappointment and failure. But I kind of think that you can't do something without taking that risk. So I just tend to think if you want it and you wish for it that much and that's what you're really aiming for, just go for it and do it. And perhaps the environment in which I've been brought up has enabled me to do that. And I completely understand that for some people that is probably difficult and challenging. I do get that. Rhiannon Hiles: So I feel that if I can help others who maybe haven't got that kind of environment to help them like those lads and lasses from the Woodshed at Sacrosanct and folks like that if we can provide spaces where they really want to try something but they're not sure how to do it then I think then we've achieved something. Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's lovely. Do you know what? So I'm reading the book at the minute I've read the book Manifest, and it is about visualisation and the power of our thoughts and how we talk to ourselves and the things that we kind of want to bring into our lives. And there was a little bit of it that I was kind of going, "Is it the power of the universe?". It felt a little bit way woo to me, but then I kind of reflected on it a bit and went, but this is about taking action, really. It's about going, "I want this to happen in my life.". And it's not about sitting back and hoping that it might happen just because you've put a picture of it on your wall. It's actually about going out and doing the bloody hard work to make it happen. Kelly Molson: So have those conversations with the right people who are the people that can open the doors for you. Go and meet them, ask out to them. And I think that's a really important element of the whole. Yes, you can wish for something to happen, absolutely. But you've got to put the legwork in to make it happen. What a great book. All right, Wish for a Pony. Rhiannon Hiles: Wish for a Pony. Kelly Molson: Listeners, as ever. If you want to win a copy of Rhiannon's book, if you go over to this podcast announcement on Twitter and you retweet it with the words, I want Rhiannon's book, then you'll be in with a chance of winning it. I'm maybe not going to show it to my daughter because I'm actually terrified of horses. Rhiannon Hiles: You don't want a horse to appear in your garden. Kelly Molson: Her cousins have got a pony. She can do it with them and not at home here. Rhiannon, it's been so lovely to have you on. Thank you. I feel like this is one of those chats that could go on and on for hours. So I want you to come back when the accommodation is open. Yeah, because I want to know all about that. I'm going to visit that cinema. But, yeah, I'd love you to come back on and tell us how it's gone once you've had your kind of first guest and stuff. I think that'd be a really great chat. Rhiannon Hiles: I'd love that. All right. Kelly Molson: All right. Wonderful. Thank you. Rhiannon Hiles: Super. Thank you, Kelly. Thank you. Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip The Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Learn Portuguese | PortuguesePod101.com
Level 1 Portuguese: Immersive Practice #4 - Practice Using Basic Greetings

Learn Portuguese | PortuguesePod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2023 2:05


practice using basic greetings with your teacher, Clara Veiga.

The Nishant Garg Show
#247: Dr. Gail Brenner — Living Fully, Open to Everything, Beyond Your Life's Stories, and Infinite Potential

The Nishant Garg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2023 83:07


Join me at my "Rite Of Passage Retreat" - An Immersive 2-day retreat to guide you from living off the stresses of your mind into thriving from the wisdom of your soul. You're ready for life to FEEL better. Not because of what you have or what you've achieved or who you're with - but because of how you relate to yourself and to life. Guest: Gail Brenner, Ph.D. is a psychologist, author, speaker and lover of truth with a fire that burns brightly. She is an expert in healing from early trauma and brings years of experience with individuals and groups. Her work lovingly illuminates our everyday humanness with the deepest spiritual truths, and she is known for creating the safe space needed for inner exploration. Gail has special expertise working with older adults and their families in the transitions of aging, death, and dying. She was an assistant clinical professor at the University of California San Francisco where she trained physicians and maintained a clinical practice. She has published numerous professional articles on coping with stress and chronic medical illness and is the author of the award-winning The End of Self-Help and Suffering Is Optional. She loves healthy living and exploring different cultures through international volunteering. Please enjoy! Please visit https://nishantgarg.me/podcasts/ for more info. Join us December 8th - 10th in Austin, TX Sign up link: https://nishantgarg.me/pod/retreat For questions, contact me: https://nishantgarg.me/contact/ Connect with Nishant: Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter

Doing CX Right‬ Podcast
103. Designing Immersive Customer Experiences Based on Leading Brand Case Studies with Joe Wheeler

Doing CX Right‬ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2023 31:04


How can you intentionally design impactful, immersive customer experiences amid constant digital change? Stacy Sherman and Joe Wheeler share proven strategies based on analysis of real case studies, from successes like Nike to failures of other brands. You'll also hear the latest techniques to blend human connections and digital innovation based on research, not hype. By the end of this episode, you'll be ready to equip your organization with actionable CX lessons that drive customer loyalty and long-term growth. Learn more at

KQED’s Forum
Forum From the Archives: Immersive Documentary “32 Sounds” Encourages Us to Feel the Noise

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2023 56:00


The hushed thrum of the womb. The warble of the last living species of a now-extinct bird. The fury and thrust of a jet engine in flight. These are some of the sounds that populate filmmaker Sam Green's immersive documentary “32 Sounds.” The movie is not just a collection of sounds, but rather a meditation on the strange power that sound has on us, whether it is voices, music, the natural world or sounds that we are trying to tune out. Watching the movie, even on a tiny screen, can be a full-body experience in which you're encouraged by Green, who narrates the film, to feel the sound. We're bringing this segment out of the Forum archives as 32 Sounds returns to Bay Area theaters later this month for more screenings at: Roxie Theater, San Francisco, Oct. 28 Rialto Cinemas Elmwood, Berkeley, Oct. 29 Rialto Cinemas Sebastopol, Sebastopol, Oct. 30 Guests: Sam Green, filmmaker, "32 Sounds" Mark Mangini, Sound designer, "32 Sounds." Magini has won two Oscars in sound design for his work on the movies "Dune" and "Mad Max Fury Road. He has received multiple Academy Award nominations for his sound design work on films including, "Blade Runner 2049" and "Star Treks I, IV and V."

Learn Spanish | SpanishPod101.com
Level 1 Spanish: Immersive Practice #14 - Practice Asking if a Store Has Something in Stock

Learn Spanish | SpanishPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2023 2:00


practice asking if a store has something in stock with your teacher, Víctor Trejo.

The Nishant Garg Show
#246: Richard Kepple — From Silicon Valley to Sedona, My Inner Life/Spirituality Leads My Work, and Much More

The Nishant Garg Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2023 99:33


Join me at my "Rite Of Passage Retreat" - An Immersive 2-day retreat to guide you from living off the stresses of your mind into thriving from the wisdom of your soul. You're ready for life to FEEL better. Not because of what you have or what you've achieved or who you're with - but because of how you relate to yourself and to life. There's a knowing inside you that life can be so much richer than what you're currently experiencing - you just don't know how. But you're ready to find out. You're ready to go ALL IN. You're ready to pull down your walls and masks and start leading a more fulfilling existence. You're ready to feel more invigorated by life - not because of your material or monetary successes - but to start thriving from the inside out.I f this is resonating…the Rite of Passage Retreat was created exactly for you. This is an event of death, and rebirth. A sacred journey to let your dust and darkness wash over you…To learn how to face it and whatever life may throw your way with love and surrender…So you can walk back into your life with more vitality, self-love, innate joy - and especially more Soul-led truth  than you've ever experienced before (and likely with a few new best friends!) This is a once-in-a-lifetime experience like no other.  From the people we'll connect in sacred passage with, to the fun and dancing and giggles we'll let loose in, to the tears and truths we'll unearth from the deepest parts of our hearts…It's time for your Rite of Passage.Immerse yourself with us into this 2-day guided journey to access your unwavering inner peace and start coming Home to your fullest Self.Join us December 8th - 10th at the stunning Samadhi Retreat Center December 8th - 10th, Austin, TX Sign up link: https://nishantgarg.me/pod/retreat only for podcast listeners This is so much more than a retreat. This is an initiation. To dive into the depths of yourself. (and play and laugh like you're five again!) Total immersion. Community. Connection. Unification. To come as you are and leave anew. You've already been working on yourself and living more from your heart. But there's a burning ache inside you for more…More Depth More Passion More Trust More Connection More Fulfillment You've lived your whole life consumed by your thoughts, conditioned behaviors, limiting stories, and external pressures. You've worked really hard to get where you are and are very grateful for your successes and progress. You've done a fair amount of inner work already by investing in coaching, therapy or personal development events, and you're committed to regularly feeding your mind and heart through heart-centered podcasts and books and practices. But something is missing… In some ways (or many), you feel like you're treading water - living just on the surface of what's really possible. You feel stuck or unfulfilled in your love life, career, relationships, inner connection, health (or all of the above). You have a burning desire to feel more connected to yourself, more connected to others, and more connected to the pulse of life itself. Sign up link: https://nishantgarg.me/pod/retreat Immerse yourself with us into this 2-day guided journey to access your unwavering inner peace and start coming Home to your fullest Self. Join us December 8th - 10th at the stunning Samadhi Retreat Center Sign up link: https://nishantgarg.me/pod/retreat For questions, contact me: https://nishantgarg.me/contact/ Connect with Nishant: Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter

Learn French | FrenchPod101.com
Level 1 French: Immersive Practice #20 - Practice Talking About Your Hobbies

Learn French | FrenchPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2023 1:20


practice talking about your hobbies with your teacher, Grégory Gauthier.

Here & Now
Dianne Feinstein's legacy; U2 guitarist The Edge on Las Vegas' new immersive venue

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2023 22:50


California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein has died at the age of 90. KQED's Marisa Lagos reflects on Feinstein's trailblazing legacy. And, United Auto Workers President Shawn Fain announced Friday an expansion of their strike to include 7,000 additional workers at Ford and GM plants. Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton talks about the impact of the ongoing strike. Then, if Las Vegas is about big bets, it doesn't get much bigger than a new $2.3-billion venue opening Friday on the Strip called The Sphere. WBUR's Laura Hertzfeld spoke to U2 guitarist The Edge about the band's residency at the immersive venue.