Podcasts about remembered

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  • 2,411PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about remembered

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Latest podcast episodes about remembered

Moods & Modes
Best of Moods & Modes: Peter Green, Part 1

Moods & Modes

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 63:26


While Alex is out on the road with Testament on the Bay Strikes Back Tour, we thought we'd take you on a journey back to the early days of Moods & Modes. This week, we're featuring Episode 3: Peter Green, Remembered and Rediscovered. A deep dive into the life and music of Peter Allen Greenbaum, better known as Peter Green, who passed away on July 25, 2020. Although best known for co-founding the first version of Fleetwood Mac, there is so much more to uncover. This episode features a roundtable of experts on the gentle genius of guitar known as “Greenie,” plus a few surprises. Alex is joined by Mike Zito, Dave Rubin, Andy Aledort; and, via shared podcast: Dean Delray & Kirk Hammett.Peter Green was a British blues rock guitarist and composer. As the founder of Fleetwood Mac, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. Green founded Fleetwood Mac in 1967 after a stint in John Mayall's Bluesbreakers and quickly established the new band as a popular live act in addition to a successful recording act, before departing in 1970. Green's songs, such as “Albatross”, “Black Magic Woman”, “Oh Well”, “The Green Manalishi (With the Two Prong Crown)” and “Man of the World”, appeared on singles charts, and have been adapted by a variety of musicians. Green was a major figure in the “second great epoch” of the British blues movement. Eric Clapton praised his guitar playing, and B.B. King commented, “He has the sweetest tone I ever heard; he was the only one who gave me the cold sweats.” His trademark sound included string bending, vibrato, and economy of style.In 2015, Rolling Stone ranked him at number 58 in its list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”. Stay tuned next week's Best Of episode Peter Green, Part 2.Moods & Modes is presented by Osiris Media. Hosted and Produced by Alex Skolnick. Osiris Production by Kirsten Cluthe and Matt Dwyer. Editing and mixing by Matt Dwyer. Music by Alex Skolnick. Artwork by Mark Dowd. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent
Kansas City Profiles Presented by Easton Roofing-A Lifetime Legacy-Larry Holley Revisited and Remembered

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 59:54


We lost a great one far too soon when William Jewell legend Larry Holley passed unexpectedly last week. Over 900 coaching wins, yes, but so much more. His amazing life and times are chronicled here in this engaging conversation from August of 2020.

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent
Kansas City Profiles Presented by Easton Roofing-A Lifetime Legacy-Larry Holley Revisited and Remembered

Danny Clinkscale: Reasonably Irreverent

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 60:06


We lost a great one too soon when William Jewell legend Larry Holley passed unexpectedly last week. Over 900 coaching wins, yes, but so much more. His amazing life and times are chronicled here in this engaging conversation from August of 2020.

Money Monopolizers Podcast
Episode 135: Defining Your Legacy - How Will You Be Remembered When You're Gone?

Money Monopolizers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 48:31


Here's a question for you: if you died today, what would people say about you at your funeral?This question isn't meant to be morbid, but rather help you think about how your day to day actions affect the legacy that you're leaving on the world.Many people wander aimlessly through life with no true purpose to fulfill. So when they pass away, they are soon forgotten. We don't want you to fall into that category! So on this episode, we went in depth into the conversation of how to know if the legacy that you're leaving is in line with what hope for it to be!If you enjoyed this episode please rate it 5 STARS on Apple Podcasts, share it with anyone you think should hear it, and subscribe to our podcast!If you're looking to get started investing in real estate, check out the real estate course, How to Acquire Your First Flip or Rental Property: https://gum.co/firstrealestatedealIf you'd like to achieve early financial freedom, learn how you can by starting with the car in your driveway with the Rebus Rental Car eBook! https://www.rebusrentalcars.com/ebookYou can learn more about us and order your Money Monopolizers merchandise at www.moneymonopolizers.comBe sure to follow us on social media!Instagram: @moneymonopolizersYouTube: Money MonopolizersTwitter @TheMonopolizers 

Liberty Baptist Tabernacle Podcast
He Remembered Vashti | Pastor Brooks | Wednesday Night

Liberty Baptist Tabernacle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022


Text: Esther 2:1-4  A sermon from our Wednesday night series through the book of Esther

Front Row
Kay Mellor remembered

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 42:20


Television screenwriter Kay Mellor, the woman behind popular series like Band of Gold, Fat Friends and The Syndicate, is remembered by fellow dramatist Sally Wainwright, Kat Rose Martin holder of the Kay Mellor Fellowship and television critic Julia Raeside. The idea of a minimum wage for artists is discussed by Aisa Villarosa Director of External Relations at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Dr Joe Chrisp of the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Bath and Angela Dorgan, Chair of the National Campaign for The Arts, in Dublin Nick talks to Chloe Moss writer of a new play, Corinna Corinna, at the Liverpool Everyman about the only woman on board a ship bound for Singapore. Presenter : Nick Ahad Producer Ekene Akalawu

The Daily Gardener
May 17, 2022 Sandro Botticelli, Montreal, Robert Tannahill, Elvin Charles Stakman, 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek, and Louisa Yeomans King on Peony Pruning

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:33


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1510 Death of Sandro Botticelli, Italian Renaissance master.  His painting Allegory of Abundance or Autumn is one of his most elaborate and detailed drawings, and it depicts an abundance of flowers and fruits. Sandro painted idyllic garden scenes filled with beautiful women and men from the classical period. His painting, Primavera, depicts nine springtime gods and goddesses from classical mythology in a garden. Venus, the goddess of love, presides over the Garden of the Hesperides. To her right, Flora, the goddess of flowers, sprinkles roses. The garden features orange and laurel trees and dozens of other species of plants.   1642 On this day, Paul de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, French military officer, catches his first glimpse of Montreal's landscape. He is recognized as the founder of Fort Ville-Marie (modern-day Montreal) in New France (Province of Quebec, Canada). In George Waldo Browne's 1905 book, The St. Lawrence River: Historical, Legendary, Picturesque, he wrote, On the 17th of May, the rounded slopes of Mount Royal, clad in the delicate green foliage of spring, burst into sight, stirring the hearts of the anxious beholders with newfound joy. They were delighted with the scenery. The fragrance of the springing forest permeated the balmy air, and, what was dearer far to them, over the water and over the landscape, rested an air of peace quite in keeping with their pious purpose. Maisonneuve was the first to step upon the land, and as the others followed him... they fell upon their knees, sending up their songs of praise and thanksgiving. Their first work was to erect an altar at a favorable spot within sight and sound of the riverbank, the women decorating the rough woodwork with some of the wildflowers growing in abundance upon the island, until the whole, looked very beautiful.  Then every member of the party... knelt in solemn silence while M. Barthelemy Vimont... performed ...high mass. As he closed, he addressed his little congregation with these prophetic words: You are a grain of mustard seed that shall rise and grow till its branches overshadow the earth.   1810 Death of Robert Tannahill, Scottish poet, and lyricist. Remembered as the 'Weaver Poet,' Robert was born in Paisley and is often hailed as Paisley's own Robert Burns, as his work is said to rival Robert Burns.  Today in Paisley, a stunning 50ft high mural of a young Robert Tannahill was painted by Mark Worst, collaborating with Paisley Housing Association. The mural overlooks where Robert Tannahill was born on Castle Street in 1774. One of Robert's most beloved songs is Will Ye Go Lassie, Go. The lyrics mention picking Wild Mountain Thyme, a plant known botanically as Thymus serpyllum (TY-mus sir-PIE-lum). Wild Mountain Thyme is a showy, wide growing groundcover from the Old World and has beautiful rose-red flowers and glossy deep green, mat-forming foliage. In the song, the thyme has grown in and around the heather. O the summer time has come And the trees are sweetly bloomin' The wild mountain thyme Grows around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go? And we'll all go together To pull wild mountain thyme All around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go?   1885 Birth of Elvin Charles Stakman, American plant pathologist. Elvin is remembered for his work identifying and combatting diseases in wheat. In 1917, he married fellow a  plant pathologist named Estelle Louise Jensen. He also encouraged Norman Borlaug to pursue his career in phytopathology after Norman's job at the Forest Service was eliminated due to budget cuts. Elvin was Norman's teacher. And Norman went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1970) after discovering dwarf wheat varieties that reduced famine in India, Pakistan, and other third world countries. In 1938, Elvin gave a speech entitled These Shifty Little Enemies that Destroy our Food Crops. During his talk, Elvin focused on one shifty little enemy in particular: rust. Rust is a parasitic fungus that feeds on phytonutrients in grain crops like wheat, oat, and barley. Today, Elvin is remembered with the naming of Stakman Hall - the building where Plant Pathology is taught - at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus.  In The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World, Charles Mann reflected, Stakman did not view science as a disinterested quest for knowledge. It was a tool—may be the tool—for human betterment. Not all sciences were equally valuable, as he liked to explain. “Botany,” he said, “is the most important of all sciences, and plant pathology is one of its most essential branches.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek  This book came out in 2022. Stefanie writes in her introduction: In 150 Gardens You Need to Visit Before You Die, I've shared a vast range of gardens, from immense botanical institutions with thousands of specimens, to smaller plots for quiet meditations, to museums that combine both artworks and plantings. I hope these brief introductions inspire you to plan a visit or two, whether in your hometown or on your global travels, so that you can enjoy the sights, smells, sounds, and stories of the world's best gardens.   The publisher writes: From Kew Gardens in London to the Singapore Botanical Gardens, and from Monet's garden at Giverny to the Zen garden of the Ryoan-ji Temple in Kyoto, this handsomely bound book captures in words and images the most notable features of these 150 glorious, not-to-be-missed gardens. An essential bucket list book for garden lovers! You can get a copy of 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes.   Botanic Spark 1905 On this day, Louisa Yeomans King wrote in her garden journal about peonies. She published a year's worth of entries in her book, The Flower Garden Day by Day.  In 1902, Louisa and her husband moved to Michigan, where they built a home called Orchard House. With the help of a gardener named Frank Ackney, Louisa began to plan and create her garden. She also began writing about her Gardens. Soon, she gave lectures, contributed pieces to magazines, wrote columns, and organized garden clubs. She even became friends with prominent gardeners of her time like Gertrude Jekyll, Charles Sprague Sargent, and the landscape architects Fletcher Steele and Ellen Biddle Shipman. Louisa learned to garden during the heyday of American Garden Culture. Her garden writing in newspaper columns and magazine publications made her the most widely read American Garden author in the United States. Louisa's first book, "The Well-Considered Garden," the preface was written by her dear friend Gertrude Jekyll. In 1915, when the book debuted, it was considered an instant classic in garden literature. Louisa would go on to write a total of nine books. The garden estate known as Blithewold has a copy of "The Well-Considered Garden." Their particular text also contains a handwritten inscription along with Louisa's signature. The inscription borrows a quote from Sir William Temple, who said, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no man is too high or too low." Louisa changed the quote and wrote, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no woman is too high or too low." Louisa helped start the Garden Club of America and the Women's National Farm and Garden Association. She held leadership positions in both organizations. When her husband died suddenly in 1927, Louisa was forced to sell Orchard House. She moved to Hartford, New York, and bought a property she called Kingstree. This time, she set up a smaller garden. The size meant less work, which accommodated her writing and speaking commitments better. On this day, Louisa wrote in her journal this note of advice about the Peony: May 17. Disbud most of your peonies now; that is, of a cluster of buds, cut off all but the larger central one. Certain varieties, however, are considered more beautiful if left alone to flower as they will. Among these are Alsace Lorraine and La Rosiere.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Battle Drill Daily Devotional
Your Blessing Will be Remembered

Battle Drill Daily Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:40


Today's Battle Drill Devotional: Your Blessing Will be Remembered   I tell you the truth, wherever the Good News is preached throughout the world, this woman's deed will be remembered and discussed.” (Matthew 26:13)   Read Matthew 26:6-13. All of us remember people who are generous towards us. People who can't wait to bless us because God has blessed them. Whether it's their time, money, or other resources they share with us, we remember their generosity.   The woman who anointed Jesus' head with expensive perfume from her beautiful alabaster jar was certainly generous. The perfume is described in Mark's gospel as pure nard, a fragrant ointment imported from the mountains of India. It was very expensive! Mary was nothing but radically generous with what she had.   What if you and I were as radically generous? What if our Salvation Army corps and churches were as radically generous? We are all responsible for what God has given us. But his blessings are not to be hoarded for ourselves. They are to be shared with others. We can use the resources God has given us – individually and corporately – to make an impact. A Kingdom impact. We can make an impact in our families, amongst our friends, in our neighbourhood, in our community, in our school or workplace and in the world at large. Christians and the Christian church can be remembered for their radical generosity. We have been blessed! Let's be a blessing to others.   THINK IT OVER Think about the following: What's one practical step you can take this week to be radically generous towards someone? There's a new episode of Battle Drill Devotional every Monday through Friday. Head to https://battledrilldevotional.podbean.com for more details and to subscribe to the podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

The Jimmy Smith Show
What Will Andrew Symonds Best Be Remembered For? Nick Davis Picked The Brain Of Trent Copeland! 16/05/22

The Jimmy Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 7:29


Palestine Remembered
Palestine Remembered - NAKBA

Palestine Remembered

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


read more Nakba testimonies herehttps://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/5/19/nakba-survivors-share-their-stories-of-loss-and-hope https://www.972mag.com/qazaza-palestinian-nakba/ 

Dever-Conner Calvary Chapel
"The Lord Remembered" - 1 Samuel 1:1-28

Dever-Conner Calvary Chapel

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:39


"The Lord Remembered" - 1 Samuel 1:1-28 by Sunday Sermons & Well Versed

F1: Beyond The Grid
Gilles Villeneuve Remembered

F1: Beyond The Grid

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:17


40 years ago, in May 1982, Formula 1 lost a marvellous maverick. No-one else drove a car quite like Gilles Villeneuve. He lost his life in a crash while at the very peak of his racing powers. In this special episode, those who knew Gilles share their memories and stories with Tom Clarkson. F1 World Champions Mario Andretti and Jody Scheckter and 7-time Grand Prix winner Rene Arnoux raced alongside Villeneuve and were close to him as friends. Jonathan Giacobazzi idolised Gilles; his family's name appeared as a sponsor on the Canadian's race suit, and their families travelled the racetracks of Europe together. Jochen Mass was also a good friend of Villeneuve – a fact that makes his blameless involvement in the crash which claimed his life even more tragic. They remember Gilles as a person, a teammate, a rival and a friend, and consider why he is still so adored, 40 years after his death. This episode is sponsored by:  Credit Karma: Head to creditkarma.com/loanoffers to see personalized offers  LinkedIn Jobs: Go to linkedin.com/GRID to post a job for free. Terms and conditions apply. F1 Manager: Launching on PC, PlayStation and Xbox, Summer 2022. Visit F1manager.com to Wishlist the game on your platform of choice and follow @F1Manager on Twitter to stay up to speed 

The Daily Gardener
May 10, 2022 John Hope, Arthur Cleveland Coxe, Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli, Francis Younghusband, Lemon, Love & Olive Oil by Mina Stone, and Polly Park

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 23:04


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events   1725 Birth of John Hope, botanist, professor, and founder of the Royal Garden in Edinburgh. John produced considerable work on plant classification and physiology. He was appointed the King's botanist for Scotland and superintendent of the Royal Garden in Edinburgh. At the time, Edinburgh was the place to study medicine, and all medical students had to take botany courses. John created a school for botanists after spinning off the school's materia medica (pharmacy) department, which allowed him to specialize exclusively in botany. John was a captivating instructor. He was one of the first two people to teach the Linnean system. He also taught the natural system. John was one of the first professors to use big teaching diagrams or visual aids to teach his lectures. John led over 1,700 students during his tenure. His students traveled from all over Europe, America, and India. John Hope Alumni include the likes of James Edward Smith, founder and first President of the Linnaean Society, Charles Drayton, and Benjamin Rush. A field botanist, John encouraged his students to go out and investigate the Flora of Scotland. He awarded a medal every year to the student who collected the best herbarium.   1818 Birth of Arthur Cleveland Coxe, American theologian and composer. Arthur served as the second Episcopal bishop of Western New York. He once wrote, Flowers are words, which even a baby can understand.   1891 Death of Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli, Swiss botanist. Although he studied cell division and pollination, Carl's claim to fame is being the guy who discouraged Gregor Mendel from pursuing his work on genetics. Gregor regarded Carl as a botanical expert and his professional hero. When Gregor sent Carl an overview of his work with pea plants in a letter, Carl dismissed the results out of hand, labeling them "only empirical, and impossible to prove rationally." Carl poo-pooed natural selection. Instead, he believed in orthogenesis, a now-defunct theory that living organisms have an internal driving force - a desire to perfect themselves- and evolve toward this goal. Over a seven-year period in the mid-1800s, Gregor Mendel grew nearly 30,000 pea plants - taking note of their height and shape and color - in his garden at the Augustinian monastery he lived in at Brno (pronounced "burr-no") in the Czech Republic. His work resulted in what we now know as the Laws of Heredity. Gregor came up with the genetic terms and terminology that we still use today, like dominant and recessive genes. Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli's dismissal prompted Gregor to give up his work with genetics. After his promotion to the abbot of the monastery, Gregor focused on his general duties and teaching. In 1884, Gregor died without ever knowing the impact his work would have on modern science. Fifteen years later, in 1899,  a friend sent the Dutch botanist Hugo de Vries a copy of Gregor's work - calling it a paper on hybridization - not heredity. At the same time, Gregor's paper was uncovered by a student of Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli's - a man named Carl E. F. J. Correns. Hugo de Vries rushed to publish his first paper on genetics without mentioning Gregor Mendel. But he did have the nerve to use some of Gregor's data and terminology in his paper. Carl Correns threatened to expose De Vries, who then quickly drafted a new version of his paper, which gave proper credit to Gregor Mendel. Through his work with the humble pea plant, Gregor came up with many of the genetic terms still used today, like dominant and recessive genes.    1907 It was on this day that Francis Younghusband, British Army officer, explorer, and spiritual writer, documented the progression of spring in the Residency Garden in Kashmir. Francis shared his observations in a book called Kashmir(1909). The Residency Garden was an English country house that was built specifically for guests by the Maharajah, and so naturally, Francis loved staying there. Here's what Francis wrote in May of 1907 about the Residency Garden, which was just coming into full flower. Francis observed,  By May 1st ...The May trees were in full blossom. The bank on the south side of the garden was a mass of dark purple and white irises, and [the] evening [sun] caused each flower to [become] a blaze of glory. Stock was in full bloom. Pansies were out in masses. Both the English and Kashmir lilacs were in blossom, and the columbines were in perfection.  The first horse chestnuts came into blossom on May 10th, and on that date, the single pink rose, sinica anemone, on the trellis at the end of the garden, was in full bloom and of wondrous beauty; a summer-house covered with Fortune's yellow was a dream of golden loveliness;  I picked the first bloom of some English roses that a kind friend had sent out... and we had our first plateful of strawberries. A light mauve iris, a native of Kashmir, [is now in] bloom; ...and some lovely varieties of Shirley poppy... from Mr. Luther Burbank, the famous plant-breeder of California, began to blossom; and roses of every variety came [on] rapidly till the garden became a blaze of color.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Lemon, Love & Olive Oil by Mina Stone This book came out in September of 2021. Now, if you're a cookbook lover, you know that Mina's debut cookbook called Cooking For Artists was a smash hit. It was also self-published. And in fact, right now, if you go on Amazon and you try to get a copy of that first cookbook, you'll pay somewhere in the neighborhood of $150. To me, Mina's story is fascinating. She actually went to school to be a designer, and then, on the side, she started cooking for families. And then she started cooking for special events. And then eventually, she started cooking for a gallery, and that's where she started cooking for artists. Thus, the name of her first book. The story behind the second book, Lemon Love and Olive Oil, stems from the fact that whenever people would ask MIna for ingredients to make something taste great, her answer was always lemon juice, olive oil, and a little bit of salt. So, those are her go-to ingredients. Mina contends that you can make anything taste good with a little bit of her favorite three ingredients: lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. So that became the name for the cookbook, except salt was replaced with love. When this cookbook was released, it met with rave reviews. In fact, the New York times rated it a best cookbook of the year, writing, Author of the cult-favorite Cooking for Artists, Mina Stone, returns with a collection of 80 new recipes inspired by her traditional Greek heritage and her years cooking for some of New York's most innovative artists.   I've watched a couple of interviews with Mina, and one thing she says over and over again was that when she was creating this cookbook is, she was constantly thinking about the love aspect of these recipes. By that, Mina was focusing on the comfort level and the coziness factor of the food. So that's what she was trying to capture with these 80 recipes. I found that so poignant, especially in light of the fact that she was putting this together during the pandemic while she's in lockdown in 2020. Mina is not the kind of person that comes up with a cookbook and then has to go out and create a bunch of recipes. That's not how Mina works. Instead, Mina pays attention to the recipes that she starts making again and again. So these are recipes that have staying power. They are the recipes that pass the Mina Test, and they rise to the top of her favorites because they are just naturally so good. Also, if you are a lover of reading cookbooks, you are going to really enjoy Mina's book. Before each section, there are essays from Mina that share stories about her family - and her grandmother, who is kind of the original Greek cook in Mina's life.  Mina has great insight, not only on these recipes and ingredients but also from her sheer personal experience.  I couldn't help, but think as I was reading this cookbook that Mina could write a memoir because her stories are so intriguing. In addition to the essays for each section of the book, every recipe gets a little personal introduction as well. For an excerpt, I selected a few little snippets from a section that Mina calls My Kitchen. This is a chapter about the key ingredients that Mina uses on repeat. She writes, I've always found pantry lists in cookbooks to be intimidating. Asa self-trained home cook, I never sought out hard-to-find ingredients. It never crossed my mind as an option. The ingredients in my recipes and the food found in my pantry reflect my surroundings touched with a dose of Greekness. (It can't be helped.) Here are some thoughts on how I approach cooking in my kitchen, what I like to keep in my cupboards, what I run out to the store for, and some clarification on how I wrote the recipes.   Salt Sea salt is more salty and kosher salt is less salty. Because kosher salt is less salty it gives you more control over the seasoning. For example, it is great for seasoning meat because you can use more and achieve a lovely salt crust as well as the right amount of seasoning without oversalting. It is the salt up using the most.   Extra-Virgin Olive Oil I like to use olive oil sparingly during cooking (this makes thedish lighter) and add the bulk of it at the end, once cooking is completed. use much more olive oil in the recipes than people are accustomed to using. suggest adding more than you would think when you're cooking from this book. That's a great little tidbit, especially if you're using olive oil for cooking with your garden harvest. There is so much that comes out of our garden that goes into the pan with a ton of olive oil. But now, maybe you can dial that back a little bit with this tip from Mina.   Lemons They add floral buoyancy but, above all, a fresh form of acid that I usually prefer to vinegar. When using lemons for zest, try to always use organic ones.    I've never thought about lemons that way, but I love how she describes that floral buoyancy. And, you know, she's exactly right. Personally, I also think that there's something just a little less harsh about lemon juice as compared to vinegar. So if you have a sensitive tummy, consider incorporating lemon juice instead of vinegar.   Green Herbs: Parsley, Mint, Cilantro, and Basil I like fresh herbs in abundance and can often find a place to incorporate them with relative ease. In the recipes, herbs are usually measured by the handful: 1 handful equals about 1/4 cup. It doesn't need to be exact, but that is a good place to start if you need it. This advice is helpful as well because if you're planning your kitchen garden, you need to think about how many plants you need to plant so that you can have an abundant harvest. Just to give you an idea of how much Basil I use in the summertime, I usually end up buying about four to five flats of Basil.   Dried Oregano Oregano is my number one dried herb. Greek oregano has a pronounced savory and earthy flavor to it, and it is my preference to use in more traditional Greek dishes. Better-quality dried oregano, which is milder in flavor, is great to use as a general seasoning for salad, fish, and meats.   This book is 272 pages of more than eighty Mediterranean-style dishes and the stories that inspired them. These recipes are uncomplicated, and they're Mina's go-to recipes. And, of course, they can always be enhanced with lemon, olive oil, and salt. You can get a copy of Lemon, Love & Olive Oil by Mina Stone and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $15.   Botanic Spark 2017 Death of Polly Park, American-Australian amateur gardener, speaker, and writer. Remembered as the designer of Boxford, a Canberra garden, Polly and her husband Peter created classic garden styles using their own creativity and gumption. On their half-acre suburban property, Boxford attracted visitors from across the world and featured six unique gardens: a modern garden inspired by Roberto Burle Marx, an English knot garden, a parterre garden with an Italien statue from Florence, a Chinese garden inspired by the Suzhou ("sue-joe") garden, an Indian garden, and a Japanese garden. Polly and Peter made a great garden team. Polly came up with the design ideas, and Peter was the muscle. Polly created the stone courtyard for the Indian garden and a mosaic inspired by the great 20th-century Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer ("Nee-myer") for the modern garden. Peter built the pond and meditation house for the Japanese garden. In 1988, Polly wrote a biography of their gardens in the book The World in My Garden. Although Boxford was identified as a National heritage site - after Peter and Polly sold the property in 2006 - the garden was destroyed. In 2011, Peter died. Polly followed him home six years later on this day at the age of 96. You can get a used copy of The World in My Garden by Polly Park and support the show for around $17.    Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.   John Hope, Arthur Cleveland Coxe, Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli, Francis Younghusband, Lemon, Love & Olive Oil by Mina Stone, Polly Park

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: Edith Bolling Wilson remembered. Professor H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 13:46


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Ukraine:  Edith Bolling Wilson remembered. Professor H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Wilson

GOLBC
And God Remembered Noah

GOLBC

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 67:05


Pastor Ryan continues the series in Genesis as he preaches a sermon titled "And God Remembered Noah" out of Genesis 8 during this Sunday evening service.

The Daily Gardener
May 6, 2022 Jean Senebier, Joseph Joubert, Sigmund Freud, Mirei Shigemori, The Layered Garden by David Culp, and Versailles

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 21:25


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events Compost Awareness Week   1742 Birth of Jean Senebier, a Swiss pastor and botanist. Where would we be without Senebier? We'd still be breathing, but we'd lack the knowledge that carbon dioxide is consumed by plants and, in turn, that plants produce oxygen as part of the process of photosynthesis. In a nutshell, Senebier's work is crucial because he had learned the function of leaves: capturing carbon for food. Before Senebier, the purpose of leaves and what they did for plants and people was unknown. It was Jean Senebier who said, Observation and experiment are two sisters who help each other.   1754 Birth of Joseph Joubert, French moralist and essayist. Remembered mainly for his Pensées ("Pon-see") or (Thoughts), which were published posthumously, he once wrote, All gardeners live in beautiful places because they make them so.   1856 Birth of Sigmund Freud (books about this person), Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Freud once offered this humorous insight: Common sense is a rare flower and does not grow in everyone's garden.   Freud offered up a few dispassionate observations regarding the natural world.  He once wrote,  Beauty has no obvious use, nor is there any clear cultural necessity for it. Yet civilization could not do without it.   And he also wrote, Flowers are restful to look at. They have neither emotions nor conflicts.   Online there are many photos of Freud and his family in the garden of their home in London. The Freuds left their home in Austria to escape the Nazis with the help of Princess Marie Bonaparte (books about this person), known as Princess George of Greece and Denmark. In 1938, there was a photo of Sigmund with his daughter Anna and Martha in the garden of Marie Bonaparte's house in Paris after arriving on the Orient Express from Vienna. Anna looks happy, Martha looks at a flower, and Sigmund has a little snooze in his garden bed. The Freud home in London was much larger and nicer, and there was a large backyard with a garden.  The property still boasts Freud's rose garden and is now the Freud Museum at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, London NW3, England. In 2008, the French botanist and biologist Francis Hallé wrote, Everyone knows that going to the garden does not solve the problems of everyday life, yet it relativizes them and makes them more bearable.  Sigmund Freud had this late regret: 'I lost my time; the only important thing in life is gardening.'   1925 On this day, at the age of 29, the great twentieth-century reformer of Japanese gardens, Mirei Shigemori (books about this person), changed his name from Kazuo ("Kah-zoh") to Mirei (“me-RAY”).  The name change was a tribute to the 19th-century French painter of pastoral landscapes and daily life, Jean Francois Millet (books about this person), who once said, It is the treating of the commonplace with the feeling of the sublime that gives to art its true power.   In 1932, Mirei founded the Kyoto Garden Society. Mirei practiced the art of tea - Chado ("Cha-doe") and the art of flower arranging - Ikebana ("ick-aye-bah-na").  Mirei once advised, People who try to do research on the garden have to very seriously study the way of tea.   Mirei wrote eighty-one books, including the Illustrated Book on the History of the Japanese Garden in 26-volumes, released in 1938. Mother Nature played an important role in shaping Mirei's life when the Muroto Typhoon destroyed much of Kyoto in 1934. Many sacred temples, shrines, and gardens were wiped out in the life-altering storm. In response, Mirei took action.  He used his own money and became one of the first designers to survey every garden in Japan - creating records for restoration if they were ever damaged or destroyed. The tour provided a valuable service to his country and was also a means for Mirei to learn garden design - with a particular focus on incorporating rocks and stone. As a garden designer, Mirei was entirely self-taught. Throughout his fifty-year career, Mirei designed over two hundred gardens, including the checkerboard North Garden/Moss Garden at Tofukuji ("Tofu-kah-gee") Temple, Kyoto (1939), the dry landscape at Zuiho-in ("zwee-ho een" (1961), and the garden at the oldest shrine in Kyoto City, the Matsuo Taisha ("maht-sue-oh Ty-sha"(1975). The shrine is dedicated to the gods of water in western Kyoto and was an important place for sake-brewing families to worship over the centuries. In 2020, the second edition of landscape architect Christian Tschumi's book, Mirei Shigemori - Rebel in the Garden, was released.  In it, Christian breaks down the profound influences and meanings behind Mirei's most iconic gardens. Christian once wrote, Shigemori's body of work is a compelling manifesto for continuous cultural renewal.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Layered Garden by David Culp This book came out in 2012, and the subtitle is Design Lessons for Year-Round Beauty from Brandywine Cottage. Well, I'm a huge David Culp fan, and I feel like I'm telling you about this book just in time for summer because this book can help you set the stage for how you want your garden to look all year long. And since the summer lays entirely before us, this book is just in time for you. If you're planning a new garden or a garden redesign, you could do a lot worse than having David Culp be your guide. Laura Springer Ogden wrote a review that's right on the cover of the book, And it says, Garden-making in its finest form is a celebration of life and love - and David and this book epitomize this. I couldn't agree more. And by the way, you'll probably recognize the photographer's name for David's book as well -  it's Rob Cardillo. Rob always does such a fantastic job photographing gardens, so this book's photos are top-notch. Now David kicks things off in this book with a quote from Francis Bacon, it's from Of Gardens (1625) - and it's one of my favorite garden quotes: There ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which severally things of beauty may be then in season.   Of course, this sets the stage for what David is trying to teach us: how to have a garden that looks good all year long. Now I thought I would share this quick little sweet story that David shares at the beginning of his book. It gives all of us some great ideas - especially if you have young gardeners in your life. David wrote One fall, when I was about nine years old, my grandmother Thorpe gave me a bag of bulbs and said, "you go out and plant them." I felt more than a little trepidation. I had never planted anything without her supervision. But she reassured me. "You can do it. You won't go wrong." Her generosity could have been ruinous to her flower border. But I got the bulbs planted with no mishaps. The next spring, when they bloomed, I almost burst with pride. When she told all her friends, "David did that."  And from that moment, I knew I was a gardener.  And after all these years, it remains the core of how I define myself.   I love that story for a couple of different reasons. Number one, it really does tee up what David is talking about here in The Layered Garden because as a gardener, if you dismiss specific categories of plants out of hand, like the flowers that you get with spring bulbs, then you'll likely miss one of the layers that can help make your garden beautiful all through the year. Now the other reason I like this story is for practical purposes. I hear all the time from new gardeners who are so anxious about planting bulbs, And now I'm going to say, "Hey, if David Culp - as a nine-year-old - can do it, you can too. And then last but not least, I hope this plants a tiny seed with all of us that if we are interacting with kids in the garden, we definitely need to introduce them to planting spring-flowering bulbs because the result in the spring is just so impressive and unique. It also instills that sense of pride that you can get when your garden work goes to plan, and you experience that first flush of color. It's so wonderful. Throughout David's book, he reinforces this concept of the layered garden, but I will give you just a little snippet of how he introduces it here. He goes into much more detail and offers many more tips - wonderful little nuggets and tiny ideas - for making this look work for you. Here's how he introduces the concept in his book. Garden layers are made up of a variety of plants- some with complimentary or contrasting colors, others with interesting shapes or textures. Layers are more than just perennials or annuals or bulbs or ground covers. They're more than just the ground layer of plants. That's the sole focus of many gardens. Beautiful combinations are certainly possible, even in the tiniest scale. Think of dwarf Solomon's Seal underplanted with moss - that makes a precious six-inch-high picture. But to get the most interest from any garden, all the layers need to be considered from the ground level to the middle level of shrubs and small trees up to the canopy trees. Growing plants on vertical surfaces, walls, fences, trellises, arbors, and other supports even climbing up trees, when we can be sure that they will do no harm, adds to the picture by bringing flowers and foliage to eye level and above.   So there you go. An introduction to what David is talking about when he says The Layered Garden. You might be intuitively doing some layering already in your garden as you look for more ways to garden - looking for different plants - or finding and curating other ideas that you can put in your garden. But I think what David adds is his mastery because he knows how to make all of this work in a very cohesive way that's pleasing to the eye. David's book talks about how to do a layered garden and design it - which is probably the key for most of us because we often don't think about that. If we layer the garden, it can just happen organically. But then, sometimes, we can end up with a little bit of a confused look. Next, David talks about maintaining the layered garden, which is very important. Now there are two other aspects of this book that I want to share with you. So the first chapter talks about the layered garden, and it walks you all through that. But The second chapter introduces you to his garden at Brandywine Cottage. This is important because you get a garden tour here, and David shows you how he's put this layered garden technique to work right on his property. By the way, this is not David's first at-bat gardening; he's designed many gardens. So, all of his work is coming together, culminating at Brandywine. And then the last chapter, I think, is one of the most important chapters of the book. Here David shares his signature plants that he advises we consider incorporating into our gardens throughout the seasons. So, this is a great list. This is a list of plants from a garden designer - a garden lover - and someone who works in gardens every day. So right there, that's an invaluable part of this book. This book is 312 pages of layered gardening, the beauty of the garden at Brandywine, and then some of David's most treasured garden design secrets and favorite plants. You can get a copy of The Layered Garden by David Culp and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $18.   Botanic Spark 1682 On this day, Louis XIV (books about this person) of France moved his court to the Palace of Versailles. Originally, Versailles was built as a country house. Nine miles from Paris, Versailles was ideally situated near neighboring forests for hunting. Today Versailles is known for its opulence - the Hall of Mirrors, stunning art, and lush gardens. The massive gardens at Versailles are the most famous in the world. The garden is home to over 1,000 statues, and in the Facebook group for the show, I shared a stunning photo of the garden sculptures at Versailles surrounded by sandbags for protection during WWII. In 2006, Ian Thompson wrote a fantastic book called, The Sun King's Garden: Louis XIV, Andre le Notre and the Creation of the Gardens of Versailles. Ian believes that Louis XIV may also have been history's most passionate gardener. Louis, the absolute monarch, was known as the “Sun King,”  specifically designed the central axis to be east-west to track the sun's path across the garden. Louis worked closely for forty years with the low-born gardener André Le Nôtre to devise the original design and geometrical layout. Temperament-wise, André and Louis could not have been more different. Louis was driven and merciless. André was funny, thoughtful, insightful, and easy-going. In 1979, Versailles, including the garden, was declared a World Heritage Site. And in 2014, Alain Baraton wrote Gardener of Versailles: My Life in the World's Grandest Garden. As the gardener-in-chief, Alain lives on the grounds at Versailles. Alain has worked in the gardens, orchards, and fields for four decades. This memoir reveals Alain's connection to the grandest garden in the world. And in case you're wondering, Alain believes fall is the best time to visit. Alain oversaw the recovery from the worst natural disaster ever to hit Versailles. On Christmas night through the 26th of December in 1999, a monster winter storm with winds of up to 105 mph struck the grounds of Versaille. Alain watched in horror as century trees let go of the earth in response. In a little over an hour, the storm felled 10,000 trees at Versailles, including two tulip trees planted by Marie-Antoinette in 1783 in Trianon and a Corsican pine planted for Napoleon in 1810. Alain said, It was like the apocalypse. In one hour, 200 years of trees were destroyed.   But, miraculously, all of the statues survived unharmed. Although, there was one account that I read of a tree falling on one of the great statues. And as it hit the ground, the branches parted as if to spare that statue. It gave me chills just reading that. It was quite the story.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

RNZ: Morning Report
John Gordon remembered at South Island sheepdog championships

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 5:09


Many New Zealanders will be familiar with that tune - from the rural television Sunday staple - "A Dog's Show". The sheepdog trial programme which ran for 15 years until the early 1990s was hosted by John Gordon - who died last week at age 78. Today's the final day of the week-long South Island championships - where Southlander Gordon has been remembered by many. New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association president Pat Coogan spoke to Corin Dann.

Spaghetti Grenades
90's Supergroups Remembered

Spaghetti Grenades

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 2:51


Are you going hungry? Eat THIS! 

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - SHOSHANNA ALLISON - Robert W Ghostwolf Remembered

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 41:28


For 35 years, Shoshanna Allison travelled the US on spiritual missions - which brought her to New Mexico with Robert Ghost Wolf. She became 'internet savvy' early and in 1996 became involved with the Anti-Aspartame movement, warning people of the dangers of putting chemicals in their bodies.....This effort expanded to warning the public about MSG, Fluoride, Vaccines, Genetically Modified Foods and a myriad of other toxic substances. In her travels she became involved with Native Americans and was trained in ceremony and beliefs by Elders of several tribes - which put her in perfect step to understand the teachings of Robert Ghost Wolf......whose work she is still bringing to the public. She now lives in the Mid-West with her 3 dogs and a very busy computer! - www.robertghostwolf.com and www.wolflodge.org *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - SHOSHANNA ALLISON - Robert W Ghostwolf Remembered

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 41:29


For 35 years, Shoshanna Allison travelled the US on spiritual missions - which brought her to New Mexico with Robert Ghost Wolf. She became 'internet savvy' early and in 1996 became involved with the Anti-Aspartame movement, warning people of the dangers of putting chemicals in their bodies.....This effort expanded to warning the public about MSG, Fluoride, Vaccines, Genetically Modified Foods and a myriad of other toxic substances. In her travels she became involved with Native Americans and was trained in ceremony and beliefs by Elders of several tribes - which put her in perfect step to understand the teachings of Robert Ghost Wolf......whose work she is still bringing to the public. She now lives in the Mid-West with her 3 dogs and a very busy computer! - www.robertghostwolf.com and www.wolflodge.org*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

Christ Covenant Church
Forgotten by Man, Remembered by God

Christ Covenant Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 42:00


Record Rangers
Legendary Jimmy Bell remembered | Are RB Leipzig starting to feel the heat? | Kemar Roofe set to lead line in Seville bid

Record Rangers

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 33:48


Scott McDermott and Andy Newport join Gavin Berry to look at the latest news from Ibrox

Another Day With Jesus
Remembered In Heaven

Another Day With Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 8:06


When you go to war in your land against the enemy that attacks you, then sound an alarm with the trumpets, so that you may be remembered before the Lord your God, and you shall be saved from your enemies. - Numbers 10:9 Read Transcript (http://pastorpriji.com/podcast)

Pigskin Daily History Dispatch
The Anthracite League is Remembered with Historian Joe Zagorski

Pigskin Daily History Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 31:40


Pro football just after World War I was an interesting period in gridiron history indeed. As what would become the NFL was just starting up there were other, and I say this loosely, "leagues" where paid football players took the field. One of those was a short-lived group of teams in the Coal Region of Eastern Pennsylvania fondly called the Anthracite League. Historian https://pigskindispatch.com/(searchresults)?q2=%22Joe+Zagorski%22 (Joe Zagorski) visits to talk about this and more. You can find Joe on his podcast https://sportshistorynetwork.com/podcasts/pro-football-in-the-1970s/ (Pro Football in the 1970s) on the https://sportshistorynetwork.com/podcasts/ (Sports History Network). Come join us at the https://pigskindispatch.com/ (Pigskin Dispatch website) and the https://jerseydispatch.com/ (Sports Jersey Dispatch) to see even more Positive football news! Sign up to get daily football history headlines in your email inbox @ https://pigskindispatch1.aweb.page/p/92342af4-80c0-41a6-8ea2-80671be8d774 (Email-subscriber) Miss our football by the day of the year podcasts, well don't because they can still be found at the https://pigskindispatch.com/ (Pigskin Dispatch website). Go to https://my.captivate.fm/SportsHistoryNetwork.com/Row1 (SportsHistoryNetwork.com/Row1 )for access to the full Row One catalog for gallery prints and gift items. Plus, get a 15% discount on all prints on the Row One Pictorem Gallery with coupon code SHN15.

Christ Covenant Church Sermons
Dr. Kevin DeYoung | Forgotten by Man, Remembered by God

Christ Covenant Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 42:45


Sunday Morning, May 1, 2022Given by Dr. Kevin DeYoung | Senior PastorChrist Covenant ChurchForgotten by Man, Remembered by GodSermon Text: Genesis 40:1-41:57Watch on YouTube | Download our mobile app

Weekend Review | Turf's Up Radio
How do you want to be remembered?

Weekend Review | Turf's Up Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 60:00


Palestine Remembered
Palestine Remembered - Abby Martin

Palestine Remembered

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


More from Abby Martin  Gaza Fights For Freedom (2019) Full Documentary Directed by Abby Martin https://gazafightsforfreedom.com/ Empire Files: Israelis Speak Candidly to Abby Martin About Palestinians https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1e_dbsVQrk4 Abby's YouTube channel Empire Files  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG29FnXZm4F5U8xpqs1cs1Q

Redfield Arts Audio
An Interview With GORDON B. SHRIVER, author of “Boris Karloff, The Man Remembered” (Ep 22-6)

Redfield Arts Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 68:36


An interview with Gordon B. Shriver, author of “Boris Karloff, The Man Remembered”. Redfield chats with Shriver, two “Monster Kids”, about the life and work of beloved actor Boris Karloff, and Shriver's life-long fandom and research into Karloff's life. The interview was conducted by phone in April, 2022. The book, “Boris Karloff, The Man Remembered”, can be ordered from Amazon, or directly from the publisher, Bear Manor Media. Thank you for subscribing and listening to The Redfield Arts Audio Podcast! Don't forget to subscribe! For more great audio visit: http://www.RedfieldArtsAudio.com

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Late former U.S. Sec. of State Madeleine Albright remembered as a champion of democracy

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 42:22


Joy Reid leads this episode of The ReidOut with the late former U.S. Sec. of State Madeleine Albright being remembered on Wednesday as a champion of democracy, a message that could not be more relevant today. Joy and her guests discuss the latest reports detailing the efforts of leading Republicans to overturn the 2020 election and undermine our democracy. Plus, Russia and the United States carried out an unexpected prisoner exchange also on Wednesday, trading an American Marine veteran jailed by Moscow for a convicted Russian drug trafficker serving a prison sentence in the U.S. Bill Richardson, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and former governor of New Mexico, traveled to Moscow in the hours before the Ukraine war in hopes of securing this Marine veteran's release. Richardson also joins The ReidOut to discuss. Finally, Ron DeSantis tries to position himself as a competent MAGA warrior, but his battle with Disney over its opposition to his "Don't Say Gay" law appears to be rather incompetent. Rep. Val Demings, who is running for U.S. Senate for the state of Florida, joins Joy on how this battle will ultimately hurt Floridians. All this and more in this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
WWI Veterans of Le Quesnoy remembered

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 5:13


This week we're running a series of WWI veteran stories with Jude Dobson. We share the stories of four men who were all fighting in the Northern French town of Les Quesnoy. Today's episode is about Reverend Clive Mortimer.

Midnight Movie Cowboys
Jimmy Wang Yu Remembered

Midnight Movie Cowboys

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 107:57


This week, Hunter and John are joined by returning guest Chris Poggiali to discuss the career of late martial arts movie star Jimmy Wang Yu. Myths are debunked, narratives are busted, and a legend is put into perspective as we dig in to this martial arts movie hero. Enjoy   Join us on Discord via the link below Discord Link   

Duluth News Tribune Minute
Barry family remembered and celebrated at vigil

Duluth News Tribune Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 9:45


Here's a look at the top headlines from around the Northland for Monday, April 25, 2022.  The Duluth News Tribune Minute is a product of Forum Communications Company and is brought to you by reporters at the Duluth News Tribune, Superior Telegram and Cloquet Pine Journal. Find more news throughout the day at duluthnewstribune.com. If you enjoy this podcast, please consider supporting our work with a subscription at duluthnewstribune.news/podcast. Your support allows us to continue providing the local news and content you want.

Lois Koffi's Healthy N Wealthy N Wise Podcast
The Soul of Personal Branding To Get NOTICED, REMEMBERED & PAID With Keasha Lee

Lois Koffi's Healthy N Wealthy N Wise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 33:21


The biggest mistake I see clients make is NOT to have their heart and Soul in their mind/heart before they strike out on a lead generation and sales strategy   It can kill your business before it even starts to now connect deeply to your vision, your purpose, your WHY   Today we talk about that with Keasha Lee and we asked some really hard questions that you need to ask yourself before starting your sales and marketing plan   WHAT DO YOU WANT IN NEXT 2 YEARS? WHAT DO YOU STAND FOR? WHAT IS YOUR "IT" FACTOR? WHAT IS YOUR CREATIVE SELF EXPRESSION?     Keasha Lee is a personal branding coach, Messaging Mentor, Speaker, and is Founder & CEO of Striking Statements. Through her business, she helps conscious and creative entrepreneurs and coaches get NOTICED, REMEMBERED & PAID to be more of who they are while doing what they love.   Keasha has 15+ years experience in marketing, speaking, copywriting, and personal branding. She's worked with hundreds of entrepreneurs and small business owners to revamp their branding, define and grow a profitable niche, refine their messaging and position themselves as experts in their fields. Her top values are creative self-expression, respect, grace and communication. I'm on a mission to help even more entrepreneurs, experts, coaches and creatives make Striking Statements so they can create a business and life that they love. Visit her website: https://strikingstatements.com   SIGN UP FOR HER MASTERCLASS https://www.subscribepage.com/3partmasterclass_ondemand   FOR COACH LOIS' RESOURCES - go to www.loiskoffi.com/resources SIGN UP FOR COACH LOIS' LEAD GEN & SALES MASTERCLASS - https://loiskoffi.lpages.co/leads-2022-masterclass/   FIND HER 4 STEP PROVEN FRAMEWORK AT: https://loiskoffi.lpages.co/4-step-proven-framework/   JOIN HER FACEBOOK COMMUNITY AT HER PODCAST WEBSITE: www.loiskoffi.com/podcast   SUBSCRIBE TO HER YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/loiskofficoffee    

Locked On NHL - Daily Podcast On The National Hockey League
Alex Ovechkin Injured, Guy LaFleur Remembered and the Wild On Fire

Locked On NHL - Daily Podcast On The National Hockey League

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 33:40


The Washington Capitals lost a game and maybe more on Sunday when captain Alex Ovechkin left the contest early with an upper-body injury. Dan Holmi of Locked On Capitals has the latest updates on Ovi and what the Capitals need to do to be ready for the playoffs. Montreal Canadiens legend and Hockey Hall of Famer Guy LaFleur passed away on Friday at the age of 70. Locked On Canadiens co-hosts Laura Saba and Scott Matla remember "The Flower" and his impact on the Habs four straight Stanley Cup wins from 1976-1979. And the Minnesota Wild remain red-hot and added a buzzer beater in OT to defeat the Nashville Predators Sunday. Seth Toupal of Locked On Wild discusses the keys to his club's latest winning streak and what they need to do to prepare for the St. Louis Blues in the first round of the playoffs. All this and more on today's Locked On NHL Podcast with Gil Martin. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

History Ago Go
George Washington's Hair: How Early Americans Remembered the Founders (Keith Beutler)

History Ago Go

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 54:05


Mostly hidden from public view, like an embarrassing family secret, scores of putative locks of George Washington's hair are held, more than two centuries after his death, in the collections of America's historical societies, public and academic archives, and museums. Excavating the origins of these bodily artifacts, Keith Beutler uncovers a forgotten strand of early American memory practices and emerging patriotic identity.Between 1790 and 1840, popular memory took a turn toward the physical, as exemplified by the craze for collecting locks of Washington's hair. These new, sensory views of memory enabled African American Revolutionary War veterans, women, evangelicals, and other politically marginalized groups to enter the public square as both conveyors of these material relics of the Revolution and living relics themselves.George Washington's Hair introduces us to a taxidermist who sought to stuff Benjamin Franklin's body, an African American storyteller brandishing a lock of Washington's hair, an evangelical preacher burned in effigy, and a schoolmistress who politicized patriotic memory by privileging women as its primary bearers. As Beutler recounts in vivid prose, these and other ordinary Americans successfully enlisted memory practices rooted in the physical to demand a place in the body politic, powerfully contributing to antebellum political democratization.HOST:  Rob MellonFEATURED BREW:  Elusive Memory New England Style IPA, Good City Brewing Company, Milwaukee, WisconsinBOOK:  George Washington's Hair: How Early Americans Remembered the Foundershttps://www.amazon.com/George-Washingtons-Hair-Americans-Remembered/dp/0813946506/ref=sr_1_1?crid=10OH3SXX5E0X3&keywords=washington%27s+hair&qid=1650320153&sprefix=washington%27s+hair%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1MUSIC:  Bones Forkhttps://bonesfork.com/

Bergen Bible Baptist Church
"A Night to be Remembered" by Ptr. Jether Manalo

Bergen Bible Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 59:46


Sunday Afternoon Worship Service April 24, 2022 | 2:30 PM (ET) Speaker: Ptr. Jether Manalo "A Night to be Remembered"

Reformed Witness Hour
Joseph Remembered and Exalted

Reformed Witness Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 23:00


Vintage Grace's Podcast
Easter Sunday | They Remembered His Words

Vintage Grace's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 40:32


Drew Sodestrom offers a Biblical perspective on the victory that Jesus won for us on the cross, and how we can live in that victory daily and eternally.

The Dom Giordano Program
Jay Wright Decides To Retire, How Should He Be Remembered?

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 41:01


Full Hour | Today, Dom leads off the Dom Giordano Program by discussing the historic nature of today in New Jersey, as marijuana dispensaries open up for legal recreational sales after the State voted to legalize the substance last year. Then, Giordano gives a quick recap of yesterday's Masked Singer reveal with Rudy Giuliani revealing himself as the Jack in the Box, calling out how cringeworthy the entire process was. After that, Giordano offers his thoughts about the surprising news of Jay Wright's decision to retire, explaining his frustration with both the coach and Villanova over their stance on the national anthem and free speech. Giordano takes calls from listeners offering their thoughts on Jay Wright and the marijuana topics, then prepares to welcome gubernatorial candidate Jake Corman back onto the show. Then, State Senator Jake Corman returns to the Dom Giordano Program to discuss issues he's seeing play out across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as he runs for Governor. First, Giordano asks Corman about rumors centered on his campaign, with grumblings the State Senator was going to drop out of the race until he spoke with former President Donald Trump, who encouraged him to continue running. Corman tells why he continues to run as Governor, explaining why he believes he can with both the primary and general elections, with a better shot than ‘fringe candidates' such a Doug Mastriano. Then, Giordano asks Corman about a new initiative he's announcing today focusing on election reform, with plans to strengthen the legitimacy and safety of elections moving forward after highly questionable actions in the 2020 election. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Core Truth Radio
Being Remembered - Part 2

Core Truth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 25:00


Pastor Steve teaches out of God's Word in Genesis 5 Listen to CORE TRUTH RADIO every weekday at 5:30pm on KKLA 99.5 FM!

News & Features | NET Radio
Ashford Remembered as Statesman, Friend

News & Features | NET Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 2:09


Former congressman and state senator Brad Ashford, who died Tuesday, is being remembered for his kindness and political independence.

Pocatello Business Podcast
#208 Spencer Ward - How will you be Remembered in 20 years?

Pocatello Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 16:17


All of your dreams are in the deep end of the pool in your life. Deciding when you'll decide to jump into the deep end will depend on you.

Core Truth Radio
Being Remembered - Part 1

Core Truth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 25:00


Pastor Steve teaches out of God's Word in Genesis 5 Listen to CORE TRUTH RADIO every weekday at 5:30pm on KKLA 99.5 FM!

Library Rap: The Hip Hop Interviews with Tim Einenkel
DJ Kay Slay Remembered - Throwback Interview

Library Rap: The Hip Hop Interviews with Tim Einenkel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 31:02


RIP to the Legendary DJ Kay Slay. This week we replay Tim's interview with DJ Kay Slay. The Drama King talked to Tim about the history of the Graffiti Hall of Fame, how he went from an incredible graffiti artist to a highly respected DJ and breaks down the importance of every hip hop element. Kay Slay also talked about his album, Hip Hop Frontline, working with artists such as: Bun B, Joell Ortiz, Jon Connor, Lil Wayne, The Lox, his thoughts on streaming services and why artists need to educate themselves about the all aspects of Hip Hop culture. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

CRE with CBCworldwide
Leadership: How do you want to be remembered?

CRE with CBCworldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 33:26


On this episode, Christina Balas is joined by Ryan Estis, Founder and Keynote speaker. Ryan spent 15 years helping companies connect with employees and customers as an ad agency executive, building a client roster of category leading brands. Nine years ago, he decided to put that experience into practice and launch his own research and learning organization. His writing has been featured in Forbes, Inc., Fast Company and Entrepreneur Magazines. He inspires audiences with practical insight, plenty of energy and powerful, relevant stories that resonate long after the meeting ends. Attendees walk away with a specific plan for applying new ideas once they get back to work. He spoke at the Coldwell Banker Commercial Leadership Summit and rejoined us for an interview about his journey as a leader and tips you can implement today. On LinkedIn, you can connect with Ryan at linkedin.com/in/ryanestis/ and subscribe to his weekly newsletter on his site ryanestis.com

Beholder's Eye
Season 3 Episode 25 - Inspiration Remembered

Beholder's Eye

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 28:01


Music from //FILMMUSIC.IO//"Curse of the Scarab","Our Story Begins", Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Fantasy Ambience by Alexander NakaradaBugbears be Approaching by Tim KuligLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Sound Effects by //ZAPSPLAT.COM//

Bible Baptist Church
And They Remembered

Bible Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 23:00


Renovation Church
Then They Remembered

Renovation Church

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 27:49


Sometimes words sit inside of us dormant until just the right time. And when we remember them, they change our life!

IRON EMPIRE
What will you be remembered for?

IRON EMPIRE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 6:18


If you are a man, father, husband, and business owner you are in the right place.In this podcast, we share Apex tactics on how to build a business built to last. Build the Legacy without sacrificing your health or your family. These lessons are the chess moves. If you want the strategy on how to win the entire game as a KING, not a pawn go to www.manspathtoprosperity.com

Fitzdog Radio
Gilbert Gottfried, Remembered

Fitzdog Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 71:47