Podcasts about biological diversity

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Variety and variability of life forms

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  • Jan 12, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about biological diversity

Latest podcast episodes about biological diversity

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living
How the Automotive Industry Impacts Climate Change—and What You Can Do to Help

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 38:09


Transportation accounts for 29% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, making it the largest contributor—even over electricity and agriculture. After decades of stalled action on fuel efficiency standards, fuel efficiency and new vehicle greenhouse gas standards are on a path to improve over the next 13 years. This week, Laura speaks with Dan Becker, director of the Center for Biological Diversity's Safe Climate Transport Campaign, about the future of the transportation industry and its role in climate change. He also discusses how we can shape the future of the automotive industry. For show notes, visit https://brightly.eco/how-to-reduce-your-transportation-footprint.

Outrage and Optimism
135. No Substitute For Nature with Zac Goldsmith

Outrage and Optimism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 63:33


There's no pathway to capping our global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius without protecting and restoring nature. That's the lay of the land according to The Rt Hon Lord Goldsmith, Minister for the Pacific and the International Environment - our final guest for 2021. At the close of a year that's seen enormous momentum to incorporate forests and land use well and truly into the climate agenda, Lord Goldsmith shares insights into the context and his vision for the next twelve months. So, where do we stand now? Among the remarkable outcomes of COP26 was a commitment to halting and reversing forest loss and land degradation by 2030. Signed by 141 countries, the Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forest and Land Use covers an incredible 90 percent of global forest. We also saw meaningful progress at this year's Convention on Biological Diversity in Kunming. And the direction of travel? Our ultimate challenge and goal, Lord Goldsmith says, is to reconcile our economy with our natural world – and now has to be the turning point. So! Join us for a reflection on some major moments on the podcast this past year and a look into this turning point moment. Can we reduce emissions by 7% each consecutive year from here on out? And - we have a holiday-themed song this year as our last song of the season! A special acoustic performance of “It's Christmas” by Callum Beattie. Stick around for it! Thank you for a great season!   —   Christiana + Tom's book ‘The Future We Choose' is available now! Subscribe to our Climate Action Newsletter: Signals Amidst The Noise   —   Mentioned links from the episode:   Read: Glasgow Leaders' Declaration On Forests and Land Use Donate: Steps To Hope   —   Thank you to our guest this week:   Zac Goldsmith (Rt Hon Lord) Minister for the Pacific and the International Environment Twitter   UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Twitter | LinkedIn    Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office Twitter | LinkedIn   —   Callum Beattie is our musical guest!   Callum Beattie Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | Website | Music   DONATE: Steps To Hope   Steps To Hope Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Donate   —   Keep up with Christiana Figueres here: Instagram | Twitter   Tom Rivett-Carnac: Instagram | Twitter | LinkedIn   Paul Dickinson: LinkedIn | Twitter   —   Follow @GlobalOptimism on social media and send us a message! Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | LinkedIn   Don't forget to hit SUBSCRIBE so you don't miss another episode of Outrage + Optimism!

EcoJustice Radio
Conserving Civil Rights History and Biological Diversity in Alabama

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 58:24


What is now known as Alabama and the environs of the Deep South, boast exceptional biodiversity and capture the imagination with its rich cultural and historical significance. It is the ancestral home of Cherokees, Choctaws, Muscogee or Creeks, and numerous lesser known Native nations and also the place where civil rights activist Stokely Carmichael planted the seeds of Black Power. Moreover, Dr. King famously marched from Selma to Montgomery, weaving along the Alabama River to manifest a dream of unity. Listen to rich stories of ecological restoration and preservation of places of civil rights history that is Alabama. We welcome Bill Finch of Alabama River Diversity Network and the Paint Rock Forest Research Center, and Phillip Howard, Project Manager of Civil Rights People and Places Initiative. They share the vision and mission of these non-profit organizations dedicated to preserving and promoting the extraordinarily diverse natural and human heritage of this essential region. Bill Finch is the founding director of Paint Rock Forest Research Center [https://paintrock.org] and founding partner of the Alabama River Diversity Network [https://alabamarivernetwork.org]. Finch is author of Longleaf, Far As the Eye Can See, an exploration of the potential in North America's most diverse forest ecosystem. He is former conservation director for the Nature Conservancy's Alabama Chapter, and an award-winning writer on gardening, farming and environmental issues. Phillip Howard is Project Manager for The Conservation Fund's Civil Rights People and Places Initiative. He recently produced a film about the Campsites of the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail called 54 Miles to Home. 54 Miles to Home: https://vimeo.com/591288364 Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://www.wilderutopia.com/category/ecojustice-radio/ Support the Podcast: https://socal350.org/contribute-to-socal-350-climate-action/ Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Interview by Carry Kim Intro by Jessica Aldridge Engineer and Original Music: Blake Quake Beats Show Created by Mark and JP Morris Episode 122 Image: EJR with thanks to Bill Finch and Phillip Howard

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme
Virginijus Sinkevičius, EU Commissioner for the Environment, Oceans and Fisheries

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 30:21


Dr Renard Siew, Climate Change Activist and ideaXme Climate Change Ambassador interviews Virginijus Sinkevičius, EU Commissioner for the Environment, Oceans and Fisheries. Amongst the many subjects discussed, they talk of COP26, climate change activism, key objectives for 2022 and the Commissioner's new legislation relating to deforestation. Virginijus Sinkevičius biography: Commissioner for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries 2019-present Minister of Economy and Innovation 2017-2019 Member of the Parliament 2016-2019 Chair of the Committee on Economics of the Parliament 2016-2017 Deputy Leader of the Lithuanian Farmers and Greens Union 2016-present Team Leader of the Group for Regulatory Affairs, Invest Lithuania 2016 Project Coordinator, Lithuanian Airports 2015-2016 International Group Project Manager, AB Lietuvos Paštas 2014 Assistant Project Manager, Centre for European Policy Analysis (CEPÁ), Washington (USA) 2013-2014 Author and Editor of news portal The Lithuanian Tribune 2011-2015 Master of Arts in European Studies, Maastricht University (Netherlands) 2012-2013 Bachelor of Economic and Social Studies, Aberystwyth University (United Kingdom) 2009-2012 Responsibilities of the Commissioner: Ensuring the environment, oceans and fisheries remain at the core of the European Green Deal. Presenting a new Biodiversity Strategy for 2030: from Natura2000, deforestation, species and habitats, to sustainable seas and oceans. Delivering on the Commission's zero-pollution ambition, including air and water quality and hazardous chemicals. Leading on a Circular Economy Action Plan to promote the use of sustainable resources Promoting plastic-free oceans and proper implementation of legislation on plastics, particularly microplastics. Ensuring full implementation of the reformed Common Fisheries Policy. Effective control and enforcement and respecting the maximum sustainable yield objective. Evaluating the Common Fisheries Policy by 2022, including the social dimension, climate adaptation and clean oceans. Contributing to the ‘Farm to Fork' strategy on sustainable food, maximizing the potential of sustainable seafood and the aquaculture sector. Promoting international ocean governance, playing a lead role in international discussions. Ensuring Europe leads the way to an ambitious agreement at the 2020 Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Taking a zero-tolerance approach to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. Contributing to WTO discussions on a global agreement to ban fisheries subsidies that cause overfishing, illegal fishing and overcapacity. ideaXme is a global network - podcast on 12 platforms, 40 countries, mentor programme and creator series. Mission: To share knowledge of the future. Our passion: Rich Connectedness™!

EcoJustice Radio
Port Arthur Texas: Community Resistance vs. the Climate Change Nexus

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 59:00


The communities of the Gulf of Mexico are at the nexus of climate change and community resistance. Port Arthur Texas is homebase for the largest oil refinery in North America and a dizzying toxic array of fossil fuel and chemical facilities. But the people are stepping up to say - NO MORE.. Port Arthur Community Action Network (also known as PACAN) is raising the alarm, holding the polluters accountable, and paving the path to transition away from an extractive economy to one that supports restorative justice. Our guest today, John Beard, Jr., Founder and CEO of Port Arthur Community Action Network [https://www.pa-can.com/], is helping to mobilize his community of Port Arthur and the Southeast Texas region. As a former oil employee turned advocate for environmental justice in the place he has lived all his life. John has been fighting for health and safety protections on the refineries, export terminals, petrochemical plants, and leading efforts against deepwater ports, each of which could export an estimated 2 million barrels of crude oil per day. He is the recipient of the 2021 Rose Braz Award for Bold Activism from the Center for Biological Diversity. This year he helped lead October's historic People vs. Fossil Fuels week of action in Washington DC, and he brought a powerful voice to November's U.N. climate talks in Glasgow. More: https://www.portarthurcan.org/ https://youtu.be/00upOJrPn2o The Plastic Plague Series by EcoJustice Radio: https://socal350.org/ecojustice-radio-on-kpfk-90-7-fm-in-los-angeles/plastic-plague-series/ Break Free From Plastic on EcoJustice Radio: https://www.wilderutopia.com/ecojustice-radio/break-free-from-the-plastic-death-cycle/ News Sources https://www.commondreams.org/news/2021/12/01/congress-lifted-crude-export-ban-2015-us-has-dropped-climate-bomb-world https://biologicaldiversity.org/w/news/press-releases/john-beard-jr-honored-with-rose-braz-award-for-bold-activism-2021-12-08/ Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://www.wilderutopia.com/category/ecojustice-radio/ Support the Podcast: https://socal350.org/contribute-to-socal-350-climate-action/ Hosted by Jessica Aldridge Engineer and Original Music: Blake Quake Beats Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Show Created by Mark and JP Morris Episode 121 Photo credit: Bianka Csenki / Artivist Network

MassRecycle Podcast
Episode 28: Simplify the Holidays & Reduce Waste

MassRecycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:34


Gretchen and Waneta talk with Kelley Dennings of the Center for Biological Diversity about simplifying the holidays and reducing waste. They discuss top holiday waste generators, alternative gift ideas, hosting and decorating, the role of public policy, and the perceived barriers to celebrating with fewer material items. Should you buy a fake or real Christmas tree? Is wrapping paper recyclable? All this and more, in this lively conversation. Find Kelley Dennings at kdennings@biologicaldiversity.org Great ideas, tools, and information can be found at https://simplifytheholidays.org

Montana Public Radio News
Advocacy group sues over rule expanding hunting and fishing on national wildlife refuges

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 1:06


The lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity says the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service didn't properly assess the impact of a rule opening 2.3 million acres in the National Wildlife Refuge system to hunting and fishing.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.19.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 56:12


Study: Sustainable eating is cheaper and healthier Oxford University, November 11, 2021 Oxford University research has today revealed that, in countries such as the US, the UK, Australia and across Western Europe, adopting a vegan, vegetarian, or flexitarian diet could slash your food bill by up to one-third. The study, which compared the cost of seven sustainable diets to the current typical diet in 150 countries, using food prices from the World Bank's International Comparison Program, was published in The Lancet Planetary Health. (next) Meta-analysis concludes resveratrol beneficially modulates glycemic control in diabetics Zagazig University and Suez Canal University (Egypt), October 29 2021.  Findings from a meta-analysis of clinical trials published in Medicina Clinica (Barcelona) revealed an association between supplementing with resveratrol and improvements in glycemic control. “This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to consider resveratrol's efficacy on glycemic and cardiometabolic parameters in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).” (next) Exercise linked to better mental health Kaiser Permanente Research, November 11, 2021 Kaiser Permanente research published in Preventive Medicine showed people who exercised more during the initial lockdown period of the COVID-19 pandemic experienced less anxiety and depression than those who didn't exercise. It also showed that people who spent more time outdoors typically experienced lower levels of anxiety and depression than those who stayed inside. (next) Bedtime linked with heart health University of Exeter (UK), November 9, 2021 Going to sleep between 10:00 and 11:00 pm is associated with a lower risk of developing heart disease compared to earlier or later bedtimes, according to a study published today in European Heart Journal—Digital Health, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). "While we cannot conclude causation from our study, the results suggest that early or late bedtimes may be more likely to disrupt the body clock, with adverse consequences for cardiovascular health." (NEXT) Garlic compounds may boost cardio health indirectly via gut microbiota National Taiwan University, November 6 2021 Allicin from garlic may prevent the metabolism of unabsorbed L-carnitine or choline into TMAO, a compound linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, says a new study. TMAO – or trimethylamine N-oxide – has been known to be generated from dietary carnitine through metabolism of gut microbiota, and was recently reported to be an “important gut microbiota-dependent metabolite to cause cardiovascular diseases.”  New data indicated that carnitine-fed lab mice showed a “remarkable increase in plasma TMAO levels”, compared with lab mice fed a control (no carnitine). However, when allicin supplements were provided with the carnitine diet, TMAO levels were significantly reduced.   (NEXT) Drug used to prevent miscarriage increases risk of cancer in offspring University of Texas Health Science Center, November 9, 2021 Exposure in utero to a drug used to prevent miscarriage can lead to an increased risk of developing cancer, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston  The drug, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC), is a synthetic progestogen that was frequently used by women in the 1950s and 1960s, and is still prescribed to women today to help prevent preterm birth.  (OTHER NEWS NEXT) 2,433 Dead Babies in VAERS as Another Study Shows mRNA Shots Not Safe for Pregnant Women by Brian Shilhavy Editor, Health Impact News, November 7, 2021 There have now been 2,433 fetal deaths recorded in VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) from pregnant women who have been injected with one of the COVID-19 shots. The vast majority of these have been from the Pfizer shot (1,862 deaths) and the Moderna shot (656 deaths.) There have been more fetal deaths in the past 11 months following COVID-19 shots than there have been for the past 30+ years following ALL vaccines (2,198 – Source.) Last month (October, 2021) the New England Journal of Medicine admitted that the original study used to justify the CDC and the FDA in recommending the shots to pregnant women was flawed. (Source.) Since then, researchers in New Zealand have conducted a new study on the original data, and concluded: A re-analysis of these figures indicates a cumulative incidence of spontaneous abortion ranging from 82% (104/127) to 91% (104/114), 7–8 times higher than the original authors' results. (Source.) And yet, the CDC and FDA still continue to recommend the shots for pregnant women, even though a correct analysis on the original data shows that 82% to 91% of pregnant women will suffer miscarriages if their unborn child is less than 20 weeks old. (Source.) VAERS is a passive system that is severely under reported. The CDC and FDA have never conducted a study to determine what this under-reported factor is, but independent scientists have, and we have previously published the analysis conducted by Dr. Jessica Rose, who has determined that a conservative under-reported factor would be X41. See: STUDY: Government's Own Data Reveals that at Least 150,000 Probably DEAD in U.S. Following COVID-19 Vaccines This means that there have probably been at least 99,753 fetal deaths following COVID-19 injections so far. Here is a video report we made on this last month with some very unfortunate gruesome examples of what these shots are doing to unborn babies. 1,969 Fetal Deaths Recorded Following COVID-19 Shots but Criminal CDC Recommends Pregnant Women Get the Shot UPDATE – November 7, 2021 PM A couple of hours after publishing this article, a video that has been circulating on the Internet of an interview with a Funeral Director in the UK became known to me. He has been in practice for over 3 years and is identified as “Wesley,” and was interviewed by a group called “Resistance GB.” He claims that last fall was one the slowest periods of seeing deaths for all funeral directors, but when the COVID-19 shots were introduced, deaths started dramatically increasing. It started with the elderly, but then by April they were seeing large numbers of people in their 30s and 40s. Many of them were dying of myocarditis. Now, they are seeing unprecedented numbers of newborn babies, and they are piling up in hospital refrigerators. Some are full term, some are pre-term, he claims. The UK originally recommended that pregnant women and nursing mothers should NOT get the experimental COVID shots, but like the CDC in the U.S., they eventually changed their recommendation to encourage pregnant women to get the shots. (NEXT) An ethical analysis of vaccinating children against COVID-19: benefits, risks, and issues of global health equity Johns Hopkins University, Oxford-Johns Hopkins Global Infectious Disease Ethics Collaborative, Wageningen University - The Netherlands, University of Oxford, Abstract We argue that it is currently unclear whether routine COVID-19 vaccination of healthy children is ethically justified in most contexts, given the minimal direct benefit that COVID-19 vaccination provides to children, the potential for rare risks to outweigh these benefits and undermine vaccine confidence, and substantial evidence that COVID-19 vaccination confers adequate protection to risk groups, such as older adults, without the need to vaccinate children. We conclude that child COVID-19 vaccination in wealthy communities before adults in poor communities worldwide is ethically unacceptable and consider how policy deliberations might evolve in light of future developments. (NEXT) What's Driving Global Deforestation? Organized Crime, Beef, Soy, Palm Oil and Wood Products Jennifer Devine,  Counterpunch, November 17, 2021 Every year the world loses an estimated 25 million acres (10 million hectares) of forest, an area larger than the state of Indiana. Nearly all of it is in the tropics. From my research on social and environmental issues in Latin America, I know that four consumer goods are responsible for the majority of global deforestation: beef, soy, palm oil, and wood pulp and paper products. Together these commodities are responsible for the loss of nearly 12 million acres (5 million hectares) annually. There's also a fifth, less publicized key driver: organized crime, including illegal drug trafficking. The dominant role of beef Among major products that promote deforestation, beef is in a class by itself. Beef production is now estimated to be the biggest driver of deforestation worldwide, accounting for 41% of global forest losses. In the Amazon alone, cattle ranching accounts for 80% of deforestation. From 2000 to 2011, beef production emitted nearly 200 times more greenhouse gases than soy, and 60 times more than oil palm in tropical countries with high deforestation rates. Soy and palm oil: Ubiquitous ingredients Together, soy and palm oil drive nearly 10% of deforestation annually – almost 2.5 million acres (1 million hectares). Clearing land for palm oil plantations fuels large-scale rainforest destruction in Indonesia and Malaysia, where most of the world's palm oil is produced. Palm oil is the most commonly produced, consumed and traded vegetable oil. Some 60% of the 66 million tons produced globally every year is used to produce energy in the form of biofuel, power and heat. About 40% is used for food, animal feed and chemical products. Palm oil is an ingredient in half of all products found at the supermarket, including margarine, shampoos, frozen pizza and detergents. Soy production has doubled globally in the past 20 years. Nearly 80% of global soy is fed to cows, chickens, pigs and farmed fish. This demand reflects the tripling of global meat production over the past 50 years. Wood products Wood products are responsible for about 5% of annual global deforestation, or about 1.2 million acres (500,000 hectares) yearly. Wood is widely used for home construction and furniture, and also as a pulp source for paper and fabric. And in low-income nations and rural areas, it's an important fuel source for heating and cooking. The three largest paper-producing countries are the U.S., Canada and China. Illegal deforestation and organized crime Another industry plays an important role, especially in tropical forests: organized crime. Large, lucrative industries offer opportunities to move and launder money; as a result, in many parts of the world, deforestation is driven by the drug trade. In South America and Central America, drug trafficking organizations are the vanguard of deforestation. Drug traffickers are illegally logging forests in the Amazon and hiding cocaine in timber shipments to Europe. In my research, I have analyzed how traffickers illegally log and raise cattle in protected areas in Central America to launder money and claim drug smuggling territory. Other scholars estimate that 30% to 60% of deforestation in the region is “narco-deforestation.” Forest Trends analysis, exports tied to illegal deforestation are worth US$61 billion annually and are responsible for 25% of total global tropical deforestation. (NEXT) ‘This Must Not Happen': If Unhalted, Permian Basin Fracking Will Unleash 40 Billion Tons of CO2 by 2050 As activists at the COP26 summit continue to denounce the “massive” gap between wealthy governments' lofty rhetoric and their woefully inadequate plans for addressing the climate emergency, a new analysis of projected extraction in the Permian Basin in the U.S. Southwest exposes the extent to which oil and gas executives' refusal to keep fossil fuels in the ground puts humanity's future in jeopardy. “While climate science tells us that we must consume 40% less oil in 2030, Permian producers plan to grow production more than 50%.” Released Tuesday by Oil Change International, Earthworks, and the Center for International Environmental Law, the second chapter of The Permian Basin Climate Bomb warns that if the drilling and fracking boom that has turned the Permian Basin into “the world's single most prolific oil and gas field” over the past decade is allowed to persist unabated for the next three decades, it will generate nearly 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide by mid-century. “With global markets flush with Permian oil and gas, it can only be harder to steer the world's economy toward clean energy.” “While climate science tells us that we must consume 40% less oil in 2030, Permian producers plan to grow production more than 50%” from 2021 to 2030, said Stockman. “This must not happen.” “If left unchecked,” the report notes, “the Permian could continue to produce huge amounts of oil, gas, and gas liquids for decades to come. With global markets flush with Permian oil and gas, it can only be harder to steer the world's economy toward clean energy.” (NEXT) Wall Street's Takeover of Nature Advances with Launch of New Asset Class By Whitney Webb A project of the multilateral development banking system, the Rockefeller Foundation and the New York Stock Exchange recently created a new asset class that will put, not just the natural world, but the processes underpinning all life, up for sale under the guise of promoting “sustainability.” Last month, the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) announced it had developed a new asset class and accompanying listing vehicle meant “to preserve and restore the natural assets that ultimately underpin the ability for there to be life on Earth.” Called a natural asset company, or NAC, the vehicle will allow for the formation of specialized corporations “that hold the rights to the ecosystem services produced on a given chunk of land, services like carbon sequestration or clean water.” These NACs will then maintain, manage and grow the natural assets they commodify, with the end of goal of maximizing the aspects of that natural asset that are deemed by the company to be profitable. Though described as acting like “any other entity” on the NYSE, it is alleged that NACs “will use the funds to help preserve a rain forest or undertake other conservation efforts, like changing a farm's conventional agricultural production practices.” Yet, as explained towards the end of this article, even the creators of NACs admit that the ultimate goal is to extract near-infinite profits from the natural processes they seek to quantify and then monetize. NYSE COO Michael Blaugrund alluded to this when he said the following regarding the launch of NACs: “Our hope is that owning a natural asset company is going to be a way that an increasingly broad range of investors have the ability to invest in something that's intrinsically valuable, but, up to this point, was really excluded from the financial markets.” Framed with the lofty talk of “sustainability” and “conservation”, media reports on the move in outlets like Fortune couldn't avoid noting that NACs open the doors to “a new form of sustainable investment” which “has enthralled the likes of BlackRock CEO Larry Fink over the past several years even though there remain big, unanswered questions about it.” Fink, one of the world's most powerful financial oligarchs, is and has long been a corporate raider, not an environmentalist, and his excitement about NACs should give even its most enthusiastic proponents pause if this endeavor was really about advancing conservation, as is being claimed. How to Create a NAC The creation and launch of NACs has been two years in the making and saw the NYSE team up with the Intrinsic Exchange Group (IEG), in which the NYSE itself holds a minority stake. IEG's three investors are the Inter-American Development Bank, the Latin America-focused branch of the multilateral development banking system that imposes neoliberal and neo-colonalist agendas through debt entrapment; the Rockefeller Foundation, the foundation of the American oligarch dynasty whose activities have long been tightly enmeshed with Wall Street; and Aberdare Ventures, a venture capital firm chiefly focused on the digital healthcare space. Notably, the IADB and the Rockefeller Foundation are closely tied to the related pushes for Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and biometric Digital IDs. The IEG's mission focuses on “pioneering a new asset class based on natural assets and the mechanism to convert them to financial capital.” “These assets,” IEG states, make “life on Earth possible and enjoyable…They include biological systems that provide clean air, water, foods, medicines, a stable climate, human health and societal potential.” Put differently, NACs will not only allow ecosystems to become financial assets, but the rights to “ecosystem services”, or the benefits people receive from nature as well. These include food production, tourism, clean water, biodiversity, pollination, carbon sequestration and much more. IEG is currently partnering with Costa Rica's government to pilot its NAC efforts within that country. Costa Rica's Minister of Environment and Energy, Andrea Meza Murillo, has claimed that the pilot project with IEG “will deepen the economic analysis of giving nature its economic value, as well as to continue mobilizing financial flows to conservation.” With NACs, the NYSE and IEG are now putting the totality of nature up for sale. While they assert that doing so will “transform our economy to one that is more equitable, resilient and sustainable”, it's clear that the coming “owners” of nature and natural processes will be the only real beneficiaries. Per the IEG, NACs first begin with the identification of a natural asset, such as a forest or lake, which is then quantified using specific protocols. Such protocols have already been developed by related groups like the Capitals Coalition, which is partnered with several of IEG's partners as well as the World Economic Forum and various coalitions of multinational corporations. Then, a NAC is created and the structure of the company decides who has the rights to that natural asset's productivity as well as the rights to decide how that natural asset is managed and governed. Lastly, a NAC is “converted” into financial capital by launching an initial public offering on a stock exchange, like the NYSE. This last stage “generates capital to manage the natural asset” and the fluctuation of its price on the stock exchange “signals the value of its natural capital.” However, the NAC and its employees, directors and owners are not necessarily the owners of the natural asset itself following this final step. Instead, as IEG notes, the NAC is merely the issuer while the potential buyers of the natural asset the NAC represents can include: institutional investors, private investors, individuals and institutions, corporations, sovereign wealth funds and multilateral development banks. Thus, asset management firms that essentially already own much of the world, like Blackrock, could thus become owners of soon-to-be monetized natural processes, natural resources and the very foundations of natural life itself. Both the NYSE and IEG have marketed this new investment vehicle as being aimed at generating funds that will go back to conservation or sustainability efforts. However, on the IEG's website, it notes that the goal is really endless profit from natural processes and ecosystems that were previously deemed to be part of “the commons”, i.e. the cultural and natural resources accessible to all members of a society, including natural materials such as air, water, and a habitable earth. Per the IEG, “as the natural asset prospers, providing a steady or increasing flow of ecosystem services, the company's equity should appreciate accordingly providing investment returns. Shareholders and investors in the company through secondary offers, can take profit by selling shares. These sales can be gauged to reflect the increase in capital value of the stock, roughly in-line with its profitability, creating cashflow based on the health of the company and its assets.” Researcher and journalist Cory Morningstar has strongly disagreed with the approach being taken by NYSE/IEG and views NACs as a system that will only exacerbate the corporate predation of nature, despite claims to the contrary. Morningstar has described NACs as “Rockefeller et al. letting the markets dictate what in nature has value – and what does not. Yet, it's not for capitalist institutions and global finance to decide what life has value. Ecosystems are not ‘assets.' Biological communities exist for their own purposes, not ours.” A New Way to Loot The ultimate goal of NACs is not sustainability or conservation – it is the financialization of nature, i.e. turning nature into a commodity that can be used to keep the current, corrupt Wall Street economy booming under the guise of protecting the environment and preventing its further degradation. Indeed, IEG makes this clear when they note that “the opportunity” of NACs lies not in their potential to improve environmental well-being or sustainability, but in the size of this new asset class, which they term “Nature's Economy.” Indeed, while the asset classes of the current economy are value at approximately $512 trillion, the asset classes unlocked by NACs are significantly larger at $4,000 trillion (i.e. $4 quadrillion). Thus, NACs open up a new feeding ground for predatory Wall Street banks and financial institutions that will allow them to not just dominate the human economy, but the entire natural world. In the world currently being constructed by these and related entities, where even freedom is being re-framed not as a right but “a service,” the natural processes on which life depends are similarly being re-framed as assets, which will have owners. Those “owners” will ultimately have the right, in this system, to dictate who gets access to clean water, to clean air, to nature itself and at what cost. According to Cory Morningstar, one of the other aims of creating “Nature's Economy” and neatly packaging it for Wall Street via NACs is to drastically advance massive land grab efforts made by Wall Street and the oligarch class in recent years. This includes the recent land grabs made by Wall Street firms as well as billionaire “philanthropists” like Bill Gates during the COVID crisis. However, the land grabs facilitated through the development of NACs will largely target indigenous communities in the developing world. As Morningstar notes: “The public launch of NACs strategically preceded the fifteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, the biggest biodiversity conference in a decade. Under the pretext of turning 30% of the globe into “protected areas”, the largest global land grab in history is underway. Built on a foundation of white supremacy, this proposal will displace hundreds of millions, furthering the ongoing genocide of Indigenous peoples. The tragic irony is this: while Indigenous peoples represent less than 5% of the global population, they support approximately 80% of all biodiversity.“ IEG, in discussing NACs, tellingly notes that proceeds from a NAC's IPO can be used for the acquisition of more land by its controlling entities or used to boost the budgets or funds of those who receive the capital from the IPO. This is a far cry from the NYSE/IEG sales pitch that NACs are “different” because their IPOs will be used to “preserve and protect” natural areas. The climate change panic that is now rising to the take the place of COVID-19 panic will surely be used to savvily market NACs and similar tactics as necessary to save the planet, but – rest assured – NACs are not a move to save the planet, but a move to enable the same interests responsible for the current environmental crises to usher in a new era where their predatory exploitation reaches new heights that were previously unimaginable.

GrowthBusters
61 Rebelling Against Black Friday Consumerism

GrowthBusters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:15


We generate 23% more waste during December than other months of the year, but more than three in four Americans wish the holidays were less materialistic. Our retail and consumer culture have gotten out of hand over holiday gift-giving. 9 in 10 believe holidays should be more about family and caring for others than about giving and receiving gifts. It's too easy to hit Amazon or just grab something off the shelf at a store. Non-material gifts require more thought, so they are valued more by the recipients. The Center for Biological Diversity's Kelley Dennings joins us to share what she's learned about dematerializing and greening up the holidays. Just like “paper or plastic,” does the question of natural or artificial Christmas tree haunt you? She also points us to resources her team has created to help you do a holiday reset (see links below). They include helpful ways to introduce new non-material holiday traditions in your family. We hope this episode inspires you. We also discuss the successful crowdfunding campaign to make our documentary, GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth free from now on (see links below). MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: Simplify the Holidays Gift guides and other green holiday info https://simplifytheholidays.org/ SoKind alternative gift registry https://sokindregistry.org/ Simplify the Holidays Through Waste Reduction – Webinar https://youtu.be/jdxyYZfV27I What Would Jesus Buy? (2007 documentary) https://youtu.be/mAxuNdtZt7c GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth – free on YouTube https://youtu.be/_w0LiBsVFBo Overshoot: World's Best Introduction - Episode 57 of the GrowthBusters podcast https://www.growthbusters.org/overshoot-worlds-best-introduction/ GrowthBusters Black Friday Trailer (2018) https://youtu.be/OiTepSTPnM0 GrowthBusters Crowdfunding Campaign (It's still active!) https://fundrazr.com/growthbustersmovie Ending Overshoot – a publication on Medium https://medium.com/ending-overshoot On the GrowthBusters podcast, we come to terms with the limits to growth, explore the joy of sustainable living, and provide a recovery program from our society's growth addiction (economic/consumption and population). This podcast is part of the GrowthBusters project to raise awareness of overshoot and end our culture's obsession with, and pursuit of, growth. Dave Gardner directed the documentary GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth, which Stanford Biologist Paul Ehrlich declared “could be the most important film ever made.” Co-host, and self-described "energy nerd," Stephanie Gardner has degrees in Environmental Studies and Environmental Law & Policy. Join the conversation on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/GrowthBustersPodcast/ Make a donation to support this non-profit project. https://www.growthbusters.org/donate/ Archive of GrowthBusters podcast episodes http://www.growthbusters.org/podcast/ Subscribe to GrowthBusters email updates https://lp.constantcontact.com/su/umptf6w/signup See the film – GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth http:www.growthbustersmovie.org Explore the issues at http://www.growthbusters.org View the GrowthBusters channel on YouTube Follow the podcast so you don't miss an episode:

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

los angeles japanese russian bay university long beach chinese california american project mexico natural surfing north world war ii state utah congress money nasa energy california department professor pacific dc meaning democratic alaska federal washington presidential gulf oil act birds places gas school southern california san francisco bay new mexico carlsbad fish deepwater horizon police journal beach businesses miami wyoming donations interior airbnb safety americas san diego fishing us open patch american history currents cambria eis orange county commission crude wall street journal north dakota apache amplify joe biden investigations beta holley bureau tom fowler hogan importantly heal cunningham coast guard santa barbara dolphin midway hwy barrels san clemente infrastructure tot protecting maintain san diego county california state senate summerland deep water rio grande emeritus music alley treaty sarahs oceanside regulations marine science busan alessi offshore refugio aro surfboards fisheries subcommittee michael h encinitas colorado river huntington beach newport beach laguna beach pacific ocean queen mary david l maryland center vhf wahoo aros santa barbara channel captain dave del mar seal beach cosco keystone pipeline ocean health executive orders ocs gao oversight veterinary medicine decommissioning elkind cancellations mileage offshore oil bsee dana point endangered species act oil drilling wing lam congressional dish international energy agency mineral resources boem ocean energy management offshore drilling government accountability office kern county business alliance newport harbor noble energy government oversight cover art design biological diversity heritage site best technology david ippolito crestview
KQED's The California Report
State Health Officials Push For More People to Get COVID Booster Shots

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 17:52


State health officials are advising adults who want to get a COVID-19 booster shot to do so before the holiday season. This comes as the state is warning about a possible surge in COVID-19 cases this winter. Fossil fuels are the biggest driver of human-made climate change. So why has an analysis by environmental group Global Witness tallied more than 500 gas and oil lobbyists at the United Nations climate conference in Glasgow? Guest: Kassie Siegel, Director for the Center for Biological Diversity's Climate Law Institute California's state delegation to the United Nations climate conference is packed with Latino power players. Latinos in California are not of the same mind when it comes to climate policy. Reporter: Raquel Maria Dillon, KQED

COP26 Daily
Monday 8 November: "We are still falling short." / with Jana Ahlers and Katherine Jones

COP26 Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 31:58


Week 2 of the conference has started - Cameron visits the People's Summit for Climate Change, based at 209 Bath Street in the city centre. He speaks to Jana Ahlers (Programme Coordinator) and chats to people attending an event at the summit called ‘A Grassroots Feminist Path to Climate Change'. Cameron then meets Katherine Jones (COP26 Project Manager for Stop Climate Chaos Scotland) to discuss the Homestay Network. Then, in the Blue Zone, Cameron meets Rodne Galicha from The Philippines and Lobsang Yangtso from Tibet - they share their thoughts on today's discussion (adaptation, loss and damage). David Cooper, Deputy Executive Secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, also comments on these issues. Towards the end of the show, Cameron highlights sections of Barack Obama's speech. People's Summit for Climate Change: climatefringe.org/events/peoples-summit-for-climate-justice-2/ Cop26 Coalition: cop26coalition.org Stop Climate Chaos Scotland: www.stopclimatechaos.scot Homestay Network: www.humanhotel.com/cop26/ Climate Fringe: climatefringe.org For more information about COP26 Daily, go to: www.thebiglight.com/cop26

Plant Based Briefing
139: Chicken vs Wildlife: The Environmental Costs of Eating Poultry from BiologicalDiversity.org

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 7:00


Consumption of chicken is increasing drastically. Learn about the environmental cost of eating chicken from the Center for Biological Diversity. Please take a moment to rate & review the podcast here. Thank you!

Honey Badger Radio
Female Dating Strategy vs Biological Diversity of Genitals(It's Men's Fault!) | Rantzerker 143

Honey Badger Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 109:11


Join us on the Rantzerker as Karen, Alison & Brian stare into the abyss, fire up the gravity drive, and attempt to drive the balrogs of feminism back to the shadowy pit from whence they came by responding to the website known as The Female Dating Strategy.

The Overpopulation Podcast
68 Sex Education (As Good As The Show!)

The Overpopulation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 59:06


Sarah Baillie and Kelley Dennings from The Center for Biological Diversity share their exciting initiatives and advocacy work on destigmatizing sex, contraception, and reproductive decisions. They also share the state of the sex ed curriculum across the states in the US, as well as their important work on awareness campaigns relating to population and consumption pressures on biodiversity. Nandita Bajaj welcomes long-time staff member of Population Balance, Alan Ware, as her new co-host, and they discuss the recent news about the rising levels of climate anxiety among youth around the world, and how our current predicament impacts intergenerational justice. Mentioned in This Episode Today's youth will face ‘unmatched' climate extremes compared to older generations https://www.carbonbrief.org/todays-youth-will-face-unmatched-climate-extremes-compared-to-older-generations Four in 10 young people fear having children due to climate crisis https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/sep/14/four-in-10-young-people-fear-having-children-due-to-climate-crisis New Coalition of Organizations Calls for Sustainable Family Planning In Face of Climate Crisis https://www.populationbalance.org/news Women on Their Choice To Be Child-Free https://msmagazine.com/2021/09/24/child-free-women-no-kids-contraception-birth-control/ Birds and the Bees: The Need for Sex Ed Curriculum Updates https://msmagazine.com/2021/08/12/back-to-school-comprehensive-sex-ed-curriculum/ Stop Panicking—There Are a Lot of Positives to the Baby Bust https://msmagazine.com/2021/03/15/baby-bust-positives-declining-birth-rate-covid-population-growth-earth-overshoot-day/ The Fight for Reproductive Health Care Is a Fight for Human Rights https://msmagazine.com/2020/11/18/contraception-birth-control-the-fight-for-reproductive-health-care-is-a-fight-for-human-rights/ Reproductive Justice is Climate Justice: Why I'm Celebrating My IUD This Earth Day https://msmagazine.com/2018/04/20/reproductive-justice-climate-justice-im-celebrating-iud-earth-day/ SIECUS - Sex Ed For Social Change https://siecus.org/sex-ed-is-a-vehicle-for-social-change/   The Overpopulation Podcast is produced by Population Balance. We offer education and solutions to address the impacts of human overpopulation and overconsumption on the planet, people, and animals. We do this by: empowering people to make liberated and informed family choices free from the pervasive forces of pronatalism that pressure us into having children; advocating for a radical shift in our relationship to animals and the rest of the natural world—from that of dominion to one of reverence and stewardship; challenging unjust and growth-driven cultural, political, and economic systems that exploit marginalized human communities and threaten all life on earth. Join co-hosts Nandita Bajaj and Alan Ware, along with guest experts, as we shine a little light on this often misunderstood subject. Share Your Thoughts With Us Join the Sustainable Population Meetup Receive Overpopulation Updates via email        

The Takeaway
Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment 2021-10-21

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:27


Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment On October 1, a ruptured pipeline resulted in 25,000 gallons of crude spilling into the Pacific Ocean near Orange County, California. While the spill wasn't as bad as initially feared, it reignited a debate over offshore drilling. California has an aging pipeline infrastructure with questionable federal oversight. And this wasn't the only large oil spill this year. Less than a month ago, after Hurricane Ida, a federal satellite detected the most oil spills from space in the Gulf of Mexico after a weather event. The federal government started using satellites to track spills and leaks starting a decade ago. The Takeaway spoke with Catherine Kilduff, Senior Attorney at The Center for Biological Diversity, and Wilma Subra, who deals with environmental human health issues, on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network. Biden Administration Plans to Rein In "Forever Chemicals" On Monday, the Biden administration unveiled its plans to rein in so-called “forever chemicals,” or PFAS. PFAS refers to a group of more than 4,000 toxic chemicals that don't break down in the environment. PFAS are found in everything from our drinking water to our cookware. Even some rain jackets and cosmetics contain PFAS. But PFAS are also hazardous for our health. In fact, they've been linked with certain cancers, thyroid disease, and other health impacts, too. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Pat Rizzuto, chemicals reporter with Bloomberg Law.  Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Are Now Running 24/7 Last week, President Biden announced that the Port of Los Angeles will move towards operating 24/7 to address the shipping delays that have led to nationwide supply chain disruptions this year. The Port of Long Beach has also expanded its operations towards a 24/7 schedule in an attempt to solve the supply chain issue. The Takeaway hears from Dr. Afif El-Hasan, Physician-in-Charge at Kaiser Permanente San Juan Capistrano Medical Offices and spokesperson for the American Lung Association, as well as Mario Cordero, the executive director of the Port of Long Beach. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The Takeaway
Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment 2021-10-21

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 40:27


Why Offshore Oil Drilling is So Bad For The Environment On October 1, a ruptured pipeline resulted in 25,000 gallons of crude spilling into the Pacific Ocean near Orange County, California. While the spill wasn't as bad as initially feared, it reignited a debate over offshore drilling. California has an aging pipeline infrastructure with questionable federal oversight. And this wasn't the only large oil spill this year. Less than a month ago, after Hurricane Ida, a federal satellite detected the most oil spills from space in the Gulf of Mexico after a weather event. The federal government started using satellites to track spills and leaks starting a decade ago. The Takeaway spoke with Catherine Kilduff, Senior Attorney at The Center for Biological Diversity, and Wilma Subra, who deals with environmental human health issues, on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network. Biden Administration Plans to Rein In "Forever Chemicals" On Monday, the Biden administration unveiled its plans to rein in so-called “forever chemicals,” or PFAS. PFAS refers to a group of more than 4,000 toxic chemicals that don't break down in the environment. PFAS are found in everything from our drinking water to our cookware. Even some rain jackets and cosmetics contain PFAS. But PFAS are also hazardous for our health. In fact, they've been linked with certain cancers, thyroid disease, and other health impacts, too. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Pat Rizzuto, chemicals reporter with Bloomberg Law.  Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Are Now Running 24/7 Last week, President Biden announced that the Port of Los Angeles will move towards operating 24/7 to address the shipping delays that have led to nationwide supply chain disruptions this year. The Port of Long Beach has also expanded its operations towards a 24/7 schedule in an attempt to solve the supply chain issue. The Takeaway hears from Dr. Afif El-Hasan, Physician-in-Charge at Kaiser Permanente San Juan Capistrano Medical Offices and spokesperson for the American Lung Association, as well as Mario Cordero, the executive director of the Port of Long Beach. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

The Straits Times Audio Features
Saving biodiversity: It should be in our nature - Green Pulse Ep 60

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 17:37


Green Pulse Ep 60: Saving biodiversity: It should be in our nature 17:36 min Synopsis: Every first and third Monday of the month, The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change. The world is full of amazing plant and animal life, without which humans could not survive. Nature, from forests to coral reefs, to soils and grasslands, provides humanity with food and materials to live. Yet nature is under great threat from our rush for resources to grow our economies and cities. About one million species are now threatened with extinction, the United Nations' biodiversity panel says, with three-quarters of the land-based environment and about 66 per cent of the marine environment significantly altered by human actions. This week, delegates from around the world met virtually to discuss a new global deal for nature to limit the damage caused by environmental destruction, pollution and climate change.  In this episode, ST environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty talk to Dr David Cooper, who is deputy executive secretary, for the UN Convention on Biological Diversity. Dr Cooper is speaking to us from Kunming in China, which has been hosting this week's talks, the first round of discussions before a major in-person meeting in Kunming from April 25 to May 8, 2022. They discuss the following points: What is the aim of the in-person COP15 biodiversity talks next year, and how will this month's virtual meet help in establishing a global deal for nature? (1:22)  What are the threats confronting biodiversity on land and in the sea today? (3:30) How bad is the situation now? (4:48)  Why biodiversity conservation needs to involve more than just environment ministers (7:20) What are the links between biodiversity and climate? (9:45) A carbon price is one policy tool to dealing with the climate crisis. What about putting a price on nature to help with biodiversity conservation? (13:07) What can individuals do to help tackle the climate and biodiversity crises? (15:28)  Produced by: Audrey Tan (audreyt@sph.com.sg), David Fogarty (dfogarty@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis & Fa'izah Sani Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV  Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2 Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6 Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu Read ST's Climate Code Red site: https://str.sg/3pSz --- Discover more ST podcast series: Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Life Weekend Picks Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa2 #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Indy
Ep. 27: Could Offshore Oil Drilling Make a Comeback in Santa Barbara?

The Indy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 22:15


On this special episode of The Indy, we dive into the effect offshore oil drilling has had on California's coastal communities in light of the recent Orange County oil spill earlier this October. As ExxonMobil attempts to reopen decades old oil platforms off the Gaviota Coast through an oil trucking project proposal, the Santa Barbara Planning Commission has a big decision to make. We speak with Julie Teel Simmonds, Senior Attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity (@centerforbiodiv), on the details of the September 29th Planning Commission hearing and Exxon's environmental impact report which was recently released.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
The oil spill along California's fragile coast

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:42


It's been about a week since a big oil spill hit the Southern California shoreline near Orange County. Tar sullied sensitive wetlands. Birds and fish died. Miles of beaches were closed. The L.A. Times newsroom has produced dozens of stories trying to understand what happened, and what we've found so far isn't pretty: aging offshore oil platforms and pipelines — being bought up by companies that have a history of safety violations.Today, we speak to L.A. Times investigative reporter Connor Sheets about the causes of the so-called Huntington Beach oil spill. And an environmental activist — Center for Biological Diversity oceans program director Miyoko Sakashita — describes what she found when visiting Southern California's offshore drilling platforms in 2018.More reading:Full coverage: the Huntington Beach oil spillCalifornia attorney general launches investigation into Orange County oil spillFederal regulation of oil platforms was dogged by problems long before O.C. spillHow much would it cost to shut down an offshore oil well? Who pays?

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Steingraber Scientists Tell Biden Halt Fossil Fuels

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:47


Over 330 U.S. scientists sent a letter to President Biden, urging him to stop all new fossil fuel projects and declare a climate emergency. Their letter is in solidarity with the People vs. Fossil Fuels actions being held in DC Oct. 11-15. We talk with Dr. Sandra Steingraber, co-author of the letter along withDr. Peter Kalmus, Food & Water Watch, and Center for Biological Diversity. With Mark Dunlea for Hudson Mohawk Radio Network.

The Beijing Hour
First part of COP15 meeting to open in Kunming

The Beijing Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 54:40


A senior UN official says the 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity provides an opportunity to end biodiversity loss. The suicide rate has been declining in China for the last couple of decades and experts say the country's progress in poverty reduction has played a major part in this process. And the speed skating test competition for the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics has concluded at the National Speed Skating Oval.

Headline News
COP15 kicks off in Kunming with ecological civilization in spotlight

Headline News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 4:45


The 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, known as COP15, has kicked off in Kunming, capital of southwest China's Yunnan Province.

Headline News
UN official calls for global efforts to preserve biodiversity

Headline News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 4:45


The executive secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity has called on countries to share their actions to conserve biodiversity.

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Center For Biological Diversity Army Corps Engineers Fossil Fuel Permits

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:57


380 plus groups have sent a petition to the Army Corps of Engineers (i.e., Biden) demanding they stop issuing permits for fossil fuel projects as being contrary to the public interest. Kassie Siegel, Director of the Climate Law Institute of the Center for Biological Diversity, discusses the petition as well as the Oct. 11-15 People vs. Fossil Fuels direct actions in DC. With Mark Dunlea for the Hudson Mohawk Radio Network.

Seas The Day
Marine protected area targets

Seas The Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 27:39


The Convention of Biological Diversity is set to meet in October 2021 and will discuss adopting a new target of protecting 30% of the ocean by 2030. Over the last two decades, there has been a drastic increase in the number of large-scale marine protected areas (MPAs) driven mainly by international MPA targets and a “bigger is better” approach to conservation. In this episode, Megan Swanson and Sage Riddick explore how these often remote ocean spaces can still have important social impacts by looking at two cases: the Chagos Marine Protected Area and the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

ZSL Wild Science Podcast
ZSL #035: Nature-based solutions - putting nature at the heart of global climate change and biodiversity science-policy agendas

ZSL Wild Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 50:14


The anthropogenically driven climate crisis and unprecedented rates of biodiversity loss are both threatening the foundations of economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide. Treating these two crises separately can be ineffectual or even deepen the problem. A recent landmark study calls for a more integrated approach to tackling the climate and biodiversity crises. Ellie Darbey will be joined by lead author of the article, Dr Nathalie Pettorelli, along with three co-authors, to share their expertise on these issues and help untangle the web of science and policy. Why is it important to tackle both these crises together? How can Nature-based Solutions help? And what needs to be done to integrate these solutions into global science-policy agendas?   Guests: Dr Nathalie Pettorelli, Zoological Society of London Professor Heather Koldewey, Zoological Society of London Professor William Sutherland CBE, University of Cambridge Matthew Lowton, Zoological Society of London   Overview 01:26 – Ellie Darbey introduces the co-host of this episode, Dr Nathalie Pettorelli, to discuss the climate change and biodiversity crises, and introduce Nature-based solutions (NbS). 12:12 – Ellie and Nathalie are joined by Professor Heather Koldewey to explore the use of protected areas and restoration projects in the marine world. 28:59 – Professor William Sutherland joins to explain how to measure the risks of NbS, and emphasises the importance of evidence-based science policies. 38:42 – Ellie and Nathalie welcome Matthew Lowton to discuss the global conventions for climate change and biodiversity, and the ways to get NbS into science-policy agendas.   Resources Article: “Time to integrate global climate change and biodiversity science-policy agendas”: https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.13985 Upcoming live ZSL Event on 12 October: https://www.zsl.org/science/whats-on/time-to-integrate-global-climate-change-and-biodiversity-science-policy-agendas Putting Nature at the heart of global decision making: https://www.zsl.org/natureatheart “Unite solutions to climate and biodiversity crises to save life on earth”: https://www.zsl.org/news/unite-solutions-to-climate-and-biodiversity-crises-to-save-life-on-earth-says-zsl-led-study Previous ZSL Event “Nature to get out of the climate crisis - how does that work?”: https://www.zsl.org/science/whats-on/nature-to-get-out-of-the-climate-crisis-how-does-that-work Previous Wild Science Podcast Episode “ZSL #028 What's next for rewilding?”: https://www.zsl.org/zsl-wild-science-podcast United Nations (UN) Framework Convention on Climate Change: https://unfccc.int/ UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties UK 2021 (CoP 26): https://ukcop26.org/ Convention on Biological Diversity: https://www.cbd.int/ ZSL's Protected Areas and Restoration work: https://www.zsl.org/regions/uk-overseas-territories/chagos-archipelago https://www.zsl.org/conservation/regions/asia/rehabilitating-mangroves-in-the-philippines https://www.zsl.org/conservation/regions/uk-europe/thames-conservation/native-oyster-restoration Conservation Evidence Resource: https://www.conservationevidence.com Book by William J. Sutherland et al. “What Works in Conservation 2021”: https://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/1490 Breadth of ZSL's conservation work: https://www.zsl.org/conservation/how-we-work

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Science
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Thought About Food Podcast
Jennifer Molidor on Just Food Systems and Sustainable Agriculture

Thought About Food Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 55:24


This episode we spoke with Jennifer Molidor about food justice and sustainable agriculture, and how that can be pursued in public policy, activism, and changing individual diets. We also talk about pursuing alternatives to academic careers. It's a lot of fun, and really interesting. Show Notes: Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Rate our podcast and leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show. Jennifer Molidor is a senior food campaigner at the Center for Biological Diversity. That organization also has a website devoted to food issues called Take Extinction Off Your Plate, and you can follow her on Twitter @JenniferMolidor Jennifer was kind enough to share a recipe with us. It's a family-favorite vegan sandwich, and I can report it's great! Here's what she had to say: "I had a hard time choosing something, from power bowls to smoothies to my renowned guacamole, but I'll go with a simple sammich because mom-life means a lot of sandwiches that are packed with protein and deliciousness. It's a smushed chickpea sandwich and measurements are all to taste: Toasted bread Plant-based mayo Lightly toasted mustard seeds Dijon mustard Small chopped red onion Small chopped leek 1 tsp Himalayan salt 1 pinch black pepper 1-2 cans of chickpeas, drained 1 cup chopped celery 1 cup chopped pickles 4 cloves minced fresh garlic 2 tsp apple cider vinegar 2 tsp lemon juice Pinch of cayenne   Use flavors to taste, but be generous with salt and mayo. Mash chickpeas, mustard and mustard seeds, add in onions, garlic, leek, pickles, celery, and other spices (mash with fork or masher). Add in mayo, lemon juice, vinegar. Taste, adjust as necessary. If you want, you can add nori sheets or yeast to make it more savory/tuna-like. Add parsley or cilantro if you're into that kind-a thing. This is great alone or in sandwiches and lasts a few days refrigerated. I add avocado slices and tomatoes on my sandwiches with this to keep it juicy." The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a great starter before a chickpea sandwich in the morning. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

KVMR News
Collette Adkins from the Center for Biological Diversity

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 6:13


Collette Adkins from the Center for Biological Diversity talks to Felton Pruitt about their petition to ban Cyanide Bombs from being deployed by the Federal Government to kill wildlife on National Lands.

Farms. Food. Future.
Balancing Biodiversity with Agricultural Development

Farms. Food. Future.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 51:40


We're focusing on the upcoming UN Convention on Biological Diversity meeting, which is taking place in China this October. With agriculture one of the major causes of biodiversity loss, IFAD's Jo Puri will be talking about how can we balance biodiversity conservation with agricultural development. And Renée Ankarfjärd will be telling us all about the Biodiversity Advantage Two Report. Also we'll be talking to IFAD's Associate Vice President Donal Brown about the ongoing response to the pandemic across IFAD operations. Then we have news from Wangendingun University in the Netherlands on the links between climate and nutrition through the food system. Also Philip Lymbery, Chief Executive of Compassion in World Farming, talks about encouraging companies to move to environmentally friendly, humane, and healthy farming. Coming up there's also news from the high tech side of farming as we talk to the people at Farm Smart. And we have news of Babban Gona in Nigeria, an organisation that is investing in the heart of rural communities in that country. And Jo Puri is back later in the programme to talk about women and youth and the intention action gap. This is Farms. Food. Future. – a podcast that's Good for You, Good for the Planet and Good for Farmers brought to you by the International Fund for Agricultural Development. For more information, visit us at https://www.ifad.org/podcasts/episode24 https://www.babbangona.com https://www.farmsmart.co/our-app https://www.ecoltdgroup.com/category/e-co-bites/e-co-sound-bites/ https://www.ciwf.org.uk/ https://www.ifad.org/en/nutrition https://www.ifad.org/en/climate-and-environment  

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living
Earth Overshoot Day Came Early This Year: What That Means for Us and the Planet

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 31:41


Earth Overshoot Day marks the date when humanity's demand for ecological resources and services in a given year exceeds what our planet can regenerate for that entire year. This year, it fell on July 29, which means that humans currently use 74 percent more resources than what the planet can regenerate. In this episode, Laura speaks with Sarah Baillie, the population and sustainability organizer at the Center for Biological Diversity, about how our everyday consumption plays a role, what we can do to ensure our resources are sustained, and more. For show notes, visit https://brightly.eco/earth-overshoot-day.

Nature Podcast
Dead trees play an under-appreciated role in climate change

Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 29:53


How insects help release carbon stored in forests, and the upcoming biodiversity summit COP 15.In this episode:00:44 Fungi, insects, dead trees and the carbon cycleAcross the world forests play a huge role in the carbon cycle, removing huge amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. But when those trees die, some of that carbon goes back into the air. A new project studies how fast dead wood breaks down in different conditions, and the important role played by insects.Research Article: Seibold et al.09:37 Research HighlightsMassive stars make bigger planets, and melting ice moves continents.Research Highlight: Why gassy planets are bigger around more-massive starsResearch Highlight: So much ice is melting that Earth's crust is moving12:04 The UN's Convention on Biological DiversityAfter several delays, the fifteenth Conference of the Parties (COP 15) to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, is now slated to take place next year. Even communicating the issues surrounding biodiversity loss has been a challenge, and reaching the targets due to be set at the upcoming meeting will be an even bigger one.Editorial: The scientific panel on biodiversity needs a bigger role 19:32 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, cannibal cane toads and a pterosaur fossil rescued from smugglers.Nature News: Australia's cane toads evolved as cannibals with frightening speedResearch Highlight: A plundered pterosaur reveals the extinct flyer's extreme headgear National Geographic: Stunning fossil seized in police raid reveals prehistoric flying reptile's secretsSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

KPCW This Green Earth
New Report Documents Funding Earmarked for Utah Communities Directed to Fossil Fuel Projects

KPCW This Green Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 18:16


On This Green Earth, Nell and Chris speak with Deeda Seed, Public Lands Senior Campaigner for the Center for Biological Diversity.

FullScale Outdoors Podcast
Recap and Rant 08/30/2021

FullScale Outdoors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 48:00


Scouting for early goose season, cancelled camping trip, fishing with my nephews. Rant: A new bill proposal that would make it illegal to transport game across state lines. This bill is pushed by two anti hunting groups, Center for Biological Diversity and Natural Resources Defense Council. Basically they are groups of lawyers getting paid very well, by preying upon the good hearts of well meaning people. https://www.acsh.org/news/2020/07/13/ratty-conversation-center-biological-diversity-14905 https://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/natural-resources-defense-council/summary?id=D000036133 https://www.opensecrets.org/Lobby/clientsum.php?id=D000071548&year=2020 https://www.outdoorlife.com/conservation/petition-could-ban-game-transport/?fbclid=IwAR06RjPxtDy2s0ySmIJpM0R3OpHlU5IhyNX8kaZcSCrxO5tvIa49HHJUxOo Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

District of Conservation
EP 204: CBD & NRDC Circulate Anti-Hunting Petitions to CDC, USFWS (ft. Sportsmen's Alliance)

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 32:04


In Episode 204 of District of Conservation, Gabriella is rejoined by Bruce and Brian from Sportsmen's Alliance to discuss two petitions circulating - one to the CDC, the other to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) - that would fundamentally alter hunting, especially interstate transport of game meat and taxidermy, if enacted. Unsurprisingly, they originate from the Center for Biological Diversity and Natural Resources Defense Council. The guys discuss the implications of these two petitions and also highlight the problems with Oregon IP 13. SHOW NOTES CDC Petition & USFWS Petition Sportsmen's Alliance Blog Post Ducks Unlimited Post --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

Planeteando de película
Para proteger a la vaquita marina hay que desmantelar redes criminales: Alejandro Olivera

Planeteando de película

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 18:06


Entrevistamos a Alejandro Olivera, representante en México del Center for Biological Diversity. - Cuáles fueron los cambios en la norma de protección de la vaquita marina (Min. 2:20) - Qué es la zona de tolerancia para la protección de la especie (Min. 4:18) - Qué mensaje transmite el Estado con estos cambios (Min. 7:42) - La vaquita marina no es una especie perdida (Min. 9:08) - Cómo se calcula la población de vaquitas marinas (Min. 10:33) - Relación con la pesca ilegal de totoaba y el crimen organizado (12:27) - La vaquita es a México como el panda es a China (Min. 15:50) CRÉDITOS Conducción: Laura Yaniz Diseño sonoro: Gloria Hernández

In Our Backyard Podcast
8. Road to Renewables : Perrin De Jong

In Our Backyard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 41:09


In this episode, Perrin will discuss the UNC coal plant and why we should be more alarmed about the lack of action being taken to remove it or at least reduce the emissions. Coal plants are not just an issue contributing to the climate crisis but also to public health and endangered species. And Perrin works as an attorney on these matters in North Carolina. Coal contains trace amounts of naturally occurring radioactive elements. This means some coal plants emit more radiation than a nuclear power plant and can cause acid rain, affecting our plants and wildlife. Perrin also goes into depth about the personal health complications he had from growing up near a coal power plant. With its abundance and inexpensive tendencies, coal has been one of the United States' leading energy resources. However, the air pollution and water pollution alone have counteracted these benefits, not to mention the inhabitants, waste, mining destruction, and significant contribution to greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. It's up to us to put pressure on these coal plants, legislators, and energy companies to put a stop to coal power. Contact and connect with Perrin: PdeJong@biologicaldiversity.org Center for Biological Diversity: https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/about/staff/ Follow BREDL's Instagram: BREDL_HQ

For A Green Future
Episode 130: For A Green Future "Let Wolves Roam Free!" 071821 Episode 132

For A Green Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 55:33


Joe DeMare welcomes back Collette Adkins from the Center for Biological Diversity. She updates us on the efforts to save the wolves from humans running state governments that want them exterminated. In this update show, we revisit Rebecca Wood's baby raccoons, the Line 3 protests in Minnesota, The Fairy Creek protests in British Columbia, Rebecca updates us on the state of Lake Erie, and Joe Biden gets some praise for reversing a horrible plan by the Trump Administration to destroy the Tongass National Forest. 

Innovation Forum Podcast
Weekly podcast: Barry Callebaut and Cargill on how data drives value chain traceability

Innovation Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 31:38


This week: Taco Terheijden, director, cocoa sustainability at Cargill, and Nicko Debenham, vice president and head of sustainability at Barry Callebaut, talk with Innovation Forum's Toby Webb about how companies can have positive impacts in supply chains through enhancing traceability and the data necessary to achieve this. The discussion, focusing on the cocoa sector, was recorded at the recent Innovation Forum Future of Food conference. Plus: UN Convention on Biological Diversity's Paris-style goals; insurance sector's new net zero alignment; independent governance body to be established for voluntary carbon markets; and, the US gets tougher on companies with China forced labour risks, in the news digest.  Host: Ian Welsh

Earth Wise
Assisted Colonization | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 2:00


As the pace of climate change continues to quicken, many species seem to be unable to keep up and could face extinction as a result.   There is a potential strategy for people to help species reach places with more suitable physical and biological conditions.  People could carry endangered animals to habitats cut off by mountains, […]

In the Studio
Emma Kathleen Thomas: A tapestry of species

In the Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 30:18


Emma Kathleen Thomas was confronted with the fragility of life at a young age. The British-Mexican artist lost both of her parents early, and this painful experience has made her passionate about preserving the rich variety of life on earth, protecting the planet for her young children and - she hopes - instilling in them the confidence to bring children into the world themselves one day. To mark International Day for Biological Diversity 2021, Emma has been planning an ambitious collaborative artwork: a tapestry of large-scale images of endangered species, laid out in different-coloured clothes and visible from the air, which will unfold in real time across the planet's surface. The project will involve participants from countries including Australia, Ghana, the UK and the US, who will create images as diverse as the white-necked picathartes, a bird living in Africa for 44 million years and now critically endangered, and the golden paintbrush, a prairie flower that is disappearing due to the loss of its habitat. Each image will be completed at exactly 17:00 local time, creating a 'Mexican wave' of endangered species around the globe, with audiences worldwide following online. Danish visual artist Eske Kath joins Emma in Copenhagen as she oversees the Danish leg of the project - a huge image featuring the great yellow bumblebee, laid out in a sports ground in the Danish capital - and finds out how some of the other participating groups have fared.

Animal Law
Animal Law Podcast #73: The Case of the Missing Ice

Animal Law

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 38:55


On this episode of the Animal Law Podcast, I speak with Emily Jeffers of the  Center for Biological Diversity about the 9th Circuit's recent decision in Center for Biological Diversity v Haaland, in which the court decided that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's sudden about face, in 2017, on whether the Pacific Walrus is subject to the protections of the Endangered Species Act was not adequately supported. In this far-ranging conversation, we get into how difficult the walruses' lives have become since the ice has started to disappear from their traditional habitat, the influence of the change in administrations on Endangered Species Act enforcement and, most fundamentally, how much can the Endangered Species Act do to protect animals in the era of climate change and biodiversity collapse. Emily Jeffers is Staff Attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity, working in the Center's Oceans program. Emily graduated from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law and received her bachelor's degree in biology from Yale University. Before joining the Center, Emily served as a law clerk to the Honorable Gregory J. Hobbs, Jr. of the Colorado Supreme Court and worked as a wildlife biologist in California and Idaho.

In Our Backyard Podcast
3. Road to Renewables : Jovita Lee

In Our Backyard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 18:20


Jovita Lee is with the Center for Biological Diversity. By applying law, science and creative media, the Center for Biological Diversity believes that to fight the climate emergency and extinction crisis, we must revolutionize our world to be entirely powered by clean, renewable, wildlife-friendly and democratic energy. They wage innovative legal and grassroots campaigns to drive this urgent transition for energy justice. Recently in North Carolina, a permit was approved for livestock liquid waste to be transformed into natural gas and Jovita will begin by covering what the new bio gas permit in North Carolina means for halting the Road to Renewables and other projects she's working on. Thank you so much to Jovita for speaking with me about your passion and expertise. BREDL along with the Center for Biological Diversity does not approve of biogas for CFAOS as a renewable energy source and you can read why in our Smoke and Mirrors report in the show notes below. And tune in next Friday where I talk with Sandy Kurtz and how renewable energy has changed in her lifetime. Contact and connect with Jovita: JLee@biologicaldiversity.org https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/about/staff/ Center for Biological Diversity: https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/programs/energy-justice/

The Indisposable Podcast
Consumption (and Contraception) in the Age of Extinction

The Indisposable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 36:50


Over the past 50 years, as the human population doubled, wildlife populations halved. Join a thought-provoking discussion with Kelley Dennings, Population and Sustainability Campaigner at the Center of Biological Diversity.  Learn about her work to connect human population growth with threats to endangered species and wild places –  and how we can change our impact by addressing population and consumption issues in ways that advance human rights and build just, sustainable economies.ResourcesCenter for Biological DiversitySimplify the Holidays CampaignKelley Dennings on LinkedIn

Building Local Power
The Role of Antitrust Law in Creating Energy Justice

Building Local Power

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 49:14


On this episode of Building Local Power, ILSR Co-Director John Farrell interviews Jean Su, director of the Center for Biological Diversity's Energy Justice program. … Read More

Curiosity Daily
Mushrooms Are More Like Humans Than Plants

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 12:14


Learn how mushrooms are more like humans than plants; why your tongue isn’t a muscle; and ferret-training robot badgers. Mushrooms are more like humans than plants by Grant Currin More from this author. (2016, January 12). How Are Mushrooms More Similar to Humans than Plants?» Science ABC. Science ABC. https://www.scienceabc.com/nature/how-are-mushrooms-more-similar-to-humans-than-plants.html  Inglis-Arkell, E. (2012, September 7). Why are mushrooms more like humans than they are like plants? io9. https://io9.gizmodo.com/why-are-mushrooms-more-like-humans-than-they-are-like-p-5940434  Steenkamp, E. T., Wright, J., & Baldauf, S. L. (2005). The Protistan Origins of Animals and Fungi. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 23(1), 93–106. https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msj011  Baldauf, S. L., & Palmer, J. D. (1993). Animals and fungi are each other’s closest relatives: congruent evidence from multiple proteins. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 90(24), 11558–11562. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.90.24.11558 ‌ Burki, F., Roger, A. J., Brown, M. W., & Simpson, A. G. B. (2020). The New Tree of Eukaryotes. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 35(1), 43–55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2019.08.008  Why do people say the tongue is the strongest muscle in the body? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Dave) Julia Calderone,Ben Fogelson. (2014, August 15). Fact or Fiction?: The Tongue Is the Strongest Muscle in the Body. Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-the-tongue-is-the-strongest-muscle-in-the-body/  ‌Katherine Harmon Courage. (2014, January 10). Octopus Arms, Human Tongues Intertwine for Science. Scientific American Blog Network. https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/octopus-chronicles/octopus-arms-human-tongues-intertwine-for-science/  The Tongue - Muscles - Innervation - Vasculature - TeachMeAnatomy. (2015). Teachmeanatomy.info. https://teachmeanatomy.info/head/muscles/tongue/  Wildlife conservationists tried to train black-footed ferrets with robots by Cameron Duke Andrews, R. M. (1989, August 26). “Robo-Badger” Is Scary, But Do Friendly Ferrets Think So? AP NEWS; Associated Press. https://apnews.com/article/3f45b4ae40266310acf8e4fffc70f01a  Biggins, D. E., Vargas, A., Godbey, J. L., & Anderson, S. H. (1999). Influence of prerelease experience on reintroduced black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes). Biological Conservation, 89(2), 121–129. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-3207(98)00158-x  Edwards, M. C., Ford, C., Hoy, J. M., FitzGibbon, S., & Murray, P. J. (2021). How to train your wildlife: A review of predator avoidance training. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 234, 105170. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2020.105170  Heim, M. (2011, February). Survival Training, Ferret Style. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/survival-training-ferret-style-32562/  Saving the Black-footed Ferret. (2021). Biologicaldiversity.org. https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/mammals/black-footed_ferret/index.html  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Thresholds
Jordan Kisner

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 54:37


To celebrate the paperback release of Thin Places, this special episode features Jordan in the interview seat in a conversation with returning guest Lydia Millet! Jordan Kisner writes essays, features, and reviews for n+1, The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, The Guardian, The Believer, and others. She also writes a column for The Paris Review. Her first book, Thin Places, was one of NPR’s “best books of 2020.” She is also the host of Thresholds. Lydia Millet has written more than a dozen novels and story collections, often about the ties between people and other animals and the crisis of extinction. Her latest novel A Children's Bible was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2020. She also writes essays, opinion pieces and other ephemera and has worked as an editor and staff writer at the Center for Biological Diversity since 1999. For more Thresholds, visit us at www.thisisthresholds.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices