Podcasts about Wildlife Service

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  • 263PODCASTS
  • 422EPISODES
  • 33mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 13, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Wildlife Service

Latest podcast episodes about Wildlife Service

Science Magazine Podcast
Cloning for conservation, and divining dynamos on super-Earths

Science Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 28:15


On this week's show: How cloning can introduce diversity into an endangered species, and ramping up the pressure on iron to see how it might behave in the cores of rocky exoplanets First up this week, News Intern Rachel Fritts talks with host Sarah Crespi about cloning a frozen ferret to save an endangered species. Also this week, Rick Kraus, a research scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, talks about how his group used a powerful laser to compress iron to pressures similar to those found in the cores of some rocky exoplanets. If these super-Earths' cores are like our Earth's, they may have a protective magnetosphere that increases their chances of hosting life. This week's episode was produced with help from Podigy. [Image: Kimberly Fraser/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Music: Jeffrey Cook] [alt: three baby black-footed ferrets being held by gloved hands] Authors: Sarah Crespi; Rachel Fritts Episode page:  https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.acz9974 About the Science Podcast:https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fish of the Week!
Behind the Scenes: Back Cast, Fish Forward!

Fish of the Week!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 57:08


Katrina, Guy and friends share favorite moments from Season 1 and offer a sneak peek into Season 2. Go behind the scenes and learn how the co-hosts and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service production partner Citizen Racecar turn fun, in-depth conversations with guests into digestible stories about ALL THE FISH. 

Carole Baskins Diary
2016-04-05 Carole Baskin‘s Diary

Carole Baskins Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 15:06


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Strengthens Protections for Captive Tigers under the Endangered Species Act   In an effort to strengthen protections for certain captive tigers under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a rule declaring that captive “generic” tigers — tigers of unknown genetic background or crosses between two different subspecies of tigers — are no longer exempt from certain permitting requirements.   Anyone selling tigers across state lines must now first obtain an interstate commerce permit or register under the Captive-bred Wildlife Registration program regardless of whether it is a generic tiger or a pure subspecies.   “Removing the loophole that enabled some tigers to be sold for purposes that do not benefit tigers in the wild will strengthen protections for these magnificent creatures and help reduce the trade in tigers that is so detrimental to wild populations,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “This will be a positive driver for tiger conservation.”   The wild tiger is under severe threat from habitat loss and the demand for tiger parts in traditional Asian medicine. Once abundant throughout Asia, today the species numbers only 3,000-5,000 animals in small fragmented groups. As a result, tigers are protected as endangered under the ESA and under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) – the highest levels of international protection. Tigers readily breed in captivity, however, and the number of captive tigers in the United States alone likely exceeds the numbers found in the wild, although the exact number is currently unknown.   The Service has worked with international partners to implement measures that ensure wild tigers survive in their native habitats and that captive tigers do not contribute to the illegal trade in tiger parts.  While this new rule does not prevent individuals from owning generic tigers, extending the permitting or registration requirement to all tigers strengthens the Service's efforts in addressing the illegal wildlife trade, both domestically and internationally. This rule results in a uniform policy that applies to all tigers and will help Service law enforcement agents enforce the ESA.   The final rule will publish in the Federal Register on April 6, 2016, and will go into effect 30 days after publication on May 6, 2016.   For a copy of the final rule, please go to http://www.fws.gov/policy/frsystem/default.cfm and click on 2016 Final Rules for Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants.   Note: Big Cat Rescue has been pressuring the USFWS since at least 2007 to rescind this loophole and on 8/22/11 after a meeting with the USFWS the Generic Tiger issue was published to the Federal Register for public comment and got over 15,000 comments in support of our request to ban the breeding of non purebred tigers. Carole Baskin emailed those in charge, at least every six months, during this 9 year process, always asking when they would finally take action.  According to their Q&A it sounds like the USFWS may still rubber stamp activities that really don't help tiger conservation, but it's a step. Regulations can't work, because USDA and USFWS don't have the resources nor apparently the will to enforce the weak rules they have, so that is why we need an all out ban on the private possession of big cats.  You can help get that done at http://BigCatAct.com   Questions and Answers   U.S. Captive-bred Inter-subspecific Crossed or Generic Tigers Final Rule   What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking?   The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a rule that strengthens protections for certain captive tigers under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final rule declares that captive “generic tigers” (Panthera tigris) (i.e., specimens not identified or identifiable as members of Bengal, Sumatran, Siberian or Indochinese subspecies (P. t. tigris, P. t. sumatrae, P. t. altaica and P. t. corbetti, respectively)) are no longer exempt from certain permitting requirements.   Anyone selling tigers across state lines must now first obtain an interstate commerce permit or register under the Captive-bred Wildlife Registration (CBW) program, regardless of whether it is a generic tiger or a pure subspecies.   What is a generic tiger?   Inter-subspecific crossed or “generic” tigers are of unknown genetic origin and are typically not maintained in a manner to ensure that inbreeding or other inappropriate matings of animals do not occur.   What is the CBW program?   In 1979, the Service established Captive-bred Wildlife (CBW) regulations to reduce federal permitting requirements and facilitate the breeding of endangered and threatened species for conservation purposes. Under the CBW program, otherwise prohibited activities, such as interstate commerce, are authorized, but only when the activities can be shown to enhance the propagation or survival of the species. Registrants of the CBW program must provide a written annual report with information on activities including births, deaths and transfers of specimens.   Why were generic tigers exempted from the CBW?   In 1998, the Service amended the CBW regulations to delete the requirement to register under the program for holders of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers. This exemption was based on the alleged lack of conservation value of these specimens due to their mixed or unknown genetic composition, and the belief there was conservation value in exhibition designed to educate the public about the ecological role and conservation needs of the species. The intention behind the exemption was for the Service to focus its oversight on populations of “purebred” animals of the various tiger subspecies to further their conservation in the wild. Despite this exemption, inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers are still protected under the ESA. Tigers have been listed under the ESA as endangered since 1970.   Why should generic tigers now be included under CBW registration?   By exempting holders of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers from the CBW registration process in 1998, the Service may have inadvertently suggested that the breeding of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers qualifies as conservation. By removing the CBW exemption, the Service can reinforce the value of conservation breeding of individual tiger subspecies and discourage the breeding of inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers. The Service has finalized this change to the regulations to ensure the agency can maintain strict oversight of captive tigers in the United States.   Withdrawing the CBW exemption for generic tigers would also close a loophole in current federal and state regulations that could allow for the use of captive U.S. tigers in trade in a manner inconsistent with conservation of the species. It places the United States in a stronger position in international negotiations regarding commercial tiger breeding farms in Asia and trade in tiger parts.   How will removal of the generic tiger exemption from the CBW regulations impact current owners of generic tigers?   Removing the CBW exemption for generic tigers will not result in control of private ownership, and will not impact sale of generic tigers within their state of residence (intrastate commerce) or non-commercial movement across state lines. However, other activities, such as the sale of animals across state lines (interstate commerce), would require authorization from the Service before such actions could be taken.   While this new rule does not prevent individuals from owning generic tigers, the permitting or registration requirement for all tigers strengthens the Service's efforts in addressing the illegal wildlife trade, both domestically and internationally. Tigers are listed under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which includes species threatened with extinction. Trade in specimens of these species is permitted only in exceptional circumstances.   This final rule results in a uniform policy that applies to all tigers and will help Service law enforcement agents enforce the ESA.   Would all private owners have to apply for a permit before breeding their tigers?   Private owners would still be able to breed generic tigers without a permit for sale or commercial purposes within their state or for non-commercial movement across state lines, provided that you meet the criteria of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act.   I own a male and female tiger and would like to breed them so that I can give a cub to my daughter. Would I need to apply for a permit under this new regulation?   If you plan to give the cub away as opposed to selling it, you would not need to apply for a permit, regardless of the recipient's state, provided that you meet the criteria of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act if the cub is going across state lines. If you have additional cubs in the litter, you could sell them within your state to someone else who resides in the same state or donate them to sanctuaries or others, either inside or outside of your state. Again, you would need to meet the criteria of the Captive Wildlife Safety Act if moving tigers across state lines.   I'm a private owner of tigers and I often display them at fairs and festivals in other states. Would the new regulation prohibit me from doing this?   The new regulation would still allow generic tigers to cross state lines for exhibition purposes, as long as the tigers are not to be sold or offered for sale.   How can I meet the standard to get a permit or register under the CBW regulations to sell a generic tiger across state lines if the Service is saying that generic tigers have no any conservation value?   The CBW registration was set up to allow institutions that were breeding listed species for conservation purposes to sell animals across state lines to other registered facilities. While it is true that breeding these animals would not provide a direct conservation benefit to the species in the wild and therefore the Service probably would not register a facility with generic tigers, it is still possible to obtain an individual permit authorizing interstate commerce with a generic tiger if the applicant meets the issuance criteria established in our regulations, i.e., if the parties involved in the sale are carrying out activities that enhance the propagation or survival of the species. While it is unlikely that such a commercial transaction would provide a direct benefit to the species, such as reintroduction, there may be indirect benefits that could be obtained from the transaction. It should also be noted that the requirement to show this benefit could be met through an individual or institution, or a group of individuals or institutions together, working to provide a benefit to the species in the wild.   For example, if one or more zoological institutions were purchasing inter-subspecific crossed or generic tigers for educational and display purposes, they could provide support (e.g., via the solicitation of donations from visitors) to carry out on-the-ground conservation efforts in the tiger's native range. The Service prefers a clear on-going commitment of several years on the part of the applicant for such conservation or research support. This on-going commitment could be fulfilled by a group of institutions working together to maximize their resources for the benefit of tigers in the wild.   What will the economic impact be on the public and small businesses?   The Service does not have data on how many businesses are involved in the interstate commerce of generic tigers, the number of businesses for which an interstate commerce permit or registration in the CBW program will be a viable option, and the economic impacts if prospective applicants are unable to either secure an interstate commerce permit or registration in the CBW program. Nonetheless, the Service believes that the regulatory change is not major in scope and would create only a modest financial or paperwork burden on the affected members of the general public.   This rule would not have a significant economic effect. If individuals or breeding operations wish to carry out an otherwise prohibited activity, such as interstate commerce, it would require that a permit application be submitted to the Service at a cost of $100-$200 per application. Submission of an application, however, would not be a guarantee that authorization will be granted.   Hi, I'm Carole Baskin and I've been writing my story since I was able to write, but when the media goes to share it, they only choose the parts that fit their idea of what will generate views.  If I'm going to share my story, it should be the whole story.  The titles are the dates things happened. If you have any interest in who I really am please start at the beginning of this playlist: http://savethecats.org/   I know there will be people who take things out of context and try to use them to validate their own misconception, but you have access to the whole story.  My hope is that others will recognize themselves in my words and have the strength to do what is right for themselves and our shared planet.     You can help feed the cats at no cost to you using Amazon Smile! Visit BigCatRescue.org/Amazon-smile   You can see photos, videos and more, updated daily at BigCatRescue.org   Check out our main channel at YouTube.com/BigCatRescue   Music (if any) from Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) This video is for entertainment purposes only and is my opinion.  Closing graphic with permission from https://youtu.be/F_AtgWMfwrk

Carolyn Copper's Podcast
Life is Better With Birds

Carolyn Copper's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 25:22


It seems birds have always delighted people all over the world. They're beautiful, powerful, engaging and make a lot of us very curious. Bird-watching or birding – the observing of birds either for fun, science applications, or other professional purposes - is an incredibly popular activity and it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. It's fair to say that dedicated wildlife photographers that include birds in their craft are also birders – me included. I've learned a lot from birders! In my newest podcast I'm excited to talk with Jay Sheppard who had a career as an ornithologist with the United States Fish & Wildlife Service; is a fellow in the American Ornithological Society; has birded in all 50 states; and more recently has been leading tours to observe short-eared owls on a Maryland property slated for commercial development.  That's how I came to know Jay. Listen now for birding tips and much more.

Ingrained
Episode 28: Time for Wildlife Refuges to Soar

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 18:18


Winter is approaching, and that will soon translate into the arrival of millions of birds to the rice fields and wildlife refuges in the Sacramento Valley. For many, including Suzy Crabtree, it's a magical time. Suzy has visited Gray Lodge Wildlife Area in Butte County thousands of times over the years, to photograph the amazing array of ducks, geese, shorebirds, raptors and other animals there. “There's so many things to see there,” she remarked. “We find it to be a place of refuge and solace. The drive down through the rice fields and the orchards is just the beginning of bringing us peace.” In addition to viewing Bald Eagles and other stunning birds, Suzy is among those who has seen a rare white deer at the refuge, as she's had four sightings over the years. Tim Hermansen is wildlife area manager at Gray Lodge. He has worked to help the Sacramento Valley ecosystem since 2008, including working with rice farmers to maintain and enhance waterbird habitat in their fields, which are vital to hundreds of wildlife species and millions of birds. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area has a long history as a wildlife sanctuary. Initial land was purchased in the 1930s. The area and scope has expanded over the years, including nearly 9,300 acres covered today. It's home to upwards of one million waterfowl at its winter peak. A highlight for visitors is a three-mile long auto loop, which includes more than $1 million in improvements carried out by Ducks Unlimited and the Wildlife Conservation Board. Hermansen said the improvements include widening the road and flattening the shoulders, with wider turnouts so visitors don't need to feel rushed. Also, they added islands and enhanced the topography in the ponds to make it more suitable to birds and draw them closer to viewers. “You can drive around and there are pullouts for people to stop and observe the wildlife that is out there,” Hermansen said. “It gives you a chance from your vehicle to be up close and personal with the birds and not scare them away. They're not as scared of a vehicle as someone walking. In some cases, they will stay within 10 to 20 yards from your vehicle.” The entire Pacific Flyway has struggled due to prevailing drought in the west. Fortunately, rice growers have worked with conservation groups and other stakeholders to do what they can to provide enough shallow-flooded fall and winter habitat.   “We continue to be concerned with issues like disease and starvation as more birds arrive and they may not have the habitat that they need,” remarked Luke Matthews, Wildlife Programs Manager with the California Rice Commission. As steps are taken to protect the millions of birds that will visit the Sacramento Valley, their presence here is a joyous sight for many. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area is one of the best places to enjoy this annual gift. Episode Transcript Suzy Crabtree: I have been to Gray Lodge probably thousands of times over the years. We find it to be a place of refuge and solace. Just the drive down through the rice fields and the orchards is just the beginning of bringing us peace. Jim Morris: Suzy Crabtree is among those who appreciate wildlife refuges in the Sacramento Valley. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area near Gridley is indeed a special place. Ducks, geese, raptors and eagles are just the beginning of your wildlife viewing. Suzy Crabtree: There's so many things to see there. There's deer, there's muskrat, there's mink, there's fox. We've seen bobcat there. Probably the most magical time I've had at Gray Lodge has been when we have come across the white deer, a leucistic deer. We usually see her in the evening and we've seen her probably about four times. It's pretty magical to see her. Jim Morris: This magic - an affordable, memorable outing, great for families, is only part of the benefits that come from wildlife refuges, and we're entering the time with the absolute best viewing. Welcome to Ingrained, the California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. I've lived in the Sacramento Valley my entire life, and my appreciation for our ecosystem continues to grow. I've learned the awe-inspiring sights that come from living along the Pacific Flyway. We'll find out more about fantastic ways to see wildlife right from your vehicle, but first, an update on how birds are faring during this drought. Luke Matthews, Wildlife Program's Manager with the California Rice Commission, what are you seeing and hearing from the field about the wildlife migration? Luke Matthews: There's definitely a lot of birds here already. We're not at the peak of the migration on the Pacific Flyway yet, but we're nearing that. Numbers are continuing to build, but there's definitely experiencing some issues with drought conditions across the west. Jim Morris: That is a factor. So by the time the birds are arriving here, they haven't really had their full rest and refuel capability. What have you seen elsewhere in the west that really impacts their health as they head to the Sacramento Valley? Luke Matthews: Drought conditions throughout Oregon, Washington, Utah, a lot of these areas where birds normally rest have been pretty significant. And so, we're assuming that when they get there, they're struggling and needing habitats. So when they arrive here, it's even a greater need. Jim Morris: So the value is great in the Sacramento Valley every year, but particularly in a year like this. And there is a program with the Rice Commission and the State Department of Water Resources that is helping. Can you tell us a little more about that effort? Luke Matthews: So we have a program that looks to create more flooding on the landscape with a shallow amount of water, both on rice fields and wetlands. For total, the program has about 50 to 60,000 acres across both components. And it's really just a strategic effort to increase flooding on the landscape because, in a normal year we would have on the order of 300,000 acres of flooded rice and this year, even with the program, we expect to only have probably 100,000 acres of flooded rice. Concerns are that we will not have enough habitat. And as we reach the peak migration, that will just get worse, less habitat, but more birds. So there is our effort and other efforts down in the San Joaquin Valley, for example, to increase flooding for the migration, for the duration of this winter. But we are just worried about disease and starvation and other things like that as birds arrive and may not have the habitat they need. Jim Morris: Time to learn more about one of the jewels of the Sacramento Valley, Gray Lodge. I'm visiting with Tim Hermansen, Wildlife Area Manager. Tim, let's start with your background and your experience with our valley ecosystem. Tim Hermansen: So I got the start in the Sacramento Valley ecosystem in 2008, when I became the wildlife biologist for the Colusa Natural Resources Conservation Service office, working with private land owners in the Sacramento Valley to enhance habitats on their private ground. That included habitats in the areas such as the Butte Sink, but also private rice growers throughout the valley. In 2011 and 2012, I was working with the California Rice Commission to pilot some of the initial waterbird enhancement programs throughout the Sacramento Valley to enhance that waterbird habitat across the private landscape. In 2013, I became the area manager for the Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area, located just north of Gray Lodge along Butte Creek. And then about a year ago, I became the area manager for Gray Lodge. Jim Morris: Gray Lodge was established many decades ago. Can you give me a little bit of background on the history, how much land we're talking about and other important details? Tim Hermansen: The initial purchase was in about 1931. It actually used revenues generated from pari-mutuel horse betting through the Lee Act. The design was to provide sanctuary habitat for migratory birds to draw them off of the surrounding private rice grounds and reduce depredation issues. For a few decades it was just a sanctuary where people could come out and enjoy seeing the birds. In the 1950s, they through one of the expansions, started to allow hunting. And since the initial purchase in the 1930s, we're now up to about almost 9300 acres. It's about 9260 acres where we have both sanctuary habitat for wintering waterfowl to rest and still do that depredation. But we also provide public hunting across about two-thirds of the wildlife area. Jim Morris: Your job is to balance all that, to make sure that we can enjoy this ecosystem for many years to come, I imagine? Tim Hermansen: We try to balance that. A lot of our revenue comes from hunting, license sales and things of that sort. We want to continue to provide opportunities for the hunters to come out, enjoy the area that their licenses are going to fund. But we also want to make sure that the people that just want to come out and enjoy seeing the wildlife have an opportunity also. So we have a large auto tour loop public trail system. That's open 365 days a year that people can come out and go for a hike, go for a drive, see all sorts of wildlife in our sanctuary area and still enjoy that. And it provides that sanctuary for the wintering waterfowl. Jim Morris: What can people expect when they come out? It is an amazing array of wildlife, but what are some of the things that people would see this time of the year? Tim Hermansen: We can have up to a million waterfowl on the wildlife area. A lot of snow geese, a lot of white fronted geese, pintail, mallards, but we also get other birds in the area. Last winter for example, we had six bald eagles using our closed zone all winter long. There're other raptors. In the springtime, you'll start seeing some of the Neotropical migrants, the songbirds moving through. And then year round, we have deer, quail, turkeys can be found out here, all sorts of local wildlife that don't migrate away. But this time of year the primary attraction is the waterfowl. Jim Morris: I was distracted coming in on this foggy day because right across the road from your office, there was a deer just sitting there waiting for its photo to be taken. So it is really fun to see and a great way for people to experience this is the auto loop, which is about three miles. And tell me about what that offers and also the improvements that have been done on it. Tim Hermansen: It's about a three mile auto tour loop where you can drive around. We have pullouts for people to stop and observe the wildlife that are out there. It gives you a chance from your vehicle to have an opportunity to get up close and personal with the birds and not scare them away. They're not as scared of a vehicle as they are of someone walking. So, for three miles you can drive around and from your vehicle and with your binoculars or spotting scopes or cameras see the wildlife from, in some cases, they'll stay within 10 or 20 yards of your vehicle. Tim Hermansen: Over the last two years, we've partnered with Ducks Unlimited and the Wildlife Conservation Board to do improvements to our auto tour loop that widen the road and flatten the shoulders out a bit, for safety. Before, you could easily drive off into the canals or ditches and they improved all of that. And it also made those turnouts wider so you don't have to feel rushed if someone's coming up behind you. Out in the ponds, we added islands and enhanced the topography to make it more suitable for the birds and draw them in closer to you in your car. So that project just finished up this summer. It was a huge success, huge project, over a million dollars worth of funding went into it. And I just can't thank our partners enough for that. Jim Morris: A few suggestions when you're driving through, please drive slowly out of respect for everyone. And of course the birds that are there. Also, my wife always suggests go a second time if you can through a loop because you often see different wildlife that you can appreciate. This has been a tough go for our world, with the pandemic and other stressors. And I am jealous of your work environment. So what is it like to work out here regularly? Tim Hermansen: When you drive in you see deer right off the side of the road. From our office we can look up from the computer if we're stuck in the office for the day. And oftentimes seeing those deer, seeing the waterfowl flying by, ducks and geese. In the springtime, you have California Quail right outside making their calls and having a good time. So it's great. You get to see the wildlife from your office. And then when you aren't in the office, you're still working. So you get to drive around, if we're checking water or doing a survey, or just seeing how the wildlife area is doing and you're out there in the wild, you have the great view of the Sutter Buttes in the background and you're still doing the job and getting paid for it. So can't beat that. Jim Morris: You mentioned it right up top. There's a coordinated effort to help the Pacific Flyway Migration and our entire Sacramento Valley ecosystem. What have you seen in terms of cooperation among rice growers, conservation groups, state, and federal government, water districts, and other stakeholders in this area? Tim Hermansen: There's a huge partnership in this area between all of those groups you just mentioned. Through this last year in the drought, we were having coordination calls between the state agencies, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, US Fish and Wildlife Service. We had other partners like USGS, Ducks Unlimited, California Waterfowl Association, and the California Rice Commission was involved with those calls, trying to help coordinate where we might strategically place the limited water supplies on the landscape during this critical drought year. It was a very large effort. We met regularly to try to coordinate. And, it seems like when you look around the valley, that those coordination efforts paid off because the birds are spaced out. We're not having any disease issues yet. Thankfully. Let's hope it stays that way. We have the partnership with the rice growers to pump water and have it on their fields, through programs that California Rice Commission or DWR have worked on. We've been able to meet many of the needs of the waterfowl that came down from the north lands this year. Jim Morris: So good to hear about this great partnership. And a lot of the refuges are right around the rice fields. A quick comment, if you would, about how important the rice fields are, those surrogate wetlands. They've largely replaced the original wetlands that California had. How important are the rice fields to maintain this ecosystem? Tim Hermansen: Like you mentioned, most of the natural historic wetlands in the basins around here, they did large reclamation projects to turn it into agricultural ground. So, we have small postage stamps of state and some privately owned wetland habitats, moist soil management wetland habitats, but we also have hundreds of thousands of acres of rice. After the harvest is complete, those rice fields, if they are flooded or even if they're not, if they're properly managed, they can provide great food resources for waterfowl. Both the waste grain that doesn't get picked up by the combines, but also invertebrates that are in the soil that the birds will eat. It's important, not just for ducks and geese, but also waterbirds, shorebirds, the little sandpipers and killdeer, black-neck stilts. All of those really rely on those fields in the wintertime for those supplemental food sources that our wildlife areas just can't provide. Tim Hermansen: We don't have enough space. Rice fields also provide some good habitat for resident nesting and breeding wildlife in the spring and summer months. A lot of birds will use the checks for nesting habitat. More barren checks are used by some of the shorebirds, like the stilts and avocets to nest on. If they're allowed to get more weedy cover, mallards, and some of the other local ducks will nest on them. And then they can use the flooded rice fields to raise their young in and have a bit of a supplemental habitat, in addition to the wildlife areas. The fields that are closer to the wildlife areas, the state areas and the federal refuges they're generally used more, but they're important throughout the valley. Jim Morris: The other day, I was at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, and it was great as always, but across I-5 in a rice field were tens of thousands of snow geese so I understand exactly what you said in that last comment. Probably unfair of me to ask, but do you have a favorite sighting that you ever had here or a favorite bird or mammal that you've seen at Gray Lodge? Tim Hermansen: A sighting that stands out to me. I had a friend, he was actually a mentor from when I worked in the Midwest. He came out to visit. It's been close to a decade ago before I worked for the department, but I took him out here and he wanted to see Gray Lodge. And as we're driving the tour loop, he had never seen a Eurasian Wigeon before, and I would drive the tour loop regularly just to see what's out here before going hunting. And I told him usually right around this corner, there's a Eurasian Wigeon. So we came around the corner and sure enough, there he was. I got proven right on that account and my friend from the Midwest got to see his first Eurasian Wigeon which was pretty neat. And it still stands out in my mind as a neat sighting. Tim Hermansen: That's something to keep note of. If you come out for our auto tour loop or our public trails, or if you come out to go hunting, we do get those odd visitors from other flyways from time to time. The Eurasian Wigeon, blue-winged teal - some of the birds you normally wouldn't see in the Pacific Flyway, we will get through here. And you have an opportunity to perhaps see the bird for the first time in your life. Jim Morris: Take your time, enjoy it. And then when you see a lot of birds, look carefully, because there may be an unusual visitor in the mix. Hopefully after what you heard today, you will soon plan a trip to a wildlife refuge near you. Before we wrap up, a few final suggestions from Suzy Crabtree on how you can get it the most out of your Grey Lodge experience. Suzy Crabtree: If you are going to Gray Lodge the one thing that I would suggest is to take the walking hiking trail first, and then take the auto loop. And when you are going to take the hiking trail, always make sure that when you're walking to take a moment to stop and look back from where you've just been. It's a good way to find things that you may have passed that you didn't see. Owls are really great at hiding and blending in with their surroundings. If you go and park at Lot 14, and you head out on the dirt trail, not on the asphalt trail and just that first trail that you go along right across from the canal, there is a pair of great horned owls that you, if you're really good at looking, they're very hard to find, but you can find them. And they're right before you make the first right hand turn on that trail. Suzy Crabtree: Bald eagles are really a thrill to see at Gray Lodge. You can see the adults as well as the juveniles. And it's really interesting to watch the adults training the juveniles on how to hunt. And it's really fun to watch them teach the juveniles and the next upcoming ones that are coming onto the lodge. Jim Morris: We will continue to chronicle the Pacific Flyway Migration and drought impacts in the coming weeks. You can go to podcast.calrice.org to find out more information. Thank you to Suzy Crabtree, Luke Matthews, and Tim Hermansen for their time and expertise. Be sure to subscribe for future episodes. We appreciate your comments and reviews. Thanks for listening.

Carole Baskins Diary
2015-12-14 Carole Baskin‘s Diary

Carole Baskins Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 12:04


Sent a letter to President Obama re: Generic Tigers The Humane Society of the United States asked me to collaborate on a letter to the POTUS.   President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500   Dear President Obama:   On behalf of Big Cat Rescue, one of the largest accredited sanctuaries in the world dedicated entirely to abused and abandoned tigers and other exotic cats, I write in strong support of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's proposal to remove mixed lineage, or “generic”, tigers from the list of animals that are exempt from registration under the Endangered Species Act Captive-Bred Wildlife (“CBW”) regulations. 76 Fed. Reg. 52297 (Aug. 22, 2011); 50 C.F.R. § 17.21(g). The generic tiger exemption has led to a proliferation of tigers in unqualified facilities, undermining animal welfare, public safety and conservation efforts. Additionally, the sanctuary community has been left to take in and care for numerous abandoned tigers that are often cast aside once they grow too large to be used for direct contact with the public and are therefore no longer considered profitable. As this rule would provide the requisite federal oversight needed for thousands of generic tigers who are bred and housed in substandard conditions, Big Cat Rescue urges the Administration to take swift action to finalize the rule.   Big Cat Rescue is a non-profit educational sanctuary devoted to rescuing and providing a permanent home for exotic cats who have been abused, abandoned, bred to be pets, retired from performing acts, or saved from being slaughtered for fur coats. As part of its mission, Big Cat Rescue works to educate the public about these animals and the issues facing them in captivity. Big Cat Rescue is home to the most diverse population of exotic cats in the world, with 10 of the 35 species of wild cats represented. Currently, Big Cat Rescue is housing 90 residents.  These include tigers, lions, leopards, cougars, bobcats, lynx, ocelots, servals, caracals and others, many of whom are threatened, or endangered.   By best estimates there are more tigers living in the U.S. today than exist in the wild, though the total number of captive tigers is unknown (in part because of the CBW exemption for generic tigers, which has facilitated rampant breeding by unqualified entities and eliminated necessary oversight). Nearly all of these generic tigers are held at unaccredited breeding facilities, roadside zoos, traveling zoos, pseudo-sanctuaries, circuses and private menageries. Many roadside zoos and traveling menageries in the U.S. profit from a constant supply of infant tiger cubs used for public contact exhibition (petting, play sessions, bottle feeding, photo ops, and swim with tiger cub programs).  At just a few months of age, the tigers can no longer be used for these types of ventures, whereupon they are often discarded and sanctuaries, like Big Cat Rescue, are called upon to provide care for these generic tigers.   The breeders and dealers do not contact Big Cat Rescue for placement directly, because they know it is our policy to require that anyone giving up a big cat never own one again, so it is the hapless private owner who ends up calling us.  After cubs are no longer profitable they are often given away to people as pets.  By the time the cats are a year old and twice the size of their owners, is when we get the call to rescue them.   Big Cat Rescue is currently home to 13 tigers and has been the final home for 17 more tigers over the years.  Proper care for one big cat at Big Cat Rescue requires a financial commitment of approximately $10,000 per year, with tigers in captivity living for approximately 20 years. This places a large financial burden on sanctuaries that care for these animals.  Just these 30 tigers have meant a commitment of resources exceeding five million dollars.  We have been asked to rescue an additional 42 tigers during the same time frame (1999-2015) but could not afford the lifetime care and were unable to help them.   Tigers Rescued From Texas   In 2011 we rescued three tigers from a sanctuary in Texas that went bankrupt under the crushing weight of some huge rescue missions it had attempted.  Those three tigers had been bred to be used as cub handling props, but when an adult tiger escaped the breeding facility in New Jersey, the Texas sanctuary came to the rescue and took in 23 tigers at once.  That was in 2003.  I remember thinking that no sanctuary was prepared for such a massive undertaking, and in time they folded.  When they did, it left 400 lions, tigers, bears and chimps without food or a place to call home.  It took the concerted efforts of several large animal protection groups and two full years to place all of the animals in other sanctuaries.   Two of the tigers we rescued had broken off their canine teeth during the 2003 transfer from NJ to TX.  Due to the fact that most sanctuaries have no money in the bank, the tigers never had medical or dental care.  Imagine exposed nerves in your mouth as you chewed through bones for eight years.  We made sure they received root canals and extractions of the broken teeth and are doing well, but that's not what it's like for most big cats in captivity.   Tigers Rescued From New York   Kimba, Keisha and Zeus were rescued last year from New York.  They too had been bred to be used as pay to play props.  Because white tigers are a bigger draw for the tiger pimps, they bred Zeus back to his mother, Kimba, over and over, in an effort to force the mutation of the white coat that comes with inbreeding.  Keisha was one of those cubs, but was born golden.  There were 11 tigers at the facility and all of them were the product of inbreeding Zeus to his mother.  Five of the tigers suffered from luxated lens, which is when the lens in the eye breaks loose and begins to scratch against the wall of the eyeball.  This would be akin to having glass in your eye all the time.   It took four sanctuaries to remove all of the big cats out of the New York facility, which was in such dire straights that the only food provided was road killed dogs, cats and other wildlife.  Kimba only survived a few days with us, as she had been so starved, for so long, that her body was shutting down.  Zeus looked like a tiger skeleton, draped in a dull and matted coat.  Keisha had lost her tail and part of her ear to cage mates and was starving too.  Now Zeus has had his eye attended to by an expert vet and both cats are filled out and have shiny coats.  I doubt seriously that the other tigers with eye problems have gotten any relief, because sanctuaries just aren't financially sound enough to do so, in most cases.   Photo: Kimba on the day of the rescue at the facility in New York.   Tigers Rescued from Ohio   In just the past few weeks we have taken in four more tigers from the Ohio Department of Agriculture (“ODA”).  Three are part of a lawsuit resulting from the backyard breeder refusing to comply with state law.  The fourth was a similar case, where the owner had five tigers in a small pen in his backyard.  When the ODA arrived and darted the tiger named Teisha, she didn't stand up, so they asked him if she had a problem.  They reported that his answer was that the other tigers beat her up all the time, so she can't walk.   During her two weeks at the Ohio facility for confiscations they said the tiger would lay in her own waste and didn't stand until they began giving her pain medication.  She could get to her feet and move a few feet out of her own feces and urine, but the state of Ohio knew that we would be able to give better medical care and accommodations, so they asked if we would take her right away.  Ohio found other sanctuaries for the remaining four tigers.  When Teisha arrived here, it took her three hours to be able to stand and step out of the transport trailer into her new enclosure.  She's doing a little better every day.   Burden Placed on Sanctuaries   There is a huge problem looming ahead and it's only a matter of weeks or months before there is another disaster that will cause the need for relocation of dozens, if not hundreds, of tigers.  It all starts the same way: Cubs are bred, pulled immediately to be used as pay to play props and then discarded into pet homes or overcrowded and underfunded “sanctuaries” or warehoused for the purpose of breeding more profitable cubs.   Photo: Zeus upon arrival to Big Cat Rescue   The “sanctuaries” are depending on the money they can raise from a “rescue” but it's only enough to cover the costs for the first year, so they keep “rescuing” more and more cubs until they implode.  The “zoos” are breeding more and more cubs to pay for the overhead of the animals they have, but as those hungry mouths increase, they can't breed enough cubs to keep the reverse Ponzi scheme going.  I know of at least  three facilities with an excess of 500 tigers that are on the brink of collapse.  None of these tigers serves any conservation value, and in fact the breeding and use of them as pay to play props hurts conservation.   The pitch made by those who charge for cub handling is that paying to pose with a cub helps conservation.  The public is being duped and their funds diverted from real conservation, which can only happen in the wild. Breeding tigers in captivity, and labeling it as conservation, only fools the public into thinking they don't have to do the hard work of saving habitat, because there are so many places that have them in cages.  This harms real conservation efforts.   Photo: Keisha looks better now, but lost her tail and part of an ear to improper housing of tigers   The Service's proposal to eliminate the CBW exemption for generic tigers would ensure all tigers in this country are subject to the same safeguards and protections.  It is a necessary step to guarantee the preservation and humane care of these iconic creatures and to ensure the safety of our communities. Big Cat Rescue urges the Administration to swiftly finalize the Service's rule regarding generic tigers.   Sincerely,  Carole Baskin   Also copied:   Christy Goldfuss, White House Council on Environmental Quality, christina_w_goldfuss@ceq.eop.gov Eisenhower Executive Office Building 1650 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, DC 20501   Administrator Shelanski, Office of Management and Budget, howard_a_shelanski@omb.eop.gov Eisenhower Executive Office Building 1650 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Rm. 262 Washington, DC 20503   Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet, Small Business Administration 409 Third St., SW, Suite 7000 Washington, DC 20416   Secretary Jewell, Department of Interior 1849 C St., NW Rm. 6612 Washington, DC 20240   Director Ashe, Fish and Wildlife Service 1849 C St., NW, Rm. 3359 Washington, DC 20240

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 270 - The Everglades in Florida with Steve Davis from the Everglades Foundation

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 52:19


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/270 The purpose of this episode is to raise your awareness about the Everglades in Florida issue - how our actions contribute to the problem and how restoring it would benefit us in the long run. More than 8 million people rely on the Everglades for drinking water. It supports multi-billion dollar economies of agriculture, recreation, and tourism in South Florida. The Everglades is home to two Native American tribes and contains a diverse array of habitats, ranging from coral reefs and brackish estuaries offshore to sawgrass prairies and cypress swamps inland. Everglades in Florida Show Notes with Steve Davis 2:50 - Steve has been working as a scientist in the Everglades Foundation around Florida Bay since 1995 4:15 - According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, about 60% of the wetlands have been lost throughout the country (USA) - while in Europe, about 90% have been lost as a result of wetlands development 5:14 - Steve explains the importance of the wetlands, their role in the ecosystem, and why we need to protect them 7:22 - An overview of the problem and how the Everglades Foundation is addressing it 9:22 - How restoring the quality and the quantity of the waters benefit the variety of species that live there - many of which are an essential part of the food chain 11:24 - The things that hold back the Everglades Foundation movement and the things that are keeping them from meeting their goals - #1 is funding 12:01 Everglades restoration is a state-federal partnership and it's a 50/50 cost-share for a roughly 16 billion USD program - the largest ecosystem restoration program in the world 12:40 - The Kissimmee River restoration is one of the Everglades projects that had huge success recently  13:35 - One of the most important projects is the Everglades reservoir (south of Okeechobee Lake) which is in the early stage of construction and is one of their key projects - it's a 2 billion dollar reservoir that gets clean water flowing south 14:50 - The Everglades Restoration Story Map 16:50 - In 2015, there was a massive seagrass die-off event in Florida bay with roughly 50,000 acres of seagrass died off in some of the most prime fishing habitats in the backcountry, Everglades National Park 17:40 - The Everglades restoration effort started when the first seagrass die-off with great magnitude happened in Florida Bay in the late 80s and early 90s and it was larger than the ones that happened in 2015 - it led to about 10 years of blue-green algae blooms in Florida Bay which decimated the fishing industries 22:20 - Blue-green Algaes are microscopic plants that are the result of human activities - they can grow so densely and block out the sunlight for the living things under the water like seagrass 24:40 - Once these organisms (algae) start to flourish, they can release toxins out into the water and are detrimental to fish, vertebrates, marine mammals, sea turtles, and are potentially lethal to human beings 25:30 - Education is the key - when people understand the significance of the issue, they can learn some of the most prudent actions 28:18 - What the farmers can do to help reduce pollution 29:49 - Captains for Clean Waters is an organization started by 2 guys that got fed up with how people are polluting our waters - they're on a mission to raise awareness and advance science-based solutions, to solve Florida's water mismanagement and secure the health of our water resources, protecting our way of life for future generations 31:48 - Lake Okeechobee is the heart of the Central Everglades - the historical gatekeeper between the watershed from the north and the Southern Everglades and Florida Bay to its south 39:21 - There are signs that the Everglades Restoration can be completed within the next 10 to 15 years (depending on funding) 40:00 - Urban Development Boundary is one of the issues that the organization is dealing with 44:38 - What Steve recommends us to experience when we visit Florida 49:09 - The Lake of Okeechobee System Operating Manual is the new plan that will help cut discharge to both coasts and will allow more water to flow south in the Everglades Everglades in Florida Conclusion with Steve Davis Today, we discussed the problem with the Everglades - how our actions greatly contribute to the problem and how we can help restore it. What will you do differently now that you are aware of the Everglades' status? Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/270

Conservation Careers Podcast
Cade London | Diversity Joint Venture for Careers in Conservation

Conservation Careers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 53:30


What is the diversity deficit in conservation, and how can we tackle it? In this episode we speak to Cade London, Associate Advisor, Office of Diversity and Inclusive Workforce Management, and Diversity Joint Venture Program Manager with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Cade is a 5th generation local from Hawaii, with a passion for conservation programs both in and out of government. Cade currently serves as the U.S. Domestic Focal Point and Communication, Capacity-building, Education, Participation and Awareness (CEPA) Government Focal Point for the Ramsar Convention. We talk about how the diversity deficit in conservation came about, what problems it creates and why it's so important to increase diversity in conservation. We also discuss the Diversity Joint Venture for Careers in Conservation and their mission to “strengthen the conservation workforce by increasing diversity, equity and inclusion", including increasing the number of women and people of color in the conservation workforce. Lastly explore how people like YOU can get involved and help!

Delta Waterfowl Podcast
Ep. 25 Duck and Goose bands - Oh my! The history and current use of waterfowl banding

Delta Waterfowl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 59:39


In this episode Joel talks with Pam Garrettson of the US Fish and Wildlife Service about duck and goose banding. Why is it done? What do we get out of it? All things duck and goose banding. 

Montana Public Radio News
Advocacy group sues over rule expanding hunting and fishing on national wildlife refuges

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 1:06


The lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity says the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service didn't properly assess the impact of a rule opening 2.3 million acres in the National Wildlife Refuge system to hunting and fishing.

EWN - Engineering With Nature
Applying EWN strategies at National Parks and Refuges

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 27:30


Climate change and the imperative to take action now is top of mind following the COP26 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels, changing temperature and precipitation patterns, wildfires  and many other changes impact vulnerable natural resources, including national parks and wildlife refuges. In this episode, host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature Program at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are joined by Rebecca Beavers, Coastal Geology and Adaptation Coordinator for the National Park Service and Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist for Refuges within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Rebecca and Scott share a strong commitment to protecting our national parks and wildlife refuges by making them more resilient to the changing conditions exacerbated by climate change. Teddy Roosevelt established the National Wildlife Refuge System in 1903 at Pelican Island, Florida, originally a five-and-a-half-acre island dedicated to saving Brown Pelicans from being over-harvested for their feathers. Sea-level rise and erosion have reduced Pelican Island to about two acres. “Thanks to an Engineering With Nature solution put in place about 20 years ago, that trend has been reversed,” Scott says. Pelican Island now stands at about three acres.  Scott describes how climate change is affecting refuge management today: “Refuges are typically established with a specific purpose, like protecting waterfowl, but because of the impact of climate change, we may not have waterfowl there anymore. We really need to be shifting our mindset about how we are managing that specific refuge, looking from a broader context, thinking about things like biodiversity. We want to look at the shorebirds, the wading birds, or whatever species and habitats are in that particular area and plan for species that are probably going to be leaving the area and new species that will probably be coming because of the shifts in climate.” Rebecca sees similar threats in her work with the National Park Service: “Many of these parks are changing in tremendous ways. Drought in the west is often followed by wildfire and following wildfire we're seeing landscape changes from major debris flows–cascades of water and rocks that come down the hillsides. These can affect homes, infrastructure, along with the habitats of the plants and animals which are very much affected.” Rebecca adds that the effects on natural features can be significant, “A freshwater marsh may become brackish where it has some of the saltwater components, or it may become a fully saline marsh–what we call a saltmarsh.” These changing conditions add complexity to the challenge of protecting and preserving the parks, along with the many physical structures of historical significance. “We also have to look at some of the other stressors that we put on the landscape. In some of these places we built dams that are great for hydroelectric power, but it also has an impact of holding up sediment further up the watershed.” Rebecca and Scott share several examples of EWN approaches being used to protect parks and refuges and make them more resilient.  At Fort Pulaski National Monument, on the Savannah River in Georgia, and Fort Massachusetts, on the Gulf of Mexico coast of Mississippi, beneficial use (BU) of sediment reduces coastal erosion and returns beneficial sediment to the system. Thin layer placement (TLP) of dredged sediments builds up sinking wetlands at the Chafee Refuge in Rhode Island, and in turn, protects and preserves wildlife habitat. Scott says, “Sea level rise is starting to eat away at the marsh, and we're having some marsh die off, along with the plants. With TLP, we're taking some dredge materials and actually stacking it on top of the marsh to buy some time. We've added a little bit to the elevation, and that gives vegetation a shot in the arm.” Rebecca adds that TLP was used on the Big Egg Marsh Project in Jamacia Bay, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York in 2003.  The Marsh is currently being resurveyed to provide insight into the effectiveness of the project and natural adaptation.  Collaboration is a key theme throughout this episode.  The leading-edge work at the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and the adjacent Harriet Tubman Underground Railway Park in Maryland is a great example of NFS, NPS, USACE, and several other non-government organizations working together to protect the marsh and this important historical landmark.  According to Scott, “This is a really good demonstration project to show what you can do when you work together with what nature gives you.” In closing the show, Jeff notes, “I'm truly moved by the energy and the enthusiasm and the wonderful examples that have been shared. Thank you to the Wildlife Refuge System and the National Park Service for being wonderful partners throughout the years. Their work is really accelerating practice and will continue to do so.” In Episode 6, Rebecca, Scott, and Jeff return to talk about working together on adaptive management strategies for the parks and refuges, and what individuals can do to help protect and preserve these priceless resources.   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN Network of Engineering With Nature EWN Atlas Series Rebecca Beavers at LinkedIn National Park Service Coastal Adaptation Strategies Handbook Olympic National Park and the Elwha Valley Fort Pulaski National Monument Gulf Islands National Seashore Fort Massachusetts – Gulf Islands National Seashore Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge Gateway National Recreation Area, Jamaica Bay Unit In the Field: Restoring Big Egg Marsh National Park Service Climate Change Response Program National Park Service Coastal Geology Program Scott Covington at LinkedIn Climate Adaptation Science Centers Climate Change Page at USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System National Wildlife Refuge System History Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Hurricane Hugo Hurricane Sandy EWN Podcast S3E4: Engineering With Nature for Safe and Livable Cities

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

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Carole Baskins Diary
2015-08-03 Carole Baskin‘s Diary

Carole Baskins Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:42


Erin Carden, Vanessa Ply and me at the Animal Rights Conference 2015     The day before the conference the news broke about Cecil the lion and today I finally could put to paper (our website) what I've been mulling over.   Cecil Lion Changed the World   I have a theory.  I can't prove it, but it feels right to me.  Tell me in the comments if it makes sense to you, or what you believe.   I believe that we all are part of one universal consciousness that is becoming enlightened through this dance of perceived time, space and sense of individuality.  I think we sign up for our lot in life before we ever arrive on this stage, with the intent of playing our role toward the end goal of nirvana. Maybe it is just a coping mechanism, meant to protect me from utter despair, which fosters hope that Cecil signed up for his heroic role too.   Centuries of humans destroying the planet and everything that is beautiful and magnificent, to pursue personal wealth and status, has brought on the sixth mass extinction, with lives being extinguished at rates that are 10,000 times the norm.  The mounting evidence, of the destruction being caused, hasn't been enough to make the masses stop and take notice, but Cecil did.   When Cecil the lion was lured from a protected area, onto private land to be brutally shot with a bow and arrow, caused to suffer for 40 hours as he ran for his life, only to be gunned down by a rich American, so that his head and skin could be stolen as a trophy; it was an act so egregious that just about everyone was outraged.   For days his plight made every media outlet even though animal abuse is rarely discussed in mainstream media, for fear of offending industries who profit from animal suffering by being massive advertisers.   Social media first broke the news of Cecil's torture and slaying, and the public outcry was so enormous that mainstream media couldn't ignore it.  Jane Velez-Mitchell from CNN passionately spoke about how we have finally reached a tipping point in our attitudes toward animal protection at the Animal Rights Conference 2015 in Washington, DC on August 1.   “The evolution revolution is a process; not an event and we are headlong into that process.” said Jane Velez-Mitchell   I've been busy providing interviews to CNN, ABC and Fox, as well as a number of newspaper reporters and documentarians, but in between educating them about the nature of lions and their plight, I've been trying to look at this from the 30,000 foot level.  What is it about Cecil's story that so moved everyone?  What made this lion different from the hundreds of thousands of lions who have been massacred since the 1940's when there were estimated to be 450,000 of them in the wild?   The drop in wild lion populations to 30,000 by 2011 was enough to prompt many large wild animal protection groups to petition the US Fish and Wildlife Service to list lions as endangered.  Since then lion numbers have dropped as low as 20,000, and yet even knowing these facts the USFWS has ignored the petition for four years and the public has allowed them to do so…until Cecil.   I can't help but think about how many of us first learned to read by following the heroes in comic books like Batman.  We grew up loving the storyline of a hero bringing the evil villain to justice, for his crime against a sympathetic victim.  All we had to do was shine that bat symbol on the night time sky (expose the issue) and we knew that justice would soon be served.  From what I've seen, most people want their part in Cecil's justice to be that they easily sign their name to a petition and lions will be protected.  That's a start…but it's only a start.   Thanks to Cecil we are all shining the light on the issue.  But here's the mind bending part.  We are all Batman.  We are all the victim.  We might all be the villain as well.  That's the part I can't quite wrap my head around.  Do some of us sign up before we enter this life to be evil incarnate, just to cause the massive mind shift that is necessary to become our better selves?  Or are we all on a path, to realizing that we are really all ONE, and those that we perceive as evil aren't really a part of the collective soul, but rather are a projection we make to fool ourselves into action?  Sort of like the endangered species that were projected onto the Empire State Building on August first 2015.  The images were to make us think about what we are doing.   Some things we don't know and can't know; but there are some things that we do know.   • We do know that most people (96% of Americans) care about protecting animals from cruelty and that every year that number grows as the older generations, and their outdated beliefs die out. • We do know that now vegetarians outnumber hunters.  A 2011 poll showed that 13 million Americans are hunters and that has been a dying sport.  Hunt clubs have been desperately trying enlist children under the age of 16 and battered women, in an effort to bolster their numbers.  A 2014 poll revealed that there are 15 million Americans who proclaim to be vegetarians 100% of the time and 50 million who say they are vegetarians 50% of the time.  400-500 million fewer animals were eaten in the past few years as a result, despite climbing human populations. • We do know that cubs bred in foreign countries for pay to play as cubs are often used in canned hunts when they grow up. • We do know that approximately 200 lion and tiger cubs are being bred by a handful of bad actors in America each year for the pay to play schemes where people pay to see or pose with a cute cub. • We do know that the vast majority of those cubs just disappear off the radar once they are too big to use as photo props. • We do know that some end up in tacos or in slaughterhouses. • We do know that the only way cubs can be used as photo and pay to play props is by taking them from their mothers at only days or hours old; never to return to her comfort again. • We do know that when celebrities ignorantly choose to pose with these wild animal cubs that they will be bashed by the mainstream media and social media for doing so.   But why isn't the outrage as strong yet, against those who perpetuate the exploitation of cubs, as it was against the dentist who poached Cecil the lion this summer?  Cecil had the benefit of being raised by his own mother and living free for 13 years.  Lion, tiger, liger and leopard cubs who are bred and pimped out by outfits like the GW Zoo, Kevin Antle's TIGERS, Dade City's Wild Things and others never had the benefit of being raised by their mothers or living wild and free.   Maybe the difference is that their ultimate plight is hidden from view?  Being shot with an arrow and then with a gun are a pretty gruesome way to die, but the public isn't privy to the suffering, neglect and disposal of captive cubs when they grow up.  They quietly disappear behind closed gates and doors.   Maybe it is because we didn't know their name?  T.S. Elliott famously opined that regardless of the names we may give a cat…   “But above and beyond there's still one name left over,  And that is the name that you never will guess; The name that no human research can discover – But THE CAT HIMSELF KNOWS, and will never confess. When you notice a cat in profound meditation, The reason, I tell you, is always the same: His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplation Of the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name: His ineffable effable Effanineffable Deep and inscrutable singular Name.”   I don't know why we have been so slow as a people, to protect lion and tiger cubs, but I think, if we did, we could end the practice of keeping wild cats in cages.  I may not know if Cecil signed up for this awakening, but I do know that he made a difference, and YOU can too.  Contact your member of congress and ask them to champion the Big Cats & Public Safety Act.   Hi, I'm Carole Baskin and I've been writing my story since I was able to write, but when the media goes to share it, they only choose the parts that fit their idea of what will generate views.  If I'm going to share my story, it should be the whole story.  The titles are the dates things happened. If you have any interest in who I really am please start at the beginning of this playlist: http://savethecats.org/   I know there will be people who take things out of context and try to use them to validate their own misconception, but you have access to the whole story.  My hope is that others will recognize themselves in my words and have the strength to do what is right for themselves and our shared planet.     You can help feed the cats at no cost to you using Amazon Smile! Visit BigCatRescue.org/Amazon-smile   You can see photos, videos and more, updated daily at BigCatRescue.org   Check out our main channel at YouTube.com/BigCatRescue   Music (if any) from Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) This video is for entertainment purposes only and is my opinion.

Brutal South
29: The Lord God Bird is dead (w/ Matt Drury)

Brutal South

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:14


We're gathered here today to speak of the ivory-billed woodpecker, a tremendous beautiful bird that is gone forever ... or so some people think.Hey. Welcome to Episode 29 of the Brutal South Podcast. The ivory-billed woodpecker has been on my mind again since late September when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving it and 22 other species from the endangered species list forever, effectively declaring the bird extinct.It's been called the Lord God Bird, supposedly because of the things people would exclaim when they encountered this big, elusive bird in the American wild. The last universally accepted sighting was in 1944 in northeast Louisiana. Hobbyists and professionals alike kept searching, though, keeping the faith that it was out there, but hiding, like a cryptid. This bird has been the subject of songs, novels, endless speculation, and long expeditions in the swamps and forests of the Southeastern United States.My guest this week is Matt Drury, who's currently working as a resource management coordinator for the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. In the course of his career he's done all kinds of fascinating and vital work in the woods in this part of the country, including a stint leading the search for the ivory-billed woodpecker in old-growth swamplands across South Carolina. I don't want to give too much away, but I learned so much from him. There's a lot to mourn, but a lot we can still save, too.To learn more and support Matt’s work, visit appalachiantrail.org and southernspruce.org.If you liked the podcast, please leave a nice review wherever you do that or just share it with your friends. Also, if haven't yet, check out the Brutal South newsletter at brutalsouth.substack.com. I've been publishing at least one interesting thing a week for more than 2 years on labor, ecology, parenting, art, and just about everything else from my little perch here in South Carolina. I think you might find something you like. One piece you might appreciate is this one from June 23 on camping in fragile places with young children during the Anthropocene:The episode art is an engraving of ivory-billed woodpeckers, Campephilus principalis, by John J. Audubon. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at brutalsouth.substack.com/subscribe

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Duck Season Somewhere
From the Mississippi Flyway Headwaters: Jim Leafloor, Canadian Wildlife Service

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 63:58


The sun is setting on the rooftops of fabled Delta Waterfowl Research Station across the road, and gregarious Canada goose flocks are trading along the sprawling shores of Lake Manitoba when Ramsey Russell meets with Jim Leafloor, Head of Aquatic Unit for the Canadian Wildlife Service. Responsible for all migratory gamebird management activities throughout Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan, Leafloor's team also oversees arctic goose banding programs. A lifelong waterfowl hunter himself, Leafloor covers pertinent, must-hear migratory waterfowl management topics from the Mississippi Flyway headwaters.  How'd Leafloor begin waterfowl hunting, what lead to his interest in becoming a waterfowl biologist?  How are Canadian bag limits determined and why are they more generous than in the Unjted States? What drives harvest rates, how are harvest rates determined and do spinning-winged decoys detrimentally increase harvest? Why were pintail limits increased from 4 to 8 daily throughout Prairie Canada? What happened when mallard bag limits were lowered in Canada last time? How might prevailing drought conditions affect Canadian duck bag limits in upcoming seasons--and what other important factors are now considered? What proposed modernizations to Migratory Bird regulations could effect waterfowl hunters, why were they proposed? Is there really a new spring hunting season for Canada geese in Manitoba? In a world awash with misinformation derived from intentional bureaucratic obscurity and online armchair quarterback conjecture, it's sobering to hear it explained straight from the top and backed by scientific data. You do not want to miss this episode.   Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys GetDucks USHuntList   It's really duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com  

The Wild Life
Protecting Wolves with Dr John A. Vucetich

The Wild Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 44:26


An effort to end protections for gray wolves that began with the Florida Man administration has come to fruition under the Biden administration. The species, native to much of the US and Canada, was only recently dropped from the endangered species list. In response, a https://wpr-public.s3.amazonaws.com/wprorg/wolf-esa-relisting-letter-5-13-21.pdf (team of scientists is calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) to instead continue safeguarding the species. The primary signatory of this letter is John Vucetich. For the past 25 years, John Vucetich has been the lead researcher of the Wolves & Moose of Isle Royale project. He is newly the author of https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/title/restoring-balance (Restoring the Balance: What Wolves Tell Us about Our Relationship with Nature), a book which meaningfully recounts all that John has learned from these incredible creatures. “A wolf,” John says, “is a living creature, with a perspective, memories of yesterday, an interest in how tomorrow turns out, joys and fears of its own, and a story to be told.” Today on The Wild Life, why protections were ended, what's happened since, why hunting wolves is viewed by many as unjustifiable, their social nature and disruptions, the why behind anti-wolf rhetoric, and how protections can be put in place once again. Support the show at www.patreon.com/TheWildLife Support this podcast

What's the Deal, Grosse Ile?
S2E7 - US Fish & Wildlife Service Detroit River Fish Lab

What's the Deal, Grosse Ile?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


Episode Notes Ben talks with the team that caught a 100 year old, 6 foot 11 inch Lake Sturgeon in the waters off of Grosse Ile in April. They share the impact of the work they do, keeping an eye on the native fish species of the Great Lakes. It's a whopper! Transcript Links US Fish & Wildlife Service Alpena Office Detroit River Fish Laboratory Free Press article about the sturgeon Detroit River Coalition Contact What's the Deal, Grosse Ile? Web Facebook Facebook Group Instagram Patreon Tip Jar (For One-Time or Recurring Contributions) WhatsTheDealGI@gmail.com (734) 250-9554 Music: J.F. Gloss / Rhythm of the River / Courtesy of www.epidemicsound.com https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/VYqJoVOxgL/

Fish of the Week!
American Eels feat. Holly Richards

Fish of the Week!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 22:49


The American eel starts its mysterious life in the Sargasso Sea before making its way into rivers along the Eastern Seaboard. Katrina and Guy are joined by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish enthusiast and eel fan Holly Richards. 

At Home with Linda & Drew Scott
Holy Crow! An episode all about… Crows! with John Marzluff

At Home with Linda & Drew Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 40:54


If you've been following along, you might have heard about his run-ins with the neighborhood crows! So to help him find a middle ground with these curious and intelligent creatures, we surprised Drew with guest, John Marzluff! John is a wildlife biologist, author and Professor of Wildlife Science at the University of Washington. His research is focused on the social behavior and ecology of crows, jays and ravens. John shares with us intriguing insight to help us better understand crows and to help us explore ways we can learn to live in harmony with our feathered friends! He is a member of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Recovery Team for the critically endangered Mariana Crow, a former member of the Washington Biodiversity Council, a Fellow of the American Ornithologist's Union, and a National Geographic Explorer. Connect with John: https://sites.uw.edu/sefsacl/Read his book: In Search of Meadowlarks: Birds, Farms, and Food in Harmony with the Landhttps://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300237146/search-meadowlarksAn ornithologist's personal look at farming practices that finds practical solutions for sustainable food production compatible with bird and wildlife conservationWith predictions of a human population of more than nine billion by the middle of this century and eleven billion by 2100, we stand at a crossroads in our agricultural evolution. In this clear and engaging yet scientifically rigorous book, wildlife biologist John M. Marzluff takes a personal approach to sustainable agriculture. He travels to farms and ranches across North and Central America, including a Nebraska corn and soybean farm, California vineyards, cattle ranches in Montana, and small sustainable farms in Costa Rica, to understand the unique challenges and solutions to sustainable food production. Agriculture and wildlife can coexist, Marzluff argues, if farmers are justly rewarded for conservation; if future technological advancements increase food production and reduce food waste; and if consumers cut back on meat consumption. Beginning with a look backward at our evolutionary history and concluding with practical solutions for change that will benefit farmers and ranchers, he provides an accessible and insightful study for the ecologically minded citizen, farmer, rancher, or conservationist.LINKS N' THINGS: Thanks to our friends at ADT for making it possible for us to share these stories in a safe and secure place, At Home. https://www.adt.com/AtHomeHello Makers! If you're a maker and would like to be considered for a Maker Moment on At Home, please send us a DM on social and fill out this questionnaire. We can't wait to see what you're making!https://bit.ly/hellomakerCheck out our first Makers Episode!https://athomepodcast.net/episodes/makersText 310-496-8667 with your questions for #AtHomePodcast !If you've enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, rate and share with a friend! Thank you for being a part of the At Home community! Connect with Linda & Drew: instagram.com/athomeinstagram.com/imlindorkinstagram.com/mrdrewscott#AtHomePodcastTHEME SONG BY: Victoria Shawwww.instagram.com/VictoriaShawMusic Chad Carlsonwww.instagram.com/ChadCarlsonMusic MUSIC COMPOSED AND PRODUCED BY:Rick Russohttps://www.instagram.com/rickrussomusicSpecial thanks to all our At Home homies: PRODUCERS:Brandon AngelenoHanna PhanPOST AUDIO ENGINEER:Chris CobainDIGITAL PRODUCER:Cortney EwonusWEBSITE:Wesley FriendSERIES PHOTOGRAPHER: Dennys Ilicwww.instagram.com/dennydennSponsored by:ADT: It's important to have not just a beautiful home -- but a smart and safer home.https://www.adt.com/AtHomeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tennessee WildCast
TW 262 - Partnering For Trout

Tennessee WildCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 28:31


Join us as we visit with TVA's Allen Clare and our very own Frank Fiss to talk trout and great partnerships following a ceremonial signing and fish release. The Tennessee Valley Authority and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have reached a multi-agency agreement to provide continued funding for three federal fish hatcheries that have stocked waters in Georgia and Tennessee with millions of trout. We will cover this and so much more. #tnwildlife #tennesseewildcast #tva #fishing #gooutdoorstennessee #fishing www.tnwildlife.org

Montana Public Radio News
Montana's Martha Williams nominated to lead the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 1:05


Martha Williams has informally led the Fish and Wildlife Service since January. The federal agency manages wildlife and habitat across the country and is in charge of more than 150 million acres of land in the National Wildlife Refuge System. FWS also administers the Endangered Species Act.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, October 14, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Alaska's decline in COVID-19 cases stalls. Also, former Anchorage Assembly members weigh in on the current, fraught mask debate. And the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service begins its next review of polar bears' status under the Endangered Species Act.

Day Fire Podcast
Tennessee River Gorge Trust -- On the Move

Day Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:27


This week Clint and I talked with Rick Hoffines and Eliot Berz. Rick is the Executive Director for the Tennessee River Gorge Trust. He joined the organization in 2013 after retiring from a 26-year career of public service with the US Fish and Wildlife Service where he has worked throughout the Southeast in five different states in various capacities. Most recently, Rick served as the Deputy Regional Chief of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Eliot Berz received his bachelor's degree in environmental studies from Sewanee: The University of the South. Eliot has worked on public access endeavors on various blueways and greenways, such as the Rapidan River in Virginia and Hiwassee River in Tennessee. When not working, you will likely find Eliot in the river kayaking or fishing. The Tennessee River Gorge Trust is the perfect example of what can happen when a small group of thoughtful citizens come together to change their community for the better. The Trust was founded in 1981 —later incorporated in 1986 — as the result of a dinner party at Adele Hampton's house on Elder Mountain. Chattanooga-area citizens gathered around her coffee table to discuss the worrisome development of the mountains bordering Chattanooga. With the help of cooperative landowners, TVA, the State of Tennessee and engaged citizens, our community has protected over 17,000 of the 27,000 acres of the Gorge! The Gorge consists of 27,000 acres carved through the Cumberland Mountains by 27 miles of the Tennessee River. It is the only large river canyon bordering a mid-size city (Chattanooga) and it is the fourth largest river canyon east of the Mississippi. The Gorge begins approximately 5 miles downstream from downtown Chattanooga (across from Williams Island) and continues 27 river miles to Hales Bar Dam Marina near Nickajack Lake. Through dozens of archaeological sites, evidence of human's presence in the Gorge dates back to 10,000 years ago.

National Parks Traveler Podcast
National Parks Traveler: Wildlife Extinctions, Recoveries, And Future

National Parks Traveler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 44:37


We're in the middle of a world-wide extinction crisis. Here in the United States, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just announced that nearly two dozen species, from the Ivory-billed woodpecker to two freshwater fish species, are extinct. How are wildlife in the parks doing? To explore that and other questions surrounding wildlife, we're joined by Dr. Joel Berger, a senior scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society as well as the Barbara Cox Anthony University Chair in Wildlife Conservation at Colorado State University.

Locals Share Green Action
Wildlife Biologist, Conservation Photographer, & Graphic Artist, Kaitie Schneider – Understory Studio

Locals Share Green Action

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 14:37


Kaitie Schneider is a wildlife conservation biologist and educator for Boulder County Parks and Open Space, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Blue Turtle Sustainable. In her free time, she runs her own business as a digital artist and photographer for environmental organizations and earth-conscious businesses. Below are her recommends to learn more about conservation, wildlife biology, as well as the many ways we can get more involved using our own varied skills and interests. Podcasts: Impact the Conservation Photography Podcast How to Save a Planet Ologies In Defense of Plants TED Climate A Sustainable Mind Books: Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer Animal Kind by Ingrid Newkirk and Gene Stone Tom Browns guide to healing the Earth Are We Smart Enough to Know how Smart Animals Are? By Frans de Waal Ways to get involved, no degree required: Citizen science with https://www.inaturalist.org https://www.wlrv.org Volunteer with local wildlife agencies Volunteer at animal rescues and sanctuaries Apply for my Conservation Career Scholarship! https://www.theunderstorystudio.com/scholarship

Public Health On Call
381 - How the Pandemic Has Opened Our Eyes to Our Relationship with Nature

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:39


During the pandemic, many found solace outdoors on hikes and in city parks. Dr. Mamie Parker, ecologist, activist, and the first Black Head of Fisheries for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service talks with Josh Sharfstein about how getting back in touch with nature offers an opportunity to see just how connected we are to the earth, how much we depend on a healthy environment for our own physical and mental well-being, and how critical it is for us to take action on conservation.

No-Till Farmer Podcast
Why No-Till Benefits Birds With Kelly VanBeek Mixdown

No-Till Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 30:45


In this episode of the No-Till Farmer Influencers & Innovators podcast, brought to you by Terrasym, Frank Lessiter gets into the weeds with Kelly VanBeek, wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Migratory Bird Program to discuss which no-till fields provide the best habitats for songbirds, what cover crops are most hospitable to birds and finding a balance between productivity and conservation on farmland.

The Ray Hadley Morning Show: Highlights
Former Member for Monaro Peter Cochran reveals new brumby population estimate endorsed by national park ranger

The Ray Hadley Morning Show: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 4:29


The former MP has revealed a new estimate of the brumby population in Kosciuszko National Park a fraction of the official count used by the National Parks and Wildlife Service. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1A
Gone For Good: How A Species Is Declared Extinct

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 29:35


More than 20 animals and one plant were declared extinct by the Fish and Wildlife Service last week — one of the longer extinction announcements in the history of the agency.Declaring extinction is not as straightforward as you might think. Many of the species on this list likely disappeared decades ago but knowing for certain can be difficult.And climate change is only exacerbating the problem. A report released by the United Nations last year estimates that one million plant and animal species are at risk of being gone for good.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Writer's Bone
Friday Morning Coffee: Mary Roach, Author of Fuzz

Writer's Bone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 32:20


On today's Friday Morning Coffee, Mary Roach, author of Fuzz, tells Daniel Ford all about animals behaving badly (or more accurately, hungrily). Caitlin Malcuit also discusses the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing delisting 23 species from the Endangered Species Act because they are extinct. To learn more about Mary Roach, visit her official website and follow her on Twitter. Also listen to our first conversation with the author in Episode 198. Fuzz was featured in September 2021's "Books That Should Be On Your Radar." Today's Friday Morning Coffee episode is sponsored by Libro.fm.

Post Reports
On the death of species

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 14:26


This week, the Fish and Wildlife Service proposed taking 23 animals and plants off the endangered-species list — because none can be found in the wild. What this tells us about climate change, and things to come.Read more:The ivory-billed woodpecker is officially extinct, along with 22 other species of plants and animals. “Just having to write those words was quite difficult,” Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Amy Trahan told climate reporter Dino Grandoni, choking up. “It took me a while.”The woodpecker was known as the “Lord God Bird” because it was supposedly so beautiful that anyone who saw it would blurt out the Lord's name. Grandoni said that some scientists think the Endangered Species Act came too late to save a lot of animals. But maybe not all hope is lost. “My inbox today, after publishing the story online, is full of photos from amateur photographers in their backyards of woodpeckers, asking me if this is the bird that people are saying has gone extinct,” Grandoni said. “This might spur some interest in people going on and understanding the birds and other animals that are still with us.”

Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier

Ben Eielson Russ Merrill Airplanes first disappeared in Alaska as soon as they glided over the mountains, glaciers, oceans, tundra, and forests here. The rugged ocean and landscape of Alaska offer an abundance of places for a plane to vanish. Over the years, many planes have gone missing in Alaska, but not all the outcomes were bad, especially in the early years of aviation in the territory. Often, days or even weeks after a plane disappeared in a remote region and the pilot was assumed dead, he would wander out of the brush and into a village. Sources: Leon Crane Mondor, Colleen. 2012. The Map of My Dead Pilots. Lyons Press. Gilford, CT. Coppock, Mike. Flying on the Edge: Alaska's Legendary Bush Pilots. History.net. https://www.historynet.com/flying-on-the-edge-alaskas-legendary-bush-pilots.htm Wien, Noel. Pioneer/Entrepreneur. Aviation Hall of Fame. https://www.nationalaviation.org/our-enshrinees/wien-noel/ A WWII Survival story from the Charley River. National Park Service. https://www.nps.gov/yuch/learn/historyculture/leon-crane-survival-story.htm Davis Joy. 9-4-1979. Rhode plane wreckage in Alaska found by hikers after 21 years. Fish and Wildlife Service. Department of the Interior. https://www.fws.gov/news/Historic/NewsReleases/1979/19790904a.pdf Ian Mackintosh Ian Mackintosh MacLeod, Calum. 2013. Did spy writer's disappearance mirror his fiction? https://www.whatson-north.co.uk/whats-on/books/did-spy-writers-disappearance-mirror-his-fiction-112358/ Folsom, Robert G. 2012. The Life and Mysterious Death of Ian Mackintosh. Potomac Books Eric Johnson 9-20-04. AKfatal.net. https://www.akfatal.net/Johnson%2009-20-04.htm Search for missing aircraft continues in Katmai National Park. Katmai. National Park Service. https://www.nps.gov/katm/learn/news/katmai-missing-plane-3.htm Mondor, Colleen. 7-8-2015. Aircraft missing in Alaska Bush remain among state's Rhode's Grumman       unsolved mysteries. Anchorage Daily News. https://www.adn.com/bush-pilot/article/missing-aircraft-alaska/2015/07/08/ ______________________________________ If you would like to support Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier? Become a patron and join The Last Frontier Club. Each month I will provide one or more of the following to club members. · An extra episode of Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier available only for club members. · Behind the scenes glimpses of life and wildlife in the Kodiak wilderness. · Breaking news about ongoing murder cases and new crimes in Alaska · Merchandise or discounts on MMLF merchandise or handmade glass jewelry. Become a Patron! _______________________________________________________________________________________ Check out the store: Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier merchandise. _______________________________________________________________________________________ Subscribe to my free, monthly Murder and Mystery Newsletter for more stories about true crime and mystery from Alaska. Join me on: Facebook Instagram Twitter LinkedIn Visit my website at http://robinbarefield.com Check out my books at Author Masterminds ___________________________________________________________________________________ Recent Book Release __________________________________________________________________________________ If you would like to check out one of my novels, visit The Readers and Writers Book Club, where you can read Murder Over Kodiak - Free! While you are there, take a look at some of the other free book serializations by wonderful authors in nearly every genre you can imagine.

The Daily Dive
United Airlines Terminating Nearly 600 Employees Who Failed to Comply With Vaccine Mandate

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 25:09


United Airlines has the strictest vaccine mandates of all the U.S. airlines and just announced that they will move to fire almost 600 workers who failed to comply. The company has about 67,000 employees and about 96% of them have been vaccinated. Others who sought exemptions for religious or medial reasons will be placed on temporary unpaid leave. Leslie Josephs, airline reporter at CNBC, joins us for how the ball is dropping for those refusing the mandate. Next, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that 23 animals and plants have been cleared off the endangered species list and are officially extinct. The most notable animal on the list is the ivory-billed woodpecker which is sometimes referred to as the “Lord God Bird.” The last reported sighting was in 2004, but even then it was not confirmed. Dino Grandoni, environmental reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for more. Finally, Texas politics is taking over America. Recent happenings there such at the strict new abortion law, the Haitian immigrant crisis, and any action taken on Covid have all extended beyond the Texas borders and influenced the national debate on those topics. Marissa Martinez, fellow at Politico, joins us for how everyone is talking about Texas. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

PBS NewsHour - World
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Science
Here's what contributed to the extinction of ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 5:07


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed moving 23 animals and plants off the endangered species list, declaring them extinct. Perhaps the most well-known of the species deemed gone forever is the ivory-billed woodpecker. These extinctions are part of an accelerating crisis driven by human actions. John Yang and Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Fish of the Week!
Sheefish feat. Ray Hander and Bill Carter

Fish of the Week!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 23:37


Siilvik, the Iñupiaq name for Selawik, means "place of sheefish." Learn more about this amazing place and Alaska's largest whitefish. Katrina and Guy are joined by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish biologists Ray Hander and Bill Carter to talk about the fall spawning migration, collaborative fish science and permafrost thaw slumps. (episode 6 featuring Siikauraq Martha Whiting focuses on the winter sheefish fishery in Kotzebue, AK). 

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-09-06: Marvin "Bad News" Barnes, Q&A doc for Potter Hill Mill dam removal, and Justin Thomas Anderson

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 5:21


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about news, the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now for some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Marvin “Bad News” Barnes, was an all-american basketball player and played professionally in both the ABA and NBA? In 1973, Barnes was the first player to score ten times on ten field goal attempts which wouldn't be beaten until 1986. He was rookie of the year in the ABA playing for the Spirits of St. Louis. Barnes was known for his colorful personality. Barnes once refused to board a plan from Louisville Kentucky to St. Louis because the short flight was scheduled to arrive before its departure time as it switched time zones. He famously said “I ain't getting in no damn time machine.” and rented a car instead. Now, we turn our feature story…. A new question-and-answer document is available for those hoping to learn about plans to remove the Potter Hill Mill dam that spans the Pawcatuck River and once provided power for the now-defunct textile facility. The 21-page informational piece was developed by the project team and provided to the town councils in Westerly and Hopkinton and is also posted on Westerly's municipal website. The document attempts to answer questions about the project that have been submitted to the project team through Westerly's website. Tim Mooney, spokesman for the Nature Conservancy said: "At the public meetings, the project team encouraged folks to submit their questions to the town of Westerly's website. And we got a lot of great questions. The Q&A document gives the project team a way to answer the community's questions and provide an update on the status of the project at the same time." The private, non-profit Nature Conservancy is working on the project along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Wood-Pawcatuck Watershed Association, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the state Department of Environmental Management, the Southern Rhode Island Conservation District and the town of Westerly. Removal of the dam has emerged as the project team's preferred option for accomplishing the project's main goals: improving fish passage in the river and reducing flood risks. Repairing the dam has been ruled out because of maintenance that would have to be performed once the repairs were made. The dam and mill property were both petitioned into receivership by the town of Westerly after property owner Edward Carapezza and his Renewable Resources Inc. failed in efforts to redevelop it. Prior owners also allowed the mill property to languish. The dam is the last barrier to fish passage on the river. Many members of the project team have worked together for years to remove other dams and obstacles in the river. Stay up to date on this developing story at westerlysun.com There are a lot of businesses in our community that are hiring right now, so we're excited to tell you about some new job listings. Today's Job posting comes from Cargill in Westerly. They're looking for shipping and receiving associates. You'll be responsible for working in a fast paced environment packing meat products. Pay is up $20.00 per hour. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=740518464e480bd4 Today we're remembering the life of Justin Thomas Anderson, 47, of Charlestown, who peacefully assumed Executive Chef duties behind the eternal line. Born  in Hartford, he was a lifelong Whalers fan. In his youth, he demonstrated early signs of culinary acumen by referring to chicken wings as chicken-on-the-cob. Justin was forevermore drowned out by the arrival of his siblings. Raised in West Hartford, Justin was a '92 graduate of Conard High School, where with a group of masterful misfits he forged unbreakable bonds, whose antics tried the patience of parents and brake calipers. A self-taught musician, he won the talent show and was a featured member of his Dads garage band, Duke and the Esoterics. He spent his summers in Quonochontaug, RI, getting into good trouble with lasting friends, and where he would eventually call home despite detesting sand. He attended Johnson and Wales in Providence, RI as he honed his technique and creativity at various established restaurants before working up the line at W.B. Codys in Westerly. After 15 years of succulent BBQ and a cast of treasured Codys characters, including his best friend Chad, Justin enjoyed his remaining years at the Breachway Grill in Charlestown. A gifted Executive Chef, Justin was known for his tireless dedication, diligence, and intrepidness. Over the years, he refined his signature dishes of Chicken Scarpello, Fish Tacos, Sweet Chili Pasta, and Braised Short Ribs, while constantly pushing himself and the limits of expletives, on one occasion perfecting a tricky flan recipe for a Breachway Wine Night Dinner. A compassionate mentor and peer, he was quick with a knowing smirk to a harried colleague. He is predeceased by his best dog pal, Cody and is survived by countless friends far and near, extended family including loving Aunts, Uncles and cousins, his parents, three siblings, his adoring out-laws that thought of Justin as their own, nieces, nephew and Godson, and his cat, Papi. Thank you for taking a moment with us today to remember and celebrate Justin's life. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Carole Baskins Diary
2012-12-31 Carole Diary

Carole Baskins Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 24:04


2012 Annual Report    Big Cat Rescue is more than just a place that provides permanent care for big cats.  It is a movement;  a change in the tide of human perceptions and is the combined effort of more than 79,000 supporters.  If you are one of them, you are a Big Cat Rescuer and the following is the great work YOU did!  If you haven't helped yet, you can do so now at the top right of the screen or here:  http://bigcatrescue.org/donate   Big Cat Rescue's Mission Statement:  Big Cat Rescue's dual mission is to provide the best home we can for the cats in our care and educate the public about the plight of these majestic animals, both in captivity and in the wild, to end abuse and avoid extinction.  We are Caring for Cats and Ending the Trade   Advances:  With your help we are winning in the battle for compassion! Up until 2003 the number of requests for rescues we had to turn down due to lack of space or funds had roughly doubled every other year, to 312 that year. We feared it would double again to over 500 in 2004. Instead, it has steadily declined since then thanks to the passage of a federal bill and several state bills that restrict the ownership of exotic cats. This year there were “only” 85 big cats who came to our attention as being abandoned.  Note that 69 of them came from failed pseudo sanctuaries.  We were able to take in 7. We offered to take all of the cats who were cougar size or smaller, if their owners would contract to never own another exotic cat, but the rest refused.  We just do not have enough Senior Keeper staff to take on more lions or tigers than the three we took this year.   Volgistics became our new time tracking service on Jan 1, 2012 and has replaced our use of Freshbooks.  Everyone seems to like the big buttons and easy check in and check out process.   Animal Care:  By the end of this year, 96 of our 101 exotic cats are over the age of 12;  80 of those are over the age of 15; and 19 of those are over the age of 20. This is well beyond how long they are designed to live in the wild and much older than most zoo cats.  This is a testament to the excellent animal care we provide, but we are dealing with many more age related illnesses and are losing more of our big cat friends every year.   We use operant conditioning to enable much of our vet care without the necessity of anesthesia, which is very hard on the cats, but despite that, 43 of our animals had to be sedated for vet care in 2012.  We also performed 6 Necropsies:  (most performed for interns, all with Dr. Justin), had 4 high ticket Special Surgeries at Blue Pearl, had 2 intricate specialized surgeries by Dr. Hay, 4 on-site dentals by Dr. Peak and vaccinated 84 cats, in addition to countless trips to Ehrlich Animal Hospital to have the cats treated by our volunteer vet, Dr. Liz Wynn.   Rescues:  With the help of some very special donors we were able to rescue 4 bobcats, two Savannah Cat hybrids and two kittens that were reported to be bobcats, but who turned out to be tail-less Manx.  One of those bobcats was Rufus who came in to a Rehabber on Dec 5 weighing 4 lbs, with a broken jaw, split canine and comatose.  They figured he had been hit by a car, but at 4 lbs couldn't believe that he survived.  After he woke up from the coma he was pretty loopy, but they figured the impact had done brain damage.  They had to wire the jaw shut, tube feed him and removed the broken canine. He appeared to be blind and was having bad and frequent seizures, that ultimately cut his life short, but he touched all of us deeply.   On 12/12/12 we had another perfect USDA inspection.   3 of our Cat-a-Tats were expanded with room additions, four of them had major renovations and five tunnels were installed to join cages to give the cats more room, including our first overhead tunnels.  We constructed new Outdoor Recovery Cage and made major renovations to the Hospital Recovery Cage.  We provided emergency rescue for a fox and a hawk, in addition to the bobcats.   Education:  Our website, BigCatRescue.org underwent a painful renovation from a static html site to a WordPress CMS site during 2010 and 2011.  All of the page names had to be changed to fit the new system which meant a huge drop in traffic and initially a huge drop in inbound links, although, by the end of the year we had gained more than a thousand more inbound links than we had before, so it is going to prove a worth while move.  The site has suffered some major issues and has had to be moved to larger and more powerful servers as our traffic is back up to about 1.5 million new visitors per year.  Our website is primarily an educational tool and according to Alexa we are ranked 445,200 worldwide and 102,750 most visited website in the U.S.  in 2012.  We have 1,110 other sites linking to us.   Our web site addresses local and global concerns about environment and has over 9,213 pages of information, movie clips, sounds, safe interactive online games with a conservation theme and photos.  In any given week the visitors will be from more than 200 countries outside of the U.S.   The information provided has helped wildlife rehabilitators identify animals and obtain proper care instruction, helped officials in smuggling cases to identify rare species of exotic cats being illegally traded and those are just a few of the ways that we know the site has had an impact this year.   We offer about 200 outreach and field trips per year and have committed to offering 12 of them for free each year to lower income schools, but have given 18 such free tours this year and expect that demand will continue to rise with the cost of transportation.  Even when we offer the tours for free, many schools cannot come because they cannot afford the $200.00 fee for their busses.  Our Education Department has been writing grant proposals to raise the money needed for the buses.   Big Cat Rescue has been in the press 125 times, in 42+ states including AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, FL, HI, IA, ID, IO, IN, IL, KY, LA, MA, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, NC, OH, OK, PA, SC, SD, TN, VA, VT, WA, WI & WV and dozens of programs of national or international coverage or in countries other than the U.S.   Award Winning Sanctuary:  Great Non Profit 2012 at Great Non Profits.  We have received this award every year since they started awarding it in 2010 due to the many great reviews we get from visitors and donors each year.  Named as Top Day Trip for Families.  2012 CBS Tampa ranks BCR as one of the top “Day Trips for Families” http://tampa.cbslocal.com/top-lists/best-day-trips-for-families-around-tampa/  Best Place to Work:  Big Cat Rescue was nominated to The Tampabay Business Journal as one of the best places to work.   Legislation/Education:  The steady increase in legislation banning private ownership represents recognition by our society that private ownership leads to massive abuse.  Social values evolve.  It took decades to ban slavery in England and for women to win the right to vote in America.  Those ideas started out as “radical” and were held by a small minority.  Gradually more and more people understood and agreed until they became a part of our value system that we take for granted today.  The same trend is happening with private ownership of exotics.  Gradually more and more people are realizing that this simply leads to widespread abuse of these animals.  The best evidence of this is the accelerating trend in state laws.   Just since 2005 nine more states have passed some level of ban. Sweden, Austria, Costa Rica, India, Finland, Bolivia, Greece, China, the UK and Singapore have all banned or restricted the utilization of big cats in circuses-it's time for the U.S. & South Africa to do the same!   Wins for the Big Cats in 2012: Ohio Bans Private Possession of Most Exotic Cats: On June 5, 2012 the state legislature banned the private possession of dangerous wild animals, including most exotic cats. Those who have the animals must register them but cannot buy or breed more. The only exemptions for breeding are AZA accredited zoos (and ZAA for now, but that needs to change) and sanctuaries that are accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries can continue to rescue wild animals. Up until now Ohio was second (behind FL) in the nation for the number of killings, maulings and escapes by big cats.   • Oprah Announces No Fur in Her O Magazine: The October 2011 issue of O, The Oprah Magazine announced its decision to never feature real fur in the magazine and only use cruelty free materials in its stories, including no leather or exotic skins. This decision was broadly embraced by the readership. • CA, West Hollywood Bans the Sale of Fur: West Hollywood, CA became the first city in the nation to ban the sale of fur. With a three to one vote (with one abstention) the City Council approved the ordinance. The rule faced opposition from the local Chamber of Commerce, whose main trade group, The Fur Information Council, happens to be based in West Hollywood. Nearly half of the 200 stores in town sell at least some fur items and it is estimated to account for approximately $2 million in revenue each year. The measure will take effect on Sept. 21, 2013. • NY, New York City Bars Ban Fur Clad Customers: Bar owner Johnny Barounis, a vegetarian, refuses to allow patrons wearing real fur to enter his trendy bards in Manhattan. His bards include Revision Lounge and Gallery in the East Village, the Back Room on the Lower East Side, and Auction House and Fetch, on the Upper East Side. ”We tell people, you are welcome to come in, but the fur stays out” said Barounis. • Holland: The Holland Circus will no longer include wild animals in their shows. Here is a link to the dutch article: http://www.nu.nl/binnenland/2992728/circus-renz-stopt-met-wilde-dieren.html • UAE Ajman: Jan 2012 became the first emirate to ban the keeping of dangerous animals in private homes. Last July, a two-year-old girl was attacked by a lion cub in Ajman and had to be rescued by a maid. • Greece: Feb 3, 2012 The Greek Government has banned the use of all animals in circuses following a campaign by ADI and the Greek Animal Welfare Fund (GAWF), backed by over 50 local animal protection groups across Greece. The new animal protection law also addresses a number of important issues concerning stray animals. • Bogata, Columbia and Paraguay Ban Wild Animals in Circus Acts June 2012: Hot on the heels of the news last week that the Colombian capital Bogota is to ban all animals in circuses, Paraguay has announced a nationwide ban on wild animals in circuses. Animal Defenders Intenational (ADI) applauds Paraguay for becoming the latest country to ban the use of wild animals in circuses under Resolution 2002/12 passed this week by the Secretary of the Ministry of the Environment (Secretaría del Medio Ambiente). Since ADI launched a major undercover investigation of animals in circuses in South America in 2007, a series of bans have swept across the continent as Governments have acted decisively to end the suffering of these animals. Bans are in place in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and now Paraguay. Legislation for a ban passed its second reading in Colombia earlier this year and legislation for a ban is well advanced in Brazil. • China July 20, 2012: Wildlife conservation and forestry departments of northeast China's Heilongjiang province announced that visitors will soon not be allow to pay for pictures with Siberian tiger cubs in a tiger park.   When our CapWiz account came up for renewal on Dec 31, 2012 we switched to VoterVoice for our CatLaws.com site.  At the time of the move we had 73,503 supporters in our AdvoCat database.  We loved CapWiz, but VoterVoice promises all of the same great tools for half the price so we are going to try them out for 2013 and see how they compare.   Animal Abusers Exposed, Shut Down and / or Fined:  Big Cat Rescue enabled several under cover operations to gather evidence of exotic cats being abused, bred without regard for where they may end up, violations of the Animal Welfare Act that pertains to the cruel treatment of big cats and endangering the public.  This information was presented to the authorities along with affidavits and supporting evidence that we hope will bring an end to much of the suffering in the facilities we selected as being the worst abusers.   • Dade City's Wild Things had complaints about shoving 8-12 week old tiger cubs in the pool and forcing them to swim with patrons who pay 200.00 that resulted in the Florida Wildlife Commission initially taking the position that it was not safe, but then the FWC reversed themselves and said DCWT may continue, what many people find to be cruel abuse, as long as they didn't shove the cubs back in the pool if they climbed out.  Now DCWT staff hold the poor cubs by their tails so that they cannot reach the side to climb out, but the FWC, despite numerous complaints, has failed to shut down these activities. • Inside Edition exposed Joe Schreibvogel of GW Park and the fact that at least 23 tiger cubs died at his facility. • The BBC's Show called America's Most Dangerous Pets with  Louis Therous suggested their show should have been named, America's Most Dangerous Pet Owners. • Animal Planet's Fatal Attractions interviewed Carole Baskin in Tigers Unleashed about dangerous exotic animal owners including Savage Kingdom's Robert Baudy and Lost Creek where Haley Hilderbrand was killed by a tiger while posing with the cat for her high school yearbook photo.   It appears that USDA did not pursue any of the exotic animal abuse cases to conclusion in 2011 or 2012.     Fundraising and Marketing:  Big Cat Rescue was reported favorably in the news 125 times in 2012.   Some of our national press included shows on  CNN,  MSNBC, National Geographic, Animal Planet, Discovery and the History Channel in addition to such publications as USA Today, National Geographic and the New York Post and major media coverage in several other countries as well.   YouTube and Revision 3 were the big news this year.  Revision 3, which is owned by Discovery, contacted us and asked us to be their first animal themed channel.  Thanks to this partnership and cross promotions with Animal Planet, we are experiencing more than 1 million views per MONTH!  By year end we had 359 videos and they received more than 15 million views in 2012.  We ended the year with appx 53,000 subscribers and 53 million views.  Check it out here http://www.youtube.com/bigcatrescue   YouTube Mini Clip Site:  DailyBigCat was launched Nov. 20, 2010 to provide a channel for the mini clips we upload directly from our iPhones.  By year end this site had 3,200 subscribers and 434,000 views.  We surpassed 79,000 fans on Face Book.   2 of 363 million If you search “big cats” our site comes up in position 2 AND 3 out of 363 million competing sites.  We also enhanced our presence on Care2.org and many other such sites.  We now have 500+ contacts in our LinkedIn presence here:  linkedin.com/in/BigCatRescue Our MySpace account now has 7,418 friends. myspace.com/1BigCatRescue  Mavrix Photo began using our photos in Dec. 2012   Google awarded Big Cat Rescue a grant of $40,000 per month in free AdWords. People who love animals love to share their photos and stories.  In 2008 Big Cat Rescue unleashed a Chat Big Cats community but in December of 2012 the underlying provider discontinued the free service.    Big Cat Rescue now has an Endowment Fund to provide a secure future for the cats. The Fund resides at the Community Foundation of Tampa Bay.  We initiated a program with Capitol One so that you can choose one of our beautiful cats for your credit card image and 1% of all of your purchases will be donated to Big Cat Rescue at no cost to you.   We were the Diamond Sponsor for the Taking Action for Animals conference in Washington, DC where more than 1,000 animal activists converged to learn more about legislation to protect animals.  We were a sponsor for Animal Coalition of Tampa's Stride for Strays, as we are every year.   One of Jamie Veronica's photos was accepted by the Fish and Wildlife Service for publication in their 2013 calendar.   We were interviewed by Animal Planet and featured as experts in their series, Fatal Attractions – Tigers Unleashed and another upcoming episode.   An article on Hope the bobcat was featured in Nat Geo Kids Magazine, with a teaser on the cover.   Saving Wild Places for Wild Cats:  In 2012 Big Cat Rescue donated $1500 towards Panthera conservation programs and outfitting rangers in other countries on behalf of our volunteers.   Helping Others: After delivering a couple of free webinars for the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), and hosting their first in person 2 day Workshop in 2011, Patty Finch asked if the board of GFAS could use our facilities for their meeting. We were delighted to meet the members of the board that we had not met before and were proud to show off Big Cat Rescue to all of them.  Howard Baskin presented on our fundraising streams and the history of Big Cat Rescue and I shared how we use google Apps and how we manage over 100 top notch volunteers.   Big Cat Rescue provided our CatLaws.com service to Animal Coalition of Tampa in their efforts to send a powerful message to the Hillsborough County Commissioners on the subject of TNR.  Trap, Neuter and Return.   As with every year we supplied Free Passes, Certificates for Feeding Tours and Keeper Tours, and Two For One Passes to many other animal causes to use in their fundraising efforts.  We donate primarily to those organizations that are providing services to cats of all sizes.  We do donate to some human related fundraisers as well, but animal causes make up 3% of all charities and yet compete for less than 1% of all donated dollars.   Then and Now: Below are the audited financial statements of Revenue and Expense for the past five years. We pride ourselves in keeping our fundraising and administrative total expenses below 20%. Because our tour revenue exceeds our fundraising and administrative costs, 100% of donations go to Program Expense.   The majority of the increase in Program Expense in 2012 was the cost of lawsuits we filed in furtherance of our mission against what we believe to be one of the most notorious exploiters of tiger cubs. We prevailed in the lawsuit in early 2013. Without the generous support of our donors we could not have sustained this successful effort. Thank you!   Officers and Members of the Board of Directors in 2012 and meetings: • CEO and Founder  Carole Baskin (not compensated by BCR) • President and Chairman of the Board Jamie Veronica (not compensated by BCR for her role as a Director) • Secretary & Treasurer Howard Baskin (not compensated by BCR for his role as a Director) • VP Director Lisa Shaw (not compensated by BCR) • Director Mary Lou Geis (not compensated by BCR) • Pamela Rodriguez (not compensated by BCR) • Darren Kipnis (not compensated by BCR) • Keith Lawless (not compensated by BCR) • Kim Mahoney (not compensated by BCR) These members met for quarterly board meetings at the sanctuary.  The board met 4 times in 2012.   Paid Staff: • Operations Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Gale Ingham • Staff Manager, Editor & Creative Director Jamie Veronica • Gift Shop & Guest Services  Honey Wayton and Kim Dever • Project Manager Chelsea Feeny • Education Director  Willow Hecht • Vernon Stairs Cage Builder and Maintenance • Scott Haller Cage Building Apprentice and Maintenance • PT Operations Manager and Videographer and Social Networking Chris Poole • Director of Donor Appreciation  Jeff Kremer • Assistant to Operations Manager and Staff Relief Person Jennifer Flatt • CFO Howard Baskin • PR Susan Bass • LaWanna Mitchell is an independent contractor who works remotely on web issues. All of our animal care is done by volunteers or by staff who also volunteer time before & after work.   Volunteers:  Big Cat Rescue had 93 volunteers at the end of 2012 who clocked in 37,715 man-power hours in addition to staff, 25 interns (12,700 hours) and 5,658 Volunteer Committee member hours. Volunteers and interns provided roughly the equivalent workforce of 24 more full time staff.  Interesting breakdown of volunteers: We 93 volunteers; 75 women and 18 men.  The youngest 20 years old, the oldest 84 years old.  Between January 1, 2010 and September 10, 2012 Big Cat Rescue had 77 interns from 10 countries and 22 states.   Staff and Volunteer Training:  We want to say a special thank you to all of our staff & volunteers who have just completed their 10th year of service to the cats.  Several of our staff attended the Safe Capture Course, as we do any time they are in Florida.   Get our Financial Reports:  See our IRS 990 and audited financial statement for Big Cat Rescue at http://bigcatrescue.org/finances/  

Here And There with Dave Marash
Here And There 23 August, 2021 Jimmy Tobias

Here And There with Dave Marash

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 51:19


Polls consistently show that about 80% of the American people support the Endangered Species Act, so why is the Fish and Wildlife Service weakening enforcement of its protections for animals like the red wolf and the Florida panther? Jimmy Tobias has written about these issues for The Intercept and recently in The Nation.  The threats to both animals aren't just hunters, but developers a nd right-win Republican politicians. 

The LA Report
The L.A. Report for Tuesday, August 3

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 4:00


Here's your morning news: Two elderly men who lived close to the site of the LAPD's botched detonation of illegal fireworks have died and their loved ones are saying their deaths may have been caused in part by the incident; The Sierra Nevada red fox has been granted endangered status by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. But the response comes after years of legal wrangling and may not fully satisfy, and more. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
622: Leon Kolankiewicz on Preserving Quality Farmland

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 37:49


Working to Protect the Land That Produces Our Food. In This Podcast: Leon Kolankiewicz defines the problem of urban sprawl, and he describes the alarming rate at which it is permanently destroying farmland and our future food security.   What is driving this sprawl, and what can we do about it? Leon is optimistic that farmland can be saved if long term trends are addressed. Hear the solutions he recommends, based on his decades of research, and the changes he believes can be made at both the individual and government levels. Don't miss an episode!visit UrbanFarm.Org/podcast   Leon is a consulting environmental scientist and planner. He has managed Environmental Impact Statements (EIS's) on projects ranging from dams and reservoirs to flood control facilities, roads, parks, power plants, oil drilling, and mines. He has assisted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the preparation of management plans at 50 national wildlife refuges in many states. Receiving his B.S. at Virginia Tech and M.Sc. at the University of British Columbia, during his career he has worked for several agencies including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, National Marine Fisheries Service, as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Honduras, and as a consultant.   Visit www.UrbanFarm.org/Podcast-by-episode-titles under the Farmer Fridays section for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library! Leon Kolankiewicz on Preserving Quality Farmland.

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: Developers and neighbors in conflict over open spaces on the Front Range; Davis Waite, Colorado's populist governor

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 13:27


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Monday August 2nd.   Today - Across the state developers and neighbors are in conflict over some of the most precious open spaces left on Colorado's Front Range.    Before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today we're going back to August 2nd, 1893, when Colorado's populist governor, Davis Waite, gave a fiery speech in Chicago employing his trademark line... “it is better, infinitely better, rather than our liberties should be destroyed by the tyranny which is oppressing humanity all over the world, that we should wade through seas of blood — yea, blood to the horses' bridles”.    Waite, himself, was a colorful Colorado character, a prospector for silver, the founder of the Aspen Union Era newspaper, and the only Colorado governor to ever hail from a third party.    Now, our feature story.    Colorado is fighting a battle over its open spaces, from the Park Hill golf course in Denver to a farm in Westminster to vacant space near Colorado State University in Fort Collins. Developers and neighbors are in conflict over some of the most precious unpaved spots left up and down Colorado's Front Range. Colorado Sun co-founder Jennifer Brown talks with reporter Michael Booth about the fight for development on revered open spaces.    To read our report on Front Range development, go to coloradosun.com.   Thanks for listening. Finally, here are a few stories you should know about today:   Wildlife advocates are petitioning federal officials to restore protections for gray wolves throughout the West after Idaho and Montana passed laws intended to drastically cut their numbers. Colorado voters decided last fall to reintroduce wolves to the state. But meanwhile in Montana and Idaho, lawmakers have passed new laws intended to kill hundreds more wolves each year. The environmental groups have sent their petition to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The agency is supposed to respond within 90 days.    A coroner in southern Colorado has not yet determined what caused the death of a spiritual leader whose mummified body was found decorated with Christmas lights and glitter. Saguache County Coroner Tom Perrin told The Denver Post he doesn't know when Amy Carlson's autopsy will be finished because he can't find a lab to test her body for heavy metals. Carlson was the leader of the group Love Has Won. The group used electrolysis to break down metals into solutions that its members sold online as health aids. Authorities want to know if Carlson had been ingesting those substances.   Residents of some of the most-vaccinated counties in Colorado are now being urged to resume wearing masks. At the same time, some of the least-vaccinated counties in Colorado are not. It's the latest surprising turn in the pandemic. The delta variant is accounting for 95% of new coronavirus cases in Colorado. About two-thirds of counties have case rates high enough to fall under the CDC's masking guidance. Those counties include 18 of the 20 most-vaccinated in the state. One reason is because the most-vaccinated counties are in many cases the most- populated counties, meaning the virus is more easily spread.    Governor Jared Polis is requiring state employees who are not vaccinated to take twice-weekly coronavirus tests and wear masks at the office. Polis called the decision a “middle road” approach that respects the concerns of those on both sides of the vaccination debate. It also aligns with rules for federal employees that President Joe Biden announced Thursday.   Former Colorado Governor Dick Lamm is being remembered as a leader who championed the environment and led voters to reject the 1976 Winter Olympics. Lamm died Thursday at the age of 85. The Democrat was first elected governor in 1974 at a time when Colorado leaned conservative. He held the office for 12 years. For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. Now, a quick message from our editor. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fish of the Week!
Columbia River Steelhead feat. Nate Wiese

Fish of the Week!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 20:33


Katrina and Guy talk Columbia River Steelhead Trout, high temperatures, and everything in between with Nate Wiese, the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Biden Imitates Putin's Policies, Harris Not Ready For Presidency, and Prince Harry Turns His Back on the Royal Family

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 43:45


Tonight's rundown: Parallels between the Biden Administration and Vladimir Putin are beginning to emerge More than 60% of Americans don't believe VP Kamala Harris is ready to be President - with Biden diminishing this should be very worrisome for Democrats  As Floridians plan to sail to Cuba to show their support for protestors, the Department of Homeland Security warns that they could face jail time should they enter international waters without permission  Too little too late - Chicago PD announces an anti-gun initiative to combat violence in the city  Now fish are racist!? The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service renames the “Asian carp” due to its “negative” connotation  Loyal no more! Prince Harry turns on his family and publishes an explosive tell-all Dogs just “get us” – No wonder they are man's best friend! This Day in History, 1969: The Moon landing  Final Thought: The Anti-Vax movement includes people from both the left and the right  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duck Season Somewhere
Wildlife Artist Rebekah Knight

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 69:24


The United States' Federal Duck Stamp is singularly the most amazing waterfowl conservation tool in the world, generating over a billion dollars since its inception. Growing up in southwest Kansas, Rebekah Knight won the Federal Junior Duck Stamp at age 15, competing ever since. How did Knight become an artist and why did she start competing in the Federal Duck Stamp contest? How does she decide which species, how does she prepare and how much time goes into it? Why does Knight describe the relatively small circle of Federal Duck Stamp artists as family?  The US Fish and Wildlife Service's proposed removal of "celebrating our waterfowl hunting heritage" theme from the duck stamp contest recently caused a stir among hunters, but what's the backstory, how and why do wildlife artists feel about the proposal?  Federal Duck Stamps are now available, a sure sign we're in the homestretch to duck season.   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com   Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy GunDog Outdoors Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys GetDucks USHuntList   It's really duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com

The Big Honker Podcast
Episode #453: Brad Bortner

The Big Honker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 103:17


Jeff Stanfield & Andy Shaver are joined by Brad Bortner who is retired Chief for the Division of Migratory Bird Management with the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The guys cover many topics, including, the importance of waterfowl hunters participating in the HIP survey, how the information obtained through HIP is used to set hunting season regulations, the limited impact the snow goose conservation season has on snow geese, cooperating with foreign governments and managing migratory birds, and Brad finally answers the age old question of how coots migrate.

Marketplace All-in-One
Not even the government knows the full extent of how government is using facial recognition

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 9:06


A new report from the Government Accountability Office says at least 20 federal agencies are using facial recognition technology, and not just the obvious acronyms like the FBI, TSA and ICE. Agencies like the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NASA are using the tech, too. More than half of the agencies using facial recognition don't know what systems their employees are using or how often they use them. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams interviews Gretta Goodwin, director of the GAO’s homeland security and justice team, about the agency’s findings.

Marketplace Tech
Not even the government knows the full extent of how government is using facial recognition

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 9:06


A new report from the Government Accountability Office says at least 20 federal agencies are using facial recognition technology, and not just the obvious acronyms like the FBI, TSA and ICE. Agencies like the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NASA are using the tech, too. More than half of the agencies using facial recognition don't know what systems their employees are using or how often they use them. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams interviews Gretta Goodwin, director of the GAO’s homeland security and justice team, about the agency’s findings.