Podcasts about Wildlife Service

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  • 360PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Wildlife Service

Show all podcasts related to wildlife service

Latest podcast episodes about Wildlife Service

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
President Biden Visits NM, Reporting Challenges During Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire & Wildfire's Impact on Mexican Wolves | 6.17.22

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 46:13


The Line Opinion Panel reacts to President Biden's weekend visit to our state. The panel discusses the President's pledge to cover all the costs associated with the Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire, and who will be left behind with the current reimbursement strategy. Our Land Executive Producer Laura Paskus talks with two reporters about their experiences covering the largest wildfire in state history and how you can apply for aid money if you've been impacted by the Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire. More than 20 years ago, in 1998, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partner agencies released Mexican wolves into the wild for the first time since the wolves had been driven to extinction in the United States in the 1970s. Today, a population of wolves lives in the Gila National Forest and across the border in Arizona. The program isn't without its challenges, and this year, the Black Fire ignited in the Gila National Forest during denning season, where it's affecting four wolf packs. Maggie Dwire, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Deputy Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator, talks with Our Land Executive Producer Laura Paskus about the Mexican Wolf and recovery efforts. Line Host: Gene Grant Line Opinion Panelists: Tom Garrity, Garrity Group Public Relations Rebecca Latham, CEO, Girl Scouts of New Mexico Julie Ann Grimm, editor & publisher, Santa Fe Reporter Our Land Executive Producer: Laura Paskus Guests: Maggie Dwire, assistant wolf recovery coordinator, Mexican Wolf Program, US Fish & Wildlife Service Patrick Lohmann, reporter, Source NM Adria Malcolm, freelance photojournalist For More Information: Biden: Whatever it Takes, as Long as it Takes – Santa Fe New Mexican Biden Ramps up Federal Help for NM Wildfire Fight – Associated Press Locals Find a Bit of Hope in President's Promises – Santa Fe New Mexican Wildfire Victims Living on Land Grants Will Not Qualify For Federal Aid - KUNM Recovery Area Map Black Fire Maps & Information Apply For Assistance- FEMA Adria Malcolm – Freelance Photojournalist Patrick Lohmann – Source New Mexico --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

On The Wing Podcast
PODCAST EP. 170: A State-of-the-Union for Lesser Prairie Chickens

On The Wing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 65:26


Host Bob St.Pierre is joined by Ted Koch, the executive director of the North American Grouse Partnership and a former U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service endangered species biologist, along with Ron Leathers, PF & QF's chief conservation officer, for a discussion about lesser prairie chickens and their likely listing as an endangered species. As a former endangered species biologist, Koch brings a depth of knowledge about the mechanics of an endangered species listing, as well as the conservation initiatives already underway to work with landowners around voluntary habitat programs for the birds. Episode Highlights: • Koch explains what ideal grassland habitat looks like for the lesser prairie chicken using a volleyball that's 80% covered in grass visualization, while Leathers talks about how using cattle on a grasslands landscape can help keep that volleyball 20% exposed and free from being overgrown by grass that's too tall or encroached upon by trees. • Koch also addresses the “shoot, shovel, and shut up” mentality often associated with an endangered species listing and how voluntary conservation programs, especially CRP, can be a major opportunity for landowners in the lesser prairie chicken's footprint. • Leathers also delivers a powerful message about how we often hear that quail are an “edge” species, but the fact they're considered an edge species is because the edge is all we leave them. Wide open grassland habitat created for lessers will also be terrific habitat for bobwhite quail.

GLT's The Leadoff
The Leadoff - Wednesday 6/15/22

GLT's The Leadoff

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 8:40


WGLT's The Leadoff is everything you need to know for Wednesday, June 14. Caterpillar is moving its headquarters to Texas, but the CEO of the Greater Peoria Area Economic Development Council says that won't have much of an impact on Central Illinois. Plus, the decurrent false aster might look like a run-of-the-mill daisy flower, but it's actually a flower that can only grow along the banks of the Illinois River. WCBU's Tim Shelly spoke with Emily Hodapp of the U-S Fish and Wildlife Service about the efforts to preserve and expand its delicate habitat in the Illinois River floodplain.

The Kitchen Sisters Present
191—The Egg Wars and the Farallon Islands

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 18:09


The Egg Wars—a hidden Gold Rush kitchen—when food was scarce and men died for eggs. We travel out to the forbidding Farallon Islands, 27 miles outside San Francisco's Golden Gate, home to the largest seabird colony in the United States. Over 250,000 birds on 14 acres. But it wasn't always so. One hundred seventy years ago it was the site of the “Egg Wars.” During the 1850s, egg hunters gathered over 3 million eggs, violently competing with each other, and nearly stripping the island bare. In 1969 the Point Reyes Bird observatory began working to protect the Farallones. The islands had been through a lot. The devastating fur trade of the 1800s. The Egg Wars. During WWII the Islands were used as a secret navy installation with over 70 people living on the island. From 1946-1970 nearly 50,000 drums of radioactive waste were dumped in the Farallon waters. Fisherman often shot high powered rifles at sea lions and helicopters were causing whales and other animals to panic. Today the Farallones are off limits to all but researchers, some who live out on the desolate island for months in the old lighthouse there. Surrounded by thousands of birds, they wear hard hats to keep the gulls from dive bombing their heads. The Islands are a sanctuary—The Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The Kitchen Sisters were given permission to travel out to the islands on one of the supply runs that goes out to the islands 2 times a month. The Farrallon National Wildlife Refuge is managed by US Fish and Wildlife Service Our story features: Gary Kamiya, journalist and author; Mary Jane Schram, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; Peter Pyle, Farallon Biologist; Ava Crosante, Illustrator; Peter White, Author of Farallon Islands—Sentinels of the Golden Gate; Skipper Roger Cunningham; Pete Warzybok, Scientist Farallon Islands; Russ Bradly, Farallon Program Leader for Point Blue Conservation Science. Special thanks to: Melissa Pitkin, Point Blue Conservation; Doug Cordell and the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Edward Jenkins; Julia Gulka; Sean Gee; Keith Hansen, Eve Williams, Gerry McChesnwey; and the Farallon Marine Sanctuary. The Kitchen Sisters Present is produced by The Kitchen Sisters, Nikki Silva and Davia Nelson, with Nathan Dalton and Brandi Howell. We are part of PRX's Radiotopia Network.

Idaho Matters
High school students work to protect Idaho's wolves

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 9:51


Students at Timberline High School are working to protect Idaho's wolves after pups from the Timberline Pack were killed last year by Wildlife Services biologists.

Stories for Action
Life in the Land: Big Hole Valley, USFWS Partners Program, Jim Magee

Stories for Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 31:16


Jim Magee is a biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program in the Big Hole Valley of Southwest Montana. The Partner Program provides free technical and financial assistance to landowners, managers, tribes, corporations, schools and nonprofits interested in improving wildlife habitat on their land.  For the past 28 years, Jim has been an active part of the Big Hole Watershed Committee, which brings together a variety of voices from the Valley to lead programs and provide resources to benefit the land and communities of the Big Hole Watershed. Jim shares about creating productive relationships between agency and private landowners, the exciting work that they have been able to implement to benefit both wildlife and ranchers in the Big Hole, and the collaboration to successfully keep the Arctic grayling fish from being listed as an endangered specie. This is great information for both agency and landowners alike. LINKS: USFWS Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program Big Hole Watershed Committee This episode is part of the Life in the Land project, which is a series of films and podcasts produced by Stories for Action, which hears from folks that interact with the complexities of Montana's landscapes, speaking to the value of locally-led work and the holistic approaches needed for the health of communities and the ecosystems they're a part of. Find out more about the project and watch the films at LifeintheLand.org Stories for Action holds a mission to use the power of storytelling to create human connection and advance a thriving planet for all. StoriesforAction.org  Follow along on our Instagram and Facebook: @StoriesforAction

Montana Public Radio News
FWS is headed back to court over road-building in Flathead National Forest

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 1:16


Conservation groups are suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over its assessment of the Flathead National Forest's road-building policy in grizzly bear and bull trout habitat.

Wild About Arizona
Endangered Mexican Wolf Recovery in Arizona

Wild About Arizona

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 66:50


In 1976, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Mexican wolf as an endangered species. The Arizona Game and Fish Department has been actively involved in reintroducing Mexican wolves to portions of their historical range since before the first release of wolves in 1998. On this episode of Wild About Arizona we welcome Jim Heffelfinger, Arizona Game and Fish Wildlife Science Coordinator and Jim deVos our Mexican Wolf Coordinator to discuss ongoing management and recovery activities along with challenges and successes of Mexican Wolf recovery efforts.    Visit  the Arizona Game and Fish Department Web Site: www.azgfd.gov

The Wandering Naturalist
Episode 130: Birds of Prey - Eagle Artifacts

The Wandering Naturalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 24:53


Thomas Howes, Natural Resource Manager of the Fond du Lac Reservation, joins us to discuss the rules that dictate how Native People can possess and use eagle artifacts. He also discusses the work he has collaborated on to update the US Fish and Wildlife Service's rules so Native Nations can work with the USFWS to allow access to eagle artifacts that starts to better meet the needs of Native People while still protecting eagles. 

KZMU News
Wednesday May 25, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 8:08


A butterfly living in the high elevation wetlands on the Colorado Plateau is under threat. Their only food source grows near water, which is in short supply in a region with a warmer climate and reduced snowpack. Today on the news, a report on the ‘butterfly effect' of climate change as the US Fish and Wildlife Service considers listing the silverspot as officially threatened. Plus, federal research is beginning to prevent and treat ‘long' COVID. And, as Utah braces for another COVID-19 surge, doctors recommend ways to reduce risk. // Show Notes // Photo: A male silverspot butterfly. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is considering listing the species as threatened. Credit Terry Ireland/USFWS // U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Service Proposes Listing Silverspot Butterfly as Threatened under Endangered Species Act https://www.fws.gov/press-release/2022-05/service-proposes-listing-silverspot-butterfly-threatened // Silverspot Butterfly Range https://www.fws.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Speyeria%20nokomis%20nokomis%20range%20map.png // Recover COVID https://recovercovid.org // UPR: As Utah braces for another COVID-19 surge, doctors recommend how to reduce risk https://www.upr.org/utah-news/2022-05-20/as-utah-braces-for-another-covid-19-surge-doctors-recommend-how-to-reduce-risk

I Am This Age
Audrey Mayer: Ecologist

I Am This Age

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 30:52


Audrey Mayer, an ecologist with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, is on the pod today! She was a professor living in the UP of Michigan with her son, Lucas, until she recently left her job and she and Lucas moved to New Hampshire. It turns out even if you're working in the highest echelons of academia, you still might have feelings of doubt, failure, and regret from time to time. Listen now to hear Audrey's story of change, plus a short about me slinging pizza after college. (Peter, if you're out there, hi.) Enjoy! 

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 17, 2022: Crozet panel learns about Albemarle's climate action planning; Developer seeks 130 units in "downtown" Belmont

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:38


On this day in 1890, Idaho became the 43rd member of the United States of America, a fact that may not have resonance but could be the important piece of information you hear today. This is doubtful, but we are only at the very beginning of this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a program that contains between two and two-hundred-and two facts per newsletters or podcast. Actual amounts may vary by consumer. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. Sign up for free to get all of the information!On today’s program:A site plan will be held tomorrow for a large condominium complex on land in Belmont that’s been used for automotive repair It’s the 68th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, and the R.R. Moton School in Farmville is now an officially designated historic site Albemarle County’s Climate Action Coordinator talks Climate Action with the Crozet Community Advisory CommitteeAlbemarle Supervisors to vote on resolution to allow reintroduction of a freshwater mollusk to area rivers Time is running out to inform surveys for climate action planning in Charlottesville First shout-out: Charlottesville Jazz Society spotlighting benefit show for UkraineIn today’s first subscriber supported shout-out. The Charlottesville Jazz Society is spotlighting a benefit event to support the people of Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Young jazz students near the besieged city of Mariupol sent guitarist Royce Campbell a plea to help, and several area musicians have jumped into action. Vocalist Monica Worth has organized the event, and Campbell will play for Ukraine with bassist Andre La Vell and drummer Jim Howe. Many of Charlottesville’s best jazz musicians will sit in. Donations will be collected and sent to Global Giving’s Ukraine Crisis Relief Fund, and you can also go ahead and support this effort with a payment online. That’s We Play for Ukraine at the Whiskey Jar this Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. City climate actions surveys closing this FridayThe city of Charlottesville is working on a Climate Action Plan to guide decisions on funding and resources for efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the community. Charlottesville and Albemarle County both have agreed to meet certain reduction targets by 2030 and to be carbon-free by 2050. A pair of surveys has been live since April 20, but the deadline to participate is coming up this Friday. The first seeks input on how you think greenhouse gas emissions should be reduced and there have been over 160 responses so far. (survey #1)The second wants your thoughts on what issues are faced by vulnerable populations when it comes to the top three climate hazards identified by staff. They are extreme heat, increased intensity of precipitation and flooding, and changing season conditions. This survey is five pages long. (survey #2)To learn more, there are five Climate Action Fact Sheets on the city’s website.Site plan review meeting for Belmont infill residential scheduled for tomorrowAs Charlottesville continues to change under the impact of a new Comprehensive Plan that encourages more residential density, there are still some examples of projects that could build to higher density under existing zoning.One such example comes up tomorrow at a site plan review conference that will be held virtually at 10 a.m. by the city’s Neighborhood Development Services Department. (meeting info)An entity with the name Belmont & Carlton Holdings LLC owns 16 parcels in the area, with one of them being a 2.58 acre parcel purchased in February 2006 upon which an automotive repair use has been on the property for many years. All of the land is zoned Neighborhood Commercial Center, which is the reason there are commercial uses in what some refer to as downtown Belmont. Now, that entity seeks to develop a portion of nearly 6.2 acres of their property and they need a critical slopes waiver to do it. “The applicant is looking to construct 118 multi-family condominiums and 12 single-family attached townhouses,” reads a supplement for the site plan review related to the critical slopes waiver. “The site includes existing city right of way that will be improved with the project for the development of the street grid and proposed neighborhood.”As part of the development, the applicant is seeking to designate eight of the units as affordable and argue that is why the slopes waiver should be granted. Of the total site, 14.31 percent are defined as critical slopes. To mitigate the impact, the applicant will build a stormwater management facility to reduce the impact to the watershed. In addition to the site plan review meeting, the critical slopes waiver will need to come through the Planning Commission and the City Council. Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education ruling todayToday marks the 68th anniversary of the ruling in the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case which struck down the legal doctrine of “separate but equal” that sanctioned and required schools to be segregated. This anniversary marks the first time the U.S. Park Service has extended official recognition to other sites in other communities across the country that played a role in the Brown v. Board ruling. One of them is Farmville, where students at the R.R. Moton High School walked out on April 23, 1951 to protest inferior conditions and a pattern of being denied funds for improvements. A month later a lawsuit was filed by NAACP lawyers Spottswood Robinson and Oliver Hill and the case Davis v. County School Board was consolidated with four other cases on appeal to the Supreme Court. To learn more about the ruling and about how the ruling eventually led to the five-year closing of all public schools in Prince Edward County, visit the R.R. Moton Museum’s website or its Facebook page. Last week, President Joe Biden signed into law the Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Park Expansion and Redesignation Act which officially designates the R.R. Moton Museum as a National Historic Site. Learn more in a press release on the R.R. Moton website. Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting campalbemarleva.org/donate. Albemarle Supervisors to be asked to support reintroduction of James Spineymussel The Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources is working on a plan to restore an endangered freshwater mollusk back into the James River watershed from which it has perished. On Wednesday, the Albemarle Board of Supervisors will vote on a resolution giving their support to efforts to introduce the James Spineymussel into the Rivanna River as well as the James River. “Existing JSM populations have been augmented in six streams in Amherst, Bath, Buckingham, Botetourt, and Nelson Counties, but to truly recover this endangered species, the mussel also needs to be reintroduced to waterbodies from which it has been lost,” reads the staff report.According to a staff report, there are over 300 species of freshwater mussels and many of them are located in the southeastern United States. They provide filtering of water with each individual able to process as many as 12 gallons a day in a single day. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources have been working on a recovery plan for decades and have raised James Spineymussel at the Virginia Fisheries and Aquatic Wildlife Center at the Harrison Lake National Hatchery. The species has been on the federal endangered list since July 22, 1988. The sighting of James Spineymussel has been enough to stop infrastructure projects in the past. At one point, the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority was considering a reservoir in northwestern Albemarle County, but the potential presence of the James Spineymussel eliminated that from further consideration. Albemarle CACs are being briefed on county’s climate action implementationThe Albemarle Board of Supervisors adopted a Climate Action Plan in October 2020 to help guide the county’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 45 percent of a baseline by the year 2030. That’s the first step before a second goal to be carbon neutral by 2050 and the baseline is derived from the year 2008. Albemarle Climate Program Coordinator Gabe Dayley began his journey through the county advisory panels by asking the Crozet Community Advisory Committee what their first thoughts are when thinking about climate action and what he might have as an update. (review Dayley’s presentation)“I’ll jump in because I hope that I will hear some real substantive things that we’re going to do and not just talk about them,” said Supervisor Ann Mallek. Another CAC member said he’s noticed temperature changed over the decades. Kostas Alibertis has been in Crozet since the 1980’s. “Truly in the winter time we used to be a lot cooler than Charlottesville and now our temperature seems to be more comparable to Charlottesville,” Alibertis said. “I think that some of the growth has taken away some of the coverage, the greenery and the grass, and that’s led to the community being a little warmer. Maybe I’m completely wrong about that, but how do we address what we’ve lost?” There are some new members of the Crozet CAC and this was the first for Mallory DeCoster.“I feel excited that this is a topic because this is my first meeting and I joined this group because I care about the environmental issues particularly in this county,” DeCoster said. Another new member is local Realtor Jim Duncan, who said more needs to be done about getting infrastructure built to get people out of their cars. “Climate change is a real legitimate thing but I don’t know what the viable action items are that the CAC can voice our opinion on,” Duncan said. The Climate Action Plan was adopted prior to the review of the Albemarle Comprehensive Plan which is currently underway. Dayley said the overarching Comprehensive Plan that will be adopted will be influenced by the climate plan as well as efforts to include equity as a major consideration in future county decisions.  He also said there’s a lot of work to be done.“Climate change is big and can feel overwhelming and I think sometimes in professional spaces, policy spaces, local government, and science we can shy away from that side of things,” Dayley said. “But the number two point is that there is research showing that actually kind of like acknowledging our reaction whatever it might be to climate change might move us to effective actions.”Dayley said everyone can take actions to be part of the solutions to meet community targets. Dayley said CACs can play a role in communicating back to the public what the county and its partners are doing.There are four themes to Albemarle’s Climate Action Plan that mirror the county’s adopted missions and values. “Through our efforts to address global climate change we also want to attend to our local health of people and place here, benefiting the local economy through our climate action,” Dayley said. “Also the local environment and thinking about some of our intersecting county priorities like clean water and biodiversity and then making sure the work that we do and the services we offer to folks are equitable and inclusive in how they involve people in the community and bring benefits.”The plan itself has 135 action areas to reduce emissions for each of the sources including transportation, land use, building energy use, sustainable materials, renewable energy sources, agricultural and natural resources and more. The most recent inventory of greenhouse gas emissions dates back to 2018 and another one is underway now that will give a glimpse into 2020. In September, the Board of Supervisors was told more work needs to be done to meet the 2030 targets. (read previous coverage)Dayley said for the county, climate action means things like transitioning to an electric fleet and continuing to make county buildings more efficient. “We’re also looking at how the county manages landscapes it owns and that includes things like parks and natural areas as well as school grounds,” Dayley said. “We’re soon going to be looking at also our procurement and the sustainability of the materials that we procure like plastics and paper and things like that.”A second phase for the climate action plan will be on adaptation and mitigation and to prepare for impacts. The results of a climate vulnerability and risk assessment will be available for review in the coming months. As Albemarle reviews its Comprehensive Plan and the growth management policy, Dayley said one idea is to continue to build places to live that are more dense to support public transit. Study and analysis by county staff demonstrates the role that conservation of existing ecological resources can play.“They found that our forests are helping us quite a lot,” Dayley said. “They are sequestering and drawing down carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, almost a million carbon dioxide metric tons a year.”I’ll have from other CAC presentations in future installments of Charlottesville Community Engagement. At publication time, there are 12 views of this meeting on YouTube. Can we make that 24 in 24 hours time?Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Whitetail Landscapes - The Science and Strategy of Chestnut Trees for Deer

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:49


In this podcast Tim Russell (Green Fire Forestry & Wildlife Services) and Jon Teater (Whitetail Landscapes) discuss the significance of chestnut trees and their benefit to wildlife. Tim details the history and science of chestnuts and how the landscape has changed as a result of the blight.  Previously, chestnuts provided an economic and wildlife benefit that is important to our country and is now missed with the current whitetail deer herd. The value of the chestnut tree is something we have sometimes forgotten and can be a game changer on the landscape. Listen to the podcast to further understand the benefits and how this tree can benefit your deer herd.   Jon discusses his secrets to designing a property with chestnut trees in mind. Tim discusses the benefits of chestnuts versus acorns; the answer may surprise you! Jon asks Tim about planting non-native chestnuts and the impact on the landscape. Both contributors discuss the type of chestnuts (native, non-native, hybrid and transgenic) and the benefits of each and how certain organizations are working toward supporting a transgenic tree on the landscape. Jon discusses simple options to planting and how he approaches chestnuts and deer. Tim discusses the best options going forward for those wanting to plant chestnut trees on their property, specifically the American chestnut. Tim and Jon break down the key factors for choosing chestnuts, and how to manage them on the landscape. Other important information and specifics as it relates to preferred soil type, environments and what not to do with chestnuts is explained in the podcast. Social Links Green Fire Forestry & Wildlife Services, LLC https://whitetaillandscapes.com/ https://www.facebook.com/whitetaillandscapes/ https://www.instagram.com/whitetail_landscapes/?hl=en Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”

united states music new york university game texas world earth education college guide water state zoom living tech research society ms government benefits foundation search songs north america environment fish dark press normal web natural tree va rain birds sea disease climate change baltimore ocean animals south carolina cd snow maine citizens trees cambridge agency stream priority richmond plants biology guitar native environmental bay images ash dynamic bio conservation copyright wildlife trio index commonwealth processes penn menu pond signature arial fort worth ludwig virginia tech asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations compatibility msonormal colorful forestry baltimore orioles populations times new roman ls sections aquatic poison ivy merriam webster watershed organisms zoology chesapeake minn policymakers taxonomy forest service photosynthesis shenandoah shrubs wildlife service songbirds acknowledgment cosgrove ornithology cambria math style definitions worddocument nests xeno shenandoah valley saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables stormwater dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr virginia department latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused michelle smith defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked sols semihidden unhidewhenused audubon society latentstyles table normal bmp forest management name title name normal name strong name emphasis name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid bill thompson shepherdstown birdsongs ebird living systems grades k name e wildlife resources light accent dark accent colorful accent name list cumberland gap name date rhododendrons name plain text name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list spanish moss inland fisheries forest resources warble virginia society michigan museum ben cosgrove all about birds audio notes lang elliott national conservation training center 20image water center stormwater runoff tmdl donotshowrevisions lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
The John Batchelor Show
#SpaceX: Fish and Wildlife Service speaks of the plover. Bob Zimmerman, BehindtheBlack.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 13:59


Photo:  Snowy plover chick #SpaceX: Fish and Wildlife Service speaks of the plover. Bob Zimmerman, BehindtheBlack.com https://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/fish-wildlife-documents-now-reveal-its-objections-to-spacex-boca-chica-facility/

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Listener Calls + News with Jill Zarin (ACS May 6)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 58:11


Adam takes a call from Brian, the communication consultant for Poseidon Water, who talks about environmentalists trying to stop a project over 20 years in the making which would help California's drought problem. Next Adam hears from listener Jim, a Special Agent with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, who tells his story of using JBWeld to help track and preserve alligator snapping turtles. Next, Jill Zarin reports on today's news stories including: the reason Kim Cattrall is done with Samantha on Sex in the City, Elon Musk potentially charging Twitter fees, JonBenet Ramsey's dad asking for DNA testing, the escaped Alabama inmate who had a 2-decade affair with his CO, and the Supreme Court leak about overturning abortion rights. THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: SimpliSafe.com/Adam LifeLock.com enter ADAM JBWeld.com XChairAdam.com

Irish Farmers Journal Weekly Podcast
Ep 544: Farming News: €1,000 to make silage, Teagasc's suckler U-turn and stolen calves

Irish Farmers Journal Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 25:36


Detail of a new €55m scheme to help farmers make hay and silage, Teagasc's U-turn on stocking rate advice for suckler farmers, stolen calves, the CAP plan and problems for young farmers all feature. We also discuss the National Parks and Wildlife Service's new strategic action plan.

Tennessee WildCast
TW 289 - Junior Duck Stamp

Tennessee WildCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 28:31


Join us this week as we stop by the Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge to visit with Refuge Ranger Joan Howe to learn about the Tennessee State Junior Duck Stamp contest. This art competition is the culmination of students' study of waterfowl and wetlands conservation, often using the Junior Duck Stamp Program educational curriculum. The winning stamp is produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to recognize the conservation efforts of young people and support environmental and conservation education programs in the United States. #outdoors #tnwildlife #gooutdoorstennessee #tennesseewildcast #jrduckstamp #ducks #tennesseenationalwildliferefuge https://www.fws.gov/program/junior-duck-stamp/about-us https://www.fws.gov/refuge/tennessee www.tnwildlife.org

America Outdoors Radio Podcast
America Outdoors Radio - April 23, 2022

America Outdoors Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 45:50


This week on America Outdoors Radio we will share a moving conversation with Bill Evans about the special hunts he enjoyed with his late daughter, Arianna, one of them with the help of the Hunt of a Lifetime Foundation.  Brian Lynn with the Sportsmen's Alliance sounds the alarm about a lawsuit filed by an environmentalist group against the U.S. fish and Wildlife Service that could deny anglers and hunters access and opportunities at our National Wildlife Refuges.  On the fishing front the lowland lakes opener for trout happens this Saturday and Steve Caromile with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife will tell you about this popular fishing event along with the annual trout derby taking place from now through October.  Finally, Ryan Mosley with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is asking anglers to catch and keep a limit of lake trout measuring 28 inches or less to help maintain the trophy lake trout and kokanee salmon fisheries found here.  http://www.americaoutdoorsradio.com 

Restoration Roundup
Alien invasion: How can we control invasive plants in restoration projects?

Restoration Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 42:27


Invasive plants pose a serious threat to the integrity of Vermont's riparian forests and the success of forest restoration projects, and their impact is only expected to increase as our planet continues to warm. In our new episode of Restoration Roundup, featuring Katie Kain (Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) and Ethan Tapper (Chittenden County Forester, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation), we discuss the prevalence of invasive plants and how our contributions to their establishment in our ecosystems means we have a responsibility to face the difficult realities of how to control them. This episode was designed and directed by Liz Woodhull.

Stacked Keys Podcast
Episode 131 -- Terry Peacock -- Protecting Wild Places And Animals

Stacked Keys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 55:45


Animals don't punch a time clock and that is one of the aspects that make working in this field a calling and not just a job. Meet Terry Peacock who is a refuge manager with the US Fish and Wildlife Service and she's been in management most of her career years. As an 8 year old she wanted to run a place for animals and that is exactly what she grew up to focus her career. Over time, women have asserted themselves and stood their ground in this particular field because they were capable and educated and can do their jobs protecting wild places and wildlife for the future. Terry is involved in everything that happens on the refuge. She has a passion for what she does. She shares her leadership style methods which are to never ask her employees to do something that she is not willing to do herself. When we talk about a typical day — there is no such thing as typical. Her fire officers are in the field, her biology crews are working with salamanders, the turtle projects need attention and the wolf relocation project has workers on it as well. Many plates spin in this office. Terry sees her job is to get the resources so that her people can meet the demands of their jobs and complete tasks. It is a decision making job ranging from taking care of buildings and may spin straight into working with the plans to save an endangered species. The amount of knowledge she has to hold is incredible. Be sure you tune in to hear her favorite projects. She says the salamander and the wolf programs are close to her heart. A lot of endangered species are important because they have human consequences. Everything in our world ties back to nature. We talk about fire and habitats. She explains some of the mindset of southeast prescribed fires over the thoughts out west where there are not controlled burns. The habitat gets too thick and impacts the animals negatively. There is plenty of education that goes into a day in the life — educating other professionals , educating students, educating the public and industries and providing information to impact policy. When we discuss work ethic, her upbringing influenced who she is today. She believes in working and getting the job done and done well. Terry was raised on a farm as an only child which meant the chores fell to her everyday. In her career, her problem isn't motivating her staff, but telling them to slow down. She's figured out that it is a passion— a lot of free time is spent doing exactly what you are getting paid for. She finds work life balance because her family enjoys the outdoors. Her church family and leadership opportunities take precedence over anything in Terry's life and that keeps her grounded. Tune in!! “STOMP” used by permission of artist Donica Knight Holdman and Jim Huff

Pennsylvania Legacies
The Little Things

Pennsylvania Legacies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 27:48


We celebrate Earth Day in conversation with Pennsylvania-born Rosalie Haizlett, a nature illustrator who's had work commissioned by the Smithsonian and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. She tells PEC's Lily Jones why she believes the arts can be a gateway to stewardship.

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE
Dave Parsons, Project Coyote

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 31:40


David Parsons is a Board member of Project Coyote and vice-chairman and a science fellow of The Rewilding Institute (a conservation think tank) and is the Institute's Carnivore Conservation Biologist. Dave serves on several regional steering/advisory committees for organizations and coalitions advocating for wolf recovery and landscape-scale conservation in the Southwest. Dave's interests include the ecology and conservation of large carnivores, protection and conservation of biodiversity, and wildlands conservation. Dave is retired from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service where from 1990-1999 he led the Service's effort to reintroduce the endangered Mexican gray wolf to portions of its former range in Arizona and New Mexico.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=25149153)

Earth Wise
The Plight Of Monarch Butterflies | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 2:00


The monarch butterfly is one of the world's best-known butterflies and has become the symbol for a whole class of imperiled pollinators.  Populations of the iconic orange-and-black insects have declined dramatically in recent decades.  According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the eastern monarch population has dropped 88% between 1996 and 2020.  Habitat loss, […]

RTÉ - Mooney Goes Wild
Grasslands under threat

RTÉ - Mooney Goes Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 19:11


Éanna Ní Lamnha speaks to Dr. Maria Long, Grassland Ecologist with the National Parks and Wildlife Service, about the importance of protecting our semi-natural grasslands and improving their value for biodiversity.

Living on Earth
A New Telescope to Unlock Mysteries of the Universe, Massive Government Animal Culling, Climate Risk Disclosure Mandate and more

Living on Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 52:09


The new James Webb Space Telescope is by far the most powerful space telescope ever built, able to see up to a hundred galaxies at once and detect the light emitted from some of the universe's very first stars while also checking planets near and far for conditions compatible for life.  Also, Wildlife Services, a division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, killed 1.75 million animals in 2021, including bears, wolves and beavers among 400,000 native animals. USDA claims these exterminations protect agriculture and public health, but opponents say there are better ways to deal with animals that present problems for humans. And trillions of dollars of financial assets are at risk of losses related to the climate, so the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is now moving to require public companies to disclose their climate risk. The Living on Earth Book Club is back! Join us April 25th at 5:30 p.m. Eastern in Concord, New Hampshire or online from the comfort of your own home for a conversation with bestselling author Sy Montgomery about her new book, The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty. Register at loe.org/events.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beach Weekly
LIT at the Beach S1E5: "Silent Spring" by Rachel Carson

Beach Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 4:57


For this episode, guest host Leila Nunez discusses and reads a passage of Silent Spring by Rachel Carson. This controversial book quickly became a best-seller among readers when it was published in 1962. Many credit it to be the catalyst for the environmental movement. Rachel Carson was born in 1907 in Springdale, Pennsylvania and grew up with a deep connection to the nature around her. A writer and marine biologist, she wrote many pieces on conservation and the environment during her time as Editor-in-Chief of all publications for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and later resigned to focus more on her writing. In the book, Carson calls into question the current agricultural practices at the time which used a now illegal pesticide, DDT. DDT was harmful not only to pests, but also to humans and wildlife. Carson calls for change from the government and from all mankind to make a difference. Many of what is argued in the book is still relevant today, which is why Silent Spring is still a fundamental book of the environmental movement. If you are interested in getting a copy you can go to the CSULB University Library or check out a copy at a local bookstore or even online. New episodes of LIT at the Beach will drop every Tuesday. Like, comment, and follow us on your favorite platform for more content! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast… Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=… Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/4HJaqJe… Overcast https://overcast.fm/itunes1488484518/… Soundcloud @daily49er

Species Unite
Carter Niemeyer: Wolfer

Species Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 68:42


“Packs that are continuously trapped and snared and hunted, the packs are smaller and things are a lot more chaotic in the pack because you're killing uncle, you're killing dad, you're killing mom. The pups may get good leadership training and learn how to hunt or the family could be broken up and the puppies never fully learn how to hunt.   And so all this hunting and trapping  lowers the pack size, fragments them often and might cause a pack to break up, and those broken packs can actually send out more wolves in more places.   So, all this intense wolf killing, in my opinion, it's not justified and it's unnecessary because what it's creating now, instead of biological carrying capacity, they're managed politically on social carrying capacity. How many wolves will people tolerate?” - Carter Niemeyer     Carter Niemeyer is a wildlife biologist who has been working with wolves since the 1980s. Afetr decades as a trapper of wolves (and many other predators) he transformed into one of their biggest champions.   He worked as a state trapper and conducted wildlife studies for the US Fish and Wildlife Service and by 1990, he was a full-time wolf specialist, negotiating situations where wolves were in conflict with people.   In the mid 90s, he became a core member of the Wolf Capture Team in Canada. They were there to capture and bring wolves back to the US for the Federal Wolf Reintroduction Program.   Carter's stories are seriously astonishing stories and span more than five decades of work with large predators. He's been a naturalist since he could walk and his love of nature and the outdoors are at the core of his very being.     I spent the afternoon with him at his house in Idaho. I wanted to better understand the wolf hatred and hysteria that's been going in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana for centuries - but currently seems to be at an all-time high.   I wanted to hear Carters perspective, the thoughts of a former trapper on the wolf massacre that's taking place today in the Northern Rockies and, also to ask him if there's anything that we can do to stop it.   LINKS: www.carterniemeyer.com

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke
Pileated woodpecker

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 1:16


The pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) is a large, mostly black woodpecker native to North America. An insectivore, it inhabits deciduous forests in eastern North America, the Great Lakes, the boreal forests of Canada, and parts of the Pacific Coast. It is the largest extant woodpecker species in North America, with the possible exception of the ivory-billed woodpecker, which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed be reclassified as extinct. It is also the third largest species of woodpecker in the world, after the great slaty woodpecker and the black woodpecker. "Pileated" refers to the bird's prominent red crest, from the Latin pileatus meaning "capped".

RTÉ - Mooney Goes Wild
Star-studded Skerries sandbank

RTÉ - Mooney Goes Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 9:39


Dr. Ciaran O'Keeffe, formerly Chief Scientist with the National Parks and Wildlife Service, is a man with a keen eye for interesting happenings in the natural world. Over the past few months he has been observing some rather unusual gull behaviour off Skerries, Co. Dublin.

Venery and Veritas
Musings on Light Geese: Snows, Blues, and Ross's

Venery and Veritas

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 87:46


Dr. Chris Nicolai is a renowned waterfowl biologist who grew up and completed his undergraduate degree in Minnesota.  His Master's degree from University of Alaska and  Ph.D. from the University of Nevada are both focused on breeding black brant in western Alaska.  He is a foremost expert on waterfowl banding/tracking, hunter-harvest modeling and other critical science. Chris has spent 15 years working for the US Fish and Wildlife Service and moved to Delta Waterfowl in Bismarck 2.5 years ago as the resident research scientist. Topics Discussed:Brant and why they are the coolest goose of all.Oologists and egg collectors.Snow, Blues, and Ross Geese histories.Goose GeneticsSnow goose population impacts on other waterfowl.Updating the Light Goose Conservation Order (LGCO) and what that would take. Climate change's impact on food in the arctic.Chasing Rabbits:Alaska Bird Trails: Adventures of an Expedition by Dog Sled to the Delta of the Yukon River at Hooper BaySearch for The Blue Goose: J.Dewey Soper: The Arctic Adventures of a Canadian NaturalistJoin Delta WaterfowlYou can find more about Everett Headley, your host, at his website or Instagram.  Intro Music: Jason Shaw- Back to the WoodsOutro Music: Bumy Goldson- Keep Walking

Think Out Loud
Restoring the Klamath Basin

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 9:30


Thanks to a large infusion of federal funding, more than $160 million, stakeholders in the Klamath Basin are submitting proposals to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for restoration projects. The Klamath Tribes are one of the groups submitting a proposal. Mark Buettner is an environmental scientist for the Klamath Tribes. We hear more about what the plan looks like.

Ingrained
Episode 32: Momentum Grows for Sites Reservoir

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 11:01


A third straight drought year poses major challenges for California's environment, cities and farms. While cooperation, collaboration and innovation are needed in the short term, many feel a major part of the long-term water solution is additional storage. A remote area on the west side of the Sacramento Valley could be a big part of the solution. Sites Reservoir has been debated for decades, and getting this critical addition to water infrastructure appears more likely than ever. One major development in getting this project completed is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency earlier this month formally invited the Sites Project Authority to apply for a $2.2 billion low-interest loan through the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act, which would bring the project significantly closer to construction and completion.  Jerry Brown “This really is a game changer,” said Sites Project Authority General Manager Jerry Brown. “Additive to the other sources of funds that we have, a prior loan from USDA and Proposition 1 funds from the state and federal sources, really rounds out our financing picture to a great extent. This puts us on a to track where we are now in a position to fund construction of the project, which is really exciting!” Brown said there are several steps needed, including applying for a new water right to the State Water Resources Control Board. There are other permits needed from the state and federal government. If all goes as hoped, ground will be broken in 2024 and the new reservoir will be in place in 2030.  He said if Sites were in place prior to the wet years of 2017 and 2019, it would have been completely full at 1.5 million acre feet to start 2020, and would have been able to provide about 400,000 acre feet of water for the state's cities, farm and environment.  Brown said while Sites will provide significant benefits for urban and agricultural customers, it's commitment for environmental water will set it apart from all other projects. “I don't think there's ever been a project like Sites that will provide the kind of assets and benefits for environmental purposes.” As the drought will provide significant impacts to the Sacramento Valley and state in the months ahead, hopefully getting Sites Reservoir built will provide major help in the future; especially vital considering our volatile climate.  Episode Transcript Jim Morris: After a promising start to the rainy season, California has gone extremely dry. The lack of water provides serious widespread challenges. As our climate volatility grows, the need for a more reliable water supply is even more vital. For a growing number of people, that's where Sites Reservoir comes into play. Jim Morris: Welcome to Ingrained, the California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. A lack of rain and snow has extended the drought for a third year, creating the likelihood of widespread pain. One hopeful sign for the future would be carrying out a project that's been discussed and debated for decades, Sites Reservoir. Jerry Brown is general manager of the Sites Project Authority. Jerry, let's start with key updates on the project. First, can you relay the big news from the US Environmental Protection Agency, what happened, and how important is this news? Jerry Brown: This really is a game changer. What happened was the Environmental Protection Agency is making an invitation to the Sites Reservoir Project to apply for what's called a WIFIA loan, Water Infrastructure And Finance Investment Act. And what that is, is a mechanism by which the federal government makes a loan available to a project like Sites. In this case, it's in an amount of about 49 percent of the project cost, which for Sites is roughly $2.2 billion. So it's a $2.2 billion loan that has been offered to the Sites Reservoir Project, and, additive to the other sources of funds that we have, a prior loan from USDA, the Proposition One money from the state, and the federal sources really rounds out our financing picture to a great extent and puts us on a track to where we are now in a position to fund the construction of the project, so that's pretty exciting. Jim Morris: Let's talk about that construction. Realistically, and perhaps optimistically, what is your timeframe that you're looking at? Jerry Brown: The loan doesn't really necessarily accelerate the project. There's still several steps that we have to take to get to the point where we can start construction. Probably most notable is the upcoming application that we're making for our water right. We are going to be seeking a new water right for the Sites Project, and that will be submitted within the next month. And, with that, it will kick off about an 18 to 24 month period that the State Water Resources Control Board takes to evaluate our application and make a final determination as to the water right that will be established for the project. Beyond that, there are some very critical permits that we need to secure through the Fish and Wildlife Service of both the state and the federal government. Those are under way. We've made an application recently for one of those, and there's a couple more to do, and we expect those to occur within the next 18 to 24 months, as well. So those critical activities will lead up to the point in time when we will be able to have the assets in place to then secure the loan with the federal government through WIFIA. Once that occurs, we'll be able to initiate construction fairly shortly after that. So, hopefully, by mid to late 2024, we'll start construction. And it's about a six-year period, which would put us at operational completion in about 2030. Jim Morris: If Sites were in place now, how much of a difference would it make? Jerry Brown: Because largely of the 2017, 2019 wet years, if we would've had Sites in place then, Sites would've started the 2020 year completely full at a million and a half acre feet. We estimated last year, had we had Sites in place, we would've had about a million acre feet of water in the reservoir for the farms and cities and environment. With the use that was projected last year, we would probably have about 400,000 acre feet available this year, which is still a very substantial amount, especially considering the very low conditions at our upstream reservoirs, Shasta, Oroville, Folsom. Jim Morris: We have three distinct segments in California, and they sometimes intertwine, the environment, cities, and farms. How would each of these benefit if Sites is built? Jerry Brown: The one piece of this, while I believe the benefits for the cities and farms are very important and necessary to make the project work, is the environmental element. I don't think there's ever been a project like Sites that will provide the kind of assets and benefits for environmental purposes. We're still figuring the final participation by the federal government, but, on a high end, there could be up to around 40 percent of the project, the Sites Project, that would be dedicated for environmental purposes. And that is huge, because never before has the state or the federal government owned and operated an asset like Sites, that will have both storage and water supply for the environment in the driest of years. And with that, we recently entered into some collaboration with some environmental groups to evaluate how we can optimize the use of this environmental storage to provide the optimum benefit for all the different environmental objectives that are out there. So we're super excited about that. And the board is very committed to this as a component of the project. I think one other thing to note, one of the criticisms about the Proposition One investment in environmental purposes is that maybe it's going to be somewhat of a bait and switch where we say we're going to do something, and then, when times get tough, it's not going to happen. But I can tell you with a hundred percent confidence that this board and this project is going to seek to have an ironclad contract with the environment, with the State of California, to the point where, as long as there's a California, there will be an environmental component to the Sites Reservoir. Jim Morris: When you look at rice, we have shown that you can grow a crop that's very helpful for our cuisine and incredible for our economy, but then we also have the Pacific Flyway Benefits, and looks like salmon will be benefiting from rice farming as well. So does it need to be an or conversation, or can Sites be part of a greater and picture that help our water overall in California? Jerry Brown: I've been involved in California water for decades. And we are at a stage where it seems like we are at odds a lot in terms of what kind of strategy to take to improve our situation. There's the or camp, which seems to be of a mindset that we can extend and optimize what we have. That we don't need to do much of anything, but we just need to conserve and recycle, and that will take care of all of our issues. That is a strategy, but I believe that what we're seeing today and the stresses that are occurring in our natural and developed systems, which are significant, we're seeing the results of that just an or strategy. There is an element to extending our supplies that we have, but there's also the and part of this, which is we need to build new facilities and find smart ways to extend the resources that we have to provide for the changing climate, the growing population, and all the needs of California, including the environment. And we think Sites Reservoir is a great tool that will allow us to do the and. Jim Morris: I've lived in the Sacramento Valley my entire life. And, I have to say, it's a big concern when we look at what the drought is doing to our region. So let's talk about some optimism. If not now, when would this ever happen? What kind of momentum do you see for this project, and what kind of optimism do you have at this time that this is going to get done and help our state? Jerry Brown: We are at a critical juncture where the Sites Reservoir and other storage projects, whether it be groundwater, storage, or surface storage, recycled water, conservation, desalination, all of these things are necessary to secure our future. And with SGMA, with the stresses that our existing resources are under, we have to invest. And I think more and more people are recognizing that. Somebody asked me this the other day, "What is different today than maybe 10 or 20 years ago in terms of the possibilities for Sites Reservoir?" And I think a big part of it is the recognition of the changing climate and the effect that that's having on the availability of our water supplies. And, I think, people see the sensibilities of essentially providing additional storage of water, so that as we get more of our precipitation in the form of rain instead of snow, that we have someplace that is reserving this supply, diverting it during the wettest periods, when that can be done safely, and saving it for the dry periods when we really need it most, all of us. Jim Morris: I appreciate Jerry Brown taking time to visit on this key project. As the year progresses, we will keep you updated on developments with Sites Reservoir, as well as drought impacts in the Sacramento Valley. You can find out much more at podcast.calrice.org. We appreciate your comments, questions, and reviews. Thanks for listening.

Explore Oregon: Making the most of the outdoors
'Step into the wild' of the Willamette Valley at wildlife refuges

Explore Oregon: Making the most of the outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 50:39


In this episode, Zach talks about the wildlife-packed wonders of the Willamette Valley wildlife refuges. Home to over 10,000 acres of forest, ponds, hills and one of the richest collections of birds on earth, the refuges make for great close-to-home hiking, according to guest Sam Bartling with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Points North
[Un]Natural Selection Ep. 7: Frankenfish

Points North

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 21:47


Lake trout are on life support in Lake Michigan.Every year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spends tens of millions of dollars raising and stocking them.But what if there was another way? Genetic engineering is advancing fast. Could it be used for conservation?

Habitat University
Season 2, Episode 3: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: The OTHER federal player on private lands

Habitat University

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 64:58


This week we shift our inquiry from the U.S. Department of Agriculture into the Department of the Interior where we find a litany of wildlife biologists working to conserve wildlife habitat on private lands through various programs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In this episode, Adam interviews biologist Gwen Kolb from the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program in New Mexico and Kraig McPeek from the Ecological Services Office in Illinois. Kraig and Gwen provide a detailed overview of how the USFWS works with private landowners throughout the country to help conserve a diversity of wildlife species and help landowners and managers achieve their own goals!  Help us improve the podcast by taking this Habitat University Listener Feedback Survey: https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5oteinFuEzFCDmm   Resources and references mentioned in the episode: Learn more about the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, including state contacts, at this website: https://www.fws.gov/program/partners-fish-and-wildlife  Find a U.S. FWS office near you with this link: https://www.fws.gov/visit-us?type=%5B%22Conservation%20Office%22%5D Learn more about federally endangered species here: https://www.fws.gov/program/endangered-species  Learn what species are listed in your state here: https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp/report/species-listings-by-state-totals?statusCategory=Listed  Learn more about Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCA's) here: https://www.fws.gov/service/candidate-conservation-agreements  Learn more about the Topeka Shiner conservation success story in this article from NRCS featuring interviewee Kraig McPeek!: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/ia/newsroom/stories/nrcs142p2_008651/ Learn more about the Rio Grande Cutthroat (https://westernnativetrout.org/rio-grande-cutthroat-trout/) from the Western Native Trout Initiative. 

Natural Resources University
Episode 71 - Habitat University: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the OTHER federal player on private lands

Natural Resources University

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 65:08


This week we shift our inquiry from the U.S. Department of Agriculture into the Department of the Interior where we find a litany of wildlife biologists working to conserve wildlife habitat on private lands through various programs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In this episode, Adam interviews biologist Gwen Kolb from the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program in New Mexico and Kraig McPeek from the Ecological Services Office in Illinois. Kraig and Gwen provide a detailed overview of how the USFWS works with private landowners throughout the country to help conserve a diversity of wildlife species and help landowners and managers achieve their own goals! Help us improve the podcast by taking this Habitat University Listener Feedback Survey: https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5oteinFuEzFCDmm   Resources and references mentioned in the episode: Learn more about the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, including state contacts, at this website: https://www.fws.gov/program/partners-fish-and-wildlife Find a U.S. FWS office near you with this link: https://www.fws.gov/visit-us?type=%5B%22Conservation%20Office%22%5D Learn more about federally endangered species here: https://www.fws.gov/program/endangered-species Learn what species are listed in your state here: https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp/report/species-listings-by-state-totals?statusCategory=Listed Learn more about Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCA's) here: https://www.fws.gov/service/candidate-conservation-agreements Learn more about the Topeka Shiner conservation success story in this article from NRCS featuring interviewee Kraig McPeek!: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/ia/newsroom/stories/nrcs142p2_008651/ Learn more about the Rio Grande Cutthroat (https://westernnativetrout.org/rio-grande-cutthroat-trout/) from the Western Native Trout Initiative.

Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI)
Climate Adaptation Programs across Agencies

Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 92:09


A live webcast will be streamed at 1:00 PM EDT at www.eesi.org/livecast Agencies in Action Federal Programs That Deliver Climate Mitigation and Adaptation Benefits Every Day Find out more about the briefings in this series below: Feb 08 Financing Inclusive Clean Energy Investments in Rural America Feb 24 Energy Efficiency Means Business Mar 18 Climate Adaptation Programs across Agencies Mar 29 Building a Durable National Framework for Large Landscape Conservation The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) invites you to a briefing series on federal programs that currently deliver a host of climate, environmental, economic, and social benefits nationwide. Experts and practitioners will discuss how these programs are working on-the-ground to deliver value to constituents across geographies, in both urban and rural settings. The series covers federal programs in climate financing, energy efficiency, climate adaptation, and conservation at landscape scales. The third briefing in the series will cover climate adaptation programs. As climate change continues to impact communities and ecosystems across the country, federal programs that focus on adaptation are playing a key role in helping communities prepare for and stay safe from the impacts of our changing climate. Panelists will discuss adaptation-focused federal programs administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Army Corps of Engineers, and other agencies, and why these programs are important for districts across the country. Introductory remarks from Representative Scott Peters (D-Calif.).

Short Circuit
Short Circuit 211 | Cohen the Police

Short Circuit

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 39:47


Like owls? We've got owls. Two of them. But they don't like each other. Ben Field explains how the Ninth Circuit adjudicated with this Parliament of owls, and how a 12 gauge shotgun is involved. In addition, Evan Lisull tells a story of "chalking," the police, and the First Amendment. Both from another Ninth Circuit case, but also from his own brush with the law. Throw in some qualified immunity and admin law, and you've got a very festive St. Patrick's Day episode (minus anything Irish). Register for Short Circuit Live! Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., https://ij.org/event/scl/ Friends of Animals v. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2022/03/04/21-35062.pdf Ballentine v. Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, https://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2022/03/08/20-16805.pdf Rivas-Villegas v. Cortesluna (case questioning circuits clearly establishing law), https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/21pdf/20-1539_09m1.pdf Ben Field, https://ij.org/staff/ben-field/ Evan Lisull, https://ij.org/staff/evan-lisull/ Anthony Sanders, https://ij.org/staff/asanders/

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 620 (3-14-22): Calling All Virginia Chorus Frogs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:45).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 3-11-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 14, 2022.  This is a revised version of an episode from March 2019. SOUNDS – ~5 sec. This week, that raspy call opens an episode about several species of small frogs that share a common group name but differ in sound and distribution.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two species recorded simultaneously, and see if you know the name of this frog group.  And here's a hint: to get the key word, gather a lot of harmonious singers, or skip over a song's verses.  SOUNDS  - ~10 sec. If you guessed chorus frogs, you're right!  You heard the creaky call of Mountain Chorus Frogsalong with the single notes of Spring Peepers, two of seven chorus frog species in Virginia.  The other five are the Little Grass Frog and four more species with “chorus frog” in their name: Brimley's, New Jersey, Southern, and Upland chorus frogs.  As a group, they're noted for their choruses of calling males advertising for mates in breeding season.  Those calls vary among the species in pitch, tone, and how quickly sounds are repeated.  The species also differ in their distribution in Virginia: Spring Peepers occur statewide, and Upland Chorus Frogs are found in much of the state, but the other five occupy narrower ranges in the Commonwealth. The Mountain Chorus Frog, which is found from Pennsylvania to Mississippi, including southwestern Virginia, is getting special scientific attention.  Since 2019, scientists Kevin Hamed, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, and Wally Smith, at the University of Virginia's College at Wise, have led a project to learn more about the species' distribution.  Collaborating with the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), they're inviting Virginia citizens, especially K-12 students, to look and listen for this species and to submit information on any observations.  The project's Web site notes that Mountain Chorus Frog's breeding activity is mostly from February to April, but may continue into June; they'll call during the day as well as at night; and places to hear them—which is more likely than seeing them—include wet ditches, flooded fields, mountain seeps and springs, tire ruts, and furrows in plowed fields. To learn more about this project, to submit Mountain Chorus Frog observations, or to request a classroom visit by the researchers, go online to mtchorusfrog.fishwild.vt.edu, or call Kevin Hamed at (540) 231-1887. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources and to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia.  We close with a medley of calls from the seven chorus frogs found in Virginia, in alphabetical order.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can recall their names, mentioned earlier in this episode.  Good luck! SOUNDS - ~ 23 sec – Brimley's Chorus Frog, Little Grass Frog, Mountain Chorus Frog, New Jersey Chorus Frog, Southern Chorus Frog, Spring Peeper, Upland Chorus Frog. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 464, 3-18-19. The frog sounds in this episode were from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of March 14, 2022, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/. Lang Elliott's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Thanks to the following people for their help with this episode: Carola Haas, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Blacksburg; John Kleopfer, Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources; Kevin Hamed, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Blacksburg;Wally Smith, University of Virginia's College at Wise. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Project flyer being used for the Mountain Chorus Frog monitoring initiative being conducted in 2022 by the University of Virginia's College at Wise, Virginia Tech, and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Flyer accessed at https://www.mtchorusfrog.fishwild.vt.edu, 3/11/22.A chorus frog (species not identified) in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. Photo made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov, accessed 3-14-22; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12030/rec/1.Below are Virginia county occurrence maps for the seven chorus frog species found in Virginia, all from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/, accessed 3/15/22.SOURCES Used for Audio AmphibiaWeb, https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries [now Department of Wildlife Resources], Richmond, Va., 2011. Bernard S. Martof, et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society.  (Herpetology refers to the study of amphibians and reptiles.) Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/.  Information for the seven chorus frogs found in Virginia is at the following links:Brimley's Chorus Frog;Little Grass Frog;Mountain Chorus Frog;New Jersey Chorus Frog;Southern Chorus Frog;Spring Peeper;Upland Chorus Frog. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Virginia Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  This site has detailed information on life history, distribution, habitat, and other aspects of species.  The information specifically for the seven chorus frogs found in Virginia is at the following links:Brimley's Chorus Frog;Little Grass Frog;Mountain Chorus Frog;New Jersey Chorus Frog;Southern Chorus Frog;Spring Peeper;Upland Chorus Frog. Virginia Herpetological Society, “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm. Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Mountain Chorus Frog,” online at https://www.mtchorusfrog.fishwild.vt.edu/.  This is the Web site for the Mountain Chorus Frog monitoring initiative being under taken by Virginia Tech, the University of Virginia's College at Wise, and the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources. For More Information about Frogs or Other Amphibians U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative, online at https://armi.usgs.gov/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “A Guide to the Salamanders of Virginia,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/salamanders/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “A Guide to Virginia's Frogs and Toads,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogs-and-toads/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/. Sarah Wade, “UVa-Wise team hunts for amphibians in SW Va.'s high-altitude wetlands,” Bristol Herald-Courier, July 4, 2021.  This article describes research in 2021 by Wally Smith, at the University of Virginia's College at Wise, who is one of the researchers in the Mountain Chorus Frog project noted in this episode's audio. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” subject category. Following is the link to another episode on an amphibian monitoring project:Episode 357, 2-27-17 – on the Eastern Spadefoot.  Following are links to other episodes focusing on frog species in the chorus frog group:Brimley's Chorus Frog – Episode 563, 2-8-21;Little Grass Frog – Episode 509, 1-27-20;Spring Peeper– Episode 570, 3-29-21; Episode 618, 2-28-22.