Podcast appearances and mentions of Forest service

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Best podcasts about Forest service

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Latest podcast episodes about Forest service

MPR News Update
Federal review says copper-nickel mining poses an environmental risk to BWCA

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 5:46


The U.S. Forest Service has released a long-awaited environmental study of a proposed 20-year copper mining moratorium on federal land near the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. It is the latest step in a bid by the Biden administration to place a long-term pause on proposed copper-nickel mines across a large swath of northeastern Minnesota.  This is a morning update from MPR News, hosted by Cathy Wurzer. Music by Gary Meister.

Before You Kill Yourself
Marcos Trinidad: How to break patterns, overcome addiction, practice non-violent communication and the joy of bird watching

Before You Kill Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 65:12


Joining us today is Marcos Trinidad, host of the new LAist Studios podcast “Human/Nature” is Center Director at the Audubon Center at Debs Park. During the past 5 years, he has nurtured a growing community of volunteers, youth and community partnerships; implemented a facility and grounds improvement plan; and partnered with the National Park Service to establish a vibrant native plant nursery. Born and raised in Northeast Los Angeles, where his family has lived for 70 years, Marcos has deep roots in the community. Prior to coming to Debs, he served as Director of Audubon Youth Environmental Stewards (a program of the Palos Verdes/South Bay Audubon Society), where he engaged and inspired youth to connect to nature and their community through restoration and volunteer projects. He has also spent time as a Biology Technician for the U.S. Forest Service and an Urban Forester for both Northeast Trees and TreePeople. Marcos is an Army Veteran stationed in Hohenfenls, Germany as part of the 7th Army Training Command and served as a 19D Cavalry scout, Forward Observer. Marcos continues to serve and work toward a more environmentally inclusive Los Angeles. For 2 decades, Marcos has advanced equity, diversity and inclusion in the environmental movement, including co-directing LA's Environmental Professionals of Color chapter. Through that work, Marcos promoted and sponsored forums for people of color working in environmentally-related careers. He was recognized in 2017 by the North American Association for Environmental Education as the recipient of the Rosa Parks and Grace Lee Boggs Award for his leadership in environmental justice, education and advocacy. Marcos loves to go bird watching with his 9-year-old daughter Paloma and his 7-old son Bija along the Los Angeles River. He is a world traveler and feels most complete when he goes on extended camping trips with his family. Sponsor:Is there something interfering with your happiness or is preventing you from achieving your goals? https://betterhelp.com/leo and enjoy 10% off your first month and start talking to mental health professional today!! 1-on-1 Coaching: If you want go from feeling hopeless to hopeful, lonely to connected and like a burden to a blessing, then go to 1-on-1 coaching, go to www.thrivewithleo.com. Let's get to tomorrow, together. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline800-273-TALK [800-273-8255]1-800-SUICIDE [800-784-2433]Teen Line (Los Angeles)800-852-8336The Trevor Project (LGBTQ Youth Hotline)866-488-7386National Domestic Violence Hotline800-799-SAFE [800-799-7233]Crisis Text LineText "Connect" to 741741 in the USALifeline Chathttps://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/International Suicide Hotlines: http://www.suicide.org/international-suicide-hotlines.htmlhttps://www.nowmattersnow.org/skillshttps://sobermeditations.libsyn.com/ www.suicidesafetyplan.com https://scaa.club/

Gun Dog It Yourself
Ruffed Grouse Society SERIES: Stewardship Agreements

Gun Dog It Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 24:54


Nick Biemiller joins us again for the 4th episode of the RGS Series covering Stewardship Agreements. What are stewardship agreements? Agreements between the forest service and RGS Are these tracts just unsellable tracts coming from the Forest Service? Mutually benefit for RGS and the Forest Service How do these agreements measure up to the revenue produced prior to the "new model" ----- PATREON RUFFED GROUSE SOCIETY GDIY ----- Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 630 (6-20-22): A Sampler of Shrubs from Soggy Spaces

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-16-22.

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Earth Wise
Forests And Water | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 2:00


We hear a great deal about the environmental services provided by forests.  Deforestation is one of the major factors contributing to increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.  And, of course, forests – most notably rainforests – are major contributors to biodiversity.  A new study by the U.S. Forest Service looked at the role […]

The Buzz with ACT-IAC
Service Delivery from the Farm to the Wildlands at USDA

The Buzz with ACT-IAC

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 40:51


Last year, the Biden Administration issued a series of executive orders directing federal agencies to study and measure the effectiveness of government programs - both for program recipients and the federal workforce that implements them. Specifically, how do these programs perform when measured through the lens of equity and accessibility?This difficult, but necessary, work involves gathering both qualitative and quantitative data, analyzing it, and taking a critical eye to the processes that govern our agencies in order to assess how they can better meet the needs of US citizens. This week's guests are helping to drive this historic effort at one of the broadest-reaching federal agencies: the US Department of AgricultureSimchah Suveyke-Bogin is the Chief Customer Experience Officer at USDA. Nora Johnson, a design strategist at Booz Allen Hamilton, is the former project lead for the Wildland Firefighter Equity Program at the U.S. Forest Service. This episode of the Buzz is sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton. Learn more at https://www.boozallen.com/. Follow Humans of Public Service on Instagram!Register for ELC 2022 here!Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform to never miss an episode! For more from ACT-IAC, follow us on Twitter @ACTIAC or visit http://www.actiac.org.

Tipping Point New Mexico
411 Albuquerque Homeless "Safe Spaces", Does New Mexico have an Education Secretary? and more

Tipping Point New Mexico

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 42:54


Ronchetti wins. Paul & Wally discuss that outcome and other races; Paul recently traveled to Florida for an event with anti-tax advocate Grover Norquist. He discusses the national scene; Common Cause supports New Mexico's awful judicial election process. Paul and Wally discuss their issues with it. ABQ City Council embraces “safe spaces.” Progressive former mayoral candidate Pete Dinelli is spot-on regarding local parks:  Inflation hits 8.6%, highest in four decades.  The average US gas price hits $5/gallon.  A new study finds high gas prices hit rural, poor the most (duh). Speaking of inflation, Paul recently spoke to KOAT channel 7 about trash, water,and power fees going up in Albuquerque.   Biden visited New Mexico to offer aid to forest fire victims. A lefty news site actually goes behind the headlines and talks to Northern New Mexicans frustrated by Forest Service mismanagement. In a seeming conflict of interest, NM Environment Department (headed by MLG) gives out awards to friendly legislators. Does New Mexico have an education secretary? It is hard to say.

The Sci-Files on Impact 89FM
Andrew Deleruyelle about TimbuR: The People's Forest Volume and Biomass Estimator

The Sci-Files on Impact 89FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 16:25


On this week's SciFiles, your hosts Chelsie and Daniel interview Andrew Deleruyelle. How can one go about measuring the effects forests have on combatting climate change? As a student of forestry, Andrew has observed changing climates and wondered what can be done to quantify the largescale ecological patterns they're experiencing. When Andrew finished an ecological data monitoring and analysis course taught by MSU professor Dr. Andrew Finley, he wanted to continue learning about the forest's impact on these processes. Funded under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Forest Carbon Estimation (ForCE) project, his research under Dr. Finley led him to an existing toolset: The US Forest Service (USFS) National Volume and Biomass Estimator Libraries.  These libraries proved to be useful for Forest Service employees, but remained inaccessible to the general public and mainly focused on the forests within North America. Andrew's research has been focused on writing an interface in the R computer language for these libraries, a project he calls TimbuR. Andrew's current focus, now that his research has concluded, is to bring TimbuR to the public as free-to-use software and expand its ability to serve global audiences.If you're interested in talking about your MSU research on the radio or nominating a student, please email Chelsie and Danny at scifiles89fm@gmail.com. Check The Sci-Files out on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube!

News Headlines in Morse Code at 25 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Lysychansk bombarded by Russian artillery US white supremacists arrested at Idaho pride event police March For Our Lives rally calls for unity in fight for gun reform KTVB Climate change a bigger threat than war, Fiji tells security summit Cristiano Ronaldo US judge dismisses rape lawsuit Russia unveils tasty McDonalds substitute 31 people arrested for conspiracy to riot near a Pride parade in Idaho China Footage of women attacked in restaurant sparks outrage Ukraine war latest Chemical plant hit as fighting rages in key eastern city Biden to visit Saudi Arabia next month seeking solutions as gas tops 5 per gallon report Texas state senator Uvalde school police chief directly in contrast to DPS The Lady of Heaven film Morocco bans blasphemous British film Pennsylvania Paper Rips Rep. Scott Perry as He Denies Seeking Trump Pardon Live Doppler 13 Weather Blog Stormy at times this weekend China blasts US bully, says it will fight to the end for Taiwan Billie Eilish pauses London show over fan safety Former Dodger Steve Saxs son among 5 Marines killed in training crash March For Our Lives Tens of thousands rally for stricter US gun laws Palin, Begich, Gross and Peltola are top 4 in early results from Alaskas special US House election Alaska Public Media Biden to get New Mexico wildfire briefing amid rage over Forest Service responsibility

News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Cristiano Ronaldo US judge dismisses rape lawsuit Billie Eilish pauses London show over fan safety Former Dodger Steve Saxs son among 5 Marines killed in training crash China Footage of women attacked in restaurant sparks outrage Texas state senator Uvalde school police chief directly in contrast to DPS Biden to get New Mexico wildfire briefing amid rage over Forest Service responsibility March For Our Lives Tens of thousands rally for stricter US gun laws Lysychansk bombarded by Russian artillery US white supremacists arrested at Idaho pride event police Climate change a bigger threat than war, Fiji tells security summit 31 people arrested for conspiracy to riot near a Pride parade in Idaho Russia unveils tasty McDonalds substitute China blasts US bully, says it will fight to the end for Taiwan The Lady of Heaven film Morocco bans blasphemous British film Biden to visit Saudi Arabia next month seeking solutions as gas tops 5 per gallon report Pennsylvania Paper Rips Rep. Scott Perry as He Denies Seeking Trump Pardon Ukraine war latest Chemical plant hit as fighting rages in key eastern city Palin, Begich, Gross and Peltola are top 4 in early results from Alaskas special US House election Alaska Public Media March For Our Lives rally calls for unity in fight for gun reform KTVB Live Doppler 13 Weather Blog Stormy at times this weekend

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv The Lady of Heaven film Morocco bans blasphemous British film Cristiano Ronaldo US judge dismisses rape lawsuit China blasts US bully, says it will fight to the end for Taiwan Lysychansk bombarded by Russian artillery Biden to get New Mexico wildfire briefing amid rage over Forest Service responsibility Former Dodger Steve Saxs son among 5 Marines killed in training crash Russia unveils tasty McDonalds substitute Climate change a bigger threat than war, Fiji tells security summit Texas state senator Uvalde school police chief directly in contrast to DPS March For Our Lives rally calls for unity in fight for gun reform KTVB Billie Eilish pauses London show over fan safety 31 people arrested for conspiracy to riot near a Pride parade in Idaho Palin, Begich, Gross and Peltola are top 4 in early results from Alaskas special US House election Alaska Public Media Live Doppler 13 Weather Blog Stormy at times this weekend March For Our Lives Tens of thousands rally for stricter US gun laws Ukraine war latest Chemical plant hit as fighting rages in key eastern city US white supremacists arrested at Idaho pride event police Biden to visit Saudi Arabia next month seeking solutions as gas tops 5 per gallon report China Footage of women attacked in restaurant sparks outrage Pennsylvania Paper Rips Rep. Scott Perry as He Denies Seeking Trump Pardon

Tipping Point New Mexico
410 Jennifer Fielder and Paul Fielder of the American Lands Council

Tipping Point New Mexico

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 39:32


On this week's interview Paul talks to Jennifer Fielder and Paul Fielder of the American Lands Council. The topic is federal land management and the incredibly destructive, Forest Service-set fires now burning in New Mexico. Jennifer is the CEO and Paul a retired wildlife biologist and Montana State Legislator. The American Lands Council works to improve federal lands management with the ultimate goal of replacing a great deal of federal management with state control with incentives and resources aligned toward improving both the economic and environmental management of federally-controlled lands in New Mexico and elsewhere. 

Montana Public Radio News
Land management agencies are struggling to hire enough firefighters

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:39


Federal and state land managers in Montana are not yet fully staffed with their usual number of seasonal firefighters. During its hiring process, the U.S. Forest Service has faced the same workforce shortage pressures affecting the private sector.

Montana Wildfire News
Land management agencies are struggling to hire enough firefighters

Montana Wildfire News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:39


Federal and state land managers in Montana are not yet fully staffed with their usual number of seasonal firefighters. During its hiring process, the U.S. Forest Service has faced the same workforce shortage pressures affecting the private sector.

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
Calf Canyon Wildfire Cause Revealed & Our Land: Dairy Cows Euthanized After PFAS Exposure | 6.6.22

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 39:12


The Line Opinion Panel discusses the troubling news that both the Hermit's Peak and Calf Canyon fires began as prescribed burns conducted by the U.S. Forest Service. The Panel also touches on new concerns over the burn scar left by the fire. Experts say it could lead to disastrous flash flooding once monsoon season comes around. The Line Opinion Panel also discusses the economic implications of a potential interstate that would cut through New Mexico. The international trade route would stretch from Laredo, Texas, connecting to I-25 in Raton, New Mexico. In Clovis, N.M., Art Schaap of Highland Dairy has had to euthanize more than 3,500 dairy cows contaminated with toxic chemicals from Cannon Air Force Base. New Mexico Environment Department Secretary James Kenney talks about the pollution—and about the cow carcasses, which must be treated as “hazardous waste” because of the high levels of PFAS that remain in them. Warning: graphic content. Line Host: Gene Grant Line Opinion Panelists: Algernon D'Ammassa, reporter, Las Cruces Sun-News Sophie Martin, attorney Diane Snyder, former NM State Senator Correspondent: Laura Paskus Guest: James Kenney, secretary, New Mexico Environment Department For More Information: The Struggle for PFAS Pollution Accountability Art Schaap's Dairy Dilemma Former Cannon Firefighter Kevin Ferrara Talks PFAS Contamination Groundwater War: Reporters on the Challenges of Covering PFAS Forest Officials: Dormant Prescribed Burn Caused Calf Canyon Fire – Santa Fe New Mexican NM Wildfire Burn Scar has Forest Officials Worried – Western Slopes Now NM May Get New Interstate Highway - KRCC --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

Reveal
Fighting Fire with Fire

Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 50:38


Year after year, wildfires have swept through Northern California's wine and dairy country, threatening the region's famed agricultural businesses. . Evacuation orders have become a way of life in places like Sonoma County, and so too have exemptions to those orders. Officials in the county created a special program allowing agricultural employers to bring farmworkers into areas that are under evacuation and keep them working, even as wildfires rage. It's generally known as the ag pass program. Reporter Teresa Cotsirilos investigates whether the policy puts low-wage farmworkers at risk from smoke and flames. This story is a partnership with the nonprofit newsroom the Food & Environment Reporting Network and the podcast and radio show World Affairs. Then KQED's Danielle Venton introduces us to Bill Tripp, a member of the Karuk Tribe. Tripp grew up along the Klamath River, where his great-grandmother taught him how controlled burns could make the land more productive and protect villages from dangerous fires. But in the 1800s, authorities outlawed traditional burning practices. Today, the impact of that policy is clear: The land is overgrown, and there has been a major fire in the region every year for the past decade, including one that destroyed half the homes in the Karuk's largest town, Happy Camp, and killed two people. Tripp has spent 30 years trying to restore “good fire” to the region but has faced resistance from the U.S. Forest Service and others. Twelve years ago, the Forest Service officially changed its policy to expand the use of prescribed burns, one of the most effective tools to mitigate massive, deadly wildfires. But Reveal's Elizabeth Shogren reports that even though the agency committed to doing controlled burns, it hasn't actually increased how much fire it's using to fight fire. The Forest Service also has been slow to embrace another kind of good fire that experts say the West desperately needs: managed wildfires, in which fires are allowed to burn in a controlled manner to reduce overgrowth. To protect the future of the land and people – especially with climate change making forests drier and hotter – the Forest Service needs to embrace the idea of good fire.   This is a rebroadcast of an episode that originally aired in September 2021.  Support Reveal's journalism at Revealnews.org/donatenow Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get the scoop on new episodes at Revealnews.org/weekly  Connect with us onTwitter,Facebook andInstagram

Billy Newman Photo Podcast
Billy Newman Photo Podcast | 216 Summer Thunderstorm, Wide Angle Lens Photography

Billy Newman Photo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 37:03


Donate to the podcast directly with the links below. ⚡️Donate any amount from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet ( including Cash.App ) to Billy Newman https://strike.me/billynewman ⚡️Donate $5 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay5 ⚡️Donate $11.11 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay11 ⚡️Donate $50 from a Bitcoin Lightning wallet to Billy Newman https://yr.link/lightningpay50 If you feel you are getting value from this, please help by becoming a supporter and send some sats. *New* You can send a Bitcoin Lightning payment direct from the Cash.app Get a Bitcoin Lightning wallet for free instant transfers https://breez.technology https://muun.com https://bluewallet.io Value streaming payments system enables listeners to send Bitcoin micropayments to podcasters as they listen, in real-time. Start streaming value! It's easy to remember: http://value4value.io/ newpodcastapps.com I use https://fountain.fm If you're looking to discuss photography assignment work, or a podcast interview, please drop me an email. Drop Billy Newman an email here. If you want to look at my photography, my current portfolio is here. If you want to read a free PDF eBook written by Billy Newman about film photography: you can download Working With Film here. If you get value out of the content I produce, consider making a sustaining value for value financial contribution, Visit the Support Page here. You can find my latest photo books all on Amazon here. Website Billy Newman Photo https://billynewmanphoto.com/ YouTube https://www.youtube.com/billynewmanphoto Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/billynewmanphotos/ Twitter https://twitter.com/billynewman Instagram https://www.instagram.com/billynewman/ About   https://billynewmanphoto.com/about/ 0:14 Hello, and thank you very much for listening to this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. But today's photograph comes from one of the springtime scenes of light and weather that comes through really more often than other places in the world. But it comes through pretty often through the Willamette Valley. And this is a photograph of, of a passing rain system like a big sell of a storm. In the in the Willamette Valley with with a lot of light coming through the low, the low level of it, it's really cool, you get to see the green grass is kind of D saturated tone in the green grasses that comes up to the rainbow that's there shining down onto the land, and then you see a bit of the rain as it comes up higher and higher into the darker clouds above. So it was really cool, colorful photo that I liked a lot. And this is what I try and push for a lot with some of my photographs is to is to go for more of an ethereal or dreamlike representation of what reality was at that time. Even though this was just a regular summer storm was rain and some sunlight, I think it really comes across as a special moment this photograph. So it's a really cool thing. And it's something I've been trying to work on more and more in the photographs I've been creating. You can see more of my work at Billy Newman photo comm you can check out some of my photo books on Amazon. And then you look at Billy Newman under the authors section there and see some of the photo books on film on the desert, on surrealism, camping, and cool stuff over there. Really trying to do a lot of scouting stuff, which I've enjoyed to doing some scouting stuff through the summertime has been pretty cool, where I'm really trying to go through some of these back roads and trying to like Mark spots in the map where there's good campsites, which I hadn't really done before. You know, it was a lot of places, I've driven a lot, a lot of roads I've been on, especially, you know, like back country roads, to Forest Service roads, BLM roads, and I know a lot of good dispersed camping areas. And really, I understand the context of how to find those areas so much better now that I'm older than when I was young. I mean, when I was young, and I go camping with my dad, you know, we'd go out to Eastern Oregon we'd find some spots and they'd note about this spot since you know, he was a kid and he was going over there and hunting camps and stuff with his grandpa. 2:41 So it's cool for me to get to go over to the same spot and get to check out that area and stuff. But I think there's been or at least when I was a kid, I didn't really understand that the land, like the public land rights that you have, and really how those are organized, like how public lands are organized and what you can do on him and then sort of how it operates. I didn't really understand the difference between national forest land and BLM land or national Parkland and state Parkland or wilderness areas, National Wildlife Refuge areas, man there's just so many different distinctions of different things and then also just private property. So I didn't really have a clear recollection of any of those things. And really a lot of time when it's public land, you can go on it but there's some things you can't do on it like I they maybe hunt in some circumstances, like a, like a national park, or I think you can't discharge a firearm inside of national park, but for specifically permitted events, maybe probably national wildlife refuges. I think those hunting opportunities are are limited also though, you can still do some things in those areas, I think you have to get permitted and you have to drop tag for that location, I think is what it is. But But yeah, it's kind of interesting, sort of learning about that, learn how these things go and also finally getting some maps that you can use that you can kind of trust better while you're in the back country. I think that's something that's really helped me kind of understand where I can go and what I can do and i don't know i mean, we've had those map books you know, like that, that 50 page or 100 page book of Oregon and you know, every every page is a 25 mile map of that area is always super useful, how they kind of grid out everything and show you that you know the mile by mile marking and the topography of the area, the different little roads and stuff but even those roads, those mapmakers still got things wrong. I remember to you know, back in like, was it 2004 I think we were out in an area and Southern Oregon near the Nevada border was a Druze reservoir somewhere south of Gearhart mountain. And I remember we were on some, some little, some little road I don't even know if it was if it was a national forest area, I think it was just in the in between private and public lands as it kind of jumps back and forth in those pretty remote areas. All of it is just remote, desert and forest and sagebrush Juniper, but some of it goes into like ranch land, it's more managed and some of it gets back into BLM land as this as this little road sort of meander through it. But I remember being out there and noticing that the map on the page was just totally different than the map or the you know, the real world ground truth of where the road went. And I saw Oh, wow, yeah, you can't really trust the maps to show you the information that you want to see when you need it. Other times too, you know, you'll see like, Oh, hey, like it shows there's a road right here. Good deal, we'll take that road. Well, you know, it shows it's on the map. So you cut down there, you get on the road, and then it's washed out like crazy, or it's super bumpy and like, and just terrible, right? And but it's the same green roads, the same label, the same marking is the road next to it that was graded and, and 5:49 art was that paved, right? It's graded gravel, they put more gravel down, I think, is what I'm trying to say they've, they've made it an easier going road to drive on. But then you get those washboard sections out there. I don't know if you guys have done that, where you're driving around in the Forest Service roads and those gravel roads. And I think it's a natural process of erosion that occurs that creates these waves in the material, you know, as I think, as a rainwater comes down, is sort of naturally over time generates these, these little ripples. And that's the washboard effect that you get when you're driving. That's also the thing that kind of kicks your car sideways when you're, you're going a little too fast on a gravel road. So I started doing today I think I kicked it pretty hard side or not, you know, like, it's pretty loose on the traction and it was starting to tip sideways in my truck. And so I slowed down and threw it into four wheel drive after that, and was able to cruise around out here pretty freely. But yeah, I wanted to talk on this podcast about hanging out in the Fremont National Forest and I just got finished with a huge thunderstorm that came through. It just really finished raining a little bit ago. We were kind of I think when I arrived to today at this Meadows still a few hours before sunset, so I walked around and kind of went along the perimeter of the meadow and then and then I noticed that you know, I mean it's cloudy. It's been kind of cloudy today, and there's been thunderheads that have been building up over the location that I've been ever since I kind of came over the past the Cascades had been in like a pretty solid string of a thunderheads that have sort of coalesced into big mass over the Cascades some of it here over the Fremont National Forest river mountains these are that I'm in and and yeah it seems like this section in Eastern Oregon was getting hit with a good Thunder a good summer August thunderstorm today which was kind of fun to sit through and go through it was cool that I got rained on pretty hard early when I was driving over I thought I'd get out here and be a little bit more free of it but it seemed like that storm kind of drifted over this way and it was sort of drifting north from here and and yeah, it is a new system but man there's just a bunch of lightning that was coming through and huge cracks of thunder just big deep rumbles I haven't heard Thunder like that. And in years and years probably you know where it just kind of stays and like hangs and rolls for 10 seconds 15 seconds it seems like you know you just really kind of like whoa is Can it really still be just cracking and rumbling and rolling. And, and there was enough activity and if lightning activity that was going on there where you'd hear thunder. I mean, it was almost like 45 minutes there where there was just a crack and a roll of thunder almost continuously like it was it was pretty intense. It's It's It's really I think one of the more strong lightning storms I've been in in a while but that's sort of how it goes out here when you have these higher elevations I think I'm floating around up in the 5100 feet or so above sea level. And so it just means I'm up in the mountains where these these thunderstorms get started, you know, they get there. They get there. I think that's where they they'll kind of coalesce over these big mountain tops and then float over in the hot weather. I don't really understand the weather enough to say I know how a thunderstorm starts it doesn't start now. I've just gotten cold enough I'm trying to throw jacket on. Now you got to live through it. I'm really camping. It's been good. But I'm gonna be out here for two nights I think is what I'm going to do and then tomorrow a cruise out and I'll try and hit some of these Forest Service roads for a bit. drive around do some exploring mark a couple spots on the map as a as I'm cruising around. I think that'll be that'll be a good time but the I haven't been out here before. I think I've heard of a couple friends that have been out in this area that have done some. I think they did a couple scouting trips for a hunting trip that they're going on in the fall. I think this is an area where we're one of my friends goes I think they try and drop a tag for not this area. I think it's a drainage over from here but I think I've heard about this area a couple times from from people talking about it too. Yeah it's cool it's cool spot it was out taking pictures earlier taking some photographs I've been working mostly probably for almost a year and a half now I've been working a lot with this 17 to 40 millimeter wide angle Canon lens and it's a pretty inexpensive lens and you can get it for like 400 bucks maybe a little less if you're lucky and you get it on a sale time sometimes in the fall as we're kind of ramping down toward 10:29 for Thanksgiving I think you can get some good deals on it but that's it's sort of in the the $400 range I think sometimes maybe it's more around five or something but I picked it up a couple years ago when I was starting to do some real estate photography or while I was working for Airbnb for a while where they had hired me as a photographer to go into these Airbnb plus listings and get a new set of photographs I was interested in kind of learned about how specific they wanted all those this photographs and this this really specific art style and and you know format of it and it was fine It was interesting to do for a while but but what was cool is that I picked up that lens to get in and do that work. But really after that I've been appreciating how much I can do with that wide angle lens and then you know 40 millimeters isn't way different than 50 millimeters it's certainly different for the effects of portraits and stuff but when I'm out here doing landscape stuff and I'm trying to take pictures of a lot of this stuff is kind of sketch photos to where I'm sort of going around and midday I'm taking some photos of some different things I want some cat photos and my track and my my little cooler set up in the back here and so all that's been good in addition to that the the Astro photography stuff that I can do with it is pretty cool because it drops down to the 17 millimeters it's an autofocus lens, it's a sealed lens, it's it's pretty it's it's pretty good in most ways and I've really noticed over time that I'm not as as absolute of a mandate for me to be shooting at a really wide open f stop you know, shooting at a wide open aperture almost all my photos early on were 1.8 or or 2.0 or 208 or something and I would do that really because I was trying to I was really trying to get because I didn't have very many lenses I was really trying to get as much effect out of that book k out of that soft background as I could so I was really trying to lean into that and get some photos with it and I noticed with my camera and equipment at the time that it just it just looked better. They just did look better when it was at you know f1 eight I think I just had that nifty 50 Nikon 50 millimeter for the longest time that's what I did I did my early trips on and did a lot of my portfolio building stuff on that but but I've got a different 50 millimeter lens with me now I've got it on my film camera in my bag right now which I need to take out too and I'm trying to finish a roll of avatar film it's been on there for a while and I've enjoyed shooting it it's cool it's a it's a new Canon camera to me at least I got it used on kth and spent 35 bucks on it 10 bucks to ship it and it takes a weird battery to it's one of those 90s film cameras it has this weird it almost looks like a battery pack this it's like two so it was almost like two double A's if they were a little fatter but are bonded together in this little plastic pack and then you pop that in there and shoot for a little while I guess and it runs a meter okay so I'm getting by with it but I've noticed the film cameras stuff it's it's fun to have an awesome film camera it'd be cool to have a Leica and all the lenses I wanted but a lot of the time with that you know the good lenses I have this this new or like canon l glass that I get to shoot through and for film photos and for the variety of images or the variety of lenses i have i can i can do telephoto I can do prime I can do really wide angle all with the modern digital Canon lenses that have you know chips in them that read well that meter well that make contact with or send information back and forth or at least from the lens to the camera I think xao works that works in the autofocus stuff for the digital camera this is this is autofocus Yeah, it's an autofocus digital camera. It's sending information back it's working Yeah, that makes sense yeah, so it's it's cool like that's something I didn't really have available to me for a long time you know, I think what I've probably on this podcast if you go way back in the archives I'm talking a lot about film with a Nikon f4 you know, I mean that just had autofocus that was the first camera like 88 to get autofocus period. So it's cool to have that in a more flexible way now but what I remember talking about in the past that was that I had like limited options with glass all the time, I didn't really always have the lenses that I would have preferred. And so I've kind of made a collection of that now with this canon stuff, I got a Canon camera and so I can throw all those lenses on and have that same flexibility that I have with my digital set. But just with this, this film body that I get to shoot a roll through so I kind of saved the film stuff When it's a thing that I want, but what I've noticed though for a little while, is that I miss a lot of those moments and I ended up just having the 15:09 the norm, you know, the regular digital camera with me with a bunch of my other gear, whenever going out and trying to kind of just take the camera with me and then I'll leave the bigger bag back at the truck, so that I'm not really carrying as much stuff with me, I've also started carrying, like when I'm out here in the woods and stuff I'm carrying that binocular harness with me, which is kind of cool, you can get them in different sizes, but it's sort of like if you imagine like a backpack, but what they do is they strap onto the front so it's right on your chest. And what you can do is Phil is put like a pair of binoculars in there. So you can pull them out and then scatter around with your binoculars, do some glasses, and then pop them back into your into your harness and then kind of carry on with whatever you want to do. But if you leave that empty without the without the binoculars, if you have a smaller camera rig, probably like a mirrorless or a Sony camera, you know, like one of those Sony A 6000s man, if you were a backpacker, and you had a Sony A 6000. And this, this front carry, like binocular pack, you'd be really sad that would be like all the camera bag that you'd need. In fact, really if I'm thinking about ever doing some like over you know, some longer backpacking travel, where I just have to pack everything in a way it's gonna be something I'm more conscious of. And I think that's really like the way to go is I've kind of been thinking about it a little bit it's like get to get a lighter camera. Or I mean it'd be great like carrying like a 360 camera you know, if you're going up someone else's, those are almost nothing as it is anyway but but if you're carrying like an SLR or something that you want to try and do some some more controlled photography with you had something like a, an A 6000 from Sony or an a seven, seven or three or whatever it is something that size with a lens attached to it, you know, that could fit in one of these binocular harnesses, harnesses and carry kind of route on your front and then you see something you would take it, pop that open right on your chest, pull it right up to your eyes, got straps on it in the harness, pull it right up to your eyes ready to shoot, and you can take photos, or take photos, you know as quick as you want to. So it's kind of a cool process. If you're out hiking a lot for what I'm doing, I have my binocular harness, but it's got binoculars in it. And I've been kind of going around and trying to do some bird watching stuff while I'm out here. And so cool Hawk, those posted up who's looking at me, that's about all I've seen so far. So coyote the other day, that was cool. I'll talk about that later that but 17:33 but so I had those binoculars in there. And I've been kind of going out on these, these shorter hikes and stuff that I've been trying to go around and like, just kind of watch some stuff or watch land and kind of keep an eye out. But I just had the camera on my longer strap on my side with that 17 to 40 millimeter lens. And that's worked really good. And it's been a pretty flexible kit for me to go around and take a bunch of photographs with so it's pretty easy, pretty lightweight to work with. And I can kind of move back and forth between those things strapped around my neck, you know, it's not everything just hanging around my neck with a lanyard, it's all kind of put somewhere or packed in somewhere. So it's been kind of cool. But it was good going out and taking some photos tonight, I was trying to get some of the i didn't i didn't get any lightning in the camera, though the lightning stone kind of passed as soon as it was getting really dark enough to do like a long exposure kind of thing where I could, I could sort of catch something, something spark and otherwise, you know, you got it, you got to beat the lightning bolt with your shutter finger. And that's a pretty tricky task to do. I think that's how they do it, you know, when you get those, you get those like magazine photos back in the day of powerful lightning bolt striking. I don't know the center of a road or something like that, it's what they'd show, you know, some kind of power lightning bolt, but the way that they would do that stuff is i think i think it was like it was dark out, you know, are pretty dark out. And so they set the camera up for just a cycle of long exposures. And then they would just kind of let it ride, you know, so they'd have a couple seconds to expose the image to whatever you know, at work, and then they just kind of have that rolling so that when when a bolt of lightning did strike, and it would be captured. And you could go through that collection of capital or you know how I say that, when a lightning bolt would strike the ground, the camera would have already been exposing for a photograph. Because it's just cycling the shutter on a four second exposure, let's say something like that. And so you know, it takes a four second exposure stops, processes for a second, it takes for second exposure stops processes for a second. So I think that's how they did some of that stuff where they, they kind of anticipate. Alright, it's been a couple minutes. Let's take a frame now. And then it's just going to be an event in the future. So we don't know if it's going to happen or not. We're going to wait for this event in the future when we boom see a lightning bolt and then that light then exposes the sensor or the film and the camera. And then you're left with an image that has that lightning bolt represented in the frame when you're shooting on a tripod or something like that with with like a short cycle, long exposure. And I thought that was pretty cool, but I didn't really get a chance to get all that stuff set up before the storm kind of passed me by I did get a lot of cool handheld stuff that was that's great if the thunder heads and stuff and really unfortunately just in the location that I'm at a lot of that and I guess maybe for the better. But that lightning storm didn't pass right over my head, it was still a little ways away. So I could see the lightning bolts cracking through the trees can out that distance more, a few they stretched across the sky pretty good too. It's just a big old, you know, from from east to west. It was like, you know, big old chunk of boulders crack all the way across the sky. It was cool. 20:53 So I got some photos of the thunderheads, the sunset, the the big field out here, it's cool. It's a nice area. But I was also thinking about some of the other stuff that I want to be doing tomorrow. So I'm out in the Fremont National Forest, I'm going to be heading I think, maybe south from here, and I'm going to try and explore a couple areas that are still open. Or I guess it's all open publicly, this is like a pretty large contiguous section of of national forest land here. And really like that's a big part of Oregon overall, right? It's like 53%, public lands. It's cool. Yeah, if you look at a map, you'll see the cities and you'll see like the highways and stuff. But if you have the right map, it'll show you where the BLM land is and where the different national forests are. And it's cool, this whole area of the Northwest is just, there's a lot of public land that you get to use. And there's a lot of open area that you get to go to and, and yeah, now that I've got a good map of the outdoor off road, roads and some of the terrain and stuff with some good notes, and I'm able to kind of move around and get out to a lot more places than I had before. So it's been cool. The app that I'm using is the on x off road app, it's, I think 2999 a year. And so pitch that out, picked up this app, and then you can download offline, these, these really detailed off road maps, they're supposed to show you all the trails, you know, even just walking trails, all the roads, all of the like the pieces of information you'd need for kind of moving around in the back country and really as surprising as it is as remote as a lot of these places are people go here, you know, it's also public land is managed by the the forest department forest Forest Service. Yeah, I think a lot of the stuff managed by the Forest Service, the BLM stuffs managed by the BLM. And that's why these roads are as good as they are or maintained. And that's why I like when trees are down on these mountain roads, you know, someone has to go through at the beginning of the year and cut all those out, rip them out filling the potholes, all that sort of stuff. So all these areas are, are known about and you know, kind of managed in a pretty significant way. In fact, I think, more so to come in the future. I think they just announced yesterday or the day before that they've passed the great American outdoors Act, which I really don't know the first thing about, or, or what it does or doesn't do, or what puts in or leaves out. But I think part of my understanding is that it's supposed to change some of the funding mechanisms that go into supporting the the maintenance of these public lands that are out here across the country, but really significantly out here in the western states. So it's, it's pretty cool. I think, before that it was like, well, we should spend, you know X amount of money, but there's a more important place for that money to go. So it wasn't like a guaranteed amount. Sort of what I understand so if I understand it correctly, there's like I think they've said $3 billion a year of mandated funding for projects. I think here in the back country, BLM land, Forest Service land and like national wildlife refuges and stuff so pretty cool. But yeah, I think that's gonna, well maybe we'll see a change in that I think it's supposed to better fund the operations of BLM and forest service people as they're going through and trying to get these areas ready for, for the public to be using more regularly. So it's cool. I think it'll mean a lot over the next few years or what maybe we'll see how it, how it kind of transforms some of the way that these these areas are managed. I think maybe it's more for mining, I probably shouldn't even speculate. I'm not sure at all, but it's pretty cool. I'm excited about being out here and doing some camping and stuff dealing with this thunderstorm. I think it's one of those things where by the morning, you know it's going to be or at least well I was looking at the weather it should be mostly cloudy, partly cloudy, mostly sunny tomorrow for a while. So It's pretty cool. I'm excited to be hanging out, do some cabin stuff, do some podcasting. I'm in the back of my truck right now like I was saying it was rain in early after this thunderstorm so I got that canopy on my truck. And I'm nice and dry, nice warm, kind of feels like I'm just inside somewhere. So it's, it's a cool cool rig, having the four wheel drive, having the canopy on the back, having your staff and your sleeping area, just kind of set it back there and I'm ready to go. So I've been having a good time being out here and 25:31 it's been pretty good. Pretty good trip so far. I so appreciate you guys checking out this podcast from me. I'm gonna do a couple more podcasts while I'm out here on this camping trip. And I'll I'll try and try and set up a little backlog of them on my website. I think it'll be a good idea. Now I kind of take their breaks and stuff from it. I'm sure no one, no one keeps listening when it when it is there. But hey, if you listen to this end of the podcast, shoot me an email. Time for the plugs. It's Billy Newman that photo.com if you want to check out my website, see some of my photographs, check out more podcasts that I've done, or books that I've tried to put together which is maybe what I'm going to try and do out here to try and get some photographs for another good book. 26:19 You can check out more information at Billy Newman photo comm you can go to Billy Newman photo.com Ford slash support. If you want to help me out and participate in the value for value model that we're renting this podcast with. If you received some value out of some of the stuff that I was talking about, you're welcome to help me out and send some value my way through the portal at Billy Newman photo comm forward slash support, you can also find more information there about Patreon and the way that I use it if you're interested or feel more comfortable using Patreon that's patreon.com forward slash Billy Newman photo. Yeah, this summer, I've been trying to do a lot to work to get together some new photos, some new stuff to try and kind of build a base and then move from there a little bit. But I'm really excited to try and put up a bunch of the older portfolio photographs that I have. And I was really happy to work on the website a lot this summer, I kind of redesign a bit of that, you check that out tell you anything about it's a billion human photo.com. And I try to strip out a lot of the unnecessary parts and I'm trying to kind of hone it down a little bit. So it's a little cleaner, but it's gone. Well, I've tried to set it up a little bit more. So it's stream based, if that makes sense. You know, we've kind of moved toward like the Facebook stream, the Twitter stream, the Instagram stream. So I'm trying to kind of move it to where, like I talked about on the podcast before where a lot of the media stuff that I put together, the video clips, the photographs and stuff that wherever they do end up going whatever sites I am populating, like flicker and Instagram and Facebook and all the rest of it, that's kind of what's shown on the website, or you know how the website's going to try and automatically pull that stuff and ingest that into the website. So I don't have to do it as much. And that's kind of been fun. Actually, it's kind of cool doing that. But the thing that I need to do, the part that still left is I need to go through my photo portfolio, kind of the long term portfolio of images I have, and I'm trying to go through and select what would be good to show the work that I've done so far. And I'm trying to do that in a way that's more developed than I had before I've gone through and I've selected, I've kind of picked the photos that I like a lot. But I've tried to do a couple different things. And hey, another truck. That looks like a few times of gravel in the back. So what I want to do, though, with the photo stuff, and what I've kind of been trying to work out a little bit is to go through Instagram or to go through Facebook and to try and select my favorite photographs, but then also just select the ones that have been sort of chosen by the market. That's another idea that I'm trying to go for what what do people actually like of the pictures that I take? What are the ones that people seem to connect with the most. So in one level, I'm trying to find all those photos. And then I'm trying to sort of remake those photos or re edit them or you know, kind of re republish them in a way that looks sort of new. And that's cleaned up a little bit in the way that I can I can edit and create stuff now. So part of the step is that and then the other part is to sort of learn what people like of the photos I'm making that I want to go out and try and make more of that. Or I try and dig in a little deeper on on the part that seems to get the most traction or that seems to be seen as the most valuable. So what are those like what I've noticed? 29:39 Well, yeah, what I've noticed anecdotally so far is that the low light stuff or the Astro photography, the night photography, the landscapes where there's stars matched in the background seem to really perform really well. And I really love trying to take those photos and I know a lot about how to lay out the stars that I would want in that foot or you know, I know where the stars are I know how to kind of line some of the landscape stuff out that I know how to expose for it. So that's a part that I'd really like to get into and push for more of what seems to be a draw the photos that I take. But on the other side of that, too, I really want to do more, more fine art photography, that's what I really liked, and was kind of drawn into when I first started taking photos, even way back on film, before I knew how at all, but I really liked the fine art side of it, where you could go through and try and put the nicest elements together or, you know, try and put a landscape together. But I liked that side of it a lot more than the product or production side of it. In a sense, at least. And I've always been really interested in the fine art photographers that are out there, or the fine art landscape photographers where you see some of the advanced kind of work that they put together, some of the ways that they're able to put real pieces real elements into a photograph, it's always seemed so cool, when you're really able to be in tune with that sort of stuff. And I don't know, I've just always loved the old landscapes, and, you know, old Fine Art images from the past. So that's kind of the stuff that I'm trying to get into. But organizing this stuff has been interesting. So I'm trying to use this program called Scrivener. And maybe I talked about it before or maybe a while back, I talked about it. But Scrivener is kind of interesting. It's this, and I talked about it yesterday, no, but it's this writing application that I'm trying to get into. And it seems like it would take a few tutorials to really figure out it's a little bit more in depth, hey, gravel truck, it's a little bit, it's quite a bit more in depth than something like Word. Even though Microsoft Word is sort of an industry standard that everyone has sort of learned on for the last 1520 years, it really is a little bit more specific to like an essay for at least the way I've learned it. But it's more specific to the essay format of word processing, where you're trying to get a page accomplished, you're trying to edit through that or you're trying to edit through kind of a single document. And Scrivener is sort of laid out in a way where there's a few more pieces on the side of it, where it's really supposed to be a research applicant, or you're supposed to kind of compile 32:04 different documents of text research or photo research and kind of put that together. And then you're able to sort of assemble a larger writing project from there, which I think is kind of interesting, like i'd figure like book authors would use a writing program like this to work on their character outlines. And their story outlines their plot summaries, and then they would work that into the manuscript that they would make into their book later. So I just think it's kind of an interesting way that they seem to be going, or that the program is built to sort of go about it. So I'm trying to get into that and do it well. But one of the aspects I'm trying to do is to put in all the portfolio of photographs that I have, into this Word document, and then sort of sort those photographs, and write about those photographs a little bit to see which photographs really seem to connect with me, or connect and connect with an audience the most and, but also a photograph sort of have a story associated with them, I love that. Like, if you would follow me for this for a second, you would kind of see that there's a difference between the photographs that are going to be the most monetizable the ones that you can make money from like, let's say portraits, let's say business portraits for some company you could get, you could get some money for that. But you wouldn't really want to post that in your portfolio of work necessarily, you'd want to like, at least in my case, what I'd like to do is show some photos from the imnaha River Canyon, like where we were last week on our photo trip. So you kind of want to move into that stuff. But you don't, it's not gonna be the same sort of thing. Like those landscape Fine Art photos are just, you know, the landscape, travel, adventure, tourism sort of stuff, that's all going to be on one side of it. And then the other is going to be, you know, senior portraits, business portraits, event photography, wedding photography, that sort of stuff. So there's sort of two sides of, of a portfolio. One of them's a photo product that's valuable for money. And the other one's a, an art piece that's valuable because of its aesthetic. And those are sort of different things that you've kind of, as a photographer, you're trying to build both of those up at the same time, it's sort of like two different routes that you have to work on at the same time until they sort of merge together and unify. So it's got an interesting part of it. And that seems to be part of the process that I'm in right now is trying to figure that stuff out. So some weeks, it's, I'm working really hard on the aesthetic side of the photography. And then some weeks I'm working really hard on the monetizable compensation based side of the products that I want to try and build as a photographer that's in business, right? And there are those are interesting challenges. But I guess I've been doing it for a couple years, and it's kind of fun, at least to a ticket to still be doing it. So a couple of things that I'm trying to do is I'm trying to go through and build a new Lightroom catalog of all the photos that I've taken this year and all the photos from the last couple Will your second organize those and do a little bit of what I'm talking about. So I have this kind of tighter collection of maybe the top 100 Top 200 Top 50 some number in there of of well laid out photo essays and stories with an image you know that's kind of what I'm trying to get to especially for like the, the social media content side of it, I want to try and have that ready to go with a higher frequency almost all the time. So I'm trying to get everything kind of pre produced, right? Does that make sense? One all the portfolio photos pre selected and then ready for me to go if I want to, if I want to post those, I get those out on any given day. So it's interesting, it's kind of a cool project. I worked on it a little bit to work on it a little bit here and there when I can but that's another part that's kind of tough. I mean, gosh, I haven't even finished my website yet. Which I guess the last part is still just this I need to it's kind of what it's been waiting for is I need to finish the selection of the portfolio and then I can build the portfolio gallery and put that up on the website. But so far, it's been working great just to send the y'all over to Instagram. I think that's where most of the stuff goes. That's where all the current content goes. Anyway. Thanks a lot for checking out this episode of The Billy Newman photo podcast. Hope you guys check out some stuff on Billy Newman photo.com a few new things up there some stuff on the homepage, some good links to other other outbound sources, some links to books and links to some podcasts. Like this blog posts are pretty cool. Yeah, check it out at Billy new minnesota.com. Thanks a lot for listening to this episode and the back end

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
National Efforts Fighting NM Wildfires, Understanding the Fires & Pueblo Cannabis Agreement | 5.27.22

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 60:19


Sen. Martin Heinrich talks with correspondent Laura Paskus about New Mexico's wildfire season, what the future might hold, and the need to professionalize the country's federal wildland firefighting workforce. In the Gila National Forest, the Black Fire ignited on May 13—and has already grown into the state's third largest wildfire in history. Fire behavior analyst Arthur Gonzales, with the Southwest Incident Management Team #5 talks about the conditions fueling the giant fire. "I started this business in 1995, and I've seen a lot of large fires,” he tells correspondent Laura Paskus. “But it is surprising, Laura. It's surprising. And it should surprise everybody. These are unprecedented conditions.” Gonzales also talks about the fire's footprint, the varying levels of fire severity within the perimeter, and what people might expect to happen in the Gila this summer. The Line Opinion Panel reacts to the U.S. Forest Service's decision to pause all prescribed burns for at least 90 days. And, a conversation about how we can learn to better manage forests to prevent major catastrophes like the Hermit's Peak Fire. They also explore the possibilities for native tribes after two New Mexico Pueblos reached an agreement with the state to produce and sell recreational cannabis products. Plus, a larger conversation about potential for cannabis legalization at the national level. Correspondent: Laura Paskus The Line Host: Gene Grant Line Opinion Panelists: Serge Martinez, professor, UNM School of Law Dan Foley, former New Mexico state representative Inez Russell Gomez, editorial page editor, Santa Fe New Mexican Guests: Martin Heinrich, U.S. Senator, New Mexico Arthur Gonzales, US Forest Service, fire behavior analyst For More Information: Heinrich Urges Administration to Establish Pay Rate for Federal Wildland Firefighters – Los Alamos Daily Post With Climate Change Fueling Wildfires, Changes Needed – New Mexico Political Report National Interagency Fire Center US Forest Service Pauses Prescribed Burns – SF Reporter LANL Developing Software to Better Manage Prescribed Burns – Santa Fe New Mexican Two NM Tribes Closer to Recreational Cannabis Sales – KOB Two Pueblos Reach Cannabis Tax Agreement – Marijuana Retail Report --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

KZMU News
Friday May 27, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 27:05


It's been nearly a decade since the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources released mountain goats in the La Sal Mountains. And throughout that same decade, critics have consistently called for their removal, saying they are damaging a federally protected alpine ecosystem. Just this week, the U.S. Forest Service released data outlining their concerns about potential impacts from mountain goats, recreation and climate change. Today on the news, why a conservation advocate calls the Forest Service data a ‘watershed' moment in the ongoing controversy over mountain goats in the La Sal Mountains. //Plus, the Weekly News Reel, where we check in with reporters on their latest stories of the Moab area. Sophia Fisher of the Times-Independent talks addiction recovery resources and the scale of the local opioid epidemic, COVID increases, possible development in Castle Valley and Moab City's $16.3 million budget. Alison Harford of the Moab Sun News discusses a profile on Japanese railroad workers at the turn of the century, farming in the desert at Easy Bee Farm and the return of Canyonlands PRCA rodeo. // Show Notes //Photo: Since their introduction to the La Sal Mountain range in 2013, mountain goats have been a source of ongoing controversy in the Moab community. Now the Forest Service has concerns about their potential impacts to the alpine ecosystem. Image from the Utah Division of Wildlife's 2018 Mountain Goat Statewide Management Plan // (May 24, 2022) USFS: Alpine Ecosystem Monitoring in the La Sals, Forest Service to Release Summary of Results https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/mantilasal/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD1027112 // (2018) Utah DWR: Mountain Goat Statewide Management Plan https://wildlife.utah.gov/pdf/bg/mtn_goat_plan.pdf // USFS: Rare Plants and Alpine Vegetation of the La Sal Mountains https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/mantilasal/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD1027112 // (2015) Grand Canyon Trust: Alpine Vegetation Impact Assessment of the Mt. Peale Research Natural Area https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/Rare_Plants/conservation/success/LaSals_studies.shtml // Weekly News Reel Mentions // The Times-Independent: Moab Regional Recovery Center opening in June https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/moab-regional-recovery-center-opening-in-june/ // The Times-Independent: Overdoes, fentanyl plague Grand County https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/overdoses-fentanyl-plague-grand-county/ // The Times-Independent: Grand should be in ‘Medium' COVID status https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/grand-should-be-in-medium-covid-status/ // The Times-Independent: New residential development in Castle Valley possible https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/new-residential-development-in-castle-valley-possible/ // The Times-Independent: Moab City's $16.3 budget moves ahead https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/moab-citys-16-3m-budget-moves-ahead/ // Moab Sun News: The untold story of K. Kawanishi https://moabsunnews.com/2022/05/26/the-untold-story-of-k-kawanishi/ // Moab Sun News: Inside Easy Bee Farm https://moabsunnews.com/2022/05/26/inside-easy-bee-farm/ // Moab Sun News: Saddle up! Canyonlands PRCA Rodeo returns to Moab from June 3 to June 5 https://moabsunnews.com/2022/05/26/canyonlands-rodeo-returns/

Montana Public Radio News
Federal court puts hold on Kootenai National Forest logging and road-building project

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 1:12


A U.S. District Court judge put a hold on the project Wednesday on the basis that the Forest Service did not properly evaluate the project's impact on the small threatened grizzly bear population in the bordering Cabinet-Yaak ecosystem.

Idaho Matters
Forest Service suspends prescribed burns following the New Mexico wildfire

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 15:13


Idaho Matters takes a look at the hazards of prescribed burns, as well as their importance.

Talking About Organizations Podcast
89: Administrative Behavior in Public Sector -- Herbert Kaufman (Part 2)

Talking About Organizations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 47:00


In the conclusion of our examination of Herbert Kaufman's “The Forest Ranger: A Study in Administrative Behavior,” published in 1960, we bring the results of the study to contemporary times and look at how public sector organizations have evolved in the past six decades. As Kaufman would explain in an afterword in the revised version of his book, even the Forest Service face difficulties as civil rights and other movements took hold in the time after the original study. What are the pressures facing public servants today? To what extent are the lessons of Kaufman still relevant?

Audio Poem of the Day
On First Seeing a U.S. Forest Service Aerial Photo of Where I Live

Audio Poem of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 1:08


by James Galvin

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
Mapping Wildfires & Upending the West's Water Narratives | 5.20.22

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:43


Using public data from the U.S. Forest Service, Steve Bassett, Director of Planning and Spatial Analysis with The Nature Conservancy, has been creating perimeter maps each morning, showing the progression of the Hermits Peak-Calf Canyon Fire in northern New Mexico. “With the skills that I have and the desperation I was feeling, I went out and grabbed that data and did something with it to get some more information out and into the public hands,” he says. In conversation with correspondent Laura Paskus, he also talks about what he is learning along the way. Andrew Curley is a professor at the University of Arizona's School of Geography, Development & Environment. His research focuses on the “everyday incorporation of Indigenous nations into colonial economies” including fossil fuel development in the U.S. Southwest and creation of the Central Arizona Project off the Colorado River. In conversation with correspondent Laura Paskus, he talks about how the Colorado River's crisis far predates climate change and challenges the narrative of climate apocalypse. The Line Opinion panel discusses the now record-setting wildfire burning near Las Vegas. Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham wants the federal government to cover all the costs for all our fires, but is that a realistic request? And, the new restrictions at National Forests around the state. Correspondent: Laura Paskus Guest: Steve Bassett, Dir. Planning and Spatial Analysis with The Nature Conservancy Andrew Curley, University of Arizona, School of Geography, Development & Environment Line Opinion Panelists: Merritt Allen, Vox Optima public relations Laura Sanchez, attorney Dan Boyd, capitol bureau chief, Albuquerque Journal For More Information: The Nature Conservancy – New Mexico Steve Bassett - Twitter Contested Water Settlements Inflamed the Navajo Nation's Health Crisis – High Country News Infrastructures as colonial beachheads: The Central Arizona Project and the taking of Navajo resources – Andrew Curley “Our Winters' Rights”: Challenging Colonial Water Laws – Andrew Curley Calf Canyon Hermit's Peak Fire Now Largest in NM History - Albuquerque Journal Three NM National Forests Close Thursday Due To Extreme Fire Danger - KOAT San Miguel Temporarily Bans Fireworks – Las Vegas Optic --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

Stories for Action
Life in the Land: CSKT Forestry Division (Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes)

Stories for Action

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:07


In this episode, we are on the Flathead Reservation in Western Montana, speaking with Tony Incashola, Jr., Director of the Tribal Forestry Department for the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes (CSKT), and Ron Swaney and Darrell Clairmont of CSKT's Division of Fire. These interviews are featured in the Life in the Land film on the Seeley-Swan, as that region was not only significant for the Kalispell, Salish, and Kootenai Tribes for thousands of years, but today, the jurisdiction line between Tribal management and U.S. Forest Service follows the ridgeline of the Mission Mountains. For over a century, forest management on the Flathead Reservation was held by federal agencies. In 1996, management was transferred to the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes, who stewarded these lands for thousands of years. Tony Incashola, Jr. and his team speak about their ecosystem approach to their forestry plan, working in partnership with neighboring jurisdictions, and reconnecting to a traditional relationship with fire on the landscape.  Links: CSKT's Fire on the Land Presentation CSKT's Forestry Department & forestry plan   This episode is part of the Life in the Land project, which is a series of films and podcasts produced by Stories for Action, which hears from folks that interact with the complexities of Montana's landscapes, speaking to the value of locally-led work and the holistic approaches needed for healthy communities and ecosystems. Find out more about the project and watch the films at  LifeintheLand.org Stories for Action holds a mission to use the power of storytelling to create human connection and advance a thriving planet for all. StoriesforAction.org  Follow along on our Instagram and Facebook: @StoriesforAction

KOTO Community Radio News
Newscast 5-19-22

KOTO Community Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 29:58


- Via Ferrata to join U.S. Forest Service trail system - The nitty-gritty of applying for Sunnyside - Mountainfilm Town Read tackles corruption and gang violence

The Brian Lehrer Show
#BLTrees: A Year in the Life (May)

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:14


We check in on our year-long project #BLTrees, following the seasons through the trees around us with Marielle Anzelone, urban botanist and ecologist and the founder of NYC Wildflower Week. This month, with peak bird migration in process, Desiree Narango, a conservation scientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst working in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service, explains the important link between native trees to caterpillars to birds. Hello, gorgeous! The leaves on my pin oak are finally out, but still bright green & not at full size. But before leaves came the flowers. These pendulous strands are male🌸- no petals means improved wind pollination. Female flwrs become acorns. Itchy eyes? Thank an oak #BLTrees https://t.co/bUjRydoqQL pic.twitter.com/mLjoOwbRvv — Marielle🌳Anzelone (@nycbotanist) May 19, 2022 Yes!! So excited for the opportunity to chat about the importance of #nativetrees for insects and birds! Tune into @BrianLehrer @WNYC today at ~11:40am ET to learn about what birds eat & what you can do to support #migratorybird conservation at home. #plantsforwildlife #BLtrees https://t.co/MBJcEiMAI8 pic.twitter.com/IzMXmJYAxg — Desiree L. Narango, PhD (@DLNarango) May 19, 2022 Take a closer 👀 #BLTrees pic.twitter.com/qoOLcmrbAN — 100KSteps (@100KSteps1) May 18, 2022 #bltrees pic.twitter.com/g8giNrLvJI — Tom (@altridem) May 19, 2022 .⁦@BrianLehrer⁩ Another shot of my tree. American Elm at West 129 and Saint Nicholas Terrace.#bltrees #bltree pic.twitter.com/gS4OlVsAcw — Tulis McCall (@TulisMcCall) May 19, 2022 🌧 💦 keep falling on my head #BLTrees pic.twitter.com/Ya42Zxyii4 — 100KSteps (@100KSteps1) May 19, 2022 I think I missed a month, but here's my May entry for #BLtrees We're really starting to leaf out! pic.twitter.com/6Kkj7YAAvx — Alexander (@alexandertlane) May 19, 2022 I think I missed a month, but here's my May entry for #BLtrees We're really starting to leaf out! pic.twitter.com/6Kkj7YAAvx — Alexander (@alexandertlane) May 19, 2022 #BLtrees - Month 7Fully green - wish I'd snapped the pic yesterday, in the sunshine.cc @BrianLehrer @NYCbotanist pic.twitter.com/DUoSmmvm01 — Josh Weinberger (@kitson) May 19, 2022 #BLTrees the Hackberry has finally leafed out. The one next to it, just barely. Pictures from yesterday: pic.twitter.com/ui5rzjUYSu — Against forced-birth (@backyardbeyond) May 19, 2022 #BLTrees the Hackberry has finally leafed out. The one next to it, just barely. Pictures from yesterday: pic.twitter.com/ui5rzjUYSu — Against forced-birth (@backyardbeyond) May 19, 2022 #BLTrees the Hackberry has finally leafed out. The one next to it, just barely. Pictures from yesterday: pic.twitter.com/ui5rzjUYSu — Against forced-birth (@backyardbeyond) May 19, 2022 #bltrees this is my glorious sweetie now!!! It was very sparse and wayyyy behind its lush neighbors until like last week. I was going to ask why- but now she's good!!! pic.twitter.com/xpOYxyxTvy — jerielle (@jerielle) May 19, 2022

KTOO News Update
Newscast – Wednesday, May 18, 2022

KTOO News Update

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


In this newscast: The U.S. Forest Service will begin a restoration project on Zarembo Island, but first, they need to clear some cars out of the way; A bill that rewrites alcohol restrictions cleared the Alaska Legislature this week; Denali National Park received the most snow in 99 years this winter

The Daily Gardener
May 17, 2022 Sandro Botticelli, Montreal, Robert Tannahill, Elvin Charles Stakman, 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek, and Louisa Yeomans King on Peony Pruning

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:33


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1510 Death of Sandro Botticelli, Italian Renaissance master.  His painting Allegory of Abundance or Autumn is one of his most elaborate and detailed drawings, and it depicts an abundance of flowers and fruits. Sandro painted idyllic garden scenes filled with beautiful women and men from the classical period. His painting, Primavera, depicts nine springtime gods and goddesses from classical mythology in a garden. Venus, the goddess of love, presides over the Garden of the Hesperides. To her right, Flora, the goddess of flowers, sprinkles roses. The garden features orange and laurel trees and dozens of other species of plants.   1642 On this day, Paul de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, French military officer, catches his first glimpse of Montreal's landscape. He is recognized as the founder of Fort Ville-Marie (modern-day Montreal) in New France (Province of Quebec, Canada). In George Waldo Browne's 1905 book, The St. Lawrence River: Historical, Legendary, Picturesque, he wrote, On the 17th of May, the rounded slopes of Mount Royal, clad in the delicate green foliage of spring, burst into sight, stirring the hearts of the anxious beholders with newfound joy. They were delighted with the scenery. The fragrance of the springing forest permeated the balmy air, and, what was dearer far to them, over the water and over the landscape, rested an air of peace quite in keeping with their pious purpose. Maisonneuve was the first to step upon the land, and as the others followed him... they fell upon their knees, sending up their songs of praise and thanksgiving. Their first work was to erect an altar at a favorable spot within sight and sound of the riverbank, the women decorating the rough woodwork with some of the wildflowers growing in abundance upon the island, until the whole, looked very beautiful.  Then every member of the party... knelt in solemn silence while M. Barthelemy Vimont... performed ...high mass. As he closed, he addressed his little congregation with these prophetic words: You are a grain of mustard seed that shall rise and grow till its branches overshadow the earth.   1810 Death of Robert Tannahill, Scottish poet, and lyricist. Remembered as the 'Weaver Poet,' Robert was born in Paisley and is often hailed as Paisley's own Robert Burns, as his work is said to rival Robert Burns.  Today in Paisley, a stunning 50ft high mural of a young Robert Tannahill was painted by Mark Worst, collaborating with Paisley Housing Association. The mural overlooks where Robert Tannahill was born on Castle Street in 1774. One of Robert's most beloved songs is Will Ye Go Lassie, Go. The lyrics mention picking Wild Mountain Thyme, a plant known botanically as Thymus serpyllum (TY-mus sir-PIE-lum). Wild Mountain Thyme is a showy, wide growing groundcover from the Old World and has beautiful rose-red flowers and glossy deep green, mat-forming foliage. In the song, the thyme has grown in and around the heather. O the summer time has come And the trees are sweetly bloomin' The wild mountain thyme Grows around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go? And we'll all go together To pull wild mountain thyme All around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go?   1885 Birth of Elvin Charles Stakman, American plant pathologist. Elvin is remembered for his work identifying and combatting diseases in wheat. In 1917, he married fellow a  plant pathologist named Estelle Louise Jensen. He also encouraged Norman Borlaug to pursue his career in phytopathology after Norman's job at the Forest Service was eliminated due to budget cuts. Elvin was Norman's teacher. And Norman went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1970) after discovering dwarf wheat varieties that reduced famine in India, Pakistan, and other third world countries. In 1938, Elvin gave a speech entitled These Shifty Little Enemies that Destroy our Food Crops. During his talk, Elvin focused on one shifty little enemy in particular: rust. Rust is a parasitic fungus that feeds on phytonutrients in grain crops like wheat, oat, and barley. Today, Elvin is remembered with the naming of Stakman Hall - the building where Plant Pathology is taught - at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus.  In The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World, Charles Mann reflected, Stakman did not view science as a disinterested quest for knowledge. It was a tool—may be the tool—for human betterment. Not all sciences were equally valuable, as he liked to explain. “Botany,” he said, “is the most important of all sciences, and plant pathology is one of its most essential branches.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek  This book came out in 2022. Stefanie writes in her introduction: In 150 Gardens You Need to Visit Before You Die, I've shared a vast range of gardens, from immense botanical institutions with thousands of specimens, to smaller plots for quiet meditations, to museums that combine both artworks and plantings. I hope these brief introductions inspire you to plan a visit or two, whether in your hometown or on your global travels, so that you can enjoy the sights, smells, sounds, and stories of the world's best gardens.   The publisher writes: From Kew Gardens in London to the Singapore Botanical Gardens, and from Monet's garden at Giverny to the Zen garden of the Ryoan-ji Temple in Kyoto, this handsomely bound book captures in words and images the most notable features of these 150 glorious, not-to-be-missed gardens. An essential bucket list book for garden lovers! You can get a copy of 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes.   Botanic Spark 1905 On this day, Louisa Yeomans King wrote in her garden journal about peonies. She published a year's worth of entries in her book, The Flower Garden Day by Day.  In 1902, Louisa and her husband moved to Michigan, where they built a home called Orchard House. With the help of a gardener named Frank Ackney, Louisa began to plan and create her garden. She also began writing about her Gardens. Soon, she gave lectures, contributed pieces to magazines, wrote columns, and organized garden clubs. She even became friends with prominent gardeners of her time like Gertrude Jekyll, Charles Sprague Sargent, and the landscape architects Fletcher Steele and Ellen Biddle Shipman. Louisa learned to garden during the heyday of American Garden Culture. Her garden writing in newspaper columns and magazine publications made her the most widely read American Garden author in the United States. Louisa's first book, "The Well-Considered Garden," the preface was written by her dear friend Gertrude Jekyll. In 1915, when the book debuted, it was considered an instant classic in garden literature. Louisa would go on to write a total of nine books. The garden estate known as Blithewold has a copy of "The Well-Considered Garden." Their particular text also contains a handwritten inscription along with Louisa's signature. The inscription borrows a quote from Sir William Temple, who said, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no man is too high or too low." Louisa changed the quote and wrote, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no woman is too high or too low." Louisa helped start the Garden Club of America and the Women's National Farm and Garden Association. She held leadership positions in both organizations. When her husband died suddenly in 1927, Louisa was forced to sell Orchard House. She moved to Hartford, New York, and bought a property she called Kingstree. This time, she set up a smaller garden. The size meant less work, which accommodated her writing and speaking commitments better. On this day, Louisa wrote in her journal this note of advice about the Peony: May 17. Disbud most of your peonies now; that is, of a cluster of buds, cut off all but the larger central one. Certain varieties, however, are considered more beautiful if left alone to flower as they will. Among these are Alsace Lorraine and La Rosiere.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Talking About Organizations Podcast
89: Administrative Behavior in Public Sector -- Herbert Kaufman (Part 1)

Talking About Organizations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 46:55


This month's episode examines a classic study in public administration, Herbert Kaufman's “The Forest Ranger: A Study in Administrative Behavior,” published in 1960. The U.S. Forest Service was a widely distributed organization with its many Rangers individually assigned to manage large tracts of public land. It would have been easy for the Forest Service to lose control and fragment, but it did not. Kaufman's study showed how and why the various techniques used by the Forest Service kept the Rangers integrated under a common vision.

Talking About Organizations Podcast
89: Administrative Behavior in Public Sector -- Herbert Kaufman (Summary of Episode)

Talking About Organizations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 5:30


This month's release is on Herbert Kaufman's study of forest rangers in the 1950s, looking at how the Forest Service worked to keep hundreds of Rangers scattered around the country unified under a common purpose and vision. The study is a classic of public administration and organizational behavior, showing various techniques that public sector organizations can use to hone a well-oiled bureaucracy!

Trent Loos Podcast
Rural Route Radio May 16, 2022 Hank Vogler gives us all the back story on BLM & Forest Service permitting process and what real mustangers meant to health

Trent Loos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:02


Back in the day ranchers would manage the feral horses of the West and really make something out of them. Now just like every other thing the government controls it is a disaster.

The Hotshot Wake Up
Weekly Wildfire Update: Operational Update, Cali Coastal Fire , Southwest, and Canada. NPR Talks Firefighter Wages, Congress Takes Action, Tree Strikes Hotshot, I Get Blocked By the Forest Service.

The Hotshot Wake Up

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:27


This Week's Weekly Wildfire Update: Full Operational Update: The Cali Coastal Fire , Southwest still rips, and Canada sees increase in fire activity. Michigan firefighter charged with wildfire arson. NPR Talks Firefighter Wages. Marketplace does a segment about the fight for better wages. Congress Takes Action. Letter written to the Forest Service about fast tracking wages, Portal to Portal, and more. A tree strikes a Hotshot on the Calf Canyon fire. We talk about the incident. I get blocked by the Forest Service Northwest. Hilarious. Plus more. THE HOTSHOT WAKE UP - Thank you to all of our paid subscribers. It allows us to generously donate to firefighter charities and supports all the content we provide. https://thehotshotwakeup.substack.com/

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”