Podcasts about Water resources

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Sources of water that are potentially useful

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Water resources

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Best podcasts about Water resources

Latest podcast episodes about Water resources

Science Moab
Water Sustainability on the Navajo Nation

Science Moab

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 20:51


The Navajo Nation is the size of West Virginia. Throughout the Nation, the topography, precipitation patterns, and water recharge are extremely diverse, but not well understood. Here we talk with principal hydrologist Crystal Tulley-Cordova about her work with the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources and her research around the precipitation, recharge sources, and opportunities for sustainable water use on the Navajo Nation. This episode was made possible by a Stem Action Grant from the Society for Science

Smart Living Hawaii
Episode #45: A Talk Story w/ Lauren Roth Venu, Our Fresh Water Resources & System in Hawaii

Smart Living Hawaii

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 66:08


A Talk Story with Lauren Roth Venu as we dive deeper on Hawaii's Fresh Water and how we as a state manage our precious resource. From storm water runoff to irrigation, quality of water to green infrastructure, there is so much to learn about Hawaii's water system, our history, our current situation and how people like Lauren are solving the problems we unknowingly created over time. **Note, this podcast was recorded prior to the Halawa Shaft shutdown and Red Hill Contamination. But this podcast was very timely as it walks us through Oahu's water resources and water resiliency. This goes to show how important this resource is to Hawaii and our people and how we must be good stewards from here on out regardless the circumstance. Listen in and learn how we can all be community contributors for our future! Lauren Roth Venu is passionate about developing strategic, innovative solutions to build water resiliency. As the Founding Principal of Roth Ecological Design Int. LLC, Lauren strives to bridge her background in ecological design, the water sciences and policy to elevate site design by maximizing onsite water conservation, reuse and stormwater recharge practices that meet the triple bottom line. Her educational background includes B.A. in Environmental Science with a specialty in Water from the University of Colorado at Boulder; a Master of Science in Oceanography from the University of Hawai‛i at Manoa; a graduate of the Proper.net Leadership Program from the United Nations University / East-West Center; and is a fellow of the 2015 Water Leadership Institute (Water Environment Federation). Lauren is a frequent lecturer and published author on ecological design and green (water) infrastructure. She also has served on a variety of public service roles for the State of Hawaii and the City of County of Honolulu. Last but not least is her recent technology company we will later discuss, 3RWater. FB: @3Rwater www.facebook.com/3RWater Instagram: @3Rwater https://instagram.com/3rwater?utm_medium=copy_link @rothecologicaldesign https://instagram.com/rothecologicaldesign?utm_medium=copy_link Website: www.rothecological.com, www.3rwater.com, www.stormwaterutilitywater.org Lauren's LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/laurencrothvenu 3rWater LinkedIn: (48) Lauren C. Roth Venu | LinkedIn Email: info@rothecologicaldesign.com or lauren@rothecological.com You can reach Smart Living Hawaii at: Website: www.smartlivinghi.org | Instagram: @smart_living_hawaii | Facebook: @SmartLivingHawaii

Ingrained
Episode 28: Time for Wildlife Refuges to Soar

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 18:18


Winter is approaching, and that will soon translate into the arrival of millions of birds to the rice fields and wildlife refuges in the Sacramento Valley. For many, including Suzy Crabtree, it's a magical time. Suzy has visited Gray Lodge Wildlife Area in Butte County thousands of times over the years, to photograph the amazing array of ducks, geese, shorebirds, raptors and other animals there. “There's so many things to see there,” she remarked. “We find it to be a place of refuge and solace. The drive down through the rice fields and the orchards is just the beginning of bringing us peace.” In addition to viewing Bald Eagles and other stunning birds, Suzy is among those who has seen a rare white deer at the refuge, as she's had four sightings over the years. Tim Hermansen is wildlife area manager at Gray Lodge. He has worked to help the Sacramento Valley ecosystem since 2008, including working with rice farmers to maintain and enhance waterbird habitat in their fields, which are vital to hundreds of wildlife species and millions of birds. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area has a long history as a wildlife sanctuary. Initial land was purchased in the 1930s. The area and scope has expanded over the years, including nearly 9,300 acres covered today. It's home to upwards of one million waterfowl at its winter peak. A highlight for visitors is a three-mile long auto loop, which includes more than $1 million in improvements carried out by Ducks Unlimited and the Wildlife Conservation Board. Hermansen said the improvements include widening the road and flattening the shoulders, with wider turnouts so visitors don't need to feel rushed. Also, they added islands and enhanced the topography in the ponds to make it more suitable to birds and draw them closer to viewers. “You can drive around and there are pullouts for people to stop and observe the wildlife that is out there,” Hermansen said. “It gives you a chance from your vehicle to be up close and personal with the birds and not scare them away. They're not as scared of a vehicle as someone walking. In some cases, they will stay within 10 to 20 yards from your vehicle.” The entire Pacific Flyway has struggled due to prevailing drought in the west. Fortunately, rice growers have worked with conservation groups and other stakeholders to do what they can to provide enough shallow-flooded fall and winter habitat.   “We continue to be concerned with issues like disease and starvation as more birds arrive and they may not have the habitat that they need,” remarked Luke Matthews, Wildlife Programs Manager with the California Rice Commission. As steps are taken to protect the millions of birds that will visit the Sacramento Valley, their presence here is a joyous sight for many. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area is one of the best places to enjoy this annual gift. Episode Transcript Suzy Crabtree: I have been to Gray Lodge probably thousands of times over the years. We find it to be a place of refuge and solace. Just the drive down through the rice fields and the orchards is just the beginning of bringing us peace. Jim Morris: Suzy Crabtree is among those who appreciate wildlife refuges in the Sacramento Valley. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area near Gridley is indeed a special place. Ducks, geese, raptors and eagles are just the beginning of your wildlife viewing. Suzy Crabtree: There's so many things to see there. There's deer, there's muskrat, there's mink, there's fox. We've seen bobcat there. Probably the most magical time I've had at Gray Lodge has been when we have come across the white deer, a leucistic deer. We usually see her in the evening and we've seen her probably about four times. It's pretty magical to see her. Jim Morris: This magic - an affordable, memorable outing, great for families, is only part of the benefits that come from wildlife refuges, and we're entering the time with the absolute best viewing. Welcome to Ingrained, the California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. I've lived in the Sacramento Valley my entire life, and my appreciation for our ecosystem continues to grow. I've learned the awe-inspiring sights that come from living along the Pacific Flyway. We'll find out more about fantastic ways to see wildlife right from your vehicle, but first, an update on how birds are faring during this drought. Luke Matthews, Wildlife Program's Manager with the California Rice Commission, what are you seeing and hearing from the field about the wildlife migration? Luke Matthews: There's definitely a lot of birds here already. We're not at the peak of the migration on the Pacific Flyway yet, but we're nearing that. Numbers are continuing to build, but there's definitely experiencing some issues with drought conditions across the west. Jim Morris: That is a factor. So by the time the birds are arriving here, they haven't really had their full rest and refuel capability. What have you seen elsewhere in the west that really impacts their health as they head to the Sacramento Valley? Luke Matthews: Drought conditions throughout Oregon, Washington, Utah, a lot of these areas where birds normally rest have been pretty significant. And so, we're assuming that when they get there, they're struggling and needing habitats. So when they arrive here, it's even a greater need. Jim Morris: So the value is great in the Sacramento Valley every year, but particularly in a year like this. And there is a program with the Rice Commission and the State Department of Water Resources that is helping. Can you tell us a little more about that effort? Luke Matthews: So we have a program that looks to create more flooding on the landscape with a shallow amount of water, both on rice fields and wetlands. For total, the program has about 50 to 60,000 acres across both components. And it's really just a strategic effort to increase flooding on the landscape because, in a normal year we would have on the order of 300,000 acres of flooded rice and this year, even with the program, we expect to only have probably 100,000 acres of flooded rice. Concerns are that we will not have enough habitat. And as we reach the peak migration, that will just get worse, less habitat, but more birds. So there is our effort and other efforts down in the San Joaquin Valley, for example, to increase flooding for the migration, for the duration of this winter. But we are just worried about disease and starvation and other things like that as birds arrive and may not have the habitat they need. Jim Morris: Time to learn more about one of the jewels of the Sacramento Valley, Gray Lodge. I'm visiting with Tim Hermansen, Wildlife Area Manager. Tim, let's start with your background and your experience with our valley ecosystem. Tim Hermansen: So I got the start in the Sacramento Valley ecosystem in 2008, when I became the wildlife biologist for the Colusa Natural Resources Conservation Service office, working with private land owners in the Sacramento Valley to enhance habitats on their private ground. That included habitats in the areas such as the Butte Sink, but also private rice growers throughout the valley. In 2011 and 2012, I was working with the California Rice Commission to pilot some of the initial waterbird enhancement programs throughout the Sacramento Valley to enhance that waterbird habitat across the private landscape. In 2013, I became the area manager for the Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area, located just north of Gray Lodge along Butte Creek. And then about a year ago, I became the area manager for Gray Lodge. Jim Morris: Gray Lodge was established many decades ago. Can you give me a little bit of background on the history, how much land we're talking about and other important details? Tim Hermansen: The initial purchase was in about 1931. It actually used revenues generated from pari-mutuel horse betting through the Lee Act. The design was to provide sanctuary habitat for migratory birds to draw them off of the surrounding private rice grounds and reduce depredation issues. For a few decades it was just a sanctuary where people could come out and enjoy seeing the birds. In the 1950s, they through one of the expansions, started to allow hunting. And since the initial purchase in the 1930s, we're now up to about almost 9300 acres. It's about 9260 acres where we have both sanctuary habitat for wintering waterfowl to rest and still do that depredation. But we also provide public hunting across about two-thirds of the wildlife area. Jim Morris: Your job is to balance all that, to make sure that we can enjoy this ecosystem for many years to come, I imagine? Tim Hermansen: We try to balance that. A lot of our revenue comes from hunting, license sales and things of that sort. We want to continue to provide opportunities for the hunters to come out, enjoy the area that their licenses are going to fund. But we also want to make sure that the people that just want to come out and enjoy seeing the wildlife have an opportunity also. So we have a large auto tour loop public trail system. That's open 365 days a year that people can come out and go for a hike, go for a drive, see all sorts of wildlife in our sanctuary area and still enjoy that. And it provides that sanctuary for the wintering waterfowl. Jim Morris: What can people expect when they come out? It is an amazing array of wildlife, but what are some of the things that people would see this time of the year? Tim Hermansen: We can have up to a million waterfowl on the wildlife area. A lot of snow geese, a lot of white fronted geese, pintail, mallards, but we also get other birds in the area. Last winter for example, we had six bald eagles using our closed zone all winter long. There're other raptors. In the springtime, you'll start seeing some of the Neotropical migrants, the songbirds moving through. And then year round, we have deer, quail, turkeys can be found out here, all sorts of local wildlife that don't migrate away. But this time of year the primary attraction is the waterfowl. Jim Morris: I was distracted coming in on this foggy day because right across the road from your office, there was a deer just sitting there waiting for its photo to be taken. So it is really fun to see and a great way for people to experience this is the auto loop, which is about three miles. And tell me about what that offers and also the improvements that have been done on it. Tim Hermansen: It's about a three mile auto tour loop where you can drive around. We have pullouts for people to stop and observe the wildlife that are out there. It gives you a chance from your vehicle to have an opportunity to get up close and personal with the birds and not scare them away. They're not as scared of a vehicle as they are of someone walking. So, for three miles you can drive around and from your vehicle and with your binoculars or spotting scopes or cameras see the wildlife from, in some cases, they'll stay within 10 or 20 yards of your vehicle. Tim Hermansen: Over the last two years, we've partnered with Ducks Unlimited and the Wildlife Conservation Board to do improvements to our auto tour loop that widen the road and flatten the shoulders out a bit, for safety. Before, you could easily drive off into the canals or ditches and they improved all of that. And it also made those turnouts wider so you don't have to feel rushed if someone's coming up behind you. Out in the ponds, we added islands and enhanced the topography to make it more suitable for the birds and draw them in closer to you in your car. So that project just finished up this summer. It was a huge success, huge project, over a million dollars worth of funding went into it. And I just can't thank our partners enough for that. Jim Morris: A few suggestions when you're driving through, please drive slowly out of respect for everyone. And of course the birds that are there. Also, my wife always suggests go a second time if you can through a loop because you often see different wildlife that you can appreciate. This has been a tough go for our world, with the pandemic and other stressors. And I am jealous of your work environment. So what is it like to work out here regularly? Tim Hermansen: When you drive in you see deer right off the side of the road. From our office we can look up from the computer if we're stuck in the office for the day. And oftentimes seeing those deer, seeing the waterfowl flying by, ducks and geese. In the springtime, you have California Quail right outside making their calls and having a good time. So it's great. You get to see the wildlife from your office. And then when you aren't in the office, you're still working. So you get to drive around, if we're checking water or doing a survey, or just seeing how the wildlife area is doing and you're out there in the wild, you have the great view of the Sutter Buttes in the background and you're still doing the job and getting paid for it. So can't beat that. Jim Morris: You mentioned it right up top. There's a coordinated effort to help the Pacific Flyway Migration and our entire Sacramento Valley ecosystem. What have you seen in terms of cooperation among rice growers, conservation groups, state, and federal government, water districts, and other stakeholders in this area? Tim Hermansen: There's a huge partnership in this area between all of those groups you just mentioned. Through this last year in the drought, we were having coordination calls between the state agencies, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, US Fish and Wildlife Service. We had other partners like USGS, Ducks Unlimited, California Waterfowl Association, and the California Rice Commission was involved with those calls, trying to help coordinate where we might strategically place the limited water supplies on the landscape during this critical drought year. It was a very large effort. We met regularly to try to coordinate. And, it seems like when you look around the valley, that those coordination efforts paid off because the birds are spaced out. We're not having any disease issues yet. Thankfully. Let's hope it stays that way. We have the partnership with the rice growers to pump water and have it on their fields, through programs that California Rice Commission or DWR have worked on. We've been able to meet many of the needs of the waterfowl that came down from the north lands this year. Jim Morris: So good to hear about this great partnership. And a lot of the refuges are right around the rice fields. A quick comment, if you would, about how important the rice fields are, those surrogate wetlands. They've largely replaced the original wetlands that California had. How important are the rice fields to maintain this ecosystem? Tim Hermansen: Like you mentioned, most of the natural historic wetlands in the basins around here, they did large reclamation projects to turn it into agricultural ground. So, we have small postage stamps of state and some privately owned wetland habitats, moist soil management wetland habitats, but we also have hundreds of thousands of acres of rice. After the harvest is complete, those rice fields, if they are flooded or even if they're not, if they're properly managed, they can provide great food resources for waterfowl. Both the waste grain that doesn't get picked up by the combines, but also invertebrates that are in the soil that the birds will eat. It's important, not just for ducks and geese, but also waterbirds, shorebirds, the little sandpipers and killdeer, black-neck stilts. All of those really rely on those fields in the wintertime for those supplemental food sources that our wildlife areas just can't provide. Tim Hermansen: We don't have enough space. Rice fields also provide some good habitat for resident nesting and breeding wildlife in the spring and summer months. A lot of birds will use the checks for nesting habitat. More barren checks are used by some of the shorebirds, like the stilts and avocets to nest on. If they're allowed to get more weedy cover, mallards, and some of the other local ducks will nest on them. And then they can use the flooded rice fields to raise their young in and have a bit of a supplemental habitat, in addition to the wildlife areas. The fields that are closer to the wildlife areas, the state areas and the federal refuges they're generally used more, but they're important throughout the valley. Jim Morris: The other day, I was at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, and it was great as always, but across I-5 in a rice field were tens of thousands of snow geese so I understand exactly what you said in that last comment. Probably unfair of me to ask, but do you have a favorite sighting that you ever had here or a favorite bird or mammal that you've seen at Gray Lodge? Tim Hermansen: A sighting that stands out to me. I had a friend, he was actually a mentor from when I worked in the Midwest. He came out to visit. It's been close to a decade ago before I worked for the department, but I took him out here and he wanted to see Gray Lodge. And as we're driving the tour loop, he had never seen a Eurasian Wigeon before, and I would drive the tour loop regularly just to see what's out here before going hunting. And I told him usually right around this corner, there's a Eurasian Wigeon. So we came around the corner and sure enough, there he was. I got proven right on that account and my friend from the Midwest got to see his first Eurasian Wigeon which was pretty neat. And it still stands out in my mind as a neat sighting. Tim Hermansen: That's something to keep note of. If you come out for our auto tour loop or our public trails, or if you come out to go hunting, we do get those odd visitors from other flyways from time to time. The Eurasian Wigeon, blue-winged teal - some of the birds you normally wouldn't see in the Pacific Flyway, we will get through here. And you have an opportunity to perhaps see the bird for the first time in your life. Jim Morris: Take your time, enjoy it. And then when you see a lot of birds, look carefully, because there may be an unusual visitor in the mix. Hopefully after what you heard today, you will soon plan a trip to a wildlife refuge near you. Before we wrap up, a few final suggestions from Suzy Crabtree on how you can get it the most out of your Grey Lodge experience. Suzy Crabtree: If you are going to Gray Lodge the one thing that I would suggest is to take the walking hiking trail first, and then take the auto loop. And when you are going to take the hiking trail, always make sure that when you're walking to take a moment to stop and look back from where you've just been. It's a good way to find things that you may have passed that you didn't see. Owls are really great at hiding and blending in with their surroundings. If you go and park at Lot 14, and you head out on the dirt trail, not on the asphalt trail and just that first trail that you go along right across from the canal, there is a pair of great horned owls that you, if you're really good at looking, they're very hard to find, but you can find them. And they're right before you make the first right hand turn on that trail. Suzy Crabtree: Bald eagles are really a thrill to see at Gray Lodge. You can see the adults as well as the juveniles. And it's really interesting to watch the adults training the juveniles on how to hunt. And it's really fun to watch them teach the juveniles and the next upcoming ones that are coming onto the lodge. Jim Morris: We will continue to chronicle the Pacific Flyway Migration and drought impacts in the coming weeks. You can go to podcast.calrice.org to find out more information. Thank you to Suzy Crabtree, Luke Matthews, and Tim Hermansen for their time and expertise. Be sure to subscribe for future episodes. We appreciate your comments and reviews. Thanks for listening.

Philip Teresi Podcasts
Thursday 12/02 - Hour 1

Philip Teresi Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 36:18


Kicking it off with the Buzz Question about the omicron variant. At a stop in the central valley, Gov. Newsom states that he is confident in the state's plan to continue vaccinations and manage COVID will keep us from another shutdown heading into the holidays. A word from Dr. Bill Morice, President of Mayo Clinic Labs and the Chair of Lab Medicine and Pathology Department, discusses the latest variant. CA's Department of Water Resources has announced that valley farmers will get none of their water allocation in 2022 and municipal water users will get enough to meet minimum health and safety demands. Listeners comment.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Thursday 12/02 - Hour 1

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 36:18


Kicking it off with the Buzz Question about the omicron variant. At a stop in the central valley, Gov. Newsom states that he is confident in the state's plan to continue vaccinations and manage COVID will keep us from another shutdown heading into the holidays. A word from Dr. Bill Morice, President of Mayo Clinic Labs and the Chair of Lab Medicine and Pathology Department, discusses the latest variant. CA's Department of Water Resources has announced that valley farmers will get none of their water allocation in 2022 and municipal water users will get enough to meet minimum health and safety demands. Listeners comment.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ray Appleton
Hour 2 - Trump Torches Biden In 'Fox & Friends' Interview. Trump Reportedly Tested Positive For Covid Three Days Before Presidential Debate. California Dept. of Water Resources announces 0 Percent water allocation.

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:23


Former President Donald Trump tore into President Joe Biden in a wide-ranging interview Thursday, suggesting that the administration is "knowingly" destroying the country and is distrusted by the American people. Former president Donald Trump tested positive for Covid-19 three days before he went on stage to participate in the first presidential debate against Joe Biden and around a week before he announced another positive test on Twitter. Ryan Jacobson calls in to talk about how the Department of Water Resources Director, Karla Nemeth, announced the initial State Water Project allocation would be 0%, except for critical health and safety needs.    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED's The California Report
Omicron Variant Discovered in San Francisco Resident

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 15:36


The experts said it was coming, and they were right. Scientists have found the first case of the Omicron variant in the country in a San Francisco resident. Guest: Dr. Monica Gandhi, Infectious Disease Doctor, UC San Francisco California rules meant to protect outdoor workers from the dangers of wildfire smoke are almost never enforced. That's the finding of an investigation by KQED and The California Newsroom.  Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED & California Newsroom The state Department of Water Resources is promising no water next year for rural and urban areas, unless they need it for basic necessities. This comes as the state is dealing with another year of drought. Reporter: Ezra David Romero, KQED

20 Minute Leaders
Ep653: Yaron Ben Nun | Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Nostromo Energy

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 23:29


Yaron is passionate about the environment and is an activist for the proper use of natural resources. Before Co-Founding Nostromo, Yaron spent several years in managerial positions at software companies leading in clean-tech and industrial performance efficacy. Served in the Israeli Defense Force Air Force pilot, Yaron experienced the importance of a cleaner planet from a birds-eye view. Trained in electrical studies and granted a certificate of ‘Energy conservation master' from the Israeli Ministry of National Infrastructure, energy and Water Resources.

Inside the Castle
Inside the Castle Celebrates Native American Heritage Month

Inside the Castle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Inside the Castle celebrates Native American Heritage Month with Dr. Crystal Tulley-Cordova, Principal Hydrologist at the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources.

Talk+Water Podcast
#35, Kyle Garmany - The Nature Conservancy's Texas Water Program

Talk+Water Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 52:22


Texas+Water Editor-in-Chief Dr. Todd Votteler interviews Kyle Garmany, Water and Agriculture Program Director for The Nature Conservancy Texas Chapter. In his role at The Nature Conservancy, Garmany is responsible for developing innovative strategies to alleviate water scarcity and protect the ecological integrity of the rivers, bays and estuaries of the state. His work includes the development of partnerships with agricultural producers to decrease water use and the execution of environmental water transactions to meet instream and environmental flow demands (https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/texas/stories-in-texas/tx-water-program/). Prior to his tenure with the Conservancy, he worked as a Hydrologist for State of Texas where he focused on the administration of water rights, and lead efforts to develop tools and strategies to develop environmental water transactions. Garmany studied Hydrology at Humboldt State University, and Water Resources at Texas State University.

KZYX News
Groundwater survey could lead to new water storage approach

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 6:29


November 9, 2021 — This Thursday, residents around the Ukiah groundwater basin may see a helicopter flying low, hauling a large hoop. It's part of a state-sponsored program designed to map the geological features of groundwater basins. Katherine Dlubac is an engineering geologist and the project manager for the Department of Water Resources' stateside Aerial Electromagnetic (AEM) surveys. She laid out some of the ways that information from the surveys can be used, with the larger goal of implementing SGMA, the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act of 2014, which requires local jurisdictions to come up with plans to manage the resource. “It tells us about the aquifer structures,” she said; “where we have thick layers in the subsurface of sands and gravels that allow for water to flow, but also for water to be stored. It also tells us where we have layers of clays and silts, so fine grained materials that inhibit water movement. And so while the AEM data still needs to be combined with other types of data...what it can do is it can provide you a better picture of what's happening in the aquifer...so that you can make those management decisions of whether you want to try recharging water in the area from the surface, or if you want to try injecting water into the aquifer to store it there as another type of reservoir.” Supervisor Glenn McGourty is part of the local Groundwater Sustainability Agency tasked with gathering as much information as possible to craft the plan. The Ukiah groundwater basin relies mostly on the Russian River, but is also fed by about 160 smaller tributaries. “Any data we get is going to be useful,” he said; “because you can't usually see groundwater. You have to have some way of measuring it. Often it's delineated by wells, so you don't know for sure what you're looking at. And there are a couple of mysteries, because we don't really have uniform geology here in the valley. So the two mysteries are, where is the groundwater? And the second mystery is, how does it get recharged? The surface groundwater interface, as we call it, is the thing that's really hard to understand.” Dlubac says the electromagnetic technology has been around since the middle of the last century, but it was used mostly in mining applications. After Prop 68, a Parks, Environment, and Water Bond passed in 2018, the Division of Water Resources carried out a pilot program in central and Southern California counties to gather data for their groundwater management plans. The survey taking place now will measure basins across the state for the next two years, taking what Dlubac calls “a snapshot” of their geological features. After the two-year survey of “coarse grid data,” she hopes to go back for a finer picture. “When we go in and start collecting fine grids of data, we can start to get more high resolution information about some of the space in between the coarse grid where we didn't collect information,” she reported. “And that can support defining recharge areas, better understanding where we have clays in the subsurface, where we have subsidence, and other areas that can support the implementation of SGMA.” McGourty is interested in experiments that are currently underway in the Central Valley, on how to store water in the ground, rather than in surface reservoirs. Knowing what kinds of sediments are where could further that approach locally. “The idea would be to divert the river during really high flows and to inundate some parts of the basin where there's fairly permeable alluvium, gravel, principally,” he explained, adding that the City of Ukiah already uses recycled wastewater to recharge the aquifer. “One of the things we're not really sure about,” he reflected, adding to the mysteries still to be solved; “is what are the parameters of the river underflow and things like that. So any information about where water is coming from is of interest to us.” Dlubac expects the information from the survey to be available to local groundwater management agencies in about eight months.

Ingrained
Episode 27: The Birds

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 13:33


It took longer than normal, but fortunately it is happening. A shallow amount of water is showing up in rice fields throughout the Sacramento Valley – essentially a welcome mat for the 10 million ducks, geese and other wildlife migrating through our area for their annual Pacific Flyway journey. This year was the driest in a century in California. The water shortage led to about 100,000 fewer acres of rice planted in the Sacramento Valley. It also threatened to leave many rice fields without a shallow amount of water after harvest, which helps decompose leftover straw and provides vital wildlife habitat. Fortunately, through an innovative new program and a large recent rainstorm, the outlook for migrating wildlife has improved. “We went from historic drought to record-setting rain, and it has helped,” said Luke Matthews, Wildlife Programs Manager with the California Rice Commission. “It has saturated the soils and added a bit of water to creeks, streams and reservoirs. It's definitely going to benefit migratory birds, but one storm doesn't change a couple of years of drought. We're not out of the woods yet, but definitely hope here.” Matthews said a new program funded by the California Department of Water Resources will be a huge help. It provides for about 42,000 acres of rice fields to be shallow-flooded for birds, along with about 12,000 acres of private wetlands. Sutter County rice grower Jeff Gallagher has participated in many conservation programs, including this effort to provide more water for wildlife. He said wildlife viewing is good and getting better by the day. “It's nice to be able to come to work every day and see thousands of geese and ducks, as well as tons of shorebirds,” Gallagher remarked. “It's a good thing for everybody!” Among those closely monitoring the Pacific Flyway migration is Jeff McCreary, Manager of the Western Region for Ducks Unlimited, a key conservation partner with the Rice Commission and other stakeholders. McCreary said the Sacramento Valley is perhaps even more valuable for migrating wildlife this year, due to water shortages elsewhere on their journey. “What we're seeing with the dry conditions in the Klamath Basin and the Great Salt Lake is that birds are not staying in those locations, they're moving on quickly and coming to the Sacramento Valley earlier than they normally would,” McCreary said. “We're seeing lots of ducks and geese really early. This recent rain actually provided more habitat in the Sacramento Valley, because it's shallowly-flooding up the dry rice fields unexpectedly. We thought there would be a lot more dry ground out there all the way into the middle of winter, when the rains have typically come. Now, we're seeing rain on the landscape, which is right in the nick of time, because this is when the birds are starting to come. We're cautiously optimistic about how things are going to progress this winter.” He said those in the Sacramento area have a great opportunity to see the amazing sights from the millions of visiting birds, through local wildlife refuges. Ducks Unlimited just completed a major project at the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area in Butte County, making the auto tour loop safer and providing better access to viewing these stunning birds. Episode Transcript Jim Morris: It's an amazing annual spectacle. The Pacific Flyway wildlife migration through the Sacramento Valley is one of the largest waterfowl migrations you'll find anywhere. It has been a difficult year in the Sacramento Valley, but seeing why rice is the environmental crop, seeing all of the birds in the fields provides a chance to exhale and appreciate something beautiful. Welcome to Ingrained, the California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. The water outlook in California has improved as we get deeper into fall, but we have a long way to go, according to meteorologist Alexander Mellerski of Western Weather Group in Chico. Alexander Mellerski:  We saw a pretty significant atmospheric river event slam into California. We saw multiple inches of rainfall across the state ranging anywhere from right about three inches up north of the valley near Redding, a little bit farther south in Chico and then near Oroville about four to five inches kind of in that range. And then even down further south in the Sacramento area, we got about five to six inches of rain, maybe even a little bit more kind of closer to the foothills. So pretty significant rainfall. And, to put that into perspective, for all of last water year, so in 2020 to 2021, the water year, Sacramento for example, got anywhere from about six to seven inches of rain the entire water year. So this one storm gave us about 75 percent roughly of what we got all of last year. Jim Morris: It's pretty amazing, but we're not out of the woods in terms of the drought? Alexander Mellerski: In terms of the drought. No, unfortunately I would say, one event, that's by no means is indicative of getting us out of a drought. Jim Morris: Conditions are better, but the drought continues. And while we hope for several more storms at the right time, that's far from guaranteed, I'm near the Sutter-Yuba county line at Gallagher Ranch near Rio Oso. Jeff Gallagher, it was a stressful year for water. How did it treat your operation? Jeff Gallagher: It's definitely been one of the most challenging years we faced. Starting out the season we were cut way short on our water. We get all of our water out of the Camp Far West, which our allocation got cut about 80 percent back. So, we ended up planning about 65 percent of our ground this year had to leave out a little over a third. So, it was definitely tough here. And then we're getting through harvest, got kind of an early storm here recently, and we have a few fields still left to cut. It has definitely been a tough year. Jim Morris: Too little the front, too much on the back end, boy that is tough. So you have participated in wildlife conservation programs. It's great to see the wildlife in the rice fields and those tremendous benefits. How do these programs help you carry out what you can to help the birds? Jeff Gallagher: We've been working with the Rice Commission and Luke the last three, four years now, and the programs have just been really great. Anything we can do to kind of co-exist with the environment, help that area out and ourselves production wise, it just kind of fits really good. We're doing kind of our straw decomposition anyway in the fall. It creates this great habitat for all the waterfowl. And plus, it's just nice to be able to come out to work every day and see thousands of geese and ducks and tons of shorebirds in the spring. And so it's just a good thing for everybody. Jim Morris: And when you do look out at the fall and we're going to have a lot more wildlife coming into our region, favorite wildlife that you see? Jeff Gallagher: I would have to say the ducks and geese. I think we get here, we'll get some geese, snow geese, and specklebelly geese packed in pretty thick down here. And just to drive across the field and see thousands and thousands of birds sitting out there. And then they all get up at once. I mean, it's definitely a sight to see and something that we look forward to every year. Jim Morris: Luke Matthews is Wildlife Programs Manager with the California Rice Commission. When we look at the weather this year and getting water on the rice fields, the conditions have improved a little bit for wildlife. Can you comment? Luke Matthews: We went from historic drought to record-setting rain and it's definitely helped. It's saturated the soils. It's added a little bit of water to creeks, streams, reservoirs, stuff like that. It's definitely going to benefit migratory birds, but one storm doesn't change a couple years of drought. So we're still not out of the woods, but definitely some hope here. Jim Morris: So we really do need the wildlife programs and there is one that's unfolding right now. Can you comment on how that will help the Pacific Flyway? Luke Matthews: So we have a program that's funded by the Department of Water Resources and it is to help get more flooded acres out this winter, given the drought conditions on both rice and on private wetlands. So, really just an effort to increase the amount of flooded landscape this year, because we knew there wasn't going to be much with surface water without any sort of program. Jim Morris: This is shallow flooding of rice ground. And how many acres should be involved with this? Luke Matthews: That's correct. We're looking at very, very strategic use of this water. It'll be shallow. For the rice we have about 42,000 acres enrolled. And then on the private wetland side, we've got about 12,000 acres. Jim Morris: Rice is amazing in terms of its environmental value. The Central Valley Joint Venture, in 2020 I believe, has some new numbers. It's very impressive. Can you relay those numbers? Luke Matthews: The Central Valley Joint Venture puts out a plan every couple years and the most recent one cited the food resource use from agriculture of waterfowl and that's that ducks in the Sacramento Valley rely on rice for 74 percent of their nutritional needs. And then for geese, it's even higher, that rice provides 95 percent of all their nutritional needs for geese in the Sac valley. Jim Morris: That's a lot of food when you consider seven to 10 million ducks and geese are spending their fall in winter in Sacramento Valley rice country in adjacent wetlands. There is already stress as these birds arrive because of dry conditions elsewhere. So how important is the Sacramento Valley to keep these migrating birds comfortable, fed and rested before they continue their journey? Luke Matthews: Well, in a normal year, the Sac valley is very important because it's sort of the final resting ground for a lot of these birds that migrate south along the Pacific Flyway. So they spend a lot more time here than most of the other areas. This year, I'd say it's even probably more important, because their key staging areas in the Great Salt Lake, up on Klamath, in Oregon - those are all historically dry right now. So as they come down on their migration, they're experiencing low food availability, low resting and loafing habitats. So when they get here, they're in worse body condition we assume. And so that just means that this year, the habitat we can provide is going to be utilized more aggressively, more heavily and be even more important. Jim Morris: Innovative conservation programs are only possible through collaboration with outstanding partners, Jeff McCreary is director of operation for the Western Region of Ducks Unlimited. Jeff, how is the Sacramento Valley leg of the Pacific Flyway proceeding for ducks? Jeff McCreary: Well Jim, we're in the heart of the Pacific Flyway and the Central Valley, and particularly the Sacramento Valley, is key for the wintering habitat for the Pacific Flyaway migrating birds, ducks, geese, swans, all those great charismatic megafauna that you see out there in the rice field this time of year, but we're in a Pacific Flyway drought. And, although we've just had record rain in the Sacramento area, we're still incredibly dry, exceptionally dry all across the Western United States. So, while things are definitely better here in the Sacramento Valley, it's still challenging in two of the other main migration habitats within the Western US, that's the Klamath Basin and the Great Salt Lake, both of which have seen record dry years along with the Central Valley. Jim Morris: So the drought continues and how important are the rice fields of the Sacramento Valley? Obviously very important, but even more important this year because these birds really need to rest and refuel now in our area more than ever. Jeff McCreary: Absolutely. In the Sacramento Valley, winter flooded rice provides up to 70 percent of the energetics for these wintering birds and what we're seeing with the dry conditions in Klamath Basin and the Great Salt Lake is that birds are not staying in those locations. They're moving on quickly and they're coming to the Central Valley, the Sacramento Valley, earlier than they normally would. As we drive around the northern part of the valley here, we're seeing lots of ducks. We're seeing lots of geese and this is October. This is really early. The peak of the migration is in mid-December. What we're seeing here is that this recent rain has actually provided more habitat in the Sacramento Valley because it's shallowly flooding up these dry rice fields unexpectedly. We thought there was going to be lot more dry ground out there all the way into the middle of the winter when the rains have typically come. But now we're seeing rain on the landscape and it's right in the nick of time because this is when the birds are starting to come. And I think we're cautiously optimistic about how things are going to progress this winter. Jim Morris: I mentioned at the start of our conversation, the importance of partnerships, probably more important this year than ever, because of the limited water supply. Your view, Jeff, on the importance of partnerships to best protect wildlife and our region as a whole. Jeff McCreary: Partnerships are essential for effective conservation without a good suite of partners, nothing's going to happen on the landscape and that's private landowners, that's nonprofit groups, that's federal and state agencies, local governments, water districts, when they can all come together. What we can do collectively is greater than we would've been able to do individually. I think one great example is a recent memorandum of understanding that was signed between Ducks Unlimited, California Rice Commission, Northern California Water Association and California Trout. And we're working to re-envision the Sacramento Valley's floodplain ecosystems so that the valley can support sure, ducks, but also rice agriculture and fish. It's a complicated system that we have with the floodplains and the rivers, but we think that there's space and there's an opportunity for us all to work together so that we can see a landscape that's vibrant with winter flooded rice, millions of ducks and geese in the winter and vibrant fisheries in our rivers and streams. Jim Morris: You mentioned the millions of ducks and geese. We see this all the time. I was in Yuba County this morning and enjoyed seeing thousands and thousands of birds. How best can someone who hasn't yet experienced this, take it all in, in the weeks ahead? Jeff McCreary: Well, we are blessed to be right in the middle of a spectacle of nature, which is the Pacific Flyway migration and ducks, geese and swans are starting to arrive here in the valley and Sacramento, one of its great assets is that it's central to most everything. And, in fact, in a short drive from Sacramento area, we can see lots of wildlife right outside the vehicle and right outside of walking trails. Some great places to go, I think are the Cosumnes River Preserve , which is south of Sacramento, great rice fields and wetland habitats, all with walking trails and there's a great sandhill crane viewing area if you go there in the evening Also the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area , which is just to the west of Sacramento, great auto-tour loop. And two other places that I think have some of the more spectacular wildlife waterfowl viewing, especially during mid-winter is the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area and the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. Spectacular auto-tour routes, in fact DU just did a major project at the Gray Lodge Wildlife Area where we reconstructed the auto-tour loop to make safer and better access for viewing these spectacular congregations of waterfowl. Jim Morris: I have gone through Gray Lodge recently and it is a major upgrade. So thank you to you DU for doing that. And I would also say Colusa National Wildlife Refuge has an excellent auto loop too. Hopefully we'll have abundant rain and snow moving forward, filling the reservoirs and helping cities, farms and the environment. Until then, there are many in our region doing what they can to make the most out of a tight water situation. Thank you to our interviewees, Jeff Gallagher, Alexander Mellerski, Luke Matthews and Jeff McCreary. We will keep you updated on fall and winter along the flyway. Until then, you can go to podcast.calrice.org to learn more and listen to past episodes. Thanks for listening.

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
Accessibility issues at COP26

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 5:32


The UK has had to apologise to an Israeli minister who couldn't attend the COP26 summit because the venue was not wheelchair accessible. Israel's Minister of National Infrastructures, Energy and Water Resources tweeted that it was "sad" the UN "does not provide accessibility to its events". Today also marks Purple Tuesday - a national day which calls on organisations to make changes to improve the customer experience for disabled people. So, just how does the UK compare when it comes to disability rights and accessibility? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Paul & Jordana Show
Pete Boulay- Climatologist- MNDNR Ecological and Water Resources

The Paul & Jordana Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 5:45


Climatologist Pete Boulay from MNDNR recaps the 1991 Halloween Blizzard, and how unique it is and more with Paul and Jordana See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Giornale Radio Sostenibilità
Il nuovo rapporto “Water resources across Europe” | 29/10/2021 | Sostenibilità

Giornale Radio Sostenibilità

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:00


Il nuovo rapporto “Water resources across Europe”, pubblicato dall' EEA ( l'Agenzia Europea per l'Ambiente ), descrive lo stato attuale dello stress idrico in Europa e si concentra sulla gestione dei rischi riguardanti la disponibilità idrica dovuti agli impatti del cambiamento climatico. Nel farlo, presenta le ultime conoscenze sulla disponibilità di acqua in Europa e prospetta il passaggio dalla gestione delle crisi alla gestione del rischio, dando maggiore attenzione alle diverse misure che affrontano il consumo idrico. Il rapporto sottolinea che “lo stress idrico – cioè la situazione in cui non c'è abbastanza acqua di qualità sufficiente per soddisfare le esigenze delle persone e dell'ambiente – è già una realtà in molte parti d'Europa, dove siccità e scarsità d'acqua non sono più eventi rari o estremi, poichè circa il 20% del territorio europeo e il 30% degli Europei sono colpiti da stress idrico durante un anno medio”. L'Agenzia aggiunge che si prevede che il cambiamento climatico aggraverà il problema, aumentando la frequenza, l'entità e l'impatto delle siccità. Le tendenze sono particolarmente allarmanti per l'Europa meridionale e sudoccidentale, dove la portata dei fiumi, durante l'estate, potrebbe diminuire fino al 40%, in uno scenario di aumento della temperatura di 3° C. In quelle aree, l'agricoltura, l'approvvigionamento idrico pubblico e il turismo esercitano le principali pressioni sulla disponibilità idrica, con picchi stagionali particolarmente alti nel periodo estivo. Nel complesso, l'Europa deve, quindi, rafforzare la resilienza dei suoi ecosistemi e utilizzare l'acqua in modo più efficiente per ridurre al minimo l'impatto dello stress idrico sulle persone e sull'ambiente. In campo idrico, attualmente la ricerca e l'innovazione europee si stanno focalizzando su un vasto repertorio di argomenti che concernono: 1 ) un miglior monitoraggio della Terra e del suo clima e degli utilizzi dell'acqua; 2 ) una migliore gestione e analisi dei dati; 3 ) una migliore modellazione e previsione socio-ambientale; 4 ) migliori tecnologie per aumentare l'efficienza tecnica idrica; 5 ) migliori strumenti per aumentare la consapevolezza e controllare l'uso dell'acqua; 6 ) migliori tecnologie per consentire e promuovere l'approvvigionamento idrico da fonti idriche alternative ( come desalinizzazione e riutilizzo dell'acqua ) e 7 ) migliori tecnologie per la ricarica gestita delle falde acquifere. Lo studio si sofferma in particolare su due misure di approvvigionamento idrico, e vale a dire il riutilizzo dell'acqua e la desalinizzazione. Attualmente, in Europa il riutilizzo dell'acqua rappresenta una quota molto bassa del consumo totale idrico ed è praticato soprattutto nell'Europa meridionale, come a Cipro, Malta e in Spagna. La maggior parte dei progetti di riutilizzo punta a produrre approvvigionamenti idrici alternativi per l'agricoltura irrigua o a gestire la ricarica della falda acquifera per mitigare l'intrusione salina nelle aree costiere. Il rapporto evidenzia che “in linea di principio, i volumi totali di acqua che possono essere riutilizzati per l'irrigazione sono significativi e possono contribuire a ridurre lo stress idrico fino a circa il 10% nelle regioni in cui l'irrigazione è un'attività importante. I costi di trattamento ed energia per il riutilizzo dell'acqua, in generale, sono bassi rispetto a quelli delle infrastrutture necessarie per trasportare l'acqua -recuperata dagli impianti di trattamento delle acque reflue urbane – fino alle aree irrigate. Ci sono, inoltre, anche alcuni esempi - come quelli di Cipro - di applicazione di una politica di prezzi incentivanti per promuovere ulteriormente il riutilizzo dell'acqua. Invece, la desalinizzazione viene attuata soprattutto per produrre acqua potabile. Attualmente, la quota più elevata della capacità di dissalazione installata in Europa è nel Mediterraneo. L'EEA sottolinea che “in condizioni di grave stress idrico, la desalinizzazione sta diventando un'opzione più conveniente e affidabile rispetto ad altre soluzioni per l'approvvigionamento dell'acqua. Negli ultimi decenni, i costi sono notevolmente diminuiti e, per l'osmosi inversa dell'acqua di mare nel Mediterraneo, potrebbero aggirarsi intorno a 0,65 euro a metro cubo. Per le acque salmastre i costi potrebbero anche essere inferiori”. L'Agenzia invita, comunque, a valutare sempre attentamente gli impatti ambientali della desalinizzazione per quanto riguarda lo smaltimento della salamoia, il consumo di energia e le emissioni di CO2. ______________________________________ Ascolta "Sostenibilità" a cura di Roberto Frangipane e Ferruccio Bovio Per i notiziari sempre aggiornati ascoltaci sul sito: https://www.giornaleradio.fm oppure scarica la nostra App gratuita: iOS - App Store - https://apple.co/2uW01yA Android - Google Play - http://bit.ly/2vCjiW3 Resta connesso e segui i canali social di Giornale Radio: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/giornaleradio.fm/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/giornaleradio.tv/?hl=it Twitter: https://twitter.com/giornaleradiofm

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp
Garrison Diversion Water Conference : Tim Mahoney and Andrea Travnicek

News & Views with Joel Heitkamp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 15:19


10/21/21 : Joel is live at the Garrison Diversion Water Conference at the Holiday Inn in Fargo. In this segment, he's joined by the Director of North Dakota's Department of Water Resources, Andrea Travnicek, as well as the Mayor of Fargo and Lake Agassiz Water Authority Chairman, Tim Mahoney.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 599 (10-18-21): A Day to Weigh Water's Worth

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:00).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-15-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 18, 2021. SOUND – ~8 sec This week, those abrupt stops to the sounds of the Roanoke River, Gray Tree Frogs, and a household water faucet set the stage for an episode marking the observance of “Imagine a Day without Water,” to be held this year on October 21.  We start with some music designed to help you do such imagining.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds. MUSIC  - ~42 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “Flow Stopper,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  Besides flowing rivers, calling frogs, and household faucets, almost any aspect of life could be affected by a lack of water, including the biological structures and functions that make life possible.  Increasing the awareness of water uses and needs is a goal of the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.  According to the event's Web site, the effort is, quote, “a national education campaign that brings together diverse stakeholders to highlight how water is essential, invaluable, and in need of investment,” unquote.  The event is part of the “Value of Water Campaign,” focused on water infrastructure needs.  These campaigns are coordinated by the US Water Alliance, a non-profit organization made up of people from water utilities, government, business, other non-profits, communities, and research establishments. Worldwide, billions of people don't have to imagine lacking good water.  According to the United Nations, as of 2019 over 2 billion people lacked access to safely managed drinking water, and over 4 billion people lacked access to safely managed sanitation. In the United States, the American Society of Civil Engineers' water infrastructure “Report Card” for 2021 estimated over $1 trillion needed through 2029 for drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater, with $434 billion of that not yet funded. And in Virginia, the Department of Environmental Quality's 2020 “Water Resources Report” identified several water challenges, including maintaining groundwater availability over the next 50 years; coordinating water planning among localities; gauging the impact of unpermitted water withdrawals; understanding stream water quality and ecology; and investing in water-resources personnel, science, and education. Water is fundamental for energy, commerce, industry, agriculture, aquatic and terrestrial life, and human biology.  Imagining a day without water—and learning about where water's lacking—can help us envision and work toward well-watered future days. Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last 10 seconds of “Flow Stopper.” MUSIC  - 10 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds at the beginning of this episode, all recorded by Virginia Water Radio, are as follows:Roanoke River on from the Roanoke River Greenway between Franklin Road and Smith Park in Roanoke, Va., December 6, 2020;Gray Tree Frogs at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., July 8, 2016;Household water faucet in a Blacksburg, Va., residence, November 17, 2013. “Flow Stopper” is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign logo, accessed online at  https://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/resources. Roanoke River, looking upstream from the Roanoke River Greenway between Franklin Road and Smith Park in Roanoke, Va., December 6, 2020.  This is the location where the river sound heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was recorded. SOURCES Used For Audio American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), “2021 Report Card for America's Infrastructure,” online at https://infrastructurereportcard.org/. United Nations, “Global Issues/Water,” online at https://www.un.org/en/global-issues/water. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “Water Use Data for Virginia,” online at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/va/nwis/water_use/. US Water Alliance, online at http://uswateralliance.org/. Value of Water Campaign, online at http://thevalueofwater.org/. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), “Status of Virginia's Water Resources: A Report on Virginia's Water Resources Management Activities,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000.  The section on”Water Resource Challenges and Priorities” starts of page 27. Value of Water Campaign, “Imagine a Day Without Water,” online at https://imagineadaywithoutwater.org/; this site is the source of the quote used in this episode's audio. World Health Organization (WHO), “Drinking Water,” June 14, 2019, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/drinking-water. For More Information on Current Water Infrastructure Needs and Funds PBS NewsHour, “How the infrastructure bill delivers on clean water—and how it falls short,” August 4, 2021 (7 min./2 sec. video, with online transcript). U.S. Department of Agriculture, “Biden-Harris Administration Invests $272 Million to Improve Rural Water Infrastructure for 270,000 People Living in Rural Communities Across the Country,” October 14, 2021, News Release. Virginia Governor's Office, “Governor Northam Announces Virginia to Reduce Water Pollution, Increase Access to Clean Water,” July 27, 2021, News Release. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance of Water” and “Water Quality, Waste Management, and Water/Wastewater Treatment” subject categories. Following are links to some previous episodes with information on water uses or needs. Episode 122, 8-6-12 – on worldwide water needs.Episode 372, 6-12-17 – on water infrastructure needs, including information from the American Society of Civil Engineers' “Report Card for America's Infrastructure” for 2017.Episode 592, 6-15-20 – on Virginia's biennial water-quality assessment in 2020. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties, Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; and that human actions can affect the availability of natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life, including that water chemistry has an influence on life processes.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources.WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and nati

new york office bay humans university agency america music national natural halloween relationships earth state audio college sound accent worldwide dark tech water web status index land rain united states pond research ocean government education public conservation chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment types images oberlin college cooperation agriculture united nations va msonormal new year atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental dynamic american society times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah water resources biology chemical conservatory civics grade oberlin colorful resource yale school signature bio priorities wild turkey manhattan school increasing govt watershed transcript infrastructure earth sciences waste management water quality household wg roanoke river freshwater virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources weigh grades k roanoke drinking water imagining environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table clean water blacksburg virginia governor funds cosgrove pbs newshour msohyperlink world health organization who runoff sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp heritage park acknowledgment civil engineers virginia department cumberland gap news release sols people living tmdl report card torrin virginia standards water center space systems audio notes franklin road
PFAS Pulse Podcast
October 12, 2021 – PFAS and Water Resources (feat. Susan Schlangen)

PFAS Pulse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 55:14


HRP's Jackie Baxley is joined by WSC's Susan Schlangen for an in-depth conversation on PFAS and Water Resources. Links and resources mentioned are linked below:National PFAS Fact sheet: https://www.nacwa.org/docs/default-source/resources---public/national-pfas-fact-sheet-developed-by-pfas-receivers.pdf?sfvrsn=4Oregon ACWA PFAS resources page: https://oracwa.org/resources/pfas-resources/WateReuse Association PFAS policy paper: https://watereuse.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/WateReuse-PFAS-principles-FINAL.pdfPFAS-free product list: https://pfascentral.org/pfas-free-products/As always, to get the latest and greatest, make sure you're subscribed to the Pulse! hrpassociates.com/pfas

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
No Testing Results for NM Students, Dede Feldman Pens a Memoir on a Life in Politics, and New Climate Change Research in NM | 10.4.21

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:37


Standardized testing was so sparse in New Mexico in 2020 and 2021 that the state isn't bothering to release last year's testing results. COVID protocols and remote learning caused the lack of usual standardized measurements, but it's easy to see that students have fallen way behind in reaching grade-level markers in math and reading. New Mexico's public education budget is $3 billion. How is that money best spent to increase student achievement? The Line panelists discuss possible tactics. Former state senator and lifetime activist Dede Feldman gets personal in her latest book, “Ten More Doors.” While she and her husband have lived in New Mexico for decades, Feldman recalls learning about her Albuquerque North Valley neighborhood by knocking on the front doors of the people who lived near her and being willing to engage in their lives. This month, the state's Climate & Water Science Advisory Panel released a report, “Climate Change in New Mexico over the Next 50 Years: Impacts on Water Resources,” that's going to help guide the state's 50-year water plan. Environmental Correspondent Laura Paskus discusses the study with Tricia Snyder of WildEarth Guardians and let's you know how you can get involved and make sure your voice is heard in those planning processes. Line Panel: Dan Foley, former state representative Laura Sanchez, attorney Michael Bird, public health expert Guests: Dede Feldman, Author “Ten More Doors: Politics and the Path to Change”

Global Security
Drought in Iraq and Syria could totally collapse food system for millions, aid groups warn

Global Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021


Muhammed Fouad, a cattle rancher, was just two years into a venture to bring affordable milk to his hometown in Iraq's Anbar province, when — seemingly overnight — the cows started dying. “We brought in veterinarians from Erbil, because [the cows] were OK and suddenly dying the next day."Muhammed Fouad, cattle rancher, Iraq“We brought in veterinarians from Erbil, because they were OK and suddenly dying the next day,” Fouad said in a phone call, through a translator.The initiative left him with $350,000 in damages. Fouad had to lay off his employees and sell his home to pay his debts to the project's investors. He now works in construction in the city of Hit. Related: 'Drought has severely impacted livestock keepers' in Afghanistan Unprecedented drought — driven by climate change and exacerbated by upstream irrigation — is wreaking havoc on some of the world's oldest river-fed farmlands in Iraq and Syria.A dry winter has pushed water levels on the Tigris and Euphrates to record lows, disrupting hydroelectric power facilities and concentrating pollution in the river to undrinkable levels. Aid groups estimate that 12 million people are affected, in a crisis they warn could tip the balance of the food system and livelihoods for the entire region.Related: Climate change is driving the worst drought Madagascar has seen in 4 decades Al-guran village, Baaj, Iraq, August 2021. More than 12 million people in Syria and Iraq are losing access to water, food and electricity and urgent action is needed to combat a severe water crisis. Credit: Courtesy of Fared Baram/Norwegian Refugee Council  Devastation downstreamIn Syria, the drought is the worst in 70 years — a crisis even more severe than the 2006-2009 drought that occurred in the years before the Syrian Civil War, a coalition of aid groups warned in August.In Iraq, they said this summer was the second-driest season in 40 years.Samah Hadid, the head of Middle East advocacy for the Norwegian Refugee Council, temporarily moved her office near to the heart of the drought, in the Iraqi city of Erbil, where she spends her days interviewing farmers and families affected by the lack of water.Related: Iran's 'system is essentially water bankrupt,' says environmental expert“You know, we hear stories, people are desperate. ... They're spending so much money on drinking water and now they just plan to leave these areas and desert these areas because they just can't live on these lands anymore.”Samah Hadid, head of Middle East advocacy, Norwegian Refugee Council“You know, we hear stories, people are desperate,” Hadid said. “They're spending so much money on drinking water and now they just plan to leave these areas and desert these areas because they just can't live on these lands anymore.” Families in Iraq regularly spend up to $80 a month to purchase potable drinking water, the NRC discovered in its field research. Two hydroelectric dams in northern Syria are facing closure due to low river levels, and outbreaks of water-borne illnesses are hitting camps for internally displaced people.Related: Climate change is intensifying food shocks Haji Hassa at his farm, showing how the drought is impacting the farm and plants, Kuri Jami village, Sinjar, August 2021. Credit: Courtesy of Fared Baram/Norwegian Refugee Council  Water as a weapon The blame has quickly shifted upstream to Turkey, which maintains a series of dams on the headwaters of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers before they flow back to Syria and Iraq.“Turkey itself is being hit by the climate crisis, and low rainfall. But it really is necessary that Turkey releases more water into those rivers because millions of [people] rely on those rivers."Samah Hadid, head of Middle East advocacy, Norwegian Refugee Council“Turkey itself is being hit by the climate crisis, and low rainfall. But it really is necessary that Turkey releases more water into those rivers because millions of [people] rely on those rivers,” Hadid said.  From Anbar, Iraq, an aerial view of the Euphrates river, August 2021. Credit: Courtesy of Fared Baram/Norwegian Refugee Council  In the Sinjar district of Iraq, Qassim Ali Aizdo said it's become impossible to grow water-intense vegetables like eggplant, because there's no humidity to help the seedlings grow. Even olive trees, a hardy, drought-tolerant crop, are shriveled and dry in the heat. “The melon crops, they were ruined, even the roses, they had insects. And there were insects on the beans I've never seen in my life."Qassim Ali Aizdo, farmer, Sinjar, Iraq“The melon crops, they were ruined, even the roses, they had insects. And there were insects on the beans I've never seen in my life,” he said. Related: This start-up turns locust swarms in Kenya into animal feed  Dry olive trees in Kuri Jami village, Sinjar, August 2021.   Credit: Courtesy of Fared Baram/Norwegian Refugee Council Turkish officials insist they are abiding by existing water-sharing agreements that require the country to release from its dams a minimum of 500 cubic meters of water per second. The country has built more than 500 dams in the past two decades which, to the Turkish government, is a mark of prosperity and development in the arid southeast. The largest dam on the Tigris river is the Ilisu Dam, whose reservoir covers the ancient Turkish town of Hasankeyf. In 2019, when Turkey began filling the Ilisu, downstream levels on the Tigris were significantly curbed, contributing to a crisis of water-related illnesses in the southern Iraqi city of Basra. Map of rivers shared by Turkey, Syria and Iraq.  Credit: Courtesy of European Rivers Network  This year, delegations from Iraq's Ministry of Water Resources visited Turkey to press officials to release more water from upstream dams. Turkish officials returned the visit and formed a working group to improve Iraq's water infrastructure.But some Kurdish authorities in Syria and Iraq are accusing Turkey of using water as a weapon within the larger context of ongoing regional conflict. “Turkey is not using water as a weapon,” said Dursun Yildiz, president of the Ankara-based Hydropolitics Association. He said most of Turkey's large dams are hydroelectric ones that do impact the environment — but don't necessarily consume a lot of water. Water is lost through evaporation in dammed reservoirs more rapidly than in non-dammed rivers, however.To Yildiz, the bigger issue is that there are few clear agreements between the countries about how the water is shared, and few efforts to make water systems more efficient. Years ago, while working as a director for Turkey's State Hydraulics Works, he said, he saw firsthand how efforts to establish clearer, more cohesive water-sharing rules between Turkey, Iraq and Syria were unsuccessful in the past. This region has always had water shortages, Yildiz said. And things are likely to get worse with rapid climate change.Related: Climate change is driving extreme weather events around the world“I'm not saying these things to blame the neighboring countries. What I'm saying right now, is we have no time to lose."Dursun Yildiz, president, Hydropolitics Association, of the Ankara, Turkey“I'm not saying these things to blame the neighboring countries. What I'm saying right now, is we have no time to lose,” Yildiz said. Haji Hassa, a Yazidi farmer from Kuri Jami village in Sinjar, August 2021. Credit: Courtesy of Fared Baram/Norwegian Refugee Council Damage is done Even increased water flow or a new water-sharing agreement may come too late for many of Iraq's farmers.In Nineveh, Mohammed Ibrahim Hassan said whole swaths of his wheat and barley crops have failed. To adapt, he digs deeper wells, tapping into groundwater that likely won't replenish itself for generations to come.In the past, he said, the water levels below ground would drop about 3 feet a year. But now, it will drop 15 or 20 feet. Still, they keep digging — an investment few farmers can afford.“I wish you could come and see it,” he said in a phone call. “Otherwise, you might think that I'm exaggerating.”Editor's note: Saif Al-Aani provided translations from Arabic.

Ingrained
Episode 25: Go Time for Harvest and the Wildlife Migration

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 14:52


Even during difficult times like we've been experiencing, it helps to look for the positive. In Sacramento Valley rice country – two positives are unfolding. After a difficult year where drought left 20 percent of fields unplanted, harvest of America's sushi rice is underway and early reports are favorable. Although acreage is down, initial reports on quality and yields look strong. “We're about thirty percent down from the total acreage that we can plant,” said Everett Willey, who farms with his dad Steve, at E.D. Willey & Sons in Nicolaus, Sutter County. “The growing season went alright. It was a fight to keep water on some fields. That's why we started harvest early. There was a lack of water on the bottom check of the sweet rice field we're harvesting now. We couldn't push water down to it, so that's a big reason we're harvesting this early.” A second positive is there's help on the way for the Pacific Flyway – a program should provide emergency water to support the millions of birds heading to our region's rice country to rest and refuel. “The Drought Relief Waterbird Program is focused on providing extra water from groundwater pumping to shallow flood rice and wetland acres in the Sacramento Valley for waterbirds, commented Luke Matthews, Wildlife Programs Manager with the California Rice Commission. “It's going to be particularly important this year, given the lack of habitat that we expect to see.” In a normal year, about 300,000 acres of rice fields are shallowly-flooded after harvest, which breaks down rice stubble and creates vital environmental benefits. This year, current estimates are only about 65,000 acres will be flooded. That's where the program with the State Department of Water Resources can provide substantial help for this vital part of the Sacramento Valley ecosystem. “Well certainly the current conditions truly heighten the importance of this landscape,” said Greg Golet, Applied Ecologist with The Nature Conservancy, one of the conservation groups that work with rice growers to maximize wildlife benefits from their fields. “These birds, when they arrive here, typically are ready to rest and refuel before either they continue further south or they set for their winter period in this region.  But this year, they're going to arrive in likely poorer condition, due to the lack of good habitat in their traditional stopover sites. In addition to malnourishment, they can be susceptible to disease, and that's exacerbated by crowded conditions.” With such a dry landscape, rice field habitat is an even more important for the health of millions of ducks, geese and other birds.   “It's really an incredible opportunity that we have,” Golet remarked. “There are all of these levers, effectively, that we can pull to create the conditions that these birds depend upon. We know what they want, in terms of timing, depth of the water and how long it stays out on the fields. With this system of rice agriculture and associated infrastructure, it's really very straightforward to create those conditions and then we see virtually an immediate response. The trick, of course, is getting adequate water to create that for the birds.” The wildlife migration has begun. Shorebirds and ducks have already started to arrive. We will keep you updated on harvest and the amazing annual wildlife migration about to unfold. Episode Transcript Jim Morris: COVID, fires, and drought. This year has been a rough one throughout our state. It helps to look for the positive where you can. And for me, what I'm looking at is a positive, the rice harvest in the Sacramento Valley. It's a momentary respite from the unrelenting news cycle, and it appears there's good news as well for the millions of birds that depend on the rice fields every fall and winter in this area. Jim Morris: Welcome to Ingrained, the California rice podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for 31 years. And it's funny how life can go full circle. Before, I was in ag communications. Ten years before, I was in the marching band at John F. Kennedy High School in south Sacramento, playing trombone alongside of Steve Willey. And this morning, I'm with Everett Willey, Steve's son, at ED Willey & Sons in Nicolaus, in Sutter County. And Everett and Steve have started harvest. So Everett, how have things gone with rice harvest to date? Everett Willey: Pretty good so far. It's a lot of downed rice right now, just because of the nature of the beast. So we're trying to get it out of the field while everything else continues to ripen up. Jim Morris: What varieties have you harvested so far? Everett Willey: Right now, just Calmochi-101, which is a sweet rice, short grain, made for mochi balls, mochi ice cream. That's what that rice goes into, a lot of flour, rice flour. Jim Morris: Yeah. And if anybody hasn't tried mochi, I suggest you go to Mikuni. And the mochi they have there wrapped around ice cream is phenomenal. It's well worth trying that out. So tell me a little bit about this year. It's been challenging in many fronts in California. So what did you see with the rice? You started off with not being able to plant everything. So talk a little bit about that, and then also the growing season. Everett Willey: Yeah. We're about 30% down from our total acreage that we can plant. So there's quite a few hundred acres that's just dirt right now because of lack of water. Growing season went all right because, I mean, it was a fight to try to keep water on some fields. And that's part of the reason why we're actually harvesting right now is because the field that we're in, there was a lack of water in the bottom check because we just couldn't, we couldn't push the water down to it. So I think that has a big part in why we're actually harvesting right now. Jim Morris: And it was very smoky throughout Northern California, in fact, still is. What impact did the smoke have on the rice, if any? Everett Willey: The smoke this year wasn't as bad as last year timing-wise. Last year, it hit really heavy right when the rice was all flowering and I think that actually killed yields. The smoke this year, it came a little later. So a lot of the rice was already flowered. It'll slow down the ripening process probably a little bit because it'll keep the temperatures a little cooler. And we're definitely not getting any of the north wind, that's really what helps dry out and ripen the rice for harvest. Jim Morris: In terms of the smoke, fortunately, rice has an external hull on it. So there's not going to be a damage to the kernel, but the lack of sunlight did slow some of the maturity down in parts of the valley. Also, to your point about not planning a full crop, we have about 100,000 acres less rice grown this year in the state because of the drought. So certainly, impacts have been felt there. So the rice harvest is interesting when you compare to other crops. Other crops are sometimes harvested late at night, early in the morning. Rice, not so much. So when do you start harvest and why do you start it at that time of day? Everett Willey: In the morning, our operation, we clean off all the machines, all the harvesters, we blow it all, all the chaff and stuff off, really looking for problems with the harvester, and that way we can try to fix it. But we won't start actually cutting rice until the dew is lifted because any excess moisture that you're pulling through the machine makes the machine work harder. And then it can end up in the trailer to have a higher moisture and you don't want that because that could affect your drying cost. It could make it more expensive. Jim Morris: What is the moisture range that you're looking for when you harvest the rice? Everett Willey: Kernel moisture percentage would be like... 18-22 is a good quality to cost ratio. If you cut a little higher, so like if you're cutting 22 to 26%, you might get a little bit better quality, but the cost for drying also increases. So that 18-22% range is pretty much where you want to be. Jim Morris: And how important is the high-tech machinery that you have? Everett Willey: Having good equipment is extremely important. Compared to 10, 15 years ago, before GPS was really incorporated into these machines, it was not as efficient. Everything was smaller. You had to go slower. So when the rice was ready to come out of the field, you had to plan for it a lot more. Now, you can react and go. It saves a lot of money in the end. Jim Morris: And the GPS, Global Positioning System, is important in other aspects of the growing season too. So how else is GPS technology helping rice farming? Everett Willey: It's a big fuel saver because you're not... It knows exactly where your implement is going and has been. So if you have something that's 24-feet wide and you want to have a three-inch overlap, it'll do that for you. Whereas without it, you're going back and forth, so you have no overlap to a foot overlap. So having that consistent tillage is where you can really save some money, and it makes everything more uniform, which will make a more consistent yield. Jim Morris: Other high-tech aspects include planting, which is done by airplanes, which are guided by GPS. So it's very high tech here in California, rice country. And it's water efficient as well. Water is a concern after harvest. There will be a shallow amount of water put out there, but it's very limited this year because of the drought. I've seen a lot of wildlife on your farm. What thoughts and concerns do you have about the months ahead and rice fields helping the Pacific Flyway, but with a very limited water supply? Everett Willey: I think with the reduction in acres planted, a lot of farmers won't do a decomposition flood. Because on a fallow field, you'd be just putting water on dirt, which isn't benefiting either wildlife or the farmer. So the reason that we flood in the winter is to decompose the straw that is left over after you harvest it. So when we're done harvesting, we'll come in, we'll usually chop up the straw into smaller pieces to create more surface area, and then we'll till that ground up just a little bit to help add some air into the soil, and then we'll put a couple inches of water on it and hold that. And it'll decompose the straw, but it also provides a plethora of food and habitat for mostly waterfowl. I mean, we'll get all kinds of other stuff out here too. I mean, you got skunks, and raccoons, and coyotes, and all other kinds of things. It's a circle of life out here. Jim Morris: I've seen minks as well out here. And talk about some of the birds that you've seen too, lot of birds of prey, and not only numbers, but a wide variety of species. Everett Willey: We'll get bald eagles out here. The mink are actually pretty... They're cool. You see one of them run across and you're like, "Oh, that was a mink. I haven't seen one of those in a while." All the different varieties of geese, we'll get all the varieties of ducks. It was pretty cool. In one of our ditch systems, I actually saw a mandarin duck, which is super rare to see here, super, super rare. It looks like a wood duck, but cooler. Jim Morris: At the moment, there's not a lot of water on the landscape, and the needs for wildlife will be great later in the fall and winter. I'm speaking with Luke Matthews, Wildlife Programs Manager with the California Rice Commission. fortunately, there's a new program the Rice Commission is carrying out with the state Department of Water Resources that should help. Luke, tell us about the program. Luke Matthews: The Drought Relief Waterbird Program is focused on providing extra water through groundwater pumping to flood rice acres and wetland acres in the Sacramento Valley for waterbirds. And it's going to be particularly important this year, given the lack of habitat that we expect to see. Jim Morris: How much of a shortfall going into this program are we expecting in terms of the amount of shallow flooded acres in the Sacramento Valley? Luke Matthews: In a typical year, there's about 300,000 acres of flooded rice lands in the winter. And that provides an amazing source of food and habitat for ducks, geese, shorebirds, and more. This year, we expect, if conditions don't change, to maybe see about 60,000 acres flooded. So a very, very significant decline in flooded habitat. Jim Morris: And I imagine there's careful consideration when it comes to groundwater use. Luke Matthews: Absolutely. Yeah. We're being very sensitive to areas that may be experiencing depletions or issues with groundwater wells going dry. We also have considerations for proximity to rivers and streams, things like that. So we're considering all the options, but really focusing on providing the habitat for the resource of concern right now. Jim Morris: The Pacific Flyway is amazing, 7-10 million ducks and geese, many other birds coming through. It is really a jewel for the Sacramento Valley, important for our environment and something so many people enjoy. And how much is this water needed? Because I believe the birds are already stressed, correct? Luke Matthews: The water is really needed more this year because of a significant drought throughout the west. The Great Salt Lake is drier than it's ever been in recorded history, it's very dry up in Oregon, and Klamath as well is almost dry. So these key areas that migrating birds in the Pacific Flyway typically utilize are dry or drying out. So they're in a worst-body condition when they arrive here and they're going to need the water even more than normal. Jim Morris: As we've heard from Luke Matthews, the drought is a significant concern for the millions of birds that are heading our way for the fall and winter months. I'm speaking with Greg Golet, an applied ecologist with the Nature Conservancy, good friends of rice growers and the California Rice Commission. And Greg, as you look at the stresses that the birds have already had as they're heading our way, how much more important is the Sacramento Valley to provide food and a resting place? Greg Golet: Well, certainly, the current conditions truly heighten the importance of this landscape. These birds, when they arrive here, typically are ready to rest and refuel before either they continue further south or they set up for their winter period in this region. But this year, they're going to arrive in likely much poorer condition due to the lack of good habitat in their traditional stop oversights. Jim Morris: What concerns do you have for the wildlife? Disease and even death are possibilities unfortunately? Greg Golet: Yeah, that's definitely the case. In addition to malnourishment, they can be susceptible to disease. A lot of that's exacerbated by crowded conditions. So you get transfer of the disease through the aerosol when the birds are taking off and landing. And when they're in tight quarters and you have those high temperatures, it's just that much worse. Jim Morris: Let's talk about something optimistic. There is a program in place that's being unveiled that hopefully we'll get more water on the landscape. And we've talked about this recently, that rice fields are surrogate wetlands. And so does that give you optimism or some degree of optimism that we're going to get through this fall and winter in reasonable shape for the wildlife? Greg Golet: Yeah, it definitely does. It's really an incredible opportunity that we have. There are all these levers effectively that we can pull to create the conditions that these birds depend upon. And we know what they want in terms of the timing, in terms of the depth of the water, in terms of how long it stays out on the fields. And with this system of rice agriculture in the associated infrastructure, it's really very straightforward to just create those conditions, and then we see virtually an immediate response. The trick of course, is getting adequate water to create that for the birds. Jim Morris: I have to tell you, after a year like this, I cannot wait to see the birds. And I've been talking with the rice growers. They're keeping an eye out because it is such a joy for me to see it. What does that mean to you, when you see that wildlife come in to the Sacramento Valley every fall and winter? Greg Golet: It's extremely uplifting to see these species drop into our valley. And that's already happening for the shorebirds whose migration is earlier than for the waterfowl typically. But for me, it provides confirmation that the network of habitats that these migratory species have evolved to depend upon that stretch from the Arctic all the way to South America are still functioning at least in some way. Because they're depending upon that. It's if you take out a link in that chain, the whole system can break down. So when they show up, I have that affirmation that, "Hey, we still have this incredible natural phenomenon in place." And it's just so rewarding and personally gratifying to be part of making that possible. Jim Morris: As the migration intensifies and this innovative program takes shape, we will keep you updated on the progress. Thank you to our interviewees, Everett Willey, Luke Matthews, and Greg Golet. You can find out more @podcast.calrice.org. Please listen, subscribe, and comment. Thanks for listening.

Ojai: Talk of the Town
California Recall Electioneering with Josh Gohlke

Ojai: Talk of the Town

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 64:00


We are joined for a special episode of Ojai: Talk of the Town with Josh Gohlke, the former deputy opinion page editor of the San Francisco Chronicle. Gohlke has been writing about and covering Gov. Gavin Newson since his 2018 election. He shares his opinion about the recall process, the opera bouffe of the 46 mostly eccentric candidates, the perils of campaigning with bears, and the terrible urgency of this election. Not only can a sitting governor be replaced with someone who is the choice of fewer than 15 percent of the electorate, but control of the U.S. Senate may well be at stake. (Dianne Feinstein, please don't Ruth Bader Ginsburg us. And while we're at it, Justice Stephen Breyer, don't you either). Josh and I catch up about our years in Kernville, California, his strange, nigh mystical relationship with former Department of Water Resources chief Frank Gehrke and why journalism still matters. We also talk about the French Laundry's consciousness-altering menu, the forces behind the recall, the dual nihilism on display in the state and country and the deadline for getting ballots into the mail. We did not talk about Newsom's relationship with either his famous harp-maestro cousin Joanne or his ordeal at the hands of Kimberly Guilfoyle.

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 4 (08/23)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 34:00


Welcome to Bidenville. Torrance Police find 300 unopened recall ballots, guns and drugs in a sleeping man's car. California Dept. of Water Resources is working on adding several natural gas power plants to avoid blackouts.

KZYX News
Cities enter into mutual aid agreements to address water shortages

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 6:30


From Mendocino County Public Broadcasting, this is the KZYX News for Monday, Aug. 16. I'm Sonia Waraich.Last month was the hottest July ever recorded on Earth and in Mendocino County, according to NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,. The federal agency is also predicting there's going to be lower than average rainfall in Mendocino for at least the next six months so the drought's not going anywhere.One of the groups working on addressing the drought locally is the Mendocino Countywide Drought Task Force. The task force is made up of Supervisor John Haschek, Supervisor Glenn McGourty and Josh Metz, who was contracted by the county to coordinate the drought response. They met on Thursday by Zoom and gave updates on how the drought is being felt and addressed around the county.Josh Metz started with some good news – the county is making progress in addressing one of the major issues its facing because of the drought, how to move water from one part of the county to another.Ukiah and Fort Bragg started the push for a regional approach to the drought through mutual aid agreements. Those agreements are expected to make it easier for cities to share water by without facing regulatory hurdles.Metz said the initial goal will be to transport ten 6,000-gallon truck loads of water from Ukiah to Fort Bragg for a total of 60 to 70,000 gallons per day.There's also been talk of using the Skunk Train to transport water from inland to the coast. The idea hit some roadblocks around cost, but it looks like funding has become available for the project through the state's Department of Water Resources.Not everyone in attendance was happy with that idea. During public comments, one resident of the Willits Valley called in and told the task force to lobby elected officials to implement solutions that won't tax people living inland.Supervisor Glenn McGourty didn't foresee the depletion of groundwater being a problem in the immediate future since that water supply is monitored by the Ukiah Valley Basin Sustainable Groundwater Management Agency.Move water around the county in an efficient and cost-effective way has been central to the drought response. That's because even though the entire county is facing an extreme drought, not every part of the county is experiencing the drought the same way. Ukiah is faring pretty well through the drought because of early investments the city made in building up its water resources. The city has reduced how much water it pulls from the Russian River by 75 to 80% and still has water available to spare to help other areas around the county.But cities like Fort Bragg are concerned. The city still has a steady supply of water but last Monday the Fort Bragg City Council kicked up its water emergency to Stage 3, calling for water users in the city to conserve 10% more than they had been since mid-July.City officials are worried about the lack of rainfall predicted in the region in the coming months because of how it will impact the Noyo River. Fort Bragg relies on the Noyo River as one of three main water sources. The Noyo usually experiences its lowest streamflow at this part of the year and doesn't get replenished until there's significant rainfall. In the meantime, high tides can cause the water in the Noyo to become too brackish to be pumped for drinking water by the city. Fort Bragg Public Works director John Smith said the city's is expecting its desalination system to arrive next month. That will allow the city to make the brackish water drinkable after high tide events.For the KZYX News. I'm Sonia Waraich, a report for America corps member. For all our local stories, with photos and more, visit KZYX.org. You can also subscribe to the KZYX News podcast where you get your podcasts.

My Ag Life Daily News Report
Episode 143 - August 18, 2021 - State Water Resources Control Board Meeting

My Ag Life Daily News Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 37:14


In today's show, Sabrina Halvorson reports on the State Water Resources Control Board meeting on water curtailment. Supporting the People who Support Agriculture Thank you to our sponsors who make it possible to get you your daily news. Please feel free to visit their websites.   Agromillora – https://www.agromillora.com/ California Citrus Mutual – https://www.cacitrusmutual.com/ The California Walnut Board – https://walnuts.org/ Soil and Crop – https://mysoilandcrop.com/  For advertising inquiries, please contact us at 559-352-4456 or jay@jcsmarketinginc.com

EVN Report Podcast
How to Manage Our Water Resources

EVN Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021


  A complex set of issues is impacting water resources, from poor management to threats to water security in Armenia and Artsakh. EVN Report's Maria Titizian spoke to Stepan Khachatryan, a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and water resources specialist, who is also supporting the coordination of the Kaps Reservoir, the largest industrial hydro-engineering project in Armenia. 

Storytellers of STEMM
#132 - Paula Silva: Water Resources Engineering & Management

Storytellers of STEMM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 51:19


Today's storyteller is Paula Silva! Paula is a water resources engineer at a large international consulting firm. If you're like me, when you think water management, you either think of something like in urban areas (for me, that would be the New Orleans Sewerage & Water Board, in particular), or in more natural environments (for me, Mississippi River flows). Water is vital to a lot of things and so I'm excited to share this conversation with y'all. So Paula is here today to talk about what a water resources engineer does, what her job looks like day to day, the kinds of projects she works on, and the favorite parts of her job. We also dive into what drew her to engineering, what it's like working in this field. And towards the end, since I know Paula through Homeward Bound (we're both #TeamHB5), we chat a little about our experiences and favorite parts of the Homeward Bound program. Enjoy! --- You can find Rachel Villani on Twitter @flyingcypress and Storytellers of STEMM on Facebook and on the shiny new Twitter account @storytellers42. You can find Paula on Twitter @PaulaSilvaOchoa. Book List: The Future We Choose by Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac You can find Homeward Bound at their website https://homewardboundprojects.com.au/, on Twitter @HomewardBound16, and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/homewardboundprojects. Recorded on 19 June 2021.

KQED’s Forum
Historic Low Water Levels Force Hydroelectric Power Plant Shut-off at Lake Oroville

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 20:59


California's fourth largest hydroelectric plant, Hyatt Powerplant at Lake Oroville, has been shut down due to lack of water for the first time in its nearly 60 year history. This after water levels sank to 24% of the lake's capacity, in what the Department of Water Resources attributed to “climate-induced drought.” We discuss the effects of California's drought on the power supply and what steps the state is taking to make up for the loss of water and hydroelectric power.

USArabRadio
Water Wars: Death by Thirst or Death by Bullets?

USArabRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 58:31


On Friday August 6th, Dr. Atef Gawad discussed the Ethiopia- Sudan-Egypt dispute and more generally Water Wars with guests and experts: From D.C. Ambassador David Shinn, U.S. Diplomat for 37 years, including being Ambassador to Ethiopia. He is also a Professor at Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. From VA, journalist Omer Redi, the Editor-in-Chief at the Ethiopian news agency Ifriqiyah Media and Communications .From London, we have Adel Darwish, author of the book “ Water Wars: Coming Conflicts in the Middle East", and from Egypt, Dr. Mohamed Nasr Allam, professor of Water Resources Engineering, Cairo University, and the former Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation. The episode was broadcast: 6/8/2021 US Arab Radio can be heard on wnzk 690 AM, WDMV 700 AM, and WPAT 930 AM. Please visit: www.facebook.com/USArabRadio/ Web site : arabradio.us/ Online Radio: www.radio.net/s/

Ripple Effect
57: Drought, Drought, Drought

Ripple Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 36:18


Candice Hasenyager, Deputy Director of the Utah Division of Water Resources gives us an overview of Utah's extreme drought conditions. It's real, it's nasty, and moving the water conversation forward. Great and timely listen.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 589 (8-9-21): A Musical Tour of Rivers and Watersheds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image and Extra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 9, 2021.  This revised episode from February 2015 is the last in a series of eight episodes this summer related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 sec – Lyrics: “Take me down to the riverside.” This week, that excerpt of “Riverside,” by the Rockingham County- and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, opens an episode giving musical tour of some of Virginia's major river watersheds.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to parts of six other songs, and see if you can guess the six Virginia watersheds being represented.  Three may be obvious, but the other three may challenge your musical and hydrological knowledge. MUSIC – ~ 94 sec “Shenandoah” by Timothy Seaman – ~18 sec – instrumental. “Sandy Boys” by Sara Grey – ~11 sec – Lyrics: “Do come along, Sandy boys, waitin' for the bug-eye-boo.” “Banks of New River” by Whitetop Mt. Band – ~13 sec – Lyrics: “I'm sitting here on the banks of New River.” “Clinch Mountain Quickstep” by Timothy Seaman – ~14 sec – instrumental. “Rappahannock Running Free” by Bob Gramann – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “I love the Rappahannock and its waters running free; the rapids of this river, that's where I want to be.” “James River Blues” by Old Crow Medicine Show – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “James River blues.” “All Quiet on the Potomac” – ~18 sec – instrumental. You heard parts of “Shenandoah,” performed by Timothy Seaman; “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, referring to the Big Sandy River; “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band; “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” also by Timothy Seaman, selected here for its connection to the Clinch River; “Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann; “James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show; and “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales. The watersheds of these rivers are part of 14 major watersheds in Virginia, as identified by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.  Wherever you are in the Commonwealth, you're in one of the those watersheds, as well as being—in turn—in one of the larger watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico.  They all deserve to have songs written about them, because they're part of Virginia's varied, complex, and historic system of waterways and landscapes.Thanks to all of the artists mentioned for permission to use this week's music. We close this episode, and Water Radio's summer 2021 series on watersheds and rivers, with about 30 more seconds of The Steel Wheels' “Riverside.” MUSIC – ~29 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 251, 2-2-15. “Riverside,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 10, 2014, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Productions; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. More information about Goose Creek Productions is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 295, 12-21-15.The “Shenandoah” version in this episode's musical tour is by Timothy Seaman and Paulette Murphy, from the start of “Shenandoah/Hazel River” on the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 447, 11-19-18. “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, is from the 2009 album “Sandy Boys,” copyright by Sara Grey and Fellside Records, used with permission.  More information about Sara Grey is available online at http://www.saragrey.net/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 436, 9-3-18. “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band, is from the 2008 album, “Bull Plus 10%,” copyright Whitetop Mountain Band and Arhoolie Records, used with permission.  More information about Whitetop Mountain Band is available online at http://whitetopmountainband.tripod.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 546, 10-12-20. “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” from the 2002 album “Sycamore Rapids,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 435, 8-27-18.“Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann, is from the 2008 album, “Mostly Live,” copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 304, 2-22-16.“James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show, is from the 2006 album “Big Iron World,” copyright Nettwork Records, used with permission.  More information about Old Crow Medicine Show is available online at http://www.crowmedicine.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 373, 6-19-17. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard here was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 318, 5-30-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE AND EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT VIRGINIA'S MAJOR WATERSHEDS Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Four large watersheds containing, collectively, all of Virginia's lands are the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.  The watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Sound are also contained within the Atlantic Ocean watershed.The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds.  (This table was also included in the show notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21.)  WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 588 (8-2-21): A Singing Paddler's Take on Time and Changes in the Upper Rappahannock River

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 2, 2021.  This revised episode from September 2018 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental This week, we feature a Virginia singer/songwriter's music about time and changes along one of the Commonwealth's major rivers.  Have a listen for about 30 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 30 sec – Lyrics: “Roads and boards, mills and mines used to line this stream--all reclaimed by floods and vines, foundations sprouting gums and pines. River flows on, so does time.  Canoe splits Rappahannock water; dip my paddle, let it glide.” You've been listening to part of “Solitude,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, on the 2000 album, “That Squirrel Song.”  This and other river-themed songs by Mr. Gramann come in large part from his years of paddling the upper Rappahannock River and its tributaries, in the area between the Blue Ridge and the Fall Line at Fredericksburg.  The part of “Solitude” you heard describes some of the changes along the Rappahannock wrought by time and the effects of water, weather, humans, and other organisms.  Observers of other Virginia rivers and their watersheds might tell similar stories of change. Some riverside changes—such as flood impacts—happen relatively quickly.  Others move at a slower pace, as with trees growing in an abandoned building foundation.  Whatever the pace, changes seen in and along a river reflect events happening not only in the river channel but also upstream in the river's watershed.  Flooding, for example, is affected by upstream land uses and tributary patterns.  In turn, water flows affect stream and river shapes and materials, determining what habitats are available for living things.  And throughout a watershed, humans have land and water uses that affect downstream water quantity and quality.Virginia's rivers are continually being changed by unrelenting time and unceasing forces, and those rivers continue to provide services like water supply, irrigation, power generation, and others.  With all that going on, it's challenging and worthwhile to ensure that the Commonwealth's rivers retain places offering solitude and fostering creativity, such as in this week's music.  Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use the music, and we close with about 35 more seconds of “Solitude.” MUSIC – ~ 33 sec – Lyrics: “Rain and sleet, wind or heat, it's all the same to me.  Weather—you can never choose; each day that's mine, that day I'll use, to flee from time in my canoe, its bow splits Rappahannock water.  Dip my paddle, let it fly.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 437, 9-10-18. “Solitude,” from the 2000 album “That Squirrel Song,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES The following photos along the Rappahannock River in Virginia were taken by Bob Gramann (except as noted) and used with his permission. Rappahannock River at the confluence with the Rapidan River (at the juncture of the Virginia counties of Culpeper, Spotsylvania, and Stafford), April 2004.Rappahannock River at low water (view toward Stafford County, Va.), August 2011.Rappahannock River in winter (view toward Stafford County, Va.), February 2006.Bob Gramann, composer of the music heard in the Virginia Water Radio episode, canoeing in the Rappahannock River's “First Drop” at Fredericksburg, Va., April 1, 2018.  Photo by Lou Gramann.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE UPPER RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER AND ITS WATERSHED The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Rappahannock River-Upper," online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-upper/. “The Rappahannock River flows from its origin at Chester Gap in Rappahannock County approximately 184 miles to the Chesapeake Bay.  The first 62 miles, from the headwaters to Mayfield Bridge (Fredericksburg), are designated State Scenic River.  The river has a watershed of approximately 2,715 mi2, and average annual discharge near Fredericksburg is typically about 1,639 cubic feet per second (cfs). “During Colonial days, the Rappahannock River was a major shipping artery for transporting tobacco, salted fish, iron ore, and grains.  The watershed supports a variety of land uses; largely agricultural in the upper watershed, with manufacturing, light industrial, and retail applications throughout.  Soil erosion is a problem in the upper watershed.  Runoff from the major tributaries (Rapidan and Hazel Rivers) leaves the Rappahannock muddy after even minor storm events. “Access to the Rappahannock system (defined here as the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers) is fairly limited and primitive. Established access points on the Rappahannock (traveling downstream) are at Kelly's Ford (Route 672 off Route 651) in Culpeper County and Motts Landing (Route 618) in Spotsylvania County.  About 25 miles separates these canoe/Jon boat slides, and an overnight camp stop is nearly mandatory for those that float fish this reach. Another access point is located on the Rapidan River at Elys Ford (Route 610) in Spotsylvania County about 14 miles upstream of Motts Landing. Access may also be gained via several non-established points.  These consist of VDOT right-of-ways along bridges (e.g., Route 522 on the Rapidan). … “The Rappahannock River's character changes abruptly in Fredericksburg at the fall line (the limit of tidal influence).  Above the fall line, the river is usually clear, swift, and dominant substrates are bedrock, boulder and cobble providing perfect habitat for smallmouth bass and related species.  However, below Route 1 the river is tidal, and the substrate is finer, dominated by sand; and the water is frequently murky.  Species composition shifts with habitat, and largemouth bass, catfish and anadromous species are more common in and below Fredericksburg.  Boaters and anglers can now navigate from upstream access points such as Motts Landing across the old Embrey Dam site and into the tidal waters adjacent to Fredericksburg.” SOURCES Used for Audio U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Use in the United States,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/mission-areas/water-resources/science/water-use-united-states?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Final 2020 305(b)/303(d) Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources:“Rappahannock River-Upper," online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-upper/; “Rappahannock River-Tidal,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-tidal/.For More Information about the Rappahannock River City of Fredericksburg, Va., “Rappahannock River,” online at https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/210/Rappahannock-River. Friends of the Rappahannock (non-profit organization), online at http://www.riverfriends.org/. Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission, “Local TMDLs,” online at https://www.rrregion.org/program_areas/environmental/local_tmdls.php.  Located at this site are Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) reports on the Upper Rappahannock River, the Hazel River, and other Rappahannock River basin waterways. RappFLOW (Rappahannock Friends and Lovers of Our Watersheds; non-profit organization), online at https://rappflow.org/.For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11); available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on the Rappahannock River or its watershed.Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16.Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15.Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11.Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18.Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18.Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21.Bluffs on rivers and other waters – Episode 587, 7-26-21.Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19.Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21.Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19.Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15.New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12.Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18.Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18.Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16.Shenandoah River introduction –

bay humans university agency music photo natural relationships earth state audio friends college change accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical united states pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol chesapeake bay route chesapeake snow environment journal types images va singing significance msonormal commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial species environmental soil dynamic established times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide canoe located water resources biology upper rivers lovers grade dip colorful resource solitude madison county signature flooding bio continental stafford scales blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources observers stafford county grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table fredericksburg rappahannock james river msohyperlink wildlife resources runoff smith river sections bluffs richard b life sciences stormwater headwater radford university new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa water use new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap sols tennessee river tmdl spotsylvania boaters geological survey shenandoah national park culpeper county culpeper vdot biotic virginia standards water center first drop fall line total maximum daily load tmdl space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 587 (7-26-21): On the Bluffs of Rivers and Other Waters

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:00). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 26, 2021.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC - ~16 sec – instrumental This week, an instrumental selection by a Williamsburg, Virginia, musician sets the stage for exploring a kind of river feature that can be especially prominent geographically and historically.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds.MUSIC - ~32 sec – instrumentalYou've been listening to part of “James and York Bluffs,” by Timothy Seaman on his 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries.”  This tune honors York River State Park, located a few miles north of Williamsburg in James City County, and having—according to the album's liner notes—“a paradise of bluffs.”  River bluffs—also called cliffs, palisades, and other terms—are high, steep, broad banks overlooking a river.    They're found along many Virginia waterways, from Cedar Bluff on the Clinch River in Tazewell County, to Ball's Bluff on the Potomac River in Loudoun County, to Drewry's Bluff on the James River in Chesterfield County.  Bluffs can also form in coastal beach areas, such as along the Chesapeake Bay at Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Wherever they're found, bluffs are products of complicated land and water factors acting at the point of the bluff as well as upstream in a watershed.  In addition, bluffs are history treasures.  They reveal geologic history in layers of ancient sediments; they've been important in the humanhistory of many Virginia settlements and events; and they offer dramatic views of the natural history and heritage of the Commonwealth's waters. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “James and York Bluffs.” MUSIC - ~ 16 sec – instrumentalSHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 173, 8-5-13. “James and York Bluffs,” from the 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries,” copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 320, 6-13-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES View of a bluff at York River State Park, March 29, 2011.  Photo courtesy of Timothy Seaman.View from a bluff at York River State Park, November 19, 2010.  Photo courtesy of Timothy Seaman.EXTRA INFORMATION ON RIVER BLUFF-RELATED LOCATIONS IN VIRGINIA Following are some Virginia locations with names related to river bluffs. Ball's Bluff, Potomac River, Loudoun County.Bluff City, New River, Giles County.Bluff Point (part of Colonial Beach), Potomac River, Westmoreland County.Bremo Bluff, James River, Fluvanna County.Cedar Bluff, Clinch River, Tazewell County.Colonial Heights, Appomattox River, Chesterfield County.Drewry's Bluff, James River, Chesterfield County.Madison Heights, James River, Amherst County. SOURCES Used for Audio College of William and Mary, “Geology of Virginia/Cliffs of Westmoreland,” by Chuck Bailey, Aug. 1, 2016, online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/2016/08/01/cliffs-of-westmoreland/. County of Northampton, Virginia, “Beaches/Kiptopeke State Park,” online at http://northampton.hosted.civiclive.com/visitors/tourism/free_things_to_see_and_do/free_recreation/water_recreation/beaches. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000.  National Geographic, “Bluff,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/bluff/. National Park Service/Richmond National Battlefield Park, “Drewry's Bluff,” online at https://www.nps.gov/rich/learn/historyculture/drewrys-bluff.htm. Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority, “Ball's Bluff Battlefield Regional Park,” online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/balls-bluff-battlefield-regional-park. OntoRichmond.com, “Civil War in Richmond—Drewry's Bluff,” video (1 min./8 sec.) online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IMITTR_wC8. Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus-American Edition, Oxford University Press, 1996.U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resource Conservation Service, “Glossary of Landform and Geologic Terms,” online (as a PDF) at https://directives.sc.egov.usda.gov/OpenNonWebContent.aspx?content=41992.wba. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):“How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway;“NPDES Stormwater Program,” online at https://www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-stormwater-program. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation:“Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu;“Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places:“The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html;“Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11); available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21 Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 586, 7-19-21. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Water cycle introduction – Episode 191, 12-9-13; and water cycle diagrams reconsidered – Episode 480, 7-8-19. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 585, 7-12-21. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.5.8 – Earth constantly changes. Grades K-5: Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth ScienceES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.

oxford dictionary bay university agency music photo natural earth state audio college north america civil war impact accent dark tech water web status index land rain pond research ocean government education recreation conservation maine chesapeake bay chesapeake snow environment images yarmouth msonormal commonwealth celebration stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence williamsburg arial environmental dynamic national geographic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide waters shenandoah water resources biology northampton rivers grade colorful madison county signature bio drewry geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech bluff city atlantic ocean westmoreland bluff glossary natural resources grades k oxford university press environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table centuries james river cosgrove msohyperlink loudoun county smith river usi sections bluffs potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater radford university new river policymakers msobodytext bmp madison heights environmental protection agency epa acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols tennessee river giles county northampton county tmdl westmoreland county geological survey united states history chesterfield county virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Jason Zuk, The Social Psychic Radio Show and Podcast
Lourin Hubbard Talks Spirituality, Social Justice & More...

Jason Zuk, The Social Psychic Radio Show and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 65:00


Lourin Hubbard was born in Central Valley, the son of a single black working-class mother who was an admitting clerk for a local hospital and a union representative for SEIU-UHW in Bakersfield.  Lourin's mom struggled to raise two children amid the skyrocketing costs of housing, transportation and health care.  His mother worked 10-12 hours days and the family required food stamps to survive.   Unforutnatley, Lourin's mom struggled with chronic high blood pressure and other health problems her entire life, and without consistent access to health care she died at the age of 50.  From this experience, Lourin saw first hand the stark inequities in our nation's broken health care system and painful disparities in health outcomes for black, brown and low income families.  Lourin's mother instilled in him a strong sense of determination and taught him to fight for what is right and for what he believes In including the power of education.  Lourin was the first member of his family to attend and graduate from a 4 year university.  Lourin met his wife at Fresno State, where he earned his degree in Political Science.  At the Fresno County Department of Social Services, Lourin connected Low-income people and families to community-based resources and government assistane programs like CaliFRESH and Medi-Cal.   Lourin currently works as Operations Manager at the California Department of Water Resources, leading frontline conservation efforts, supporting family farms, and combating droughts. https://www.lourinhubbard.com/. Email: info@lourinhubbard.com: 

Inside the Castle
Inside the Castle Talks Serious Gaming

Inside the Castle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021


Inside the Castle talks with Hunter Merritt, a Social Scientist at the Institute for Water Resources, and John Kucharski, a Research Scientist at the Engineering Research and Development Center's Environmental Laboratory, about serious gaming that is enhancing collaborative efforts across the agency.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 586 (7-19-21): A Virginia Rivers and Watersheds Quiz Game

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:41). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 19, 2021.  This revised episode from September 2016 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. SOUND – ~ 7 sec This week, that sound of the Roanoke River, recorded along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Roanoke, Va., sets the stage for a Virginia rivers quiz game to highlight some key facts about the Commonwealth major rivers and their watersheds. I'll ask you six questions about Virginia's rivers.  Then I'll give you the answer after a few seconds of some appropriate music: “Exploring the Rivers,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va. Let the game begin!Question 1: What river that is very much associated with Virginia's past and present is not actually IN Virginia.MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumentalThat's the Potomac River, whose main stem along Virginia's northern border is owned by the State of Maryland.Question 2: Of the James, Rappahannock, and York rivers, which two have their entire watersheds in Virginia? MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumental The answer is the Rappahannock and the York.  A small part of the headwaters of the James is in West Virginia.Question 3: What is the largest river watershed in Virginia?MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumental This time the answer IS the James River, whose watershed covers over 10,000 square miles in Virginia.Question 5: What's the longest river in Virginia, counting only each river's main stem, not all of the tributaries? MUSIC - ~ 4 sec – instrumental Once again, it's the James, whose main stem travels about 340 miles. Question 5: What two large Virginia rivers flow generally north? MUSIC - ~ 6 sec – instrumental Virginia's major northerly-flowing rivers are the New and the Shenandoah. And last, question 6: What major river flows southwesterly into Tennessee? MUSIC - ~ 6 sec – instrumental That's the Clinch River, one of several rivers in southwestern Virginia flowing toward the Volunteer State in the Tennessee River watershed, which in turn is part of the watersheds of the Ohio River, Mississippi River, and Gulf of Mexico. If you're thinking that this game left out some major Virginia rivers and river basins, you're right!  Other main rivers in the Commonwealth include the Dan, Holston, Powell, and Roanoke.  And other major watersheds with areas in Virginia include those of the Big Sandy River, which forms the border between Kentucky and West Virginia; the Chowan and Yadkin rivers, whose main stems are in North Carolina; Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay coastal rivers; and Albemarle Sound on North Carolina's coast. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close about 25 more seconds of “Exploring the Rivers.” MUSIC – ~ 27 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 344, 9-19-16. The sounds of the Roanoke River were recorded by Virginia Water Radio from the Blue Ridge Parkway near Roanoke, Va., on June 15, 2017. “Exploring the Rivers,” on the 2006 album “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Records, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  This music used previously Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 475, 6-3-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Roanoke River as seen from the Blue Ridge Parkway near the City of Roanoke, Va., June 15, 2017 (the is the location of the recording heard at the beginning of this episode).James River at Robius boat landing in Chesterfield County, Va., June 21, 2007.New River near Eggleston, Va. (Giles County), August 13, 2016.White's Ferry on the Potomac River, viewed from Loudoun County, Va., March 23, 2008.Rappahannock River near Remington, Va., (Fauquier County), December 27, 2009.North Fork Shenandoah River at U.S. Highway 55 on the county line between Shenandoah and Warren counties, Va., October 13, 2012.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT MAJOR VIRGINIA WATERSHEDS The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  This information was also included in the Show Notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21, an introduction to watersheds. WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River Roanoke 6,274 Roanoke River, Dan River, Banister River, Kerr Reservoir Yadkin 118 Ararat River York 2,669 York River, Pamunkey River, Mattaponi River Holston 1,322 N. Fork Holston River, Middle Fork Holston River, S. Fork Holston River Clinch - Powell 1,811 Clinch River, Powell River, Guest River Big Sandy 999 Levisa Fork, Russel Fork, Tug Fork SOURCES Used for Audio Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers,” online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. Frits van der Leeden:The Environmental Almanac of Virginia, Tennyson Press, Lexington, Va., 1998;Virginia Water Atlas, Tennyson Press, Lexington, Va., 1993. Kathryn P. Sevebeck, Jacob H. Kahn, and Nancy L. Chapman, Virginia's Waters, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, Va., 1986 (out of print).Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Final 2020 305(b)/303(d) Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.  Chapter 2, “State Background Information,” states that Virginia has an estimated 100,923 miles of rivers and streams. Virginia Museum of Natural History, “Virginia's Water Resources,” special issue of Virginia Explorer, Winter 2000, Martinsville, Va. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “West Virginia Watersheds,” online at http://www.dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Watersheds.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places:“Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html;“Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, pages 8-11, available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21 Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Water cycle introduction – Episode 191, 12-9-13; and water cycle diagrams reconsidered – Episode 480, 7-8-19. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 585, 7-12-21. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth Resources4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth ScienceES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.2 – Physical geography and native peoples of Virginia past and present.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. World Geography CourseWG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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Site Selectors Guild
Episode 50 - Water Resources in Economic Growth and Development

Site Selectors Guild

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 23:47


Rick Weddle: Welcome to Site Selection Matters, where we take a close look at the art and science of site selection decision-making. I’m your host, Rick Weddle, president of Site Selectors Guild. In each episode, we introduce you to leaders in the world of corporate site selection and economic development. We speak with members of the Site Selectors Guild or economic development partners and corporate decision-makers to provide you with deep insight into the best and next practices in our profession. In this episode, we have as our guest, Larry Gigerich, executive managing director with Ginovus, one of the nation’s leading site selection and location advisory firms. Today, Larry will talk with us about the importance of water resources in economic growth and development. Join me as we welcome Larry Gigerich to Site Selection Matters. Larry, arguably, water has become the most important natural resource for communities and states. And the impact on economic development is significant. Take a minute if you will and unpack this a bit for our listeners. Why is it so important and why is it becoming so important now? Larry Gigerich: Yeah, I think as you look at it, Rick, and you think about economic and community development in the U.S., and for that matter globally, you know, water and the ability to access water has become critically important, even more so than in the past. And I think maybe the best way to frame this issue up is to really divide it into two pieces. The first being water that is specifically required to support a company’s operations and the second part being water availability to support people living and working in the geographic area. They’re different, but yet connected. And I think as you think about it, you know, water is required for certain types of industrial primarily projects, as you think about it. So, things like food and beverage manufacturing, data centers, chemical productions, some steel and metal products, things like that where you have to have water as a part of your process. And, you know, if you have an area that can’t meet those availability statistics or numbers, in particular, that’s an issue. And then the second piece is, and I think this is maybe one of the really interesting things that we’ve seen develop over the past couple of years is, the corporate decision-makers are really emphasizing ensuring that water is in available in those communities and states where they look to allocate tower. Where they’re going to put those resources of people because they want to make sure people living in that area are in a position, you know, whether it’s from a quality of place or just general everyday life, that they’re in a place where there’s water that’s available. Because I think that’s going to become even more important as we go forward and decision-makers are starting to look at that. Rick: Two big reasons and we’ll jump into that. So, we get it now, really that water’s important. Obviously, without water we can’t exist and, of course, it’s important for, as you noted, many industrial processes. But now you’re suggesting the second point that corporate decision-makers are really beginning to look at it differently and considering the availability of water when looking at potential facility locations on a broader basis. Explain this if you will. Larry: Absolutely. So, now, you know, with that second focus that has emerged, you know, again ensuring that when they put talent resources in different geographic areas, that water is available not only to meet the needs of that area today, bu

Dave and Dujanovic
Water Shaming

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 19:25


There is actually a state-run website where you can report your neighbors who waste water. The Hall of Fame or Shame it comes Through the Utah Division of Water Resources has been all the hype this year. Marcie McCartney, the Division of Water Resources' public information, water conservation & education manager joins the conversation and talks more about the website. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED's The California Report
L.A. Mayor is President Biden's Pick for Ambassador to India

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 16:55


Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has been nominated by President Biden to serve as U.S. Ambassador to India. If he's confirmed by the U.S. Senate, it will set off a chain of political activity in the city. Reporter: Libby Denkmann, KPCC Sanitation crews and polie have been clearing a large homeless encampment at Venice Beach. The move comes as the city of Los Angeles appears ready to move forward with an ordinance that would ban tents in many public spaces, including on sidewalks. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report Governor Gavin Newsom has approved an extra $500 million for wildfire prevention. The change comes after CapRadio and NPR's California Newsroom revealed Newsom's administration had nixed a similar amount.  Reporter: Scott Rodd, CapRadio A massive rock barrier through part of the Delta in Contra Costa County has recently been completed. The barrier is expected to help preserve water supplies for millions of Californians as drought conditions worsen in the state. Guest: Jacob McQuirk, a principal engineer with the state Department of Water Resources

Beyond the Bench
31. Getting to the Heart of Science Communication with Dr. Faith Kearns

Beyond the Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 45:15


How do we communicate scientific information related to emotional, contentious, and traumatizing issues such as the climate crisis? Why is it important for science communication practitioners to prioritize their emotional and physical selves? Dr. Faith Kearns, an Academic Coordinator at the California Institute for Water Resources and author of Getting to the Heart of Science Communication, discusses her new book, science writing about water, fire, and climate, and what it means to be a science communication practitioner. Follow Faith on Twitter @frkearns! Learn more about the students producing this podcast and their science communication efforts by following us on Twitter @SciCommUCR and visiting our website.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-07-12: Property on White Rock Road intends to resolve wetlands violations; Remembering Susan Jean (Marr) Bessette

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 3:49


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about news, the best local  events, new job postings, obituaries, and more.   First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial.  Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield.   Now for some trivia. Did you know that academic scholar, Paula Fredriksen, was born in Kingston? She heald the position of William Goodwin Aurelio Professor of Scripture at Boston University and is now a visiting professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She has published a number of books about religion that have led to movies, tv shows, and documentaries.   Now, we turn our feature story….   Both the current and former owner of a quarry property on White Rock Road have agreed to terms intended to resolve allegations by a state agency of wetlands regulation violations.   Cherenzia Excavation Inc. of Westerly and Strategic Commercial Realty Inc., an offshoot of Rawson Materials of Putnam, Conn., signed the consent agreement in April to resolve a notice of violation issued to the companies by the state Department of Environmental Management. The agreement does not constitute admission of the factual and legal allegations in the notice of violation.   As part of the consent agreement, the two companies have agreed to pay either an administrative penalty of $17,200 or complete a supplemental environmental project that is equivalent in value to the penalty amount. The companies have until Aug. 22 to either pay the penalty or propose a supplemental project, according to a DEM spokesman.   Cherenzia owned the property from 1998 to 2018, when it sold it to Strategic Commercial Realty Inc. Strategic also purchased a quarry that Cherenzia had operated on Old Hopkinton Road and took over the company's lease of a quarry site in Bradford.   According to the notice of violation, inspections conducted by DEM's Office of Water Resources revealed water and sediment from sand and gravel flowing into wetlands from storm runoff, alterations of wetlands associated with creation of a dirt access road, and alterations of two sections of wetlands along the banks of the Pawcatuck River, including one that had previously been restored. Two of the affected wetlands are hydrologically connected to the Pawcatuck River. A total of 81,600 square feet of wetlands were disturbed or altered, according to the notice of violation. -   There are a lot of businesses in our community that are hiring right now, so we're excited to tell you about some new job listings. Today's Job posting comes from ALDI in Westerly. They're looking for part-time floor associates. You'll be responsible for merchandising and stocking product, cashiering, and cleaning up the store. Pay is up $14.30 per hour. If you're interested and think you'd be a good fit for the role you can apply using the link in our episode description.   https://www.indeed.com/l-Westerly,-RI-jobs.html?vjk=29ee93bf88f3a0fe   -   Today we're remembering the life of Susan Jean (Marr) Bessette.    A life-long resident of Pawcatuck, she built a home together with her husband, and raised 3 sons. She enjoyed reading, gardening, and weekends on Sandy Point. She showed her love through actions by helping people when they needed it the most.  Susan will be missed for her loving companionship, talks, and chocolate chip cookies.   She is survived by her husband and high school sweetheart, Tom Bessette, her 3 boys and five grandchildren.    Thank you for taking a moment today to remember and celebrate Susan's life. -   That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 585 (7-12-21): Middle Schoolers Make the Call on the Water Cycle, Watersheds, and Stormwater

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:46). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-9-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 12, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. SOUND – ~4 sec This week, we drop in on a group of Virginia middle-school students giving citizens a vocabulary lesson on watersheds, the water cycle, and a challenging nationwide water issue.  Sound unbelievable?  Well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds. GUEST VOICES - ~36 sec – “Water cycle; watersheds; evaporation; transpiration; condensation; precipitation; rainfall intensity; infiltration; runoff; groundwater; surface water; impervious surface; divides; drainage areas; tributaries; river basins; the ocean. You've been listening to Christiansburg Middle School students who attended Stormwater Education Day on April 12, 2017.  The vocabulary list you heard included processes of the water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle; along with geographic features of watersheds, a term that people often interchange with drainage areas, drainage basins, or river basins.  Water cycle processes and watershed features are key elements in stormwater, affecting when, where, and how much of it occurs.  Stormwater results when rainfall or other precipitation can't seep—or infiltrate—into the ground, particularly when the precipitation lands on pavement or other impervious surfaces.  Stormwater runs off over the land surface into water bodies or into drains and pipes that eventually lead to water bodies.  During that runoff, stormwater can pick up various water pollutants, and high-volume stormwater can cause flooding and erosion.  Such impacts, and the laws and regulations implemented in response, have made stormwater-management a far-reaching water issue, affecting local governments, homeowners, and businesses all over Virginia and the nation. Back in Christiansburg, students learning now about the water cycle, watersheds, potential contaminants, and the filtering potential of different materials will be the future idea-generators and decision-makers who'll deal with this widespread and complicated issue. Thanks to Christiansburg Middle School students, teachers, and volunteers for lending their voices to this episode.  We close with some appropriate sounds and music for stormwater.  Here's some rain and thunder, followed by about 30 seconds of “Runoff,” composed for Virginia Water Radio by Torrin Hallett, a 2021 graduate of Lamont School of Music in Denver.SOUND - ~8 sec – rain and thunder MUSIC - ~ 28 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 365, 4-24-17. The voices of sixth-grade students (and some adults) from Christiansburg Middle School in Christiansburg, Va., were recorded April 12, 2017, during Stormwater Education Day, held on the grounds of the Christiansburg/Montgomery County, Va., chapter of the Izaak Walton League.  Thanks to Patricia Colatosti of the Town of Christiansburg and to Patricia Gaudreau of the Montgomery County School Division for organizing the event and for allowing Virginia Water Radio to participate. Learning stations at the April 2017 Stormwater Education Day were the following:Montgomery County – groundwater model;Skyline Soil and Water Conservation District, Christiansburg, Va. – runoff boxes;Town of Christiansburg/Town of Blacksburg/Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering – stream table;Virginia Cooperative Extension/Montgomery County Unit – pet waste and streams;Virginia Cooperative Extension/Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering – groundwater models;Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Karst Program – karst, springs, and groundwater;Virginia Tech Facilities – watershed model;Virginia Tech Forestry Graduate Student Association – sand filters and stormwater;Virginia Tech Learning Enhanced Watershed Assessment System (LEWAS) lab – runoff boxes;Virginia Tech Museum of Geosciences Outreach – watershed model;Virginia Water Resources Research Center/Virginia Water Radio – recording terms related to stormwater.The thunderstorm sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 28, 2016. “Runoff” is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio, a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York, and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  To hear the complete piece (50 seconds), please click here. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Some of the learning stations on April 12, 2017, for Christiansburg Middle School's Stormwater Education Day, at the grounds of the Christiansburg/Montgomery County, Va., chapter of the Izaak Walton League.Diagram of the water (or hydrologic) cycle. Diagram from the U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Water Cycle,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html.Virginia's major watersheds (river basins). Map by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, accessed online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil_and_water/wsheds.shtml. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT STORMWATER MANAGEMENT IN VIRGINIA The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), “Stormwater,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/stormwater.“DEQ is the lead agency for developing and implementing the Commonwealth's statewide program to protect water quality and quantity from stormwater runoff.  Under the Virginia Stormwater Management Program (VSMP), the agency issues permits, certifies land disturbers and offers compliance assistance.  “Stormwater occurs after precipitation and consists of runoff from streets, lawns, parking lots, construction sites, industrial facilities and other impervious surfaces.  Stormwater may enter surface waters directly or through natural and constructed channel systems.  Pollution, such as automobile oil, grease, metals, sediment, bacteria from animal waste, fertilizers and pesticides, even deposits from airborne pollutants can contaminate the runoff.“Unmanaged stormwater can cause erosion and flooding.  It can also carry excess nutrients, sediment, and other contaminants into rivers and streams.  Properly managed stormwater can recharge groundwater and protect land and streams from erosion, flooding, and pollutants. “DEQ regulates stormwater as a ‘point source' of pollution, which means its source can be located.  This includes stormwater discharges from [the following]: Municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s);Construction activities;Industrial discharges. “MS4s are publicly owned systems, such as storm drains, pipes, ditches or swales that collect or move water to surface waters.  They must obtain permit coverage and develop a stormwater-management program. “Coverage under a state permit may be required to discharge stormwater from construction activities.  In addition, local governments may manage their own stormwater-management permit programs, which are separate from the state permit program and from local land-disturbance permits. “During construction, a separate permit may be required for erosion and sediment control.  These land-disturbance permits are issued by localities as part of their erosion and sediment control programs, which DEQ periodically reviews.  The agency offers training for both erosion control and stormwater plan reviewers and land disturbers.  “Industrial discharges are covered under industrial stormwater permits and require management practices and monitoring to protect the quality of the waters receiving the stormwater discharges.“ Stormwater runoff that is not confined to a single point source is considered nonpoint source pollution, which is mainly controlled through erosion and sediment control.“Local governments are key partners in the VSMP program, administrating erosion and sediment control programs as well as some stormwater discharges.” SOURCES Used for Audio Code of Virginia, “Virginia Stormwater Management Act,” online via the Virginia Legislative Information System at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacodefull/title62.1/chapter3.1/article2.3/. King County, Washington, “Stormwater glossary of terms and abbreviations,” online at http://www.kingcounty.gov/services/environment/water-and-land/stormwater/glossary.aspx. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “NPDES Stormwater Program,” online at https://www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-stormwater-program; and “National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System General Permit Remand Rule,” published in The Federal Register on Dec. 9, 2016, online (as a PDF) at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-12-09/pdf/2016-28426.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “Water Science School/The Water Cycle,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html; and “The Water Cycle for Schools and Kids,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle-kids.html. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Stormwater,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/stormwater. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “An Introduction to Urban Stormwater,” by Rich Wagner (pages 1-7), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, August 2010, “Wherever You Are, Stormwater's On Your Street” and “Stormwater Information Sources,” by Danielle Guerin (pages 3-7), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49363. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).

kids new york bay humans learning university agency music local national natural halloween relationships earth state audio college sound map properly accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean washington government education construction public recreation conservation chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment code images oberlin college montgomery county schools va msonormal new year commonwealth atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide shenandoah water resources water conservation district biology municipal pollution conservatory civics rivers grade industrial diagram oberlin colorful resource madison county signature bio continental wild turkey manhattan school coverage scales blue ridge guest voices govt watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table blacksburg james river msohyperlink wherever you are runoff smith river sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater rainfall headwater radford university new river policymakers msobodytext federal register king county bmp environmental protection agency epa new standard acknowledgment virginia department middle schoolers cripple creek cumberland gap sols deq rich wagner tennessee river tmdl geological survey torrin water cycle unmanaged christiansburg virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
EWN - Engineering With Nature
Integrating EWN into Critical Watershed Projects in California

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 16:03


In Part 2 of Episode 7, we continue our discussion with Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and National Lead for EWN; and Kris Tjernell, Deputy Director, Integrated Watershed Management for the California Department of Water Resources. We discuss their plans to fully integrate EWN into critical watershed projects in California. They hope these projects will showcase innovation and new ways of thinking about climate change adaptation and resilience on a broad scale, while accelerating the multi-benefits of water management, habitat restoration and community resilience. As Kris notes, “because California is such a focal point now for the impacts of climate change, we're positioned perfectly to be an innovator, to be a leader, to show that you can deliver landscape-level projects at the pace required to, not only keep up with the impacts of climate change, but to really get out ahead of it and prepare our landscape for those inevitable changes.”    One of the projects that they discuss is in the Yolo Bypass, a 100-year-old flood risk management project, where weirs direct water from the Sacramento River during high flow events and spread that water out over a 60,000-acre landscape. The 16,000 acres in the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area is providing a range of other environmental and social benefits in addition to the flood risk benefits provided by the Yolo Bypass. Experience gained at this project and others can be applied to expand engineering with nature approaches to create greater economic, environmental, and social value within the existing structure of this well-established existing project. As Kris says, “if we truly want to be on the cutting edge and address the climate vulnerabilities of the State and its communities, we're going to need to accelerate the good work that we do. And we're going to need to accelerate the kinds of multi-benefit flood management, habitat, restoration, nature-based solutions that we're talking about.” Todd agrees: “You've got to think big. Some of these projects are tens of thousands of acres of opportunity to produce the kinds of integrated solutions that we've been talking about. That's the scale that's necessary. There's tremendous opportunity in California as there is across the United States.”   A key goal of EWN and the EWN Podcast is to inspire students, future scientists, engineers, planners, and policy makers. Kris and Todd close by talking about the importance of a STEM education – science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. They discuss their personal journeys, the challenges posed by climate change and the opportunities ahead for students and future professionals to apply their passion and creativity to develop innovative solutions by engineering with nature.     Related Links:  EWN Website ERDC Website Todd Bridges at LinkedIn Todd Bridges at EWN Kris Tjernell at LinkedIn Kris Tjernell at California Department of Water Resources Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area Sacramento Weirs

Business Matters
Historic tax deal announced

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 54:27


Officials from 130 countries have agreed to overhaul the global tax system to ensure big companies "pay a fair share" wherever they operate.The OECD said on Thursday that negotiators had backed a proposed minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15%. US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said: "Today is an historic day for economic diplomacy." Alex Cobham of the advocacy group Tax Justice Network tells the BBC's Fergus Nicoll he welcomes the news, but says the deal could have gone further. Also in the programme, former US President Donald Trump's company and its finance chief have been charged with tax-related crimes. Allen Weisselberg, 73, turned himself in to New York authorities on Thursday, where he was later charged with avoiding taxes on $1.7m worth of income. The BBC's Samira explains what we know of the indictment. Satellite broadband provider OneWeb has now launched enough satellites to start a commercial service. The company faces stiff competition from the likes of Elon Musk's Starlink and Amazon's Kuiper, and Neil Masterson, chief executive of OneWeb, talks us through his ambitions for the company. Plus, the entire western region of the United States has been experiencing an abnormally hot early summer. Christine Gemperle farms 135 acres of almonds in California, and discusses the impact on her business. And Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager at California's Department of Water Resources, explains the impact of water shortages on the state's dams, which provide electricity. All through the show we'll be joined by Hayley Woodin of BIV News in Vancouver, Nicole Childers with Marketplace in Los Angeles, and Liv Casben with the Australian Associated Press in Sydney. (Picture: US Treasury Secretary, Janet Yellen. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

World Business Report
Nissan announces major UK electric car expansion

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 26:28


Carmaker Nissan has announced plans for a $1.4bn investment in the northeast of England. The new plant will produce electric car batteries and a new car model, and the BBC's Theo Leggett tells us how electric vehicle production is shaping up across Europe. Also in the programme, satellite broadband provider OneWeb has now launched enough satellites to start a commercial service. The company faces stiff competition from the likes of Elon Musk's Starlink and Amazon's Kuiper, and Neil Masterson, chief executive of OneWeb, talks us through his ambitions for the company. Plus, the entire western region of the United States has been experiencing an abnormally hot early summer. Christine Gemperle farms 135 acres of almonds in California, and discusses the impact on her business. And Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager at California's Department of Water Resources, explains the impact of water shortages on the state's dams, which provide electricity.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 583 (6-28-21): One Blue Ridge Helps Start Many Virginia Rivers

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:41). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-25-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2014 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~ 10 sec – instrumental - “Big Run Thrives.” This week, musical selections highlight the connections between one famous Virginia ridge and the watersheds of six rivers.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds.MUSIC – ~46 sec – instrumentals – “Big Run Thrives,” ~18 sec; then “Hazel River,” ~28 sec.You've been listening, first, to part of “Big Run Thrives,” and second, to part of “Hazel River,” both by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., from the 1997 album “Here on This Ridge,” a celebration of Virginia's Shenandoah National Park.  Both tunes were inspired by streams flowing off of Virginia's Blue Ridge.  The part of the Blue Ridge that runs through the middle of the national park from Front Royal south to Waynesboro divides the watersheds of three Virginia rivers.  Throughout the park, mountain streams on the ridge's western slopes—like Big Run in Rockingham County—lead to the Shenandoah River watershed.  On the Blue Ridge's eastern side, streams in the northern part of the park—like Hazel River in Rappahannock County—flow to the Rappahannock River; in the southern part of the park, east-flowing streams are in the James River watershed. Outside of the national park, to the north the Blue Ridge separates the Potomac River watershed from the Shenandoah, a Potomac River tributary.  To the south of the national park, the Blue Ridge is part of the watershed divide between the James River and Roanoke River, and then between the Roanoke and New rivers. Countless other ridges in Virginia aren't as famous as the Blue Ridge, but whether high and obvious or low and indistinct, they all add to the landscape's pattern of waterways flowing through watersheds. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use parts of “Big Run Thrives” and “Hazel River.”  We close with another musical selection for mountain ridges and rivers, from the Rockingham County and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels.  Here's about 35 seconds of “Find Your Mountain.”MUSIC – ~35 sec – Lyrics: “Find your mountain.  Find your river.  Find your mountain.”  Then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 209, 4-14-14. “Big Run Thrives” and “Hazel River,” from the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” are copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.   More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  Information about the making of that album is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/timothys-blog/entry/the-making-of-our-album-here-on-this-ridge.  “Big Run Thrives” was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in in Episode 473. 5-20-19; “Hazel River was used previously in Episode 339, 10-24-16. “Find Your Mountain,” from the 2015 album “Leave Some Things Behind,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 425, 6-18-18, Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES South Fork Shenandoah River at the U.S. Rt. 211 bridge in Page County, Va., July 22, 2012.  Traveling east on 211 from this point takes you into Shenandoah National Park, across the Blue Ridge, and into the Rappahannock River watershed.The Rappahannock River, looking upstream from U.S. Route 29 at Remington, Va. (Fauquier County), December 27, 2009.  The Hazel River flows into the Rappahannock just a few river miles above this point.View of Floyd County, Va., from the Blue Ridge Parkway, June 1, 2014.  The photo shows the New River watershed; behind the photographer (on the other side of the Parkway) is Patrick County and the Roanoke River watershed. SOURCES Used for Audio College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000. National Park Service, “Shenandoah National Park,” online at http://www.nps.gov/shen/index.htm.Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission, “Local TMDLs,” online at https://www.rrregion.org/program_areas/environmental/local_tmdls.php.  Located at this site are Total Maximum Daily Load on the Upper Rappahannock River, the Hazel River, and other Rappahannock River basin waterways. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  Please see particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 365, 4-24-17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.  Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources 3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. 4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth Science ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.

canada bay university agency music natural earth state audio college north america impact accent dark steel wheels tech water web status index land rain musical united states pond research ocean government education recreation conservation maine route chesapeake snow helps traveling environment images va yarmouth msonormal commonwealth stream normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence williamsburg arial environmental national park service times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide located shenandoah water resources rivers grade colorful rt madison county signature geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech atlantic ocean natural resources grades k parkway roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table front royal rappahannock waynesboro harrisonburg countless seaman james river regions cosgrove msohyperlink fauquier county relyonvml smith river usi blue ridge parkway sections potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department floyd county cumberland gap leave some things behind sols tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park united states history total maximum daily load virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
EWN - Engineering With Nature
EWN Collaboration with the California Department of Water Resources

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 26:53


From flood risk to extreme drought and wildfire, California is feeling the brunt of climate change impacts and is, by necessity, at the forefront of climate change innovation. In this episode, we're talking about the unique challenges of managing California's precious water resources and about a new collaboration between the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and Engineering With Nature®. Our guests are Dr. Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist for Environmental Science with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and National Lead for EWN, and Kris Tjernell, Deputy Director, Integrated Watershed Management for the California Department of Water Resources. The goal of the collaboration on EWN is to advance opportunities for truly integrated solutions to water resource challenges.    California is exceptional in many ways, from its population of over 40 million people; to its size as the third largest state at over 160,000 square miles; to its economy, the largest in the United States at over $3 trillion. It is also the leading agricultural state in the US in terms of total agricultural sales and 8 million acres of irrigated land. California is also a land of extremes with its diverse landscapes and communities, and with the breadth of challenges it faces – from droughts and floods, to heat waves and wildfires – which strain the State's systems. This complexity makes presents a unique set of challenges.   As stewards of the state's water resources, DWR is responsible for delivering water to over 27 million Californians while supporting flood management in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta that flows out through the San Francisco Bay. Managing flood risk for agricultural lands, small communities, and larger urban centers is a top priority.   The San Joaquin Basin, for example, has unique flood management challenges exacerbated by the effects of climate change, with more precipitation coming in the form of rainstorms and less from snow. Traditional strategies of flood management in California included: straightening the river systems; building taller, more armored levees; and building bigger reservoirs. The question is not how to add-on to these, but as Kris notes, “how to engineer with nature to solve those challenges in ways that work for our communities and the ecosystem together”.   The partnership between DWR and EWN is intended to do that – to leverage the natural systems to produce more sustainable outcomes. As Todd notes, “by applying EWN approach, we want to find innovative engineering solutions to flooding or drought, or wildfires, that make use of natural systems to produce sustainable, resilient solutions that create more diversified economic, natural, and social value. That's what we're seeking – to be able to solve those challenges in ways that work for our communities and for the ecosystem together. That is what's really exciting to me.”   Bringing people in California communities into these projects so they can experience them and see the holistic benefits of an EWN approach is a key focus for this partnership. As Kris notes, part of the effort of DWR and EWN is to figure out a way “to tap into the human desire and joy to live within a natural environment. The feeling of walking into a local urban park. The joy of driving towards Yosemite and seeing the valley open up in front of you. Seeing what John Muir saw back in the day.” The challenge, Kris says, is “how do we paint this landscape that gets interest, invigorates the conversation that allows us to think beyond the traditional approaches to flood management and water resource management.” Todd agrees, emphasizing the integration of engineering and natural systems to produce broad value: “The economic utility of a project is one lens through which you can assess the value of a project. Importantly, there's also the environmental value and the social value that comes from connecting people with diverse backgrounds to the land and to what it provides. Projects that produce economic, natural and social value at the same time are the ones we want to collaborate on.” Related Links:  EWN Website ERDC Website Todd Bridges at LinkedIn Todd Bridges at EWN Kris Tjernell at LinkedIn Kris Tjernell at California Department of Water Resources San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge Pedro Fages expeditions to the San Joaquin Valley John Muir Trail The Moth Snowstorm  

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 582 (6-21-21): Where Headwaters Flow, Rivers Begin

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:09). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-18-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 21, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 – instrumentalThat's part of “Highland,” by the group Wake Up Robin, with musicians from North Carolina, New York, California, and Washington State.  It opens an episode about waterways in the highest and most upstream part of watersheds, where water starts following a channel and flowing overland towards rivers.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two Virginia examples, and see if you can guess the name for these upper watershed features.  And here's a hint: get this right and you'll stream to the head of water class.SOUND - ~ 11 sec If you guessed headwater streams, you're right!  Headwater streams are the first flowing waters in the upper part of a river's watershed.  These relatively small streams have a big range of functions, including as habitat for certain organisms or life stages, and as a source of water, materials, and organisms for downstream waters. Understanding the location and length of headwater streams in the Appalachian Mountains, particularly in response to storms, was the research goal of Carrie Jensen, a graduate student from 2014 to 2018 in Virginia Tech's Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.   In November 2017, Ms. Jensen described her research and its significance in just 90 seconds during the “Nutshell Games,” held by Virginia Tech's Center for Communicating Science.  Here's Ms. Jensen's presentation. GUEST VOICE - ~84 sec – “Hi, everyone.  My name is Carrie, and I study changes in stream length in Appalachian headwaters, which are the small streams where our rivers start on the landscape.  So I literally walk upstream with a GPS unit until I find where a stream begins in the mountains.  And these headwaters can expand and contract in length through time, getting longer when it's wet after it rains, and getting shorter during dry periods.  And I wanted to know if this expansion and contraction behavior is the same everywhere.  So I matched changes in stream length across the Appalachian Mountains and actually found some pretty big differences.  At some of my sites, stream length is really stable and hardly changes across a huge range of flows, but at other sites there's a lot of expansion and contraction: stream length varies from tens of feet to a couple of miles.  And this work is relevant for pretty much any application that requires knowing where streams are and when they have water.  So where to build stuff; how to build stuff; where you need riparian buffers of trees to protect water quality.  And normally we rely on maps for this information.  But the blue lines representing streams on maps don't tell us if the stream has water all the time, or 75 percent of the time, or maybe only once every couple of years.  So research describing and predicting these changes in stream length can help us better manage and protect our water resources.  Thank you.”As Ms. Jensen's work shows, there's much to know about headwaters, and such information can help us better understand quantity and quality patterns far downstream. Thanks to Carrie Jensen for permission to use the audio from her Nutshell Games talk.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstand for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Highland.”MUSIC - ~17 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 397, 12-4-17. The Nutshell Games are organized by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science to give graduate students a forum for describing their research in a short presentation designed for non-scientists.  More information about the Center for Communicating Science is available online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/.  Nutshell Games videos are available online at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC01cz4Mal3-AOZeODCauLHw.  Two news articles about the Nutshell Games are New center focuses on the art of communicating science effectively, Virginia Tech News, 2/28/17; and Understandable communication aim of first 'Nutshell Games', Roanoke Times, 3/3/17.“Highland,” from the 2018 album “Wake Up Robin,” on Great Bear Records, by the group of the same name, is used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about the album and band is available online at https://wakeuprobin.bandcamp.com.The sounds of headwater streams heard in this episode were recorded in Blacksburg, Va.'s Heritage Park on July 27, 2016, and in Blacksburg on Brush Mountain on January 31, 2010 (the latter stream is shown in the photos below). Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two views of a headwaters stream tributary to Toms Creek (New River basin) on Brush Mountain in Blacksburg, Va.: upper photo December 25, 2013; lower photo December 2, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Carrie Jensen, “Project Report, 2016 VWRRC Student Grant: Sensors reveal the timing and pattern of stream flow in headwaters after storms,” July 10, 2017, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg. Sacramento [Calif.] River Watershed Program, “Importance of the Headwaters,” by Todd Sloat, 9/21/14, online at https://sacriver.org/watershed-blog/importance-of-the-headwaters/. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Resources of the United States/Water Basics Glossary/Headwaters,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/water-basics_glossary.html#H. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Glossary/Headwater,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/dictionary.html#H. Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science, online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “The Importance of Headwater Streams,” online at https://dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Headwaters.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/ U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity.  Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia river basins.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021, so the episode number, date, and link may change. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge and three watersheds - Episode 209, 4-14-14. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – EP365 – 4/24/17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16.Following are links to other episodes with information from presentations at the Nutshell Games, produced by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Sciences.Episode

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The Current
Farmers fear drought as summer sets in

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 12:56


Summer is only just beginning, but farmers are worried about a year of drought. We talk to David Wiens, a dairy farmer in Manitoba and the vice-president of Dairy Farmers of Canada; Craig McLaughlin, a beef farmer in Ontario; and John Pomeroy, Canada Research Chair in Water Resources and Climate Change at the University of Saskatchewan.

Finding Genius Podcast
Water Resources, Flood Management, and Finding the Path to Sustainable Water Access with Ricardo S. Pineda

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 35:17


How does California and the US at large handle their water and prevent a crisis? Research and work on sustainable storage and flood prevention may lead us to the ultimate solution. Listen in and learn: Why California struggles with a consistent water supply If flood water can be used to manage water crises How local ecology can be used to control flooding Retired Water Resources Engineer from the California Department of Water Resources, Ricardo S. Pineda, discusses his continuing lifetime of work researching water access, quality, and storage. Water is a resource necessary for life everywhere, but due to specific hardships posed by locations around the country, it can be challenging to manage. Between pollution and flooding, finding a sustainable solution has remained elusive to engineers worldwide. While the United States has a competent water management system, it still faces challenges like contamination and flooding regularly, especially in California. Other countries, like Honduras, have come up with creative solutions, but a permanent fix has yet to be discovered due to the unpredictability of weather from year to year. For more information, visit water.ca.gov. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C