Podcasts about World Health Organization

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Specialized agency of the United Nations

  • 2,688PODCASTS
  • 5,012EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about World Health Organization

Show all podcasts related to world health organization

Latest podcast episodes about World Health Organization

Crina and Kirsten Get to Work

Burnout feels like depletion, exhaustion, disconnection, negative emotions and reduced capacity...sound familiar?  You're not alone! In fact burnout is so pervasive that over seventy-five percent of the workforce is currently, or has previously experienced it.     SHOW NOTES Burnout is a  real diagnosis - and defined as “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed” by the World Health Organization.  This relatively new diagnosis is defined as a “syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions: 1) feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion; 2) increased mental distance from one's job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job; and 3) reduced professional efficacy. Burnout refers specifically to phenomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to describe experiences in other areas of life.”   Christina Maslach (creator of the Maslach Burnout Inventory) first identified the syndrome - and it came out of her work with healthcare workers and their families.  Here are her inventory questions:   How often are you tired and lacking energy to go to work in the morning? How often do you feel physically drained, like your batteries are dead? How often is your thinking process sluggish or your concentration impaired? How often do you feel emotionally detached from co-workers (or customers) and unable to be sensitive to their needs?   Does it sound like you?  If you are like most of us - yes, at least some teimes.   How does this happen?  When we carry too much for too long and cannot effectively process our emotions, our neurological system gets overloaded - and we are unable to effectively deal with this overload.   Who does this happen to?  Well, all of us, but those of us that are anxious or have a low self esteem or poor boundaries are thought to be more likely to suffer burnout, according to a study of Spanish nurses.  According to authors Rachel Montane and Erika Pryor, women of color also carry the emotional burden of discrimination, fear of retaliation - and of course much of the emotional labor of diversity in the workplace..   Employers contribute to burnout by unfair treatment, an unmanageable workload, unrealistic deadlines, poor communication and a lack of support.   Enter Drs. Emily and Amelia Nagoski, authors of Burnout, who just happen to be identical twins.  They have concluded, based on their research, that the key to preventing burnout is to manage the emotions you are having so that we do not become emotionally exhausted.  They encourage us to process the emotion - actually turn towards it, and feel it.  Scary!!  But we can do it.   Here are the twins' suggestions to deal with, process and get on the other side of our emotions.   Engage in physical activity Try breathing exercises Make positive connections with people you love and care about (call someone or better yet go for a walk with a friend) Laugh - a great big belly laugh Hug for 20 seconds - the full slightly uncomfortable 20 seconds Cry - they promise it will not go on forever Be Creative - paint, sing, dance, write   The key is to send our body a signal that the danger is over, we are safe.  And how do we know our emotions have been processed and we are “done?”  The twin doctors promise your body will tell you.   Be aware of your depletion clues.  Are you sleeping well and enough?  Are you engaging in activities where you do not think of work? Are you taking breaks at work?  Do you have work-life boundaries?   The solution to burnout is actually more than self-care.  It is more about managing emotions.    While burnout is prevalent, there are things we can do to recognize our vulnerability, determine whether it is happening to us and work to relieve that chronic stress through the processing of emotions.     More good reads: How to Recover From Burnout & Love Work Again According to Science   How to Eliminate Burnout and Retain Top Talent

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Advancing colorectal cancer screening with AI

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 16:55


Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, accounting for almost 2 million new cancer cases each year, according to the World Health Organization. Colorectal cancer, also known as bowel cancer, typically affects older adults, although it can happen at any age.Screening for colorectal cancer is important to identify precancerous polyps that could develop into cancer, and several screening options are available to patients. But which screening tool is right for you?"The best screening tool is the one you're willing to get," says Dr. James East, a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic Healthcare in London. "There's no point in being set up for a colonoscopy if you're not willing to come for it. And there are a wide range of options now for bowel cancer screening — all of which provide substantial protection against bowel cancer."Screening test options for colorectal cancer include: Colonoscopy. Stool DNA test. Fecal immunochemical test.  Virtual colonoscopy, or CT colonography. While effective screening tools exist, research using artificial intelligence (AI) to develop better techniques to detect polyps is hoping to improve screening even further."I think the role of AI in endoscopy is huge. And it's it's coming to clinical care," says Dr. East. "This is really translating facial recognition technology, but instead of recognizing faces, the AI recognizes polyps at an astonishing rate during a live colonoscopy. This is really a game changer for us." On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. East discusses advances in colorectal cancer screening.

Kratom Science
62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom

Kratom Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:52


Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz is a senior toxicologist from Germany and an outspoken advocate for harm reduction and science-based, rational drug policy. On October 11, 2021, representing the European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies, Dr. Steinmetz testified against kratom prohibition for the World Health Organization’s 44th Expert Committee on Drug Dependence . Dr. … 62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom Read More » The post 62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom first appeared on Kratom Science.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-21-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 4:49


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 21st, 2021. Sometimes it just doesn't pay to be the leader of a country during a global pandemic. A leaked document suggests a Brazilian congressional panel is ready to recommend mass homicide charges be brought against President Bolsonaro over how he handled the virus. The charge is he deliberately allowed it to spread in hopes of achieving herd immunity. As we reported yesterday, millions of Russians are under strict new restrictions. In Moscow, all unvaccinated residents over 60, and unvaccinated people with chronic diseases have to lock down at home for four months. Non-working days have also been declared from October 30 to November 7 across Russia. The U.S. released its plan to vaccinate children 5 to 11. They'll be able to get it at their pediatrician's office, a local pharmacy, or maybe even their school. Authorization to use Pfizer in kids is expected in a few weeks and those will be low dose shots. Moderna won't give up how to make its vaccine, so the World Health Organization has hired an African startup to hack the formula. Or at least get as close to it as they can. Moderna's patent is public but the way it's written doesn't disclose everything. Moderna has said several times they won't enforce their intellectual property during the pandemic, so it's safe for the startup to move ahead without much fear of getting sued. They don't have a choice in whether or not to get vaccinated, they haven't organized protests against it, and so far, none of them have even said anything about it. 80 animals at the Cincinnati Zoo got two doses of vaccine designed for veterinary use. Handlers worked for weeks to get the animals comfortable with everything they'd see and feel when they got the injections. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 14%, and hospitalizations are down 19% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,540,596 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: New Hampshire and Michigan 25%, Minnesota 15%, Colorado 14%, and Montana 9%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Goshen, WY. Stark, ND. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. Lake, MT. Bethel Census Area, AK. Hale, AL. Hill, MT. Inyo, CA. Arenac, MI. And Orleans, VT. There have been at least 729,434 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 70.6%, and Connecticut and Rhode Island at 70%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 40.9%, Idaho at 43%, and Wyoming at 43.2%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 57.1%. The top five countries with a 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Oceana up 3%. Taiwan, South Korea, and Bangladesh 2%. And Australia 1%. Globally, cases were down 9% and deaths were down 11% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,805,130 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 71,809. The U.K. 43,540. Russia 33,740. Turkey 30,862. And Romania 18,863. There have been at least 4,918,215 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TonioTimeDaily
The World Association for Sexual Health (WAS) Declaration of Sexual Rights

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 51:37


"Sexual Rights Are Human Rights For women and girls, the right to control their own bodies and their sexuality without any form of discrimination, coercion, or violence is critical for their empowerment. Without sexual rights, they cannot realize their rights to self-determination and autonomy, nor can they control other aspects of their lives. Indeed it is the attempts to control women's and girls' sexuality that result in many of the human rights abuses they face on a daily basis, including gender-based violence, forced marriage, female genital mutilation, and limitations on their mobility, dress, education, employment, and participation in public life. The same holds true for lesbians, gay men, bisexual people, transgender people, sex workers, and others who transgress sexual and gender norms and who face greater risk of violence, stigma, and discrimination as a result. It is clear: sexual rights underpin the enjoyment of all other human rights and are a prerequisite for equality and justice. At the global level, there is great debate about whether or how to define sexual rights. IWHC believes in order to overcome some of the political barriers to the recognition, respect for, protection, and fulfillment of sexual rights we need to clarify what they are. IWHC, in collaboration with other leading human rights and sexual health organizations, have developed the following working definition of sexual rights: Sexual rights embrace certain human rights that are already recognized in national laws, international human rights documents, and other consensus documents. They rest on the recognition that all individuals have the right—free of coercion, violence, and discrimination of any kind—to the highest attainable standard of sexual health; to pursue a satisfying, safe, and pleasurable sexual life; to have control over and decide freely, and with due regard for the rights of others, on matters related to their sexuality, reproduction, sexual orientation, bodily integrity, choice of partner, and gender identity; and to the services, education, and information, including comprehensive sexuality education, necessary to do so. Other definitions, such as the World Health Organization working definition, make the link between sexual rights and existing human rights that are critical to the realization of sexual health, and includes: the rights to equality and non-discrimination; the right to be free from torture or to cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to privacy; the rights to the highest attainable standard of health (including sexual health); the right to marry and to found a family and enter into marriage with free and full consent of the intending spouses, and to equality in and at the dissolution of marriage; the right to decide the number and spacing of one's children; the rights to information and education; the rights to freedom of opinion and expression; and the right to an effective remedy for violations of fundamental rights." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Nurah Speaks
(Ep 171) Follow The Science: Cancel The Swine!

Nurah Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 38:29


The pig is a sick animal that consumes garbage, animal excrement and decaying flesh. Its tissue is riddled with mucous, worms, parasites and viruses that impact the health of its eater. Even the World Health Organization has concluded that processed pork is a contributor to cancer. It is simply not a meat fit for human consumption. It is time we follow the science and cancel the swine from our diets. This episode includes detailed information about the pig and how our bodies are impacted when we eat it. Below I have included links to books, articles and videos that will educate you more about pork and why we should abstain from this damaging meat. https://muhammadmen.com/product/how-to-eat-to-live-book-1/ https://muhammadmen.com/product/how-to-eat-to-live-book-two/ http://www.friendsofsabbath.org/Further_Research/Health/The%20Adverse%20Influence%20of%20Pork.pdf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALCizrpQNpc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQg0VRawBHs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNAuhtZuuDM https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-pork-bad https://draxe.com/nutrition/why-you-should-avoid-pork/ https://www.silverdoctors.com/gold/gold-news/yes-the-scientific-evidence-says-that-eating-pork-does-cause-cancer If you would like to engage with the Nurah Speaks podcast, submit your listener questions to info@NurahSpeaks.com. Listeners can also learn more about Nurah by visiting her website: NurahSpeaks.com or reading her blog by clicking this link. Follow Nurah Speaks @NurahSpeaksPodcast on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. To bring Nurah as a speaker at your next event, email info@NurahSpeaks.com. Remember, don't just Join the Movement, Be the Movement!

WorldAffairs
Sustainable Development in a Post-Covid World

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 59:01


How are cities from Pittsburgh to Bogotá using sustainable development goals to guide pandemic recovery and increase health and equity? We talk with Mamta Murthi, VP of human development at the World Bank, about the World Health Organization's decision to endorse the first vaccine for malaria. The preventable disease kills around 500,000 people a year, mostly children in Africa. Then, we talk with global development veteran Tony Pipa and Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, about a bottom-up approach cities and communities are taking to drive local progress with the goal of making global change. Guests: Mamta Murthi, vice president for human development, The World Bank Bill Peduto, mayor of Pittsburgh Tony Pipa, senior fellow, Center for Sustainable Development, Brookings Institution Hosts: Philip Yun, CEO, World Affairs Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to WorldAffairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
Humanity Gets A Malaria Vaccine!

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:05


On October 6, the World Health Organization endorsed a malaria vaccine for the first time ever. After years of testing, the vaccine was shown to be safe and effective at preventing the deaths of thousands of children in Sub-Saharan Africa. The WHO's backing of this Malaria vaccine is both a breakthrough in scientific research and an important moment in human history. Margaret McDonnell, executive director of Nothing But Nets at the UN Foundation, explains why this new malaria vaccine is so promising    

Face the Nation on the Radio
Face the Nation on the Radio 10/17

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 47:31


"Face the Nation" is pre-empted this week because of football, we will re-air a special edition of the CBS News "Weekend Roundup." hosted by Allison Keyes, this week, an FDA advisory panel approved Covid-19 booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. At the same time President Biden is trying to mitigate inflation and high prices partly driven by gridlock at the nation's ports. Allison gets the latest on what the president has to say about all of this from CBS's Ed O'Keefe. CBS News Business Analyst Jill Schlesinger discusses the inflation problem with Allison. Amid inflation and rising prices, there are things worried consumers can do to cut back. Reporter Jake Reiner explains. CBS's Alex Tin has the latest on the decision from the FDA advisory panel. But , CBS's Meg Oliver reports from Montana, that the coronavirus is surging in rural America. The White House says it will lift travel restrictions for fully vaccinated foreign nationals on November 8th for both air travel and land borders. CBS's Adrienne Bard in Mexico City says that announcement hit close to home. There's new guidance from experts on how millions of Americans use aspirin. CBS's Dr. Tara Narula reports. Help is on the way for the community of Benton Harbor, Michigan. Due to old lead pipes, residents have had to drink bottled eater for at least a year and a half because of contaminated drinking water. Reporter Andrew Feather has more. The late Henrietta Lacks, a Black woman at the center of some of the most extraordinary discoveries in medical science, is finally being honored by the World Health Organization for research using her cells without her knowledge or consent. CBS's Elaine Cobbe reports. Kean University in New Jersey is known as one of the top ten most diverse facilities in the Northern U-S. CBS's Lisa Mateo tells us its president moved to make sure the staff reflected the student population. In this week's Kaleidoscope, Allison is joined by Taisha Saintil at the non-profit Haitian Bridge Alliance. She discusses the plight of Haitian migrants trying to make their way from South America to the U-S to seek asylum. Thousands who camped under a bridge on the Southern border are gone -- many of them sent back to Haiti with limited housing, food and water. The actor who played Star Trek's Captain James T-Kirk finally went to space for real. CBS's Peter King tells us it blew William Shatner's mind. CBS's Elise Preston has a story that sounds like a Disney movie, involving a Montana Park Ranger, a little girl and her bear. One of the nation's leading authorities on autism, Temple Grandin, is out with a new book. CBS's Jaime Wax reports. Finally, Chicago legend, historian and activist Timuel Black, died this week at the age of 102. Allison talks to Chicago Sun-Times Reporter Maudlyne Ihejirika about the life of an elder statesman -- mourned by many, including former President Barack Obama.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Highwire with Del Bigtree
SHOCKING VACCINE ADMISSIONS FROM INSIDE THE WHO

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 91:53


Mere weeks before #Covid19 became a household name, The Highwire aired an entire episode exposing leading public health authorities at the “Global Vaccine Safety Summit” held by the World Health Organization at the end of 2019. Listen to what Soumya Swaminathan, Marion Gruber, Heidi Larson and other leading experts were saying about vaccines before the pandemic hit.

Life Examined
Workplace burnout and the Great Resignation

Life Examined

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 51:57


On this week's Life Examined, how health organizations and employers are recognizing that workplace burnout is a real and growing problem. In 2019 the World Health Organization officially identified workplace burnout as an “occupational phenomenon.” Today burnout is reaching epidemic proportions and many employees say the pandemic has made the problem worse. Host Jonathan Bastian talks with burnout expert and author of “The Burnout Epidemic”  Jennifer Moss about why overwork has reached epidemic proportions and what employers can do about it. We also hear from Sebastian Cruz, a former hedge fund employee, who says overwork forced him to not only to quit his job but shift careers.

Weekend Roundup
Weekend Roundup 10/15

Weekend Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:00


On the CBS News "Weekend Roundup" with host Allison Keyes, an FDA advisory panel approved Covid-19 booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. At the same time President Biden is trying to mitigate inflation and high prices partly driven by gridlock at the nation's ports. Allison gets the latest on what the president has to say about all of this from CBS's Ed O'Keefe. CBS News Business Analyst Jill Schlesinger discusses the inflation problem with Allison. CBS's Alex Tin has the latest on the decision from the FDA advisory panel. But , CBS's Meg Oliver reports from Montana, that the coronavirus is surging in rural America. The White House says it will lift travel restrictions for fully vaccinated foreign nationals on November 8th for both air travel and land borders. CBS's Adrienne Bard in Mexico City says that announcement hit close to home. There's new guidance from experts on how millions of Americans use aspirin. CBS's Dr. Tara Narula reports. The late Henrietta Lacks, a Black woman at the center of some of the most extraordinary discoveries in medical science, is finally being honored by the World Health Organization for research using her cells without her knowledge or consent. CBS's Elaine Cobbe reports. Kean University in New Jersey is known as one of the top ten most diverse facilities in the Northern U-S. CBS's Lisa Mateo tells us its president moved to make sure the staff reflected the student population. In this week's Kaleidoscope, Allison is joined by Taisha Saintil at the non-profit Haitian Bridge Alliance. She discusses the plight of Haitian migrants trying to make their way from South America to the U-S to seek asylum. Thousands who camped under a bridge on the Southern border are gone -- many of them sent back to Haiti with limited housing, food and water. The actor who played Star Trek's Captain James T-Kirk finally went to space for real. CBS's Peter King tells us it blew William Shatner's mind. CBS's Elise Preston has a story that sounds like a Disney movie, involving a Montana Park Ranger, a little girl and her bear. Finally, Chicago legend, historian and activist Timuel Black, died this week at the age of 102. Allison talks to Chicago Sun-Times Reporter Maudlyne Ihejirika about the life of an elder statesman -- mourned by many, including former President Barack Obama.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Journal.
The Vaccine That Took 40 Years to Make

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:30


The World Health Organization last week recommended the first-ever vaccine for wide use against malaria, one of the world's deadliest diseases. Paul Kofi Awuffor, a public health worker in Ghana, shares how the vaccine can change lives, and WSJ's Denise Roland explains this historic landmark in public health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Take
Could this new malaria vaccine save millions of lives?

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:57


With close to half a million deaths from Malaria in 2019 --most in Sub-Saharan Africa-- scientists have spent decades working toward a vaccine, and last week, the World Health Organization approved the first. But, with only 30 to 40 percent efficacy some are also asking, is it worth it? And, there are other questions about how quickly it can be deployed.  We talk to one Kenyan scientist who grew up in one of the world's most malaria ridden regions and hear about how he's helping to stop this dogged and deadly disease.

Free Library Podcast
Todd Doughty | Little Pieces of Hope: Happy-Making Things in a Difficult World

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 59:00


In conversation with Adriana Trigiani  The senior vice president and deputy publisher of Doubleday, Todd Doughty has worked for Penguin Random House publishing for more than 20 years. When the World Health Organization named COVID-19 a global pandemic, he decided that he had to find a way to recognize the commonplace joys many of us take for granted. As a result, Doughty wrote Little Pieces of Hope, a combination of thoughts, lists, illustrations, playlists, and exercises to remind readers of life's mundane and remarkable beauty. ''A comedy writer with a heart of gold'' (The New York Times), Adriana Trigiani is the bestselling author of 20 fiction and nonfiction books that have been published in 38 countries. She is also an award-winning filmmaker, playwright, and television writer and producer. Her forthcoming novel The Good Left Undone will be released in April 2022. (recorded 10/14/2021)

Writer's Bone
Friday Morning Coffee: Julia Dahl, Author of The Missing Hours

Writer's Bone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:51


Julia Dahl joins Daniel Ford on Friday Morning Coffee to chat about her latest novel The Missing Hours. Caitlin Malcuit also discusses a World Health Organization report on violence against women, as well as work being done by Not Our Native Daughters, National Organization of Sisters of Color Ending Sexual Assault, The National Organization of Asians and Pacific Islanders Ending Sexual Violence, The Anti-Violence Project, The National Center for Transgender Equality, and The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. To learn more about Julia Dahl, visit her official website, like her Facebook page, and follow her on Twitter and Instagram. The Missing Hours was featured in August 2021's "Books That Should Be On Your Radar." Today's Friday Morning Coffee episode is sponsored by Libro.fm.

Idaho Matters
Author shares perspectives on finding hope in a difficult world

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:24


On March 11, 2020 while on the train home from work, Todd Doughty had an idea—put a list on Instagram of “happy-making things in a difficult world." Little did he know on that same day the World Health Organization would declare a global pandemic.

UN News
UN Catch-Up Dateline Geneva: Africa's COVID tracing gap, TB alert, Afghanistan and ‘The Walk'

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 16:58


In this week's show, just one in seven COVID cases is detected in Africa while deaths from another deadly disease – tuberculosis – rise for the first time in a decade, the World Health Organization tells us. An update too from Afghanistan, where the UN refugee agency is desperately worried about a lack of funds for lifesaving aid work – and plunging winter temperatures…We'll also meet the team behind The Walk, an ambitious project to raise awareness about Syrian refugees, which involves walking a huge puppet across Europe.

Science Weekly
The world finally has a malaria vaccine. Why has it taken so long?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:57


Last week the World Health Organization approved the world's first malaria vaccine. It's been hailed as a historic breakthrough that could save tens of thousands of lives each year. But researchers have been trying to create one for more than a century – so why has it taken so long? Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Latif Ndeketa and Prof Chris Drakeley about how the new RTS,S vaccine works and why it's been so difficult to produce. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

Keto Naturopath
180: The Renaissance of NAC and what it Means to You

Keto Naturopath

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 40:29


Whether you believe it or not, your life ... rather your ability to live (an ideally healthy life) is limited to a few absolutely vital factors of your biology, your metabolism, oxygen, clean unpolluted water, and your ability to produce and have adequate amount of glutathione in your body. It is the definitive antioxidant and it is under assault from many sides. Because it is vital and mostly found in your liver and is a major factor in detoxification being low on it is often sited as a cause for many diseases.NAC is the immediate precursor for making glutathione and it has saved thousands of lives because of that. THE World Health Organization lists it as the only treatment for Tylenol overdose and liver failure.It is now in a Renaissance due to covid 19 and once again it is saving (or making better) thousands of lives. Disclaimer:This video is not meant to diagnose, treat, or mitigate any medical condition. It is merely for personal educational use only.RECOMMENDED TO WATCH NEXT:   N-Acetylcysteine:  From Autism to Addiction to Schizophrenia … Transformative for many  https://youtu.be/OTwjjleKR_QMENTIONED IN THE VIDEO:Studies and videos reviewed in this videoGlutathione, Oxidative Stress and N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) in Psychiatric Disorders - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvel1kOuUO4Applications of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) - From Addiction to Autismhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s945zr6P_rsTherapeutic blockade of inflammation in severe COVID-19 infection with intravenous N-acetylcysteine (Clinical Immunology) | https://www.sciencedirect.com/science... Examination of Hydroxychloroquine Use and Hemolytic Anemia in G6PDH‐Deficient Patients (Arthritis Care & Research) | https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/f... —————————COME SAY HI!!!  ——————————Podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/482971/episodesFacebook Group about Keto: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ketonaturopath/BLOG: https://ketonaturopath.com/Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ketonaturopathYouTube channelwww.youtube.com/ketonaturopathFree Keto Food List: https://ketonaturopath.ac-page.com/keto-food-list-optin———————————  OUR COURSE ——————————PSMF 30 day course: https://www.thebiointegrationcode.com/courses/PSMFChallenge———————————  WHERE WE GET OUR WINE (an affiliate link) ——————————Dry farm wineswww.dryfarmwines.com/ketonaturopath————————-   THE KETOMETER WE USE  ————————————————Keto mojohttps://shop.keto-mojo.com/?rfsn=3712430.393b9c&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=3712430.393b9c————————————Where you can get your labs done——————————————https://www.UltaLabTests.com/ketonaturopath————————————  WHERE WE BUY OUR SUPPLEMENTS  ————————————Wellevate: https://wellevate.me/karl-goldkamp   or call them: 855-935-5382How to use Wellevate https://youtu.be/1ulC0LLIc5cWhy get a Wellevate account to get your supplements??1. They have more brands than anywhere else to choose from;2. Their prices are 20 -50% lower than anywhere else; compare and you'll see3. This is where most physicians have their account4. Been in existence for nearly 30 years working with physicians and health practitionersHow to get your Wellevate account1. Open the link: https://wellevate.me/karl-goldkamp and registered2. Reply to their verification email3. Explore their website. And make sure you subscribe to my channel! CONTACT:Questions, INQUIRIES:Karl: drgoldkamp@ketonaturopath.comJudi: support@ketonaturopath.comSharing the metabolic strategy we used to regain our health and discoveries that will help you reclaim your vigor, and physique faster than you thought possible! No tricks, No marke

American Conservative University
SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: What Really Happened in Wuhan

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:45


SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: What Really Happened in Wuhan https://youtu.be/oh2Sj_QpZOA 3,228,588 views Premiered Sep 27, 2021 Sky News Australia 2.08M subscribers This Sky News Australia special investigation into the origins of COVID-19 reveals what really happened in Wuhan in the early days of the pandemic. Award-winning journalist Sharri Markson spent more than a year investigating the potential leak of the virus from a top-secret laboratory in Wuhan. Ms Markson uncovered evidence of a widespread cover-up and unpacks the new theory that “patient zero” worked in the Wuhan lab. Sky News Australia anchor and Investigations Writer at The Australian, Sharri has been at the forefront of investigating the origins of COVID-19 since early in 2020 when the virus spread globally. Since that time, the precise genesis of COVID-19 has been hotly contested, with scientists, government officials, the World Health Organization, and the Chinese authorities releasing conflicting reports. In a coup for Australian television, Sharri secures the first sit-down interview for an Australian broadcast media outlet with Donald Trump since he was elected president in 2016. Sharri also speaks with a range of Chinese whistle-blowers, scientists, and high-ranking intelligence officials to bring us closer to discovering the truth of what happened in Wuhan. These include John Ratcliffe, the U.S. Director of National Intelligence from 2020 to 2021, and former head of British intelligence service, Mi6, Sir Richard Dearlove. HELP ACU SPREAD THE WORD!  Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks. Forward this show to friends. Ways to subscribe to the American Conservative University Podcast Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via RSS You can also subscribe via Stitcher FM Player Podcast Addict Tune-in Podcasts Pandora Look us up on Amazon Prime …And Many Other Podcast Aggregators and sites   Please help ACU by submitting your Show ideas. Email us at americanconservativeuniversity@americanconservativeuniversity.com Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks.

American Conservative University
SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: What Really Happened in Wuhan

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:45


SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: What Really Happened in Wuhan https://youtu.be/oh2Sj_QpZOA 3,228,588 views Premiered Sep 27, 2021 Sky News Australia 2.08M subscribers This Sky News Australia special investigation into the origins of COVID-19 reveals what really happened in Wuhan in the early days of the pandemic. Award-winning journalist Sharri Markson spent more than a year investigating the potential leak of the virus from a top-secret laboratory in Wuhan. Ms Markson uncovered evidence of a widespread cover-up and unpacks the new theory that “patient zero” worked in the Wuhan lab. Sky News Australia anchor and Investigations Writer at The Australian, Sharri has been at the forefront of investigating the origins of COVID-19 since early in 2020 when the virus spread globally. Since that time, the precise genesis of COVID-19 has been hotly contested, with scientists, government officials, the World Health Organization, and the Chinese authorities releasing conflicting reports. In a coup for Australian television, Sharri secures the first sit-down interview for an Australian broadcast media outlet with Donald Trump since he was elected president in 2016. Sharri also speaks with a range of Chinese whistle-blowers, scientists, and high-ranking intelligence officials to bring us closer to discovering the truth of what happened in Wuhan. These include John Ratcliffe, the U.S. Director of National Intelligence from 2020 to 2021, and former head of British intelligence service, Mi6, Sir Richard Dearlove. HELP ACU SPREAD THE WORD!  Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks. Forward this show to friends. Ways to subscribe to the American Conservative University Podcast Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via RSS You can also subscribe via Stitcher FM Player Podcast Addict Tune-in Podcasts Pandora Look us up on Amazon Prime …And Many Other Podcast Aggregators and sites   Please help ACU by submitting your Show ideas. Email us at americanconservativeuniversity@americanconservativeuniversity.com Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks.

The NewsWorthy
Wind Energy Boost, Supply Chain Solution? & Netflix's Biggest Series - Thursday, October 14th, 2021

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:14


The news to know for Thursday, October 14th, 2021! What to know about offshore wind farms that could be going up all around the U.S. Also, a new study that might impact anyone who got the COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson. And the World Health Organization is trying something new to find the true origin of the virus. Plus, a new plan to help fix supply chain issues causing product delays, why the government will be sending more money to some Americans next year, and the series "Squid Game" set an official Netflix record. All that and more in around 10 minutes... Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by BetterHelp.com/newsworthy and Rothys.com/newsworthy Support the show and get ad-free episodes here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider            

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-14-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:09


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 14th, 2021. After a 19-month freeze, the United States will open its land borders with Canada and Mexico to non-essential travel. Fully vaccinated foreign nationals can enter the U.S. for whatever reason starting early November. Travelers will be asked about their vaccination status as part of the standard Customs and Border Protection admissions process, and no testing will be required to enter by land or sea. Despite full steam ahead by the U.S. administration and other countries, the Director General of the World Health Organization called booster shots while initial inoculations lag in some countries is "immoral, unfair, and unjust.” He went on to say, "To start boosters is really the worst we can do as a global community." A federal judge ruled the state of New York can't impose a vaccine mandate on healthcare workers and not allow their employers to consider religious exemption requests. The judge said the vaccination requirement conflicted with the workers' federally protected right to seek religious accommodations from their employers. The Governor vowed to fight the decision. At least 24 states have imposed vaccine requirements on workers, usually in healthcare. Boeing told employees they have to be vaccinated and if they don't, they might get fired. Deadline is December 8 and the company said compliance is a condition of employment. This affects about 125,000 U.S.-based employees. The International Association of Machinists union said it's their responsibility to defend and advocate for members, but the fact is the membership is polarized on the issue. So can you get a booster from a different vaccine than your original doses? A new NIH study found yes, it's safe and effective. However, Moderna and Pfizer were found to spark a stronger immune system response than Johnson & Johnson. The study found those that got J&J got stronger antibody levels after getting a Moderna or Pfizer booster, compared to another J&J shot. In the United States cases were down 21%, deaths are down 4%, and hospitalizations are down 20% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,695,293 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 23%, Minnesota 18%. North Dakota and Pennsylvania 12%. And Montana 10%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Karnes, TX. Bethel Census Area, AK. Lewis, KY. Stark, ND. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Knox, IN. Goshen, WY. Rio Grande, CO. Clay, TX. And Nome Census Area, AK. There have been at least 717,812 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 70.3%, Connecticut at 69.6%, and Rhode Island at 69.4%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia still unchanged at 40.7%, Idaho at 42.5%, and Wyoming at 42.6%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 56.5%. The five countries with biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Taiwan up 5%. And South Korea, New Zealand, Australia, and Oceana 2%. Globally, cases were down 13% and deaths were down 14% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,774,995 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 84,154. The U.K. 38,076. Turkey 33,860. Russia 28,190. And Romania 16,743. There have been at least 4,870,663 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TonioTimeDaily
I am pro-reproductive rights 100% part 1

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:06


"Reproductive rights are legal rights and freedoms relating to reproduction and reproductive health that vary amongst countries around the world. The World Health Organization defines reproductive rights as follows: Reproductive rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health. They also include the right of all to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence. Women's reproductive rights may include some or all of the following: the abortion-rights movements; birth control; freedom from coerced sterilization and contraception; the right to access good-quality reproductive healthcare; and the right to education and access in order to make free and informed reproductive choices. Reproductive rights may also include the right to receive education about sexually transmitted infections and other aspects of sexuality, right to menstrual health and protection from practices such as female genital mutilation (FGM)." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.13.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 57:32


The Government Assault Against Ivermectin and other Safe SARS-2 Treatments    Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, September 1, 2021     Had the FDA and Anthony Fauci's National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Disease (NIAID) started approving existing clinically-proven and inexpensive drugs for treating malaria, parasites and other pathogens at the start of the pandemic, millions of people would have been saved from experiencing serious infections or dying from the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Why federal health officials never followed this strategy is a question the mainstream media refuses to ask.    Another question that the medical establishment, let alone our compliant media, is why have they failed to ask whether there are reliable studies in the peer-reviewed literature and testimonies from thousands of day-to-day clinical physicians worldwide who treat Covid-19 patients with these drugs, in particular hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and Ivermectin. We may also point out the many different natural remedies, such as nigella sativa, curcumin, vitamin D, melatonin, etc, which have been shown to be effective against SARS-2 infections. In most nations, there has been enormous success in treating Covid patients at the early and moderate stages of infection. However, in the US, Anthony Fauci, Bill Gates, the FDA and our federal medical officials have categorically denied their use.  In fact during the past couple weeks, there has been an aggressive and concerted effort to erect obstacles to prevent the employment of these more effective drugs. More recently a widespread campaign is underway to denigrate them altogether.   For example, the TOGETHER trial is now touted by the mainstream media as a flagship study showing that ivermectin is ineffective and even dangerous to prescribe. The study was conducted by professor Edward Mills at McMaster University in Ontario. If we are to believe the New York Times, the trial, which enrolled 1,300 patients, was discontinued because Mills claimed the drug was no better than a placebo. However, there is strong reason to believe this entire trial was nothing less than a staged theatrical performance. When asked, Mills denied having any conflict of interests.  However, Mills happens to be employed as a clinical trial advisor for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  The Gates Foundation was also the trial's principal funder.  It may be noted that various organizations and agencies in other nations, such as the Health Products Regulatory Authority in South Africa, which have banned ivermectin, are often funded by Gates. It is naïve to believe that Gates has any philanthropic intentions whatsoever to see a highly effective treatment for SARS-2 infections reach worldwide approval. These drugs are in direct competition to his enormous investments and unwavering commitment to the Covid-19 vaccines.   In the meantime, Americans only have monoclonal antibody therapy and the controversial and ineffective drug Remdesivir at their disposal. Remdesivir's average effectiveness for late stage treatment is only 22 percent.  A Chinese study published in The Lancet found no statistically significant benefit in the drug and 12 percent of participants taking the drug had to discontinue treatment due to serious adverse effects, especially liver and kidney damage.    When questions are posited as a general argument for advocating expedient measures to protect public health during this pandemic, would it not have been wise to have prioritized for emergency use HCQ, Ivermectin, and other remedies with a record of curtailing Covid, such as the antibiotic azithromycin, zinc, selenium, Vitamins C and D, and melatonin as a first line of defense?  There was absolutely no need to have waited for experimental vaccines or experimental drugs such as Remdesivir before the pandemic became uncontrollable.  But this is what Fauci and Trump, and now Biden, permitted to happen.   If this strategy of medical intervention had been followed, would it have been successful?  The answer is likely an unequivocal “yes”.  Both HCQ and, even better, Ivermectin have been prophylactically prescribed by physicians working on pandemic's front lines with enormous success.  Yet those American physicians struggling to get this urgent message out to federal health officials are being marginalized and ridiculed en masse. Only in the US, the UK, France, South Africa and several other developed nations has there been a stubborn hubris to deny their effectiveness. The World Health Organization recommends Ivermectin for Covid-19 so why not the US and these other nations? Under oath, multiple physicians and professors at American medical schools have testified before Congress to present the scientific evidence supporting HCQ and Ivermectin.  These are otherwise medical professionals at the very heart of treating Covid-19 patients.    Today, American journalism is in shambles. In fact, it is a disgrace.  The American public is losing trust in the media. Whether it is CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the liberal tabloid Daily Beast, NPR or PBS, each has unlimited resources to properly investigate the federal and institutional machinery behind the government health policies being thrust upon us.  Yet no mainstream journalist has found the moral compass to bring this truth to the public.    In the meantime, we are allowing millions to die, and countless others to be seriously affected from a severe infection because of professional medical neglect and a healthcare system favoring the pharmaceutical industry's frantic rush to develop expensive novel drugs and experimental vaccines. The incentive by the drug makers is to take every advantage available within the FDA's emergency use loopholes to get their products approved as quickly as possible.  The primary advantage is that these novel drugs and vaccines can then leap over regulatory hurdles, which otherwise would require them to conduct lengthy and thorough clinical trials to prove their efficacy and safety. The consequence is that none of the new pharmaceutical Covid-19 interventions have been adequately reviewed.   On the other hand, HCQ and Ivermectin have an established legacy of prior research and have been on the market for decades. Worldwide, it is not unreasonable to claim that billions of people have been treated with these drugs.     Below is a breakdown of the studies conducted so far for HCQ, Ivermectin and Vitamin D specifically for combatting the SARS-CoV-2 virus   Hydroxychloroquine   344 studies, 250 peer-reviewed have been conducted specifically for Covid-19 281 have been clinical trials that involved 4,583 scientists and over 407,627 patients 64% improvement in 31 early treatment trials 75% improvement in 13 early stage infection treatment mortality results 21% improvement in 190 late stage infection treatment trials (patients in serious condition) 23% improvement in 44 randomized controlled trials Full list of HCQ studies and details:  https://c19hcq.com   Ivermectin    131 studies, 52 peer-reviewed have been conducted specifically for Covid-19 63 have been clinical trials that involved 613 scientists and over 26,398 patients 58% improvement in 31 randomized controlled trials  86% improvement in 14 prophylaxis trials 72% improvement in 27 early stage infection treatment trials 40% improvement in 22 late stage infection treatment trials 58% improvement in 25 mortality results Full list of Ivermectin studies and details:  https://c19ivermectin.com   Other inexpensive repurposed drugs for treating SARS-2   Fluvoxamine   88% improvement in early treatment 29% improvement in late stage treatment 63% improvement in all 7 peer-reviewed studies   Vitamin D   101 studies conducted by over 875 scientists 63 sufficiency studies with 34,863 patients 33 treatment trials with 46,860 patients 42% improvement in 33 treatment trials 56% improvement in 68 sufficiency studies 55% improvement in 19 treatment mortality results Full list of Vitamin D studies and details:  https://c19vitamind.com   In contrast there have been 21 studies enrolling 35,744 patients in Remdesivir trials showing only a 22% improvement in all studies combined. This rate is below that of simply taking probiotics (5 studies at 24% improvement), melatonin (7 studies at 62% improvement), curcumin (4 studies at 71% improvement), nigella sativa (3 studies at 84% improvement), quercetin (4 studies at 76% improvement), and aspirin (7 studies at 37% improvement).  Despite the small number of trials and low numbers of enrolled participants, early results indicate that greater attention and funding needs to be allocated for more rigorous research if there is to be any success in curbing SARS-2 infections' severity.   Please share this information. The inept policies and measures being taken by our federal health officials and by both the former Trump and present Biden administrations are unparalleled in American healthcare history. And never before has the media been so willing to self-censor and been so grossly irresponsible to hide the published science and the truth.   

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays
California joins historic lawsuit against ghost gun manufacturers; World Health Organization report: climate change biggest threat to human health; COVID-19 infections down 12%, deaths down 5% in U.S.

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:58


CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast
CBN NewsWatch AM: October 13, 2021

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:30


On Newswatch AM October 13th: Supply chain bottlenecks leading to inflation and shortages; House Democrats pass short-term extension to federal debt ceiling, avoiding a crisis- for now; World Health Organization to launch new committee this ... ...

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast
CBN NewsWatch AM: October 13, 2021

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:30


On Newswatch AM October 13th: Supply chain bottlenecks leading to inflation and shortages; House Democrats pass short-term extension to federal debt ceiling, avoiding a crisis- for now; World Health Organization to launch new committee this ... ...

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast
CBN NewsWatch AM: October 13, 2021

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:30


On Newswatch AM October 13th: Supply chain bottlenecks leading to inflation and shortages; House Democrats pass short-term extension to federal debt ceiling, avoiding a crisis- for now; World Health Organization to launch new committee this ... ...

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast
CBN NewsWatch AM: October 13, 2021

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:30


On Newswatch AM October 13th: Supply chain bottlenecks leading to inflation and shortages; House Democrats pass short-term extension to federal debt ceiling, avoiding a crisis- for now; World Health Organization to launch new committee this ... ...

Queens of Social Work
The Cycle of Domestic Violence

Queens of Social Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:59


October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month here in the United States and today we will be talking about what it is and  what we can do to stop it. We'll be sharing some resources for you to use or pass on to someone you may know.  This is a sensitive subject and it may trigger some of you. Please feel free to skip this episode or skip parts that may be hard to hear. Unfortunately domestic violence is one of the social ills that spans all across the world and this will be an ongoing discussion. We have a responsibility to share with you what we know so that if you or someone you know has this experience they can seek support. According to the World Health Organization, about 1 in 3 women worldwide have been subjected to either physical and or sexual intimate partner violence in their lifetime. According to the U.S Centers for Disease Control 1 in 7 men will experience physical violence by their intimate partner at some point during their lifetime and about 1 in 6 men will experience sexual violence in their lifetime. We haven't really spoken in depth about sexual violence here on the show, but we will and this will be an ongoing conversation.Our guest Queens S is a Licensed  Clinical Social Worker who has over 10 years of experience in the field of Social Work supporting survivors of trauma through an anti-racist and anti-oppression lens. Queen S is an expert in training development and facilitation, curriculum design and career development coaching, all grounded in an understanding of the network of social supports provided by New York City for people who have experienced homelessness, poverty and other trauma. Resources: Safe Horizon Domestic violence hotline (NYC): 1-800-621–HOPE (4673)Family Justice Centers in all 5 boroughs (https://www1.nyc.gov/site/ocdv/programs/family-justice-centers.page)VIP - Violence Intervention Program (VIP) Mujeres- Latinx (https://www.vipmujeres.org/)Turning Point- Muslim Women (https://tpny.org/)HotPeachPages. NetNational Domestic Violence Hotline: 800.799.SAFE (7233)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 598 (10-11-21): The Flu and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:02).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-8-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This revised episode from November 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. We start with a public health mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what seasonal, precautionary procedure is taking place.  And here's a hint: thinking feverishlycould influence your answer. SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec “Any problems with any vaccines before?”“No.”“Feeling OK today?  No fever or anything like that?”“No.”“And no allergies to foods or medications that you're aware of?”“No.”  …“So, you know, a little bit of arm soreness; that's probably the most of it.  Redness, irritation.   Might be kind of tired for a day or so, or even a low-grade fever or a headache is possible and normal.  If that were to happen, whatever you take for a headache is fine.  Any questions about anything?”“No.”“All right.” …“All right, leave that bandage on for about 10 minutes or so, and take it off anytime you remember after that.  And here's your copy for your records.  Thanks.”“Thank you.”“Have a good day.”If you guessed, a flu shot, you're right!  You heard an influenza vaccination being given in October 2017 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.  Flu season arrives every year with colder weather, bringing the potential to cause fever, body aches, and other symptoms, some quite serious or even fatal.  The flu affects millions of people in the United States each year, and health agencies like U.S. Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention and the Virginia Department of Health encourage vaccination for everyone older than six months, with some exceptions. But what does the flu have to do with water?  Consider these three connections. First, drinking plenty of fluids is a commonly prescribed treatment for flu sufferers in order to help prevent dehydration resulting from increased body temperature and other responses to the viral infection.  Infants, children, and the elderly are particularly at risk for dehydration. Second, the flu virus is transmitted between humans by respiratory droplets, and researchers have found that transmission is affected by air temperature and humidity. Specifically, transmission occurs more easily in cold, dry air, such as is typically found during fall and winter in temperate areas like Virginia. Third, waterfowl and shorebirds are among the various kinds of birds that harbor avian flu viruses, and water contaminated with aquatic birds' waste can potentially harbor avian flu for some time.  Understanding the factors related to the occurrence and transmission of avian viruses—including the role of contaminated water—is important in monitoring avian flu and its potential to spread to other birds, mammals, or humans. Flu season is upon us, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine by the end of October.  So if you hear this… VOICE - ~3 sec – “Are you here for a flu shot?” …now you'll have not only a health connection for the flu, but some hydrological ones, too. Thanks to staff of Kroger Pharmacy and Hokie Wellness for lending their voices to this episode. We close with some music for, or rather, against the flu.  Here's about 30 seconds of “Shots,” written by Wilson Stern and performed in a 2014, flu-shot-promoting video by the University of Florida's Student Health Care Center. MUSIC - ~28 sec Lyrics:“Last year less than half the population got their flu shot.  Why you wanna be stuck at home with a fever when you could be making this party hot?”“I heard that shot made you ill.”“Naw, son, that news ain't for real.  It tells your body what the virus looks like, so it knows how to deal”“Why you tellin' me this?  I got my flu shot last year.”“This virus mutates constantly, we got new strains here.”“Shots, shots, shots, shots….” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 393, 11-6-17, which has been archived. The influenza vaccination heard in this episode was performed October 24, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, by staff of Kroger Pharmacies, assisted by staff from Virginia Tech's Hokie Wellness program.  Virginia Water Radio thanks those staff people for their willingness to be recorded. The audio excerpt of “Shots,” copyright by Wilson Stern, was taken from the 2014 University of Florida Student Health Care Center video “Flu Shots,” copyright by the University of Florida; used with permission of Wilson Stern and the University of Florida's Division of Media Properties.  The 2 min./4 sec. video is available online at http://shcc.ufl.edu/services/primary-care/flu/flu-shots-music-video-lyrics/.   More information about Wilson Stern and the group Hail! Cassius Neptune is available online at https://www.reverbnation.com/hailcassiusneptune.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Colorized, negative-stained transmission electron microscopic image of influenza virus particles, known as virions.   Public domain photo taken in 1973 by Dr. F. A. Murphy, accessed from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=10072.Illustration of influenza infection, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Images of Influenza Viruses,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/images.htm.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection weekly map of flu activity, as of 10/2/21.  Map accessed online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm, 10/11/21.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart of work to develop the annual flu virus vaccine, with data for 2020-21.   Image accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/infographics.htm. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TYPES AND NAMES OF INFLUENZA VIRUSESThe following information is quoted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), “Types of Influenza Viruses,” November 18, 2019, online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm.“There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D.   Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics of disease (known as the flu season) almost every winter in the United States.  Influenza A viruses are the only influenza viruses known to cause flu pandemics, i.e., global epidemics of flu disease.  A pandemic can occur when a new and very different influenza A virus emerges that both infects people and has the ability to spread efficiently between people.  Influenza type C infections generally cause mild illness and are not thought to cause human flu epidemics.  Influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in people. ”Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N).  There are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes (H1 through H18 and N1 through N11 respectively).  …Current sub-types of influenza A viruses that routinely circulate in people include: A (H1N1) and A (H3N2).  In the spring of 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged to cause illness in people. … “Currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) viruses are related to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged in the spring of 2009 and caused a flu pandemic ( see CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu website for more information).  This virus, scientifically called the ‘A(H1N1)pdm09 virus,' and more generally called ‘2009 H1N1,' has continued to circulate seasonally since then.  These H1N1 viruses have undergone relatively small genetic changes and changes to their antigenic properties (i.e., the properties of the virus that affect immunity) over time.“Of all the influenza viruses that routinely circulate and cause illness in people, influenza A(H3N2) viruses tend to change more rapidly, both genetically and antigenically. … “Influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes, but instead are further classified into two lineages: B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. …Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.  Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world.  However, the proportion of influenza B viruses from each lineage that circulate can vary by geographic location.“CDC follows an internationally accepted naming convention for influenza viruses.  This convention was accepted by WHO [World Health Organization] in 1979 and published in February 1980 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 58(4):585-591 (1980) (see A revision of the system of nomenclature for influenza viruses: a WHO Memorandum[854 KB, 7 pages]).  The approach uses the following components: *the antigenic type (e.g., A, B, C); *the host of origin (e.g., swine, equine, chicken, etc.; for human-origin viruses, no host of origin designation is given); *geographical origin (e.g., Denver, Taiwan, etc.); *strain number (e.g., 15, 7, etc.); *year of isolation (e.g., 57, 2009, etc.); *for influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigen description in parentheses (e.g., (H1N1). “One influenza A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and one or two influenza B viruses (depending on the vaccine) are included in each year's influenza vaccines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Antonia E. Dalziel et al., “Persistence of Low Pathogenic Influenza A Virus in Water: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Meta-Analysis,” PLOS One, 10/13/16, online at http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161929.  Anice C. Lowen and John Steel, “Roles of Humidity and Temperature in Shaping Influenza Seasonality,” Journal of Virology, Vol. 88/No. 14, July 2014, pages 7692-7695; online at http://jvi.asm.org/content/88/14/7692.full (subscription may be required for access). Anice C. Lowen et al., “Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature,” PLOS, 10/19/07, online at http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151. Public Library of Science, “Higher indoor humidity inactivates flu virus particles,” posted by Science Daily, 2/27/13, online at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227183456.htm. David Robson, The Real Reason Germs Spread in Winter, BBC Future, 10/19/15. Jeffery K. Taugenberger and David M. Morens, “1918 Influenza: The Mother of All Pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), Vol. 12/No. 1, January 2006, online at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/1/05-0979_article. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):“Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html;“Flu Activity and Surveillance,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivitysurv.htm(includes a weekly nationwide map of flu activity);“The Flu: Caring for Someone Sick at Home,” online (as PDF) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/influenza_flu_homecare_guide.pdf;“Flu Season,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm;“How Flu Spreads,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm;“Influenza (Flu),” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.html;“Influenza in Animals,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/other_flu.htm (information on flu in bats, birds, dogs, swine, and other animals);“Information on Avian Influenza,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/;“National Influeza Vaccination Week,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/index.htm;“Prevent Seasonal Flu,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/index.html;“Who Should and Who Should NOT Get a Flu Vaccination,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/whoshouldvax.htm. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pandemic Influenza Fact Sheet for the Water Sector, 2009. Virginia Department of Health, “Epidemiology Fact Sheets/Influenza,” September 2018, online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/influenza/. World Health Organization (WHO), “Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic),” November 13, 2018, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic). For More Information about Water an

time health science bay university agency music current national natural earth home state audio college map accent animals dark surveillance tech human water web index rain united states pond research ocean weather government taiwan education public prevention vol voice illustration chesapeake snow environment journal types organisms display images skeleton persistence msonormal virology stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens flu bacteria voices arial environmental temperature times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading hail world health organization shots biology cdc lyrics civics grade nutrients public library docs colorful signature bio query flu season scales txt roles govt human body watershed transcript humidity toc naw passwords centers disease control virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean infants natural resources david m influenza grades k avian influenza science daily name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes h1n1 bulletin blacksburg prevention cdc kb msohyperlink world health organization who sections life sciences stormwater david robson policymakers n1 bmp environmental protection agency epa n11 new standard acknowledgment muscular flu shots virginia department lowen cripple creek cumberland gap 7c sols plos one tmdl feeling ok bbc future john steel geological survey mayo clinic health system h3n2 plos who world health organization circulatory emerging infectious diseases living systems dalziel virginia standards water center redness space systems colorized relative humidity audio notes
Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Is childhood obesity slowly becoming the real pandemic?

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 6:53


Guest: Haley  Cimring (surname pronounced as Sim-ring) | Nutrition Science Team Lead at Heart And Stroke Foundation According to the World Health Organization's obesity report of April 2020, the global prevalence is 340 million children. John Maytham speaks to Nutrition Science Team Lead at the Heart Foundation, Haley Cimring. The World Health Organization's obesity report of April 2020 indicates that the global prevalence is 340 million children. In South Africa, there is a combined overweight and obesity prevalence of 13.5% in children aged six to 14 years old which is higher than the 10% global prevalence in school children. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stratfor Podcast
Essential Geopolitics: Hope From a New Malaria Vaccine

Stratfor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:55


In this episode of the RANE Essential Geopolitics podcast powered by Stratfor, what hope can be derived from a recently approved malaria vaccine and who could benefit. The World Health Organization recently backed a malaria vaccine to be used for children in African countries. This is being touted as a major breakthrough in the fight against the deadly disease. What happens now? Clara Brackbill, Stratfor sub-Sarah analyst for RANE, has answers.

The Current
Malaria vaccine must not replace existing tools to fight the disease: experts

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 16:42


The World Health Organization has recommended a widespread rollout of the first malaria vaccine, Mosquirix, which it says could save tens of thousands of lives. But experts say it's just one tool in the fight against infection. We talk to Dr. Fredros Okumu, director of science at the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania; and Dr. Githinji Gitahii in Nairobi, Global CEO of Amref Health Africa and board member of the African CDC. 

The Best Practices Show
Cyber Security Episode with Debi Carr (Covid Conference)

The Best Practices Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:27


Cyber Security Episode #344 with Debi Carr (Covid Conference) You wouldn't give your keys, wallet, and phone to strangers — but you're giving personal information to strangers online! And you may be doing it unawares. Phishing emails, security questions, and even that game on Facebook could all compromise personal information. And to help you be proactive in protecting yourself, your patients, and your practice, Debi Carr is here to educate you on how to develop a culture of security, both in and out of the office. For expert advice and best practices for cyber security, listen to Episode 344 of The Best Practices Show! Main Takeaways: We are giving away more personal information than we realize. Always investigate when hit with ransomware. When buying supplies online, buy from reputable and known sites. If buying from lesser-known companies, investigate before giving your information. Be wary of links and be aware of what you are downloading and clicking on. Every practice should have a security manual, and a record of the training you've done. Always use two-factor authentication whenever it is available. Have an IT partner that fully understands security. For patients and employees, have guest Wi-Fi that is off your network. Be proactive and create a plan. Without a plan, it will take longer to recover. Security doesn't begin and end in the office. Practice this everywhere. Quotes: “While we've been living in fear, there is one group of people that have actually been thriving. This is their dream environment, because any time a hacker can create fear, can create chaos, they are going to profit. And they have done that. As we become desperate, they thrive.” (00:36—01:01) “In February alone, there were over 300,000 malicious websites that were listed with ICANN and with WHOIS. And this is where you claim your website domain — 300,000 of them. The FBI has identified, or actually, Google, has identified over 500,000 phishing emails, daily, being sent out. And over 200,000 of those have got malicious attachments with them. It's crazy, because they know that if they can create panic, if they can create fear, that we won't think. We'll just click, and we'll go with it.” (01:12—02:04) “We hear a lot about ransomware, but what we don't hear a lot about is the other viruses that can affect and infect a computer or a network system. And they are actually, as far as I'm concerned, do more damage. Because a ransomware attack, it's bad. I'm not going to lie to you. That can be a devastating attack. They get into your system with a ransomware, they encrypt your system, you know they're there.” (02:20—02:48) “Whenever you get hit with ransomware, you should always investigate, especially now. We've seen more sophistication in the attacks where not only are they attacking and encrypting the data, but they are actually exfiltrating the data now. So, it's really important that you have a forensic investigation and do the response to a ransomware attack in a methodical manner.” (02:52—03:21) “To me, the infection that is worse is infections such as keyloggers that sit in your system. We've seen LokiBot. That is a keylogger that sits in the system. And we know that it's coming from emails. There's a lot of talk and conversation out there about contact tracing. And so, the hackers have jumped on that bandwagon and they're sending emails out from the World Health Organization saying, ‘You've been around somebody who has been verified with COVID-19. Click here. Download this so you know what to do.'” (03:22—04:09) “What they're doing is they're allowing a keylogger, which is a type of virus that sits in your network, and it basically mimics everything and traces every time you hit a key on the keyboard. So, you go to your bank, you put in your password. You're putting in your username. You put in your password. You're giving that information away to the hacker that's sitting in your system watching everything you do.”...

Intimate Judaism: A Jewish Approach to Intimacy, Sexuality, and Relationships
(35) Sex Positivity, Sexual Health, and Sexual Rights: Are These Jewish Values?

Intimate Judaism: A Jewish Approach to Intimacy, Sexuality, and Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 51:26


The World Health Organization defines sexual health as fundamental to the overall health and well-being of individuals, couples and families, and considers sexual pleasure to be a basic human right. In Judaism, sexual pleasure is valued, but only in the context of marital sex, leaving many people in conflict between their sexual health and spiritual health. Join Rabbi Scott Kahn and Talli Rosenbaum as they discuss the six principles of sexual health, and how they conflict with or align with Jewish values. To register for the webinar referenced in the podcast, go to https://webinars.tallirosenbaum.com/workshops/Apsychotherapeutic/login. Become an Intimate Judaism Patreon subscriber to get additional episodes, merch, and more, including an upcoming Q and A. Just go to https://www.patreon.com/intimatejudaism.

Opinions That Don't Matter!
Fight, Flight, Freeze & FUHGEDDABOUDIT! OTDM podcast ep.84

Opinions That Don't Matter!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 122:01


Flight, Freeze & FUHGEDDABOUDIT!  Opinions That  Don't Matter podcast ep.84PUPPY PARLANCEWhat's wrong with Roxy?? Online vet service and then  Our first in person vet visit… Is it mange?AMAZING FIND! Mighty Paw Smart Bell 2.0, Dog Potty Communication Doorbell  https://amzn.to/2WX7ICIMy Swiss Army knife is so good… MAILBAG… I never get mail… UNBOXING…. Peter Maher sent in some vinyl. I am possibly a fraud of a Canadian because I don't know April Wine.  Eric Clapton,  Wonderful Grand Band… And let's talk about Newfoundland…  Kati's friend Cheryl Burke from Dancing With the Stars has Covid. We're hoping she is ok and will be able to finish the season strong.Newfoundland is the Caribbean of the North! Sean wants to be a outlaw from Saint Pierre and Miquelon. His knowledge is limited at best… Your name and connotations. Ka Ka Ka Katy… Did Bing Crosby's estate sue Microsoft?What Grinds My Gears: Bad drivers… The Texas Rolling Coal storyhttps://www.bicycling.com/news/a37808647/texas-driver-assaults-six-cyclists/SPEAKPIPEFr. Dubuc from La ToqueConfession? Ask for Forgiveness rather than permission…   Fr. Dubuc Church Merch design needed. We have some ideas yet no ability to draw…. Spectacles, Testicles ,Wallet and Watch. Let's go!Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost?Old school halloween costumes… AUDIENCE LETTERSOTDM pod Flag and Shield Entry for the Guild of Writers committee! - Julie Thoughts on the offer sheet!! - BuzzHockey talk  Jesperi Kotkaniemi and why I think Thomas Dundon is a petty billionaire. NHL Offer sheet rules: https://bit.ly/2X0yIRK. Thanks for writing in Buzz! I appreciate you.  Danish artist Takes The Money And Runs! https://n.pr/3DlwifOResponse, Dental trauma, and more! - Christina P.Pit of despair warning - SueMyalgic encephalomyelitis (also known as chronic fatigue syndrome or ME/CFS) is a complex chronic disease that presents with symptoms in multiple body systems.  ME is a neurological disease according to the World Health Organization.  Retraction and Possible new name - ErinVitamins, Supplements and Ayurvedic#podcast #Austin #Newfoundland-----Kati's new book TRAUMATIZED is available for order in print, ebook & audiobook. Get your copy today!  https://geni.us/Bfak0jDiscord community:  https://discord.gg/4gPTrGBM9zSend your fan art to OTDMpod@gmail.comSpeakpipe 90 second voice message: https://www.speakpipe.com/OTDM The audio version of Opinions That Don't Matter  https://opinonsthatdontmatter.buzzsprout.com/Ask Kati Anything! (2nd podcast) audio: https://askkatianything.buzzsprout.com/ Amazon Suggestions: https://www.amazon.com/shop/katimortonKati TikTok  @KatimortonInstagram @katimortonSeanTikTok @hatori_seanzoInstagram @seansaintlouisBUSINESS EMAIL   Linnea Toney  linnea@underscoretalent.com kati morton kati morton podcast fanmail on podcast letters read on podcast otdm podcast podcast but outside

Faith, Family & Freedom with Curtis Bowers

Discover the individual pieces to the puzzle of Covid. • On January 11th, 2017 Dr. Faucci warned President Trump that he would definitely have to deal with “a surprise outbreak.” • New pieces of information have been revealed by whistleblowers at the World Health Organization, the Department of Defense, and other organizations, confirming that Covid was indeed a grand conspiracy. • Understand why they needed the “pandemic” what their final objective is, and what you can do about it. RESOURCES REFERENCED IN PODCAST ARE AVAILABLE FOR SUBSCRIBERS AT AGENDAWEEKLY.COM Subscribe at: https://agendaweekly.com for a WEEKLY summary of the news you need to know, prayer and action items, additional videos and articles. Subscription is $5/month. Follow us on Gab: https://gab.com/CurtisBowers --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/curtisbowers/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/curtisbowers/support

Science Friday
State Of COVID And Antiviral Pill, Future Pandemics. Oct 8, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:14


First Malaria Vaccine Is Approved by WHO The malaria parasite is one of the world's deadliest infectious diseases, killing on average about 500,000 people per year—half of them children under the age of 5, nearly all of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Now, the World Health Organization has finally approved RTS,S or Mosquirix, the first vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, which is the most deadly strain of the parasite. The vaccine has already been administered via a pilot program to 800,000 children in Kenya, Ghana, and Malawi, and in clinical trials showed an efficacy rate of about 50% against severe disease. WNYC's Nsikan Akpan explains this and other stories, including a climate change-linked Nobel Prize in physics, controversy over the naming of the James Webb Space Telescope, and a new surveillance method that uses only the shadows you cast on a blank wall. Will Improved Testing And New Antivirals Change The Pandemic's Path? Late last week, the pharmaceutical company Merck released data on a new antiviral medication called molnupiravir—a drug taken as a course of pills over five days that the company said was dramatically effective at keeping people with COVID-19 out of the hospital. In a press release, the company said that trial participants on the medication had a 50% lower risk of hospitalization or death compared to people getting the placebo. And while eight people in the placebo group died during the trial, none of the people getting the new drug did. However, the full data from the trial has yet to be released—and the medication must still go through the FDA approval process before it can be used. Matthew Herper, senior writer at STAT covering medicine, joins Ira to talk about the drug and what questions remain. Then, infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist Céline Gounder discusses other recent coronavirus news—from a government plan to spend a billion dollars on at-home testing to recent data on the Delta variant, including projections of what might happen next. Preparing For The Next Pandemic Needs To Start Now The United States has a long history of public health crises. For many, our first pandemic has been COVID-19. But long before the SARS-CoV-2 virus arrived, HIV, measles, and the flu all left a lasting impact. As a wealthy country, you may think the United States would be prepared to deal with public health crises, since they happen here with a degree of regularity. However, that's not the case. The longstanding issues that left the country vulnerable to COVID-19 are explored in a recent article from The Atlantic, called “We're Already Barreling Toward the Next Pandemic.” The piece was written by science writer Ed Yong, who won a Pulitzer Prize last year for his coverage of COVID-19. Ira speaks to Ed and Gregg Gonsalves, global health activist and epidemiologist at Yale, about the country's history of public health unpreparedness, and what needs to happen to be ready for the next pandemic.  

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-08-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 4:51


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 8th, 2021. With the number of those killed by COVID having surpassed 700,000, among that number is a bonus tragedy. A study shows the number of children in the U.S. who were made orphans or partial orphans by the pandemic is larger than first believed. More than 120,000 lost a primary guardian or caregiver. Black and Hispanic children have experienced this the most. Finland joined Sweden and Denmark in halting the use of Moderna's vaccine as a precautionary measure for men born in 1991 and later. This because of concerns about reports of possible rare cardiovascular side effects like myocarditis and pericarditis. Finland will give those young citizens the Pfizer vaccine instead. Is the pandemic leading to diplomacy? The World Health Organization has shipped COVID-19 medical supplies into North Korea. It's the kind of help that isolated nation rarely accepts. Those supplies are still sitting in quarantine at a seaport, but still. North Korea had severely restricted cross-border traffic and trade for the past two years despite an already crippled economy. We told you yesterday about how police officers are among the most reluctant profession to get vaccinated. Well New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio doesn't care. He's considering expanding his mandates on teachers and school employees to police officers, firefighters, and correction officers. The Mayor called them the “other pieces of the puzzle.” It's widely considered unethical to refuse to treat someone because they smoke. But a Colorado woman is being denied a kidney transplant unless she gets vaccinated. The 56-year-old may not last long without the surgery and is quite confused that her hospital is so insistent on protecting her from COVID, that they're willing to watch her die from her kidney condition. In the United States cases were down 23%, deaths are down 13%, and hospitalizations are down 20% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,811,930 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: North Dakota 25%, Pennsylvania and Michigan 14%, Wyoming 11%, and Montana 9%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Kodiak Island Borough, AK. McCreary, KY. Bethel Census Area, AK. Custer, MT. Green, KY. Whitley, KY. Clay, TX. Stark, ND. Morton, ND. And Wadena, MN. There have been at least 710,173 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 69.8%, Connecticut at 69.2%, and Rhode Island at 69%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 40.6%, and Wyoming and Idaho at 42.1%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 56.1%. The five countries with the biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Taiwan up 5%. And New Zealand, South Korea, Australia, and Thailand 2%. Globally, cases were down 11% and deaths were down 9% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 5. There are 18,062,833 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 102,090. The U.K. 40,701. Turkey 30,019. Russia 27,550. And Germany 22,403. There have been at least 4,833,592 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Sonya Looney Show
The Key to Peak Performance

The Sonya Looney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:59


I've spent well over a decade focusing on peak performance- both athletically in my quest to become one of the world's best endurance mountain bikers, but also in business and brainpower.  I used to think the key to peak performance was the focus on mastery: putting in the work to acquire the skills and wisdom to be a top performer in a given area.  While mastery and work ethic are certainly key components to peak performance, I have learned that there are multiple foundations upon which peak performance stands.  So what is the foundation to mastery, work ethic, and ultimately peak performance? The answer is not as simple as one thing, but it is as broad as one category: health.  Oftentimes, we think health is as simple as sick or healthy, but the category of health goes deep and wide.  Health encompasses emotional and mental health, physical health, environmental health, spiritual health, and relational health.  In my training as a health coaching through Vanderbilt's Integrative Medicine Program and work towards becoming a NBC-HWC, we look at health in our coaching sessions broken down into these specific categories. What does it mean to be healthy? Health is multi-dimensional including emotional, mental, physical, environmental, spiritual, financial health and more.  Specifically, we consider these health categories to paint in broad strokes what it means to be healthy Sleep and Rest Mind-Body Connection Compassionate Self-Awareness Daily Rhythm and Balance Food and Nourishment Environment Spirit and Soul Relationships and Community Movement, Exercise, and Play At the center of health is mindful awareness of your actions, your attitude, your habits, and your thoughts. What do these categories have to do with peak performance? Think of yourself as a beautiful tree with a large trunk and expansive branches with and vibrant leaves.    Or if you prefer, a skyscraper with a really cool architectural design.  If your tree has roots that are not nourished properly, or if there are cracks in your building's foundation, that tree is going to eventually fall over and that building will come crashing down.  The tree can only grow big and healthy if its roots and nourishment are healthy.  A building can only be built tall and sturdily with a well-planned foundation. That brings me to today's topic which is taking care of your foundation.  It was the subject of a keynote I did last week to an executive team interested in performance, but also highlighting that peak performance starts with taking care of the person. The HARDEST thing to do when we get busy, stressed, or super-focused is to take care of our key needs as humans, but they pay the largest amount of gains.  We all want happiness, general well-being, and satisfaction in life, but you have to take care of your foundation before you feel fulfilled and good most or at least some of the time.   Things like achievement, comparison, stress, and overwhelm can crowd out feelings of ease, happiness, and having energy.  Burnout affects over 62% of the workforce. How do you know if you are getting burnt out? Symptoms of burnout include apathy for something you generally enjoy, frequent sickness, having trouble sleeping, feeling short-tempered, everything feeler harder than usual, and loss of motivation for everything.   In 2019, the World Health Organization classified burnout as a legitimate medical diagnosis. Listen Now about Peak performance! How do you take care of your foundation for peak performance? There are so many categories when it comes to health. It's why I went into health coaching.  It starts with assessing your current state with each area of your health and then choosing what you want to focus on.  Personally, I think the most important place to start is with sleep and rest.  Most people do not get enough sleep and we certainly do not get enough rest with the fast-paced hustle culture and constant stimulation from our digital devices.  When you can start looking at your life and your goals from a more rested state, it becomes easier to make better decisions about food, your self-talk, exercising, and other areas of your life that fill your cup. How Much Rest Do I Need for Peak Performance? Rest isn't just about getting enough sleep at night.  And most people do not get nearly enough sleep. Personally, sleep has always been my #1 health priority. Yes, sleep has been a priority over healthy eating (would I rather go to bed early or lose an hour of sleep doing meal prep? I always choose sleep although it shouldn't be either/or). I generally choose sleep over an extra thirty minutes of training.  Check out Dr. Matther Walker's book, Why We Sleep for a deep dive into the science of sleep and how to sleep better and more efficiently.  Rest also extends past sleep. You might be sleeping 8 hours a night, the other 16 hours of your life are stressful and hectic. Sleep helps, but taking needed mental and physical rest throughout the day is imperative for performing and avoiding burnout. Do I Need to Take Rest Days or Periods of Rest? The easiest way to look at rest cycles is in athletic performance. Most of us know you should take one rest day away from exercise during the week. The rest is part of the work and is how you get stronger. Training breaks your muscles down and the rest is how they rebuild so you can be faster or stronger the next time. Recovery and rest also extends to your brain. Check out this podcast I recorded with PhD Walter Staiano on how mental fatigue affects physical performance.   The Principle of Progression shows that we need to have cycles of build and rest to perform. A lot of us feel guilty or anxious when we take down-time.  That is partly due to our culture, but also partly due to our own issues of enoughness or self-worth.  It has taken me a lot of personal inside work to finally recognize that resting isn't lazy and that I shouldn't be pushing every single second of every single day. I've tried that multiple times, and it has always ended badly for me. You may have heard of Mihalyi Csikzentmihalyi in regards to his groundbreaking work with flow and performance.  He also has done work with studying creativity.  One thing that Pulitzer Prize Winners, Nobel Prize Winners and the brightest minds had in common: they practiced the Principle of Progression.  They had periods of focus and intensity followed by periods of restoration and recovery. An addition- it's normal to feel stress, but too much stress can lead to feeling fatigued all the time. Here's a podcast (and article) I wrote on how to rethink stress and make it work for you. What Are Some Examples of Rest? Mindfulness and meditation practices Things that don't require striving or added stress: walking, playing with your dog or kid, listening to music, or even task-oriented or creative pursuits like cooking, cleaning, or playing music. The idea is that you aren't trying to attain something by doing it. You do it because you like it, pure and simple. Exercise can count as rest if you aren't taking on a lot of physical inputs- exercise counts as mental rest and a way to destress.  Too much exercise and having exercise as the only coping mechanism for stress needs to be monitored so you don't overtrain Sleep or even just closing your eyes for 10 minutes Social time with friends.  Research out of Harvard showed better exam performances among students who spent time with friends instead of every second preparing for an exam Taking one day a week totally off. No checking email, no working at all Taking several extended vacations because sometimes it takes a couple days to get into the swing of rest or vacation mode. Consider taking a break every 90 minutes (the ultradian performance rhythm is 90 minutes on, 20 minutes of down-time). Even taking a 5-minute break every hour makes a difference. Key Takeaways on Finding Peak Performance Your work and your craft sit on top of a foundation of self-care, much like a sturdy tree trunk that grows from healthy roots The first thing to get neglected when life gets busy is taking care of our foundation. Or we prioritize our work or craft over basic self-care To perform at the highest level, whether it be physical or intellectual, a strong foundation will lead to peak performance.  It includes focusing sleep/rest, nutrition, movement, social connection, mindful self-awareness and self-compassion. This article and podcast focused on sleep and rest is a great place to start. From a rested state, you can make better decisions and have more energy and motivation for the rest of your self-care practices I listed some great ways to rest if you don't know how to rest.

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
COVID vaccines for kids in US could be coming, plus where to eat during DineLA Restaurant Week

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 50:27


Pfizer and BioNTech have officially asked the FDA to green-light its COVID-19 vaccine use in kids ages 5-11. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization has approved the first-ever vaccine for malaria. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has become a microcosm of the nation's divisions over COVID vaccines. And Press Play gets recommendations for Italian restaurants and steakhouses that are part of DineLA Restaurant Week. 

Here & Now
Dave Grohl's new memoir; First vaccine to treat malaria

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:36


Dave Grohl only spent three and a half years drumming for Nirvana — but he says it felt like a lifetime. The Foo Fighters frontman talks about his new memoir, "The Storyteller." And, Mosquirix is the first vaccine to treat malaria and the first developed to treat any parasitic disease. World Health Organization malaria expert Dr. Mary Hamel and Dr. Kwame Amponsa-Achiano of Ghana's Health Service join us to discuss the breakthrough treatment.

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램
세계보건기구, 최초의 말라리아 백신 사용 적극 권고

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 2:00


아프리카 전역에서는 2분마다 1명의 어린이가 말라리아로 사망하고 있는 가운데 세계 보건 기구가 처음 승인한 말라리아 백신이 전염 확산 방지에 큰 효력을 발휘할 것으로 기대된다.

Morning Announcements
Thursday, October 7th, 2021

Morning Announcements

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:31


Our first update this morning is on the debt ceiling negotiations. Next we move to a school shooting at a high school in Arlington, Texas, the World Health Organization's official approval of the first malaria vaccine, and some unsettling news involving phone provider AT&T. Lastly, we wrap with the temporary block of Texas' controversial abortion law. Resources/Articles mentioned in this episode: Washington Post: "Senate Democrats appear open to short-term debt ceiling reprieve from GOP" CNN: "A suspect is in custody in the Texas school shooting that left at least 4 people injured" NY Times: "First Malaria Vaccine Approved by W.H.O." Daily Beast: "We Can All Thank AT&T for the Rise of Pro-Trump One America News, Report Says" NBC News: "Federal judge temporarily blocks enforcement of Texas law banning most abortions"

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Florida has a dengue problem. The solution may be more mosquitoes

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 7:45


In a major milestone, the World Health Organization endorsed widespread use of a vaccine aimed at stemming the effects of the parasitic disease malaria, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Miles O'Brien looks at efforts to tackle other diseases carried by mosquitoes in the Florida Keys, where scientists are testing a way to kill mosquitoes -- with mosquitoes. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PRI's The World
 ‘Historic' malaria vaccine proven safe for kids 

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 48:32


The World Health Organization announced on Wednesday that a vaccine against malaria has been found to be safe and effective — including for kids, who account for the vast majority of malaria deaths. And for decades, an international network of clergy sexual abuse survivors and their advocates have been pushing for more accountability within the Catholic Church. We hear from accountability experts about how an inquiry in France may reverberate worldwide. Also, 14% of endangered coral reefs were lost between 2008 and 2019. But one oceanic expert says there's still room for hope in conservation.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
The Quest for Covid's Origins

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 41:16


In late September, the World Health Organization announced that it had assembled a new team of scientists to revive its investigation into the origins of the virus that causes Covid-19. The new group will be tasked with examining whether the virus could have originated in a lab, months after its predecessor deemed the possibility too unlikely for serious consideration.This week on Intercepted: Intercept investigative reporters Sharon Lerner and Mara Hvistendahl join editor Maia Hibbett to discuss the competing theories on the origins of Covid-19. The Intercept obtained documents that shed new light on controversial lab experiments, raising questions about the origins of the coronavirus pandemic. With neither of the main theories -- natural spillover versus a lab leak -- yet proved true, the Intercept is seeking answers as to how much officials knew about proposed behind-the-scenes experiments. As Georgetown virologist Angela Rasmussen, a staunch critic of the lab-leak theory, said after the first WHO investigation, “There are still major stones that need to be unturned.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.