Podcasts about Biodiversity

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Variety and variability of life forms

  • 1,323PODCASTS
  • 2,654EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 5, 2022LATEST
Biodiversity

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Biodiversity

Show all podcasts related to biodiversity

Latest podcast episodes about Biodiversity

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: Will the vaquita vanish?

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 10:24


This week the world marks Save the Vaquita Day. Our featured article examines a threat to this critically endangered marine mammal (Phocoena sinus), a small porpoise that lives only in the Upper Gulf of California, and of which only 8 remain in the wild. Mongabay reports that a recent CITES decision lifting a prohibition on the export of captive-bred totaoba fish from Mexico could paradoxically spell disaster for vaquitas--which drown in nets that are set to capture the fish illegally, to feed a black market which will likely continue to thrive if a legal trade in farmed totoaba is established. To also read & share the story, go here: https://news.mongabay.com/2022/06/experts-fear-end-of-vaquitas-after-green-light-for-export-of-captive-bred-totoaba-fish/ Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Photo Credit: An illustration of a vaquita. Image courtesy of Greenpeace. Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

Investing in Regenerative Agriculture
176 Cameron Frayling on what is needed to unlock biodiversity credits

Investing in Regenerative Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 67:29


A conversation with Cameron Frayling, co-founder of Pivotal, about why and how biodiversity can be measured cheaply and what that might enable.---------------------------------------------------Join our Gumroad community, discover the tiers and benefits on www.gumroad.com/investinginregenag. Support our work:Share itGive a 5-star ratingBuy us a coffee… or a meal! www.Ko-fi.com/regenerativeagriculture----------------------------------------------------Getting sick of the carbon hype? Get ready for the biodiversity one, but first, we have to figure out how to measure it and what a biodiversity gain actually means.More about this episode on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/cameron-frayling.Find our video course on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/course.----------------------------------------------------For feedback, ideas, suggestions please contact us through Twitter @KoenvanSeijen, or get in touch through the website www.investinginregenerativeagriculture.com. Join our newsletter on www.eepurl.com/cxU33P. The above references an opinion and is for information and educational purposes only. It is not intended to be investment advice. Seek a duly licensed professional for investment advice.Support the show Support the show

Plant Based Briefing
312: From Marshes to Meat: Reflections From a Career in Conservation by Sheila Voss at GFI.org.

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 12:00


From marshes to meat: Reflections from a career in conservation. By Sheila Voss at GFI.org Original post: https://gfi.org/blog/from-marshes-to-meat-reflections-from-a-career-in-conservation/    The Good Food Institute is an international nonprofit reimagining meat production in order to make the global food system better for the planet, people, and animals. GFI understands that with “alternative proteins” we can mitigate the environmental impact of our food system, decrease the risk of zoonotic disease, and ultimately feed more people with fewer resources. Visit GFI.org for more information.    How to support the podcast: Share with others. Recommend the podcast on your social media. Follow/subscribe to the show wherever you listen. Buy some vegan/plant based merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop    Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing   #Vegan #PlantBased #plantbasedpodcast #veganpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #GFI #alternativeprotein #altprotein #plantbasedmeat #culturedmeat #cultivatedmeat #sustainablemeat #conservation #animalagriculture #climatechange #biodiversity #sustainability  

Tough Girl Podcast
Susanne Masters - Ethnobotanist looking at the interactions we have with wildlife. Author of Wild Waters.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 59:19


Susanne in her own words:   “I think we have become dangerously complacent about referring to how we are disconnected from nature.    Actually, we are inescapably connected to nature.    For every single breath we rely on plants doing the photosynthetic work that also yields oxygen for us to breath, and half of that work is done by ocean dwelling microscopic plants.     When you start looking into agricultural products you see how dependent these outputs are on rain cycles and aquifers. Marine bioprospecting is a frontier of hope in finding non-addictive treatments for chronic pain and novel chemicals for treating cancer.     The deeper you dive the more connections you find between people and wild species.    Perhaps I am more aware of the reliance we have on wild species because of my research on wildlife trade at Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Seeing the work of my academic peers who also look at supply chains feeding markets for products derived from wild species shows that wildlife trade spans both the earth and the phylogenetic tree of life far beyond the niche of wildlife trade that I work on (edible orchids).    The problem is we are connected to nature, but we loose sight of that connection.   This is coupled with barriers in being able to commune with nature including public wildlife areas being difficult to reach by public transport, terrain presenting physical challenges, and social challenges to people being allowed to feel comfortable, safe, and welcome in outdoor spaces.     Biodiversity and ecological illiteracy are additional limitations.    So when I write about people outdoors or wildlife it feels more like introducing the reader to an entity—a landscape or a species— that they might consume in products they buy or forage, and that they might see when they are out and about.     I love being out in wilderness. But I am particularly interested in nature that is easier to find—wild species hidden in products that appear on supermarket shelves, wildlife that inhabits cities, creeps along canal paths, or inhabits shorelines where you can find it without needing a boat or dive gear.”     New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    You can support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media by signing up as a patron. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - every patron makes a difference. Thank you for your support.   Show notes Who Susanne is in her own words What she does Loving the outdoors, nature and wildlife Studying and her progress as a scientist Doing biology, chemistry, geography, physics and English literature Choosing a degree as a teenager Volunteering in the mental health service while at university Moving to London Working in mental health and substance misuse support services Always having more interest in plants Doing taxonomy studies on the side Getting into more detail about taxonomy Doing an 8-month journey around England, Wales, and Scotland in a campervan Realising that knowing things about plants could be a job Getting a Master's degree in Ethnobotany Interviewing people about the plants they use for homebrew Recognising how people connect with wild landscapes Making her own homebrew How she enjoys outdoor swimming Having a dog around her Moving to Bournemouth Swimming at high altitude in Bhutan Learning and understanding how the body works Attending a big science conference in Bhutan - The International Society of Ethnobiology (ISE) Hiking in Bumthang Valley Her book: Wild Waters: A wildlife and water lover's companion to the aquatic world Meeting and working with Alice Goodridge Continuing swimming all throughout the year Her plans for 2022 and 2023 Planning to finish her PhD next year Having a sister with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Looking after her niece along with her mom and dad Doing a PhD on the International Trade in orchids Final words of advice   Social Media   Website: https://susannemasters.com    Instagram: @mastersmiss    Twitter: @Ethnobotanica    

The Creative Process Podcast
Jonathan Newman - Lead Author, “Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 48:01


Jonathan Newman is an ecologist who studies plant–animal interactions in the context of species invasions and climatic change. He is the lead author of two books: Climate Change Biology, and Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics, and co-editor of Grasslands and Climate Change. He is the author of more than 100 other scientific publications.“Climate change is certainly going to affect biodiversity. Some species will benefit from climate change, but others will not, and we'll have different ecosystems, different biotic communities as a result of this. I think the impacts that are likely are pretty clear, and I think that's a pretty good reason to do all those things we can do without completely destroying our economies and our communities because those things have moral value as well. It's not just the environment that we think is important. We also think humans are important. So doing the things we can do now, do the less painful things first. We should have done them already. We should be now thinking about how to do the harder things.”WLU Webpagehttps://wlu.caClimate Change BiologyDefending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics,Grasslands and Climate Changewww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

One Planet Podcast
Jonathan Newman - Lead Author, “Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics”

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 48:01


Jonathan Newman is an ecologist who studies plant–animal interactions in the context of species invasions and climatic change. He is the lead author of two books: Climate Change Biology, and Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics, and co-editor of Grasslands and Climate Change. He is the author of more than 100 other scientific publications."The impacts of climate change are going to be variable, And it's going to depend a lot on where in the world you are, and what kind of infrastructure and government capacity you have to manage and adapt to climate change."WLU Webpagehttps://wlu.caClimate Change BiologyDefending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics,Grasslands and Climate Changewww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Jonathan Newman - Lead Author, “Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics”

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 48:01


Jonathan Newman is an ecologist who studies plant–animal interactions in the context of species invasions and climatic change. He is the lead author of two books: Climate Change Biology, and Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics, and co-editor of Grasslands and Climate Change. He is the author of more than 100 other scientific publications.“Climate change is certainly going to affect biodiversity. Some species will benefit from climate change, but others will not, and we'll have different ecosystems, different biotic communities as a result of this. I think the impacts that are likely are pretty clear, and I think that's a pretty good reason to do all those things we can do without completely destroying our economies and our communities because those things have moral value as well. It's not just the environment that we think is important. We also think humans are important. So doing the things we can do now, do the less painful things first. We should have done them already. We should be now thinking about how to do the harder things.”WLU Webpagehttps://wlu.caClimate Change BiologyDefending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics,Grasslands and Climate Changewww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

War Studies
Why biodiversity and wildlife conservation is crucial to global security with Dr Richard Milburn

War Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 34:33


“Empty stomachs have no ears…” These were the words of a poacher in Bukavu in the Democratic Republic of Congo, when asked why he continued to destroy wildlife in a local forest. It reveals what we often forget: that the degradation of biodiversity doesn't happen in a vacuum. So how are global security, development and conservation related? In what ways do conflict and its many secondary effects, bring grave risks for biodiversity? And how can start seeing action on climate and wildlife as a fundamental part of the post-conflict peacebuilding process? This special episode for London Climate Action Week sees Dr Richard Milburn, Visiting Research Associate in the Department of War Studies, answer these questions and more. He gives important insight into some of the biggest issues around climate, conservation and security, including ways to protect wildlife during conflict, post-conflict environmental recovery, and how we can fundamentally challenge our thinking on climate change, including why we should all become conservation entrepreneurs. You can find out more about Richard's work, including his innovative environmental action game here: https://www.tunzagames.com and the conservation organisation his work supports here: https://www.polepolefoundation.org

On The Green Fence
Climate change: Why planting more trees won't save us

On The Green Fence

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 27:16


Expanding forests can help bring down the amount of CO2 trapped in the atmosphere. But restoring these invaluable ecosystems is a complex business, and planting new trees can sometimes do more harm than good.

BioScience Talks
Transformative Change to Protect Biodiversity, Climate

BioScience Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:45


We're joined by Dr. Pam McElwee, Professor of Human Ecology at Rutgers University, and Dr. Sarah Diamond, Associate Professor of Biology at Case Western Reserve University. They were here to discuss their recent BioScience article, Governing for Transformative Change across the Biodiversity–Climate–Society Nexus, which describes principles for addressing global environmental crises.The abstract of their article follows.Transformative governance is key to addressing the global environmental crisis. We explore how transformative governance of complex biodiversity–climate–society interactions can be achieved, drawing on the first joint report between the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services to reflect on the current opportunities, barriers, and challenges for transformative governance. We identify principles for transformative governance under a biodiversity–climate–society nexus frame using four case studies: forest ecosystems, marine ecosystems, urban environments, and the Arctic. The principles are focused on creating conditions to build multifunctional interventions, integration, and innovation across scales; coalitions of support; equitable approaches; and positive social tipping dynamics. We posit that building on such transformative governance principles is not only possible but essential to effectively keep climate change within the desired 1.5 degrees Celsius global mean temperature increase, halt the ongoing accelerated decline of global biodiversity, and promote human well-being.

BFM :: Earth Matters
ABC's of Biodiversity: Gibbons of Malaysia

BFM :: Earth Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 27:19


There are five species of gibbons, found in Malaysia. The white-handed gibbon, dark-handed or agile gibbon, and the siamang are found in Peninsular Malaysia, while Muller's gibbon and Abbott's grey gibbon live in Sabah and Sarawak. Gibbons are known for providing one of nature's most enchanting concerts - welcoming the sunrise with their songs. But their songs and cherubic faces make them a sought-after commodity in the illegal wildlife pet trade, and coupled with habitat loss, gibbons are being pushed further into the endangered species list. We speak to Mariani Ramli, the President of the Gibbon Conservation Society, and the Head Director of the Gibbon Rehabilitation Project about these gibbons found in Malaysia, and also about the second conservation and rehabilitation project for Malaysia's Singing Apes in Kota Belud, Sabah - The Borneo Gibbon Rehabilitation Project or Borneo GReP. The ABC's of Biodiversity is an ongoing series where we explore why biodiversity loss is our loss.Image credit: gibbonconservationsociety.org

BFM :: General
ABC's of Biodiversity: Gibbons of Malaysia

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 27:19


There are five species of gibbons, found in Malaysia. The white-handed gibbon, dark-handed or agile gibbon, and the siamang are found in Peninsular Malaysia, while Muller's gibbon and Abbott's grey gibbon live in Sabah and Sarawak. Gibbons are known for providing one of nature's most enchanting concerts - welcoming the sunrise with their songs. But their songs and cherubic faces make them a sought-after commodity in the illegal wildlife pet trade, and coupled with habitat loss, gibbons are being pushed further into the endangered species list. We speak to Mariani Ramli, the President of the Gibbon Conservation Society, and the Head Director of the Gibbon Rehabilitation Project about these gibbons found in Malaysia, and also about the second conservation and rehabilitation project for Malaysia's Singing Apes in Kota Belud, Sabah - The Borneo Gibbon Rehabilitation Project or Borneo GReP. The ABC's of Biodiversity is an ongoing series where we explore why biodiversity loss is our loss.Image credit: gibbonconservationsociety.org

Nature Magic
Episode 56 Éanna ní Lamhna is passionate about our wild world

Nature Magic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 17:58


Today Mary is speaking to Éanna Ní Lamhna.Éanna is an Irish biologist, environmental consultant, radio and television presenter, author and educator. She is one of the best-known public figures in Ireland in the area of nature and the environment. Her books include Talking Wild, Wild and Wonderful and Straight Talking Wild.Her latest book Our Wild WorldFrom the birds and bees to our boglands and the ice capsis available from O Brien PressContact Mary Bermingham atmary@burrennaturesanctuary.ieCheck out Burren Nature Sanctuary at www.burrennaturesanctuary.ieSupport the Nature Magic Podcast athttps://www.patreon.com/naturemagicShow websitewww.naturemagic.ie

The Farmers Weekly Podcast
Carbon markets, soil health, Sustainable Farming Incentive launch, grass in arable rotations, does regenerative agriculture stack up? & Groundswell 2022

The Farmers Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 46:23


In this episode, we spend two days at Groundswell 2022 – the UK's biggest farm event for regenerative agriculture.Also known as conservation farming, regenerative agriculture is all about looking after the soil and improving biodiversity – as well as producing food. But how does it stack up financially?The government's Sustainable Farming Incentive (SFI) aims to reward arable farmers and livestock producers  in England who prioritise soil health.We speak to Defra secretary George Eustice, as he announces the SFI launch date – and we ask him whether the scheme is ambitious enough.We look at how growers can benefit from introducing grass into arable rotations, get the latest on carbon markets and look at a project to reduce farm paperwork.To help with the  farm paperwork project, visit www.farmadminsurvey.co.uk. This episode of the Farmers Weekly Podcast is co-hosted by Johann Tasker and Farmers Weekly arable correspondent Louise Impey.Recorded entirely on location at the Groundswell event – held on 22-23 June 2022 at Lannock Manor Farm, Hitchin, Hertfordshire, UK.

Regenerative Skills
Hannah Lewis on the mini-forest revolution

Regenerative Skills

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 59:04


Welcome back to this ongoing series on tree planting and agroforestry. As I've been researching this topic for years I've begun to see a spectrum of tree planting concepts that look like a gradient based on the diversity in the system. On one extreme you have monoculture orchards and timber plantations which are just a single species on large tracts of land, and on the other extreme you have syntropic agroforestry for productive systems and what are known as Miyawaki forests for native reforestation initiatives.  In both cases these are very densely planted areas of tens or even hundreds of different species. In both cases the idea is to accelerate the succession and maturation of the system by leveraging the diversity of plant communities to mimic natural forests to promote growth and resilience in the plantation.  In today's episode we're going to take a deep dive into the world of Miyawaki forests with Hannah Lewis, the author of the new book, “Mini-Forest Revolution.” Hannah Lewis is a writer focusing on people, nature, and conservation. She edits the Compendium of Scientific and Practical Finding Supporting Eco-Restoration to Address Global Warming, published by Biodiversity for a Livable Climate, an environmental nonprofit based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota, she discovered the Miyawaki Method and wrote Mini-Forest Revolution while living with her partner and their two children in France. In this episode we're going to get into the history of Akira Miyawaki, the visionary scientists and ecologist behind the tree planting method. We'll also break down the details of what makes this way of planting native forests so effective and revolutionary, from the deep research required to create a planting list, how to prepare the ground to ensure the trees get off to a healthy start, how to maintain the planted area as it gets established and a lot more.  We also explore the powerful community building potential of getting people together to replant degraded areas, so make sure to listen all the way to the end when Hannah gives her advice on how to start a Miyawaki forest for yourself. Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community Links: https://www.chelseagreen.com/product/mini-forest-revolution/ https://www.youtube.com/c/AfforesttGlobal https://regenerativeskills.com/how-to-grow-a-healthy-native-forest-in-record-time-with-afforestt-founder-shubhendu-sharma-146/

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: 'Lost' Amazonian cities reveal sustainability secrets

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 11:49


Our featured article this week examines archaeological research revealing details of a massive, Pre-Columbian urban settlement in the Amazon, 4,500 square kilometers in size, that provides valuable insights into how humanity could develop sustainable cities without degrading their environments.  To also read & share the story, go here: https://news.mongabay.com/2022/06/lost-amazonian-cities-hint-at-how-to-build-urban-landscapes-without-harming-nature/ Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Photo Credit: Incachaca archaeological site in Bolivia. Image courtesy of Greg Keelen on Unspash. Please send feedback to submissions@mongabay.com, and thank you for listening.

Plants of the Gods: Hallucinogens, Healing, Culture and Conservation podcast
Plants of the Gods: S3E4. Absinthe, New Orleans, and the Birth of Rock and Roll

Plants of the Gods: Hallucinogens, Healing, Culture and Conservation podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 21:21


In the previous episode, we learned how and why Absinthe was considered the ultimate creative elixir in 19th century Belle Epoque France. However, absinthe also served as an inspiration for artists in New Orleans, long regarded as the most European city in the US. As we heard in previous episodes on opium (S1E6) and cannabis (S2E7), New Orleans has long been awash in mind-altering plant products, all of which have played a vital role in the city's fecund creativity which gave rise to jazz, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll. 

UN News
News in Brief 21 June 2022

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 3:15


WHO to hold emergency Monkeypox meeting Key biodiversity talks begin in Nairobi - UNEP Nigeria's emergency will get worse without extra funding: OCHA

The Great Simplification with Nate Hagens
Energy Blindness | Frankly by Nate Hagens

The Great Simplification with Nate Hagens

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 24:06


Nate explains how our culture is "energy blind" and the implications. The YouTube video, featuring charts and graphs, of this podcast is available now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVjhb8Nu1Sk 00:35 - Jason's info + book, Post Carbon Institute, Farmland LP, CSAs 02:57 - What is a CSA 04:39 - Biodiversity and geography of the Amazon rainforest and the Andes 05:14 - How will the Amazon and Andes change with climate change 06:17 - The Future is Rural 06:56 - Net energy positive 07:18 - Optimal foraging theory 08:46 - Chewing the cud and ruminant digestion 09:32 - Fiber, cellulose and human digestion 10:16 - NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium/Potash) 11:01 - Haber Bosch process 14:30 - The Law of Return 15:11 - What is soil? Is it different from dirt? 16:30 - Hydroponics 17:10 - What makes healthy soil? (structure, microbiome, nutrients) 17:24 - Malabon soil 19:49 - How many farms are managing for healthy soils 20:10 - At the current rate our topsoil will be gone in 60 years 20:54 - What percentage of the US labor force are farmers? (~1%) 21:22 - How has the labor force shifted from pre-industrial times? (70-90%) 22:35 - Modern agriculture is an energy sink 23:17 - Past food systems were energy positive (10:1-5:1) 23:35 - The Oil Drum essay (EROI on Nate's potatoes) 25:04 - It takes 10-14 calories to produce, process, and transport every 1 calorie of food we eat 26:50 - Over the last hundred years we have had more energy available every year 27:03 - Trophic pyramids 27:51 - Entropy 31:01 - Supply chain disruptions 31:55 - Fossil fuel depletion 33:48 - Conventional crops no longer have the genes to be grown in organic agriculture 37:16 - Heavy mechanization has led to heavy specialization and regionalization 39:27 - Smaller farms have higher energy returns and higher yields 44:27 - ½ a hectare is needed to feed one person (variation from 2/10th to a whole hectare) 47:46 - Dennis Meadows TGS Episode 51:33 - Potato Famine in Ireland 53:03 - Problems with modern industrial animal agriculture (CAFOs) 54:31 - Diets were tailored to fit the land they're based in 56:13 - In Minnesota there are more pigs than people 56:20 - Population numbers of our livestock 1:00:05 - Energy blindness 1:00:23 - Norman Borlaug and Paul Ehrlich 1:01:09 - Permaculture 1:07:34 - The world's amazing and diverse life 1:09:03 - Chuck Watson TGS Episode 1 and 2 on Nuclear Risk 1:10:20 - Nature is remarkably resilient 1:10:37 - Building back healthy soil

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
The Health Of Our Cells Is Shaped The Soil And The Biodiversity - Vandana Shiva, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 7:08


The Health Of Our Cells Is Shaped  The Soil And The Biodiversity -  Vandana Shiva, PhDVandana Shiva, Ph.D. •           https://www.navdanya.org/site/•           Book - Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply Besides being a physicist, ecologist, activist, editor, and author of numerous books, Vandana Shiva is a tireless defender of the environment. She is the founder of Navdanya, a movement for biodiversity conservation and farmers' rights. She is also the founder and director of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Natural Resource Policy. Shiva fights for changes in the practice and paradigms of agriculture and food: “I don't want to live in a world where five giant companies control our health and our food.” Intellectual property rights, biodiversity, biotechnology, bioethics, and genetic engineering are among the fields where Shiva has contributed intellectually and through activist campaigns. During the 1970s, she participated in the nonviolent Chipko movement, whose main participants were women. She has assisted grassroots organizations of the Green movement in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Ireland, Switzerland, and Austria with campaigns against genetic engineering. Shiva has also served as an adviser to governments in India and abroad as well as non-governmental organizations, including the International Forum on Globalization, the Women's Environment and Development Organization, the Third World Network, and the Asia Pacific People's Environment Network. #VandanaShiva #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #RealFoodForHealth #Glyphosate #Pesticides #Monsanto  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Science Weekly
Seagrass meadows: can we rewild one of the world's best carbon sinks?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 16:13


They support an incredible array of biodiversity and may also be some of the world's most effective carbon sinks. But vast swathes of seagrass meadows have been lost in the last century, and they continue to vanish at the rate of a football pitch every half hour. Madeleine Finlay makes a trip out of the Guardian office to visit a rewilding project in Hampshire. She speaks to marine biologist Tim Ferrero about the challenges of replanting seagrass meadows and what hope it offers.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

The Bird Emergency
Monday with Holly - Urban Biodiversity with Jacinta Humphrey

The Bird Emergency

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:11


The term "biodiversity" is thrown around and inserted into conversations all the time. But when one person says biodiversity, is the full meaning of the term conveyed to anybody listening? Dr. Holly Parsons from Birdlife Australia (Birds In Backyards) is joined by Jacinta Humphrey, a PhD candidate at LaTrobe University in Melbourne. Her research focuses on the impacts of urban development on birds at the landscape scale. Holly and Jacinta kick around a lot of the issues that are picked up in any discussion about biodiversity in an urban setting with Grant. Did we reach any consensus? BTW Sign the petition - it's urgent, and it pertains to the Blue-billed Ducks that we referenced in the show. https://www.kes.org.au/home/campaigns/lakeknox   You can watch the unedited conversation for the show, and see the upcoming interviews live at thebirdemergency.com/live Subscribe to on The Bird Emergency on YouTube Follow The Bird Emergency on Twitter @birdemergency or Instagram @thebirdemergency  If you enjoy the show, how about share with your friends or colleagues?  https://followthepodcast.com/birdemergency Or you can review us at https://lovethepodcast.com/birdemergency And if you want to support what Grant is doing with the show, why not buy him a coffee? (It's currently a flat soy with no sweeteners.) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/birdemergency

Break It Down Show
Robert Fisher – Biodiversity, Urbanization and Conservation

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 67:57


Robert Fisher – Biodiversity, Urbanization and Conservation - Dr. Robert Fisher is a conservation biologist with the US Geological Survey's Western Ecological Research Center and works as part of a large integrated team. His focus has been on how natural systems are responding to the Anthropocene, and what types of resiliency they have or lack as it relates to maintaining ecological integrity and biodiversity. Find out about Robert's work at: Additionally, Robert notes that through understanding individual species and community responses to perturbations through modern monitoring techniques, he and his team can determine appropriate management experiments or options to possibly recover resiliency. Biology nerds this is an ep for you, and hey, why not non-biology nerds as well. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Robert Fisher here Focusing on the systems Of Mother Nature   ​Similar episodes: Andrews and Wilson  Anna Simons  Janeshia A. Ginyard  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Green Transition Fund to Help Businesses Move Away from Fossil Fuels

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 4:27


As part of this Government's plans to take better care of our planet, the Tánaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment Leo Varadkar TD, Minister of State at the Department of Justice and Equality with responsibility for Law Reform, James Browne TD and Minister of State for Land Use and Biodiversity, Senator Pippa Hackett today announced a new €55m Green Transition fund to help businesses move away from fossil fuels and towards more sustainable, cheaper alternatives. Green Transition Fund to Help Businesses Move Away from Fossil Fuels The Green Transition Fund is part of Ireland's National Recovery and Resilience Plan (NRRP), which is funded by the European Union. Speaking today, the Tánaiste said: “We need to take better care of our planet. This generation should aim to pass it on to the next in a better condition than we inherited it. Businesses have a really important role to play. However, we need to recognise that, despite the fact we have a higher number of people employed now than in the history of the state, many of our business owners are still getting back on their feet after what has been an incredibly difficult couple of years. So, we need to help them when it comes to what is another enormous challenge – reducing our reliance on fossil fuels. “This new €55m Fund has two elements, one part to help businesses make a plan particular to their company to give them clarity on what exactly needs to be done and another part, more aimed at our manufacturing industry, investing in a more environmental way of doing things. “Putin's war on Ukraine has highlighted the vulnerability of becoming too reliant on finite resources controlled by other states. We need to help Irish businesses now prepare for a future where economic growth and fossil fuels are not intertwined. This Fund is an important help.” Minister Pippa Hackett, said: “We will only achieve our climate targets with an all-of-Government, all-of-society approach, and the business sector has a vital role to play in our transition to a low-carbon economy. This is an exciting time for businesses who want to make that transition, and I am delighted to be part of a Government that is targeting support towards a greener, more sustainable and more resilient business environment. “Employees, customers, funders and shareholders alike are demanding more from businesses when it comes to their environmental credentials. As businesses continue their recovery from the pandemic, this €55 million Green Transition Fund is a great example of how Government funding can be used to help enterprises to move away from pre-Covid, business as usual models, to models that deliver for the environment, as well as for their employees, their customers and the communities in which they operate.” Minister James Browne TD, said: “The businesses I talk to see opportunities to reduce their costs and their carbon emissions by better managing their energy use. These Funds can unlock that opportunity for manufacturing businesses in particular, and make a real difference to the bottom line and climate impact of our enterprise base. The government understands the strain that energy costs are putting on business, and this is another way to help relieve some of that pressure.” The Green Transition Fund comprises The Climate Planning Fund for Business, which will give businesses funding to come up with a personalised plan to identify how best to remove reliance on fossil fuels in their business. A €1,800 grant to develop a plan and up to €50,000 matched funding to go towards specific capacity building within an enterprise are among the grants available. The Enterprise Emissions Reduction Investment Fund will give manufacturing businesses funding to invest in carbon-neutral heating processes, smart metering and energy monitoring, and research and development. Up to €1m is available for businesses to upgrade their processes. The programmes will run over the next five years. The National Recovery ...

WORLD ORGANIC NEWS
Episode 302. Monbiot, Mansplaining & Urban Arrogance

WORLD ORGANIC NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 7:49


LINKS No Dig Quick Start Course https://worldorganicnews.com/courses/no-dig-gardening/ buymeacoffee.com/changeug email: jon@worldorganicnews.com Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1546564598887681 Transcript: https://worldorganicnews.com/episode302/ A Revolution on Food and Farming https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00180bs Claire Ratinon https://www.claireratinon.com/ Sarah Langford https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rooted-Stories-Life-Farming-Revolution/dp/0241503744 Episode 158. Cows aren't the enemy & let's reward those doing the job! https://worldorganicnews.com/episode158/  

Humanities (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Humanities (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Science (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Science (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Evolution (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Evolution (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Genetics (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Genetics (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Science (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Genetics (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

Genetics (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

UC San Diego (Audio)
CARTA - Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes - Loss of Species Loss of Genetic Variation and the Future of Earth's Biota with Oliver Ryder

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:00


We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, historical record, and from ancient DNA studies, and that historical processes shape extinction risk. Habitat loss and changing eco-environmental conditions, competition, and other factors produce genomic impacts, also influencing extinction risk. The legacy of past events impacts resiliency of species in the current environment in interpretable ways. Demographic trajectories reveal vulnerability to extinction. Remarkable advances in genomics technologies portend a deeper understanding of the evolution of life and the vulnerability of extant species to changes now taking place through human agency. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 37906]

Heritage Radio Network On Tour
2022 Slow Seed Summit: Seed Rematriation: Bringing Seeds Home

Heritage Radio Network On Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 59:07


HRN was proud to work with Slow Food USA as a media partner for the Slow Food Summit, which took place on May 13 - May 15, 2022.  For three days, hundreds of people from around the world gathered virtually to discuss the regeneration of our world's foodways to advance good, clean and fair food for all. Each day focused on a new lens through which attendees listened, shared and planned the future of our climate, health and food justice. Returning seed to their communities of origin is important for maintaining biodiversity, ownership and security.   In this talk, hear from Dr. Rebecca Webster, Shelley Buffalo, Kirsten Kirby-Shoote, and Rosebud Bear Schneider. Dr. Rebecca Webster is an enrolled citizen of the Oneida Nation and a founding member of Ohe∙láku (among the cornstalks), a co-op of 10 Oneida families that grow 6 acres of traditional, heirloom corn together. She and her husband also own a 10 acre farmstead where they primarily grow Haudenosaunee varieties of corn, beans, and squash. They started a YouTube Channel called Ukwakhwa (Our Foods), and their family formed a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Ukwakhwa Inc.Shelley Buffalo is an enrolled member of the Meskwaki Tribe, also know as the Sac & Fox of the Mississippi in Iowa. Shelley served her community as Meskwaki Food Sovereignty Coordinator and now offers consultancy for food sovereignty and local foods initiatives. She is an advocate for indigenous foodways, food justice, and rematriation. The Meskwaki are unique in that their land based community is a settlement, not a reservation. HRN On Tour is powered by Simplecast.

Heritage Radio Network On Tour
2022 Slow Seed Summit: Closing Keynote - Vandana Shiva

Heritage Radio Network On Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 59:13


HRN was proud to work with Slow Food USA as a media partner for the Slow Food Summit, which took place on May 13 - May 15, 2022.  For three days, hundreds of people from around the world gathered virtually to discuss the regeneration of our world's foodways to advance good, clean and fair food for all. Each day focused on a new lens through which attendees listened, shared and planned the future of our climate, health and food justice. Dr. Vandana Shiva delivered the final keynote, discussing women, seeds and community. Dr. Shiva is a scholar, author, scientist and food sovereignty activist. She is the founder of Navdanya, an earth, women and farmer-centric led movement working to protect biological and cultural diversity. Additionally, Dr. Shiva is the founder and director of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Natural Resource Policy. She has received countless awards for her activism to protect our foodways, including the Right Livelihood Award, the Order of the Golden Ark, Global 500 Award of the UN, Earth Day International Award, the Lennon Ono Grant for Peace, and the Sydney Peace Prize. HRN On Tour is powered by Simplecast.

BioScience Talks
Social Justice and Conservation Education

BioScience Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 38:10


In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Robert Montgomery, Associate Professor of Biodiversity and Sustainability, Senior Research Fellow in Lady Margaret Hall College, and Senior Researcher in the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, at Oxford University. He's here to talk about his recent BioScience article, Integrating Social Justice into Higher Education Conservation Science. The abstract of the article follows.Because biodiversity loss has largely been attributed to human actions, people, particularly those in the Global South, are regularly depicted as threats to conservation. This context has facilitated rapid growth in green militarization, with fierce crackdowns against real or perceived environmental offenders. We designed an undergraduate course to assess student perspectives on biodiversity conservation and social justice and positioned those students to contribute to a human heritage-centered conservation (HHCC) initiative situated in Uganda. We evaluated changes in perspectives using pre- and postcourse surveys and reflection instruments. Although the students started the course prioritizing biodiversity conservation, even when it was costly to human well-being, by the end of the course, they were recognizing and remarking on the central importance of social justice within conservation. We present a framework for further integration of HHCC approaches into higher education courses so as to conserve the integrity of coupled human and natural systems globally.

The PrimateCast - a podcast series brought to you by CICASP
The PrimateCast #67: Dr. Susumu Tomiya on paleontology, the past, present and future of biodiversity, beardogs, and doing and communicating science

The PrimateCast - a podcast series brought to you by CICASP

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


This is podcast #67 with Dr. Susumu Tomiya. It's such a pleasure to be able to share my interview with Dr. Susumu Tomiya, my colleague for the past 3+ years in the Center for International Collaboration and Advanced Studies in Primatology (CICASP...

Earth Wise
Declining Bird Populations | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 2:00


A study by scientists from multiple institutions around the world including Cornell University has found that significant declines in bird populations are taking place across the planet.  Loss and degradation of natural habitats, direct overexploitation of many species, and climate change are driving the bird population declines. According to the study, approximately 48% of existing […]

agri-Culture
Ep 170 Triple W Genetics: The Collection Man

agri-Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 13:57


We won't be bringing you our typical podcast for the next few weeks, because we're doing a Bowman left.  Those of you who are regular listeners might remember that that's the swerve in plans we tend to do if we find something interesting to pick up.  Sometimes that's sudden, sometimes expected, but either way it's a departure from our norm.We're about to get on a plane to head to Grand Island, Nebraska, because this week is the 2022 American Boer Goat Association's National Show.  Last year we had an exhausting but truly fun time running around filming all week in the barns, and the show ring and the surrounding farms, all on behalf of the ABGA. Links:http://triplewgenetics.com/https://www.abga.org/Support the show

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Business for Biodiversity will help businesses to take action for biodiversity

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 7:27


Business for Biodiversity, a new platform to guide businesses in taking action to tackle the biodiversity crisis has been recommended to be signed up by Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform Malcolm Noonan TD and Minister of State for Land-Use & Biodiversity, Senator Pippa Hackett. Backed by the National Parks & Wildlife Service of the Department of Housing, Local Government & Heritage and the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine the platform was launched at the National Biodiversity Conference in Dublin Castle. The new platform will help businesses to measure, design and demonstrate their biodiversity impact, drawing on a network of expertise led by Natural Capital Ireland, the National Biodiversity Data Centre and Business in the Community Ireland. Business for Biodiversity Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform at the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage Malcolm Noonan said: “I'm looking forward to seeing the Irish business community drive action on the biodiversity agenda. This platform aims to bring businesses together across sectors to assess biodiversity impact, take strategic action across a range of organisational levels, and learn from international best practices in corporate biodiversity governance. Corporate action is an important element of the all-of-society approach required to address biodiversity loss and I encourage all businesses to sign up to the platform, and get involved to help protect, conserve and restore nature.” Minister Hackett said: “The business community has a vital role to play in our response to the biodiversity crisis, so I am delighted to support this platform. Employees and consumers alike are demanding more from businesses when it comes to their environmental credentials, and this platform will enable businesses to build their awareness of both their impacts and their dependencies on biodiversity. With that awareness, businesses will be empowered to take action to address biodiversity loss and to have a positive impact on the communities in which they operate.” How the Platform Works The purpose of the platform is to encourage and incentivise Irish businesses to assess their impacts and dependencies on biodiversity. The overarching aim is to support the implementation of Ireland's National Biodiversity Action Plan, halt harmful activities and promote the restoration and regeneration of Ireland's natural heritage. Business For Biodiversity received Government seed funding for an initial three-year period, but from January onwards, the platform will put a paid membership model in place, once well-developed resources are established to offer support and networking opportunities to businesses, with a tiered fee system to suit every scale, from small-to-medium enterprises to large multi-nationals. Some of the services to be offered by the platform include increasing understanding of biodiversity through educational webinars, facilitating networking and collaboration among participating companies, educating member companies around national policy on biodiversity and identifying nature-based solutions to address climate change and biodiversity loss. Platform Development Manager for Business for Biodiversity, Lucy Gaffney acknowledged the important role that participating companies play in developing standards – for example, many businesses are now working with the All-Ireland Pollinator Plan to enhance their contribution to bees and other pollinators. She said the plan is to incorporate some of these existing certifications into Business for Biodiversity's own scoring system to ensure streamlined compatibility between the various initiatives. Ms Gaffney emphasised: “Biodiversity is complex and hard to measure which is why we are working with the National Biodiversity Data Centre and Business in the Community to ask businesses to come aboard at this early stage to help us develop a biodiversity evaluation metric that can be applied and tailored...

BFM :: General
The ABC's of Biodiversity: Coral Reefs

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 51:48


Coral reefs are the ocean's most biodiverse ecosystems, and provide food, coastal protection and income for many people across the world, and here in Malaysia too. But in a recent article in Macaranga, marine ecologist Sebastian Szereday has warned that a lack of action and funding will ring the death knell for coral reefs in the face of warming seas. With most attention focussed on the climate crisis, are we forgetting the parallel biodiversity crisis we are also facing? Sebastian and Natasha Zulaikha, who are co-founders of the organisation Coralku, join us to share more about their collective mission to fight the global decline of coral reefs, and also why coral reefs are an essential ecosystem to this planet, and how detrimental their loss will be to us all. The ABC's of Biodiversity is our ongoing series where we explore why biodiversity loss is our loss.Image credit: Coralku/Facebook

Earth Wise
Forests And Water | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 2:00


We hear a great deal about the environmental services provided by forests.  Deforestation is one of the major factors contributing to increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.  And, of course, forests – most notably rainforests – are major contributors to biodiversity.  A new study by the U.S. Forest Service looked at the role […]

Hard Core
Climate, Culture, Co-Ferments

Hard Core

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 37:47


As extreme weather events become increasingly common, how will apples fare? Will the taste of cider evolve? We return to the labs at Cornell University to get a crash course from our  favorite pomologist in apple genetics, biodiversity, and climate change. Find out how studying (and growing) historic apple varieties can change the future of the cider industry and tune in for a conversation about the importance of preserving cherished aspects of apple culture. Plus, we'll look at co-ferments, food pairings, and how drinkers are connecting with the land around them.Hard Core is powered by Simplecast.

Nature Magic
Episode 55 The National Biodiversity Conference 2022 Act Now for Nature

Nature Magic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 12:27


Today Mary gives a brief outline of her experience at the National Biodiversity Conference in Dublin Castle that took place over two days in June 2022. Act Now For Naturehttps://www.biodiversityconference.ie/

The NatureBacked Podcast
Great Time For Deep Tech Investing With Outsized Ventures

The NatureBacked Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 22:11


Startups should focus on their cash burn and seek to build a 36-month runway as the downturn in markets and economies has started, but it's a great time to be investing in deep tech as founders are increasingly keen to tackle world-changing challenges, Outsized Ventures' general partner Isabel Fox said in an interview on the sidelines of the Latitude59 startup conference in Tallinn in late May 2022.London-headquartered Outsized Ventures is a 2021-founded deep tech investment firm that invests in Seed+ rounds in founders that are going to have a big impact on the world for the better.**A few key takeaways from Isabel Fox:**I think people want to do stuff that's going to have a purpose and an impact. So you're finding more and more great talent wanting to address some of the world's greatest challenges.The first thing you'll see is more founders wanting to find solutions to our problems. So we definitely see an increase in fabulous people trying to work through whether that's carbon counting, whether it's sustainability projects, which they think can get off the ground. **I still think more money will come into the area. It sort of leads with the quality of the founders and the ideas, and what they're trying to build, and the money will be there for great founders, as you know, and I think that's starting to happen. But we need to obviously speed up what we're doing in order to save our planet.**You definitely hear from corporates that they're looking at it. But I don't think many of them actually even have a strategy. They're working through the plans with the consultants, and when you start to look at the costs of going carbon neutral by 2030, they've got to make a significant investment to get there. Of which I see sort of the start, but I'm probably like you: I'm not seeing them make that full, big commitment of quite a few 100 million, in some cases to sort of drive that. So I think, I think it will be right, I think there'll be panic right at the end. And people then want to sort of see how they can get out of it, rather than necessarily fulfill that obligation.**So my advice to founders has been: to watch the cash burn, get prudent on that, and try to increase your runway to 36 months. So you have the luxury of time, and hopefully, the world may have stabilized sooner than we think. I think being tight, and being focused is not a bad thing. I always think that it's about being savvy, it's about being prudent and nimble. **I think the stuff that we're backing and the stuff that you like are big plays that have a huge impact on the future of society. That's not going to change much. For me, actually, in deep tech, I think it's a great time to be investing. We still got the problems in the world; we still need to solve them. And these opportunities are so huge that even if we have a bad two-year period now in the macro economy, they're going to come through the other side, very, very strong.

On The Green Fence
The wood wide web: What is it and how does it work?

On The Green Fence

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 28:15


Trees are connected to each other by a huge underground network through which they can exchange information. But why is this crucial for the survival of forests and how is climate change affecting connectivity?

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
National Biodiversity Conference gets underway in Dublin today

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 5:50


Malcolm Noonan, Minister of State for Heritage, discusses the National Biodiversity Conference that starts today and which will form an important part of the public consultation process on Ireland's new National Biodiversity Action Plan

Climate Tech Cocktails
Live at Techonomy (1/4)! Living Carbon: Maddie Hall

Climate Tech Cocktails