Podcasts about Biodiversity

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Variety and variability of life forms

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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Biodiversity

Show all podcasts related to biodiversity

Latest podcast episodes about Biodiversity

Earth Wise
How Quickly Can The Planet Recover? | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 2:00


Climate change refers to long-term shifts in temperatures and weather patterns.  Historically, these shifts were natural.  But since the Industrial Revolution, scientists have found that the main driver of climate change has been human activities, primarily by adding significant amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere through the burning of fossil fuels.  Today, climate change […]

Today in Focus
How Pablo Escobar's ‘cocaine hippos' became a biodiversity nightmare

Today in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 25:53


Animals brought illegally to Colombia by the drug kingpin have been allowed to roam free and are now disrupting the fragile ecosystem. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus

GZero World with Ian Bremmer
Special Edition: Why Biodiversity Loss Matters to Governments and Investors

GZero World with Ian Bremmer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 35:28


Are global leaders finally taking needed action on environmental issues? Coming out of the COP26 meeting in Glasgow, we've seen governments agree to a certain set of policies to fight climate change. But that isn't the only urgent environmental issue we face. The twin problem of climate change AND biodiversity loss are a serious threat to not just governments, but also investors. The latest episode of Living Beyond Borders, a special podcast series from GZERO brought to you by Citi Private Bank, looks at how important biodiversity is to the global economy, and what leaders need to do to prevent further loss. Moderated by Caitlin Dean, Head of the Geostrategy Practice at Eurasia Group, this episode features Anita McBain, Managing Director at Citi Research, heading EMEA ESG Research; Harlin Singh, Global Head of Sustainable Investing at Citi Global Wealth; and Mikaela McQuade, director of Energy, Climate and Resources at Eurasia Group.

The joe gardener Show - Organic Gardening - Vegetable Gardening - Expert Garden Advice From Joe Lamp'l

For centuries, the objective of gardening has been to tame the wild, and that led to many horticultural practices that are disastrous for wildlife and the ecosystem at large. The objective of ecological gardening, a new movement, is to create beautiful spaces in concert with nature rather than trying to overcome nature. To explain the value of ecological gardening and how to implement it yourself to create beauty and biodiversity, my guest this week is gardener, consultant and writer Matt Rees-Warren.

Explore the Circular Economy
What if your food could tackle climate change and build biodiversity?

Explore the Circular Economy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 26:12


The way our food is produced and designed is one of the largest contributors to some of our most significant global challenges from biodiversity loss to climate change. But what if it was possible to reverse that and to create food that was nature and climate positive?In this episode, we explore how this can be achieved through better design, which also represents a significant opportunity for food manufacturers and retailers to make food that's better for customers, better for farmers, and better for business.We'll be joined by Emma Chow and Gaelle Le Gelard from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation's team to discuss our new publication, The Big Food Redesign, which demonstrates how companies can take a design-led approach that takes nature-positive food into the mainstream.--This podcast is based on episode 41 of the Circular Economy Show. Watch the full episode here.Explore the Big Food Redesign reportHear Amanda Ravenhill from the Buckmaster Fuller Institute on the Circular Economy PodcastDiscover more episodes of the Circular Economy ShowFind out more about the Ellen MacArthur Foundation

World Ocean Radio
Achieving the Ocean Commons

World Ocean Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:31


How do we govern and manage the ocean inside and outside of national jurisdiction in order to use it responsibly and assure its long-term potential? How do we collectively affirm the transformational change required to meet the conditions and challenges we face worldwide? In this week's episode of World Ocean Radio we seek answers in a recent article published in "Proceedings of the US National Academy of Science" that suggest principles for change and action required to sustain the value of the ocean now and for the future. World Ocean Radio provides coverage of a broad spectrum of ocean issues from science and education to advocacy and exemplary projects. World Ocean Radio, a project of the World Ocean Observatory, is a weekly series of five-minute audio essays available for syndicated use at no cost by college and community radio stations worldwide.

UCL Minds
AI - Climate Change friend or foe?

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 59:33


Date: Tuesday 16 November 2021 About the lecture: The existential threat to humanity from Climate Change requires action at a scale and speed that can seem almost impossible, transitioning systems that have operated for decades on fossil fuels to a completely new paradigm. Aidan O'Sullivan will talk about how Artificial Intelligence is a natural ally and catalyst for this change and the fundamental characteristics of AI as a software technology are ideally suited to enable the scale and speed of action that we need to mitigate a climate disaster. Kate Jones will then look at whether AI can be useful for understanding climate change impacts and solutions and Geoff Mulgan will then discuss the potential of AI to combat climate change – but also and why we need radically different ways of organising data for the full benefits to be achieved and why AI needs to be combined with human collective intelligence. About the speakers: Kate Jones, Professor of Ecology and Biodiversity at Department of Genetics, Evolution & Environment, UCL Sir Geoff Mulgan, Professor of Collective Intelligence, Public Policy & Social Innovation at University College London Aidan O'Sullivan, Associate Professor in Energy and AI at UCL Energy Institute and Turing Fellow at Alan Turing Institute This event is part of UCL's climate campaign ‘Generation One'. Together we are the new generation taking responsibility for climate action and turning science into actionable ideas. Join our new era of climate action at ucl.ac.uk/generation-one

40 for Tea
Why Peatlands can Mitigate Climate Change a beginners Tea with Dr Lydia Cole & Rach Allan

40 for Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:02


In Cup 28 of 40, Rach talks with Dr Lydia Cole, conservation ecologist, fresh from COP26 on why peat is so important as a nature based solution in climate change. This is a beginners guide, with key resources detailed on what we need to know, what we can do and be inspired by a woman who loves her specialist subject. Get the kettle on and join us to talk earth and our relationship with her. We drink Pukka tea today. Resources referenced: UNESCO World Heritage Site: FLOW COUNTRY  International union for conservation nature: Round table on sustainable palm oil Peatland Code Guardian article post COP on importance on Peatlands Lydia blog post #COP26

Maloom | معلوم
قريب ولا بعيد: عن علاقتنا مع الحيوانات

Maloom | معلوم

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:35


العلاقة التي تجمعنا مع الحيوانات غريبة بعض الشيء؛ بدأنا باصطيادها فقط، وواظبنا على ذلك رغم ما سببته من ضرر لنا. صرنا نربيها ونعيش معها جنبًا إلى جنب، رغم أن هذا القرب جعلنا معرضين للمزيد من الأمراض. كوفيد-19، والجدري، والأيدز، وغيرها. كيف انتقلت هذه الأمراض إلينا من الحيوانات؟ هذه الحلقة من بحث وكتابة بشر النجار، وتحرير عمر فارس، ومونتاج محمود أبو ندى، وتدقيق تالا مراغه، وتقديم سلام قطناني. في بودكاست «معلوم» تُبسّط سلام قطناني العلوم للإجابة على أسئلة هامّة عن أنفسنا والعالم والكون. بودكاست «معلوم» من إنتاج «صوت». بودكاست «معلوم» من إنتاج «صوت». المصادر: - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC. Zoonotic diseases. https://www.cdc.gov/ Web site. https://www.cdc.gov/onehealth/basics/zoonotic-diseases.html. Updated 2021. Accessed September, 2021. - Alizon S. C'est grave dr darwin? L'évolution, les microbes et nous. Le Seuil; 2016. - National Research Council. Sustaining global surveillance and response to emerging zoonotic diseases. 2010. - Levin S. Zoonoses. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 2012:1964-1967. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7151794/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7151794/. doi: 10.1016/B978-1-4377-1604-7.00336-5. - Behbehani AM. The smallpox story: Life and death of an old disease. Microbiol Rev. 1983;47(4):455-509. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6319980 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC281588/. doi: 10.1128/mr.47.4.455-509.1983. - Henderson DA, Inglesby TV, Bartlett JG, et al. Smallpox as a biological WeaponMedical and public health management. JAMA. 1999;281(22):2127-2137. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.281.22.2127. Accessed 9/10/2021. doi: 10.1001/jama.281.22.2127. - Pan American Health Organization, (PAHO). Rabies in humans is 100% preventable but more than 55,000 people die each year . https://www.paho.org/en Web site. https://www3.paho.org/hq/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=251:2008-rabies-humans-100percent-preventable-but-more-than-55-000-people-die-each-year&Itemid=40264&lang=en. Updated 2008. Accessed September, 2021. - Sharp PM, Hahn BH. Origins of HIV and the AIDS pandemic. Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine. 2011;1(1):a006841. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22229120 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3234451/. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a006841. - de Sousa JD, Müller V, Lemey P, Vandamme A. High GUD incidence in the early 20 century created a particularly permissive time window for the origin and initial spread of epidemic HIV strains. PloS one. 2010;5(4):e9936. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20376191 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2848574/. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009936. - Platto S, Zhou J, Wang Y, Wang H, Carafoli E. Biodiversity loss and COVID-19 pandemic: The role of bats in the origin and the spreading of the disease. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2021;538:2-13. Support the show: https://www.sowt.com/plus

The 90 Second Naturalist

90 Second Naturalist for Thursday, November 25, 2021

agri-Culture
Ep 143 Happy Thanksgiving 2021

agri-Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 19:15


A thanks to all of our listeners, sponsors, and especially all of the people who bring food to our tables each day....The FarmersLinks:https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0062622/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yM25-lz1Ymshttps://www.theeisenberggroup.com/https://www.dutchessfair.com/the-fairgrounds/all-events/new-york-state-sheep-wool-festival/  https://www.virtual.sheepandwool.com/41Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/agriCulturePodcast)

Transmissions from Hawaii
03 In the Twilight Zone: Discussing Coral Reefs, Ichthyology, & Biodiversity w. Dr. Richard Pyle

Transmissions from Hawaii

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 32:00


Dr. Richard Pyle is the senior curator of Ichthyology at Bishop Museum in Honolulu. He spends his days researching fish and whenever possible diving deep into the ocean in order to discover new species of fish. On this episode of Transmissions from Hawaii, we conclude our conversation with Dr. Richard Pyle. This time we are focusing on deep coral reefs, the creatures that inhabit them, ichthyology, and the ongoing threat of climate change. Guests & Links Dr. Richard Pyle Further Information To learn more about Dr. Richard Pyle, you can visit the website below. Richard L. Pyle, Ph.D To learn more about Bishop Museum, visit their website via the link below. Bishop Museum Website Advertisers Hawaii SHIP Hawaii SHIP Website Credits Editing and sound design: Tony Vega Transcript: Milabeats.go Transmissions from Hawaii logo: fikrihidajat (Based on concept sketch by Tony Vega) Featured image: Courtesy of Richard Tanabe Jr. Follow Us on Social Media Transmissions from Hawaii on Instagram Transmissions from Hawaii on Facebook Transmissions from Hawaii on Twitter Transcript You can download the PDF transcript here.

The Steel on Steel Short Show with John Loeffler
Patrick Wood: The Great Narrative / Biodiversity

The Steel on Steel Short Show with John Loeffler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 26:46


The World Economic Forum is hosting a meeting this month in the United Arab Emirates to discuss what they are calling the Great Narrative.  Back with us today to discuss this is Pat Wood, Editor-in-Chief of Technocracy News and President of Citizens for Free Speech.  The need for this Great Narrative shows that their plans aren't working as well as they would like.  It'll still be the same propaganda it has always been, but now everyone will be on the same page.  Pat also reveals that Big Pharma and the sustainable development crowd have redefined the term biodiversity to include genetic manipulation and coding for all species on the planet, including humans.  It's scientific humanism like you've never seen it!   Enjoy the show? Help support this program. Buy John a coffee.   Want More? Listen to our daily Premium podcast and decades of archives when you subscribe at steelonsteel.com Show your support of Steel on Steel with branded apparel and accessories - Shop SOSGear!   Follow Us Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube   © 1990-2021 Steel on Steel Productions • All Rights Reserved • Contact Us

Tennessee WildCast
TW 266 - Skinner Mountain, A Biodiversity Hotspot

Tennessee WildCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 28:31


We're excited to announce the addition of 11,000+ acres for public hunting, fishing and so much more. This week TWRA's Tim Churchill and Chris Simpson join us to help us learn more about this acquisition and opportunities on this great piece of land. Special thanks to The Conservation Fund, The Nature Conservancy, Forest Legacy, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Tennessee Department of Forestry, Walmart's Acres for America Program, and U-Haul for helping make this project a success. #tnwildlife #gooutdoorstennessee #wildlifemanagement #tennesseewildcast

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global
At COP26, connecting the climate and nature agendas

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 31:55


Protecting biodiversity and adopting nature-based solutions: Both play a critical role in addressing climate change and therefore cannot be ignored. This is a key theme we heard repeated at COP26, the U.N.'s big climate conference that took place in Glasgow over the first two weeks of November. In this episode of ESG Insider, we explore the emerging dialogue on climate change and nature-based considerations. For example, 92% of country climate pledges, known as Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs, submitted for COP26 included nature in their plans, Capitals Coalition CEO Mark Gough tells us. The Capitals Coalition advocates for companies to identify, measure and value their impacts and dependencies on natural capital, social capital and human capital. "Climate change is a driver for nature change," says Mark. "But also, nature can help to drive the changes that we want to see in the climate to make improvements there." In this episode, we also talk with Sarah Bratton Hughes, Global Head of Sustainability Solutions at UK-based asset management firm Schroders. She outlines how the firm is moving to reduce deforestation risks in its portfolios. And we'll hear how hard-to-decarbonize sectors such as steel and chemicals use nature to help meet their climate targets from Anthony Hobley, who is co-executive director of the Mission Possible Platform, a partnership between the World Economic Forum and the Energy Transitions Commission. For further coverage of COP26, listen to the podcast episode on Article 6 here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/at-cop26-why-article-6-matters-to-companies-and-investors/id1475521006?i=1000539436647 And listen to the podcast episode where we interviewed the co-chair of the Task Force on Nature-related Financial Disclosures, or TNFD, here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-new-task-force-in-town-tnfd-co-chair-talks/id1475521006?i=1000528412510 Photo credit: Getty Images

Synapsen. Ein Wissenschaftspodcast von NDR Info

Bakterien nehmen wir oft vor allem als Krankheitserreger wahr. Dabei schützen sie uns auch. Streng genommen sind wir auch im Haushalt von natürlicher Artenvielfalt umgeben - schätzungsweise sind aber nur 20-50 von 200.000 Bakterienarten pathogen. Deshalb ist aggressives Putzen oft kontraproduktiv. Wissenschaftsjournalist Marko Pauli hat mit einem Biologen gesprochen, der sich als Mikroben-Fan zu erkennen gibt, und er hat ein Hamburger Labor besucht, in dem mit plastikzersetzenden Bakterien gearbeitet wird. Marko erklärt im Gespräch mit Host Maja Bahtijarević, wie Kleinstlebewesen unser Grundwasser sauber halten, unter welchen Bedingungen sie eine Ölpest im Meer bekämpfen können und warum Milben im Gesicht kein Grund zur Sorge sind. Außerdem: wie das nun mit dem Händewaschen und Desinfektionsmittel in der Coronakrise ist. • Mikroskopische Aufnahmen und darauf basierende 3D-Modelle Fluoreszenz-markierter Bakterien in einem gebrauchten Küchenschwamm | MDR, Bildmaterial der Hochschule Furtwangen https://www.mdr.de/wissen/mensch-alltag/keime-im-kuechenschwamm-102.html • Das Rob Dunn-Lab lädt Wissenschaftler aller Couleur ein, die mikrobielle Artenvielfalt zu erforschen | The Public Science Lab - Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity of Humans and Food https://robdunnlab.com • Plattform für Citizen Science-Projekte in Deutschland, ein Projekt von Wissenschaft im Dialog (gGmbH) und dem Museum für Naturkunde Berlin | Bürger schaffen Wissen https://www.buergerschaffenwissen.de • Buch von Rob Dunn: "Eine Naturgeschichte der Wildnis in unseren Häusern, von den Mikroben in unseren Duschen bis zu den Grillen in unseren Kellern" | Rob Dunn: "Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live" https://robdunnlab.com/science-portfolio/never-home-alone/ • Studie zum Rückgang der Gesamtbiomasse der Insekten um mehr als 75 Prozent in 27 Jahren | Caspar A. Hallmann et al.: More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas, Oktober 2017 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185809 • Eine Studie der Ruhruniversität kommt zu dem Schluss, dass sowohl Seife als auch Desinfektionsmittel zuverlässig Corona-Viren und deren Mutanten töten | Toni Luise Meister et al.: Comparable Environmental Stability and Disinfection Profiles of the Currently Circulating SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern B.1.1.7 and B.1.351, The Journal of Infectious Diseases, August 2021 https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/224/3/420/6276396 • Hände anstelle von häufigem Händewaschen mit Seifen desinfizieren | Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft: Handekzeme nehmen zu - Handhygiene-Strategie in Pandemiezeiten ändern, Informationsdienst Wissenschaft e. V. https://idw-online.de/de/news765848 • Das US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) zum Händewaschen: Handdesinfektionsmittel könnten schädliche Chemikalien wie Pestizide und Schwermetalle nicht von den Händen entfernen, außerdem seien Handdesinfektionsmittel auf Alkoholbasis ein mögliches Einfallstor für Bakterien, die Resistenzen entwickeln oder entwickelt haben | New Straits Times: Overuse of hand sanitisers poses health problems, Oktober 2021 https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2021/10/734242/overuse-hand-sanitisers-poses-health-problems • Studie zum Wandel der biologischen Vielfalt in marinen und terrestrischen Lebensgemeinschaften | Shane A. Blowes et al.: The geography of biodiversity change in marine and terrestrial assemblages, Science, Oktober 2019 https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.aaw1620 • Milben im Gesichtstalg | Erika Engelhaupt: Mini-Mitbewohner - In unseren Gesichtsporen leben Milben https://www.nationalgeographic.de/tiere/2020/06/mini-mitbewohner-in-unseren-gesichtsporen-leben-milben • Analyse vom Grundwasser Hannovers | Bernd Haase: Überraschende Artenvielfalt - diese Tiere tummeln sich in Hannovers Grundwasser, Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung https://www.haz.de/Hannover/Aus-der-Stadt/Uebersicht/Hannover-Im-Grundwasser-tummeln-sich-unerwartet-viele-Lebewesen • Ein Appell aus der Mikrobiologie von Antje Boetius und anderen Wissenschaftlern, die Mikroben und ihr Wirken nicht zu übersehen | "Wer über den Klimawandel redet, muss auch über Mikroben reden", Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Juni 2019 https://www.mpg.de/13561429/0613-mbio-064278-wer-ueber-den-klimawandel-redet-muss-auch-ueber-mikroben-reden • Das Potential von Bakterien im Kampf gegen den Plastikmüll | Fünf Fragen an den Mikrobiologen Wolfgang Streit: "Für eine PET-Flaschen brauchen Bakterien mindestens 500 Jahre", Universität Hamburg, April 2020 https://www.uni-hamburg.de/newsroom/19neunzehn/2020/0414-5-fragen-an-mikrobiologen.html • Forscher haben eine Methode entwickelt, ölabbauende Bakterien auf Plättchen aus biologisch abbaubaren Holzfasern aufzubringen und im Meer auszusetzen, um damit Erdöl aus dem Wasser aufzunehmen | TU Dresden: Mit Holz statt Chemie gegen die Ölpest https://www.wissenschaft.de/umwelt-natur/mit-holz-statt-chemie-gegen-die-oelpest/ • Die Exxon Valdez Ölkatastrophe von 1989 - Studie zum Verbleib, den Auswirkungen und den Sanierungsbewertungen | Yuqiang Xia, Michel C Boufadel: Lessons from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill disaster in Alaska, Oktober 2010 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259392296_Lessons_from_the_Exxon_Valdez_Oil_Spill_disaster_in_Alaska • Ölkatastrophe im Golf von Mexiko von 2010, der größten Ölpest in der Geschichte der Meere | Richard Pallardy: Deepwater Horizon oil spill environmental disaster, Gulf of Mexico https://www.britannica.com/event/Deepwater-Horizon-oil-spill

Today with Claire Byrne
Forestry licensing backlog

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 21:15


Pippa Hackett, Minister of State for Land Use and Biodiversity, and Matt Carthy, Sinn Féin TD for Cavan-Monaghan, on forestry licensing backlog

Sourcing Matters.show
Ep. 101: Will Shafroth - National Park Foundation, CEO & President

Sourcing Matters.show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 49:19


Ep. 101: Will Shafroth – National Park Foundation, CEO & President || Proper land use and natural resource management on public lands is a mechanism to foster greater planetary stability.  Joining as guest of episode 101 is the President and CEO of the National Park Foundation, Will Shafroth.  Throughout the 45 minute conversation we explore how exposure, experience and immersion into the US National Parks changes mindsets for the better. We hear how enlightenment, empathy and environmental consciousness is presented each and every year to over 330 million visitors in 422 National Parks. Spanning all 50 states, the parks encompass 84 million acres, 2400 historical sites, 17K miles of trails and 43K miles of shoreline – available to us all as a public service. The vast majority of the National Parks are untouched wilderness. This wilderness combined with smart land use and proper natural resource management will help stabilize a planet under threat by coming at it from a few different angles.  Not only will these public lands (with a collective footprint about the size of Montana) clean water, sequester & bank carbon, and nurture biodiversity, but the National Parks offer a living classroom for deeper understanding and appreciation for the all important Nature-Based Solutions to climate change. Ultimately, reconnecting more of us with natural order is a required next step in (climate) action to mitigate climate change. Wallace Stegner famously called the National Parks “America's Best Idea”. Will Shafroth and his team at the National Park Foundation (NPF) believe that this best idea should be common grounds available to each and everyone of us no matter background or history. Under Shafroth's leadership, the National Park Foundation has spawned numerous initiatives to foster inclusion for all audiences and to cater to those who have been often overlooked in previous generations of visitors. Owning “the Good, the Bad and the Ugly” of National Parks and US History, Shafroth looks to the wide array of Parks, Sites and Monuments as learning laboratories and living classrooms that will progress social and environmental solutions for decades to come. In feeding our souls by reconnecting us with Nature, and with each other, the public lands of our National Parks can teach us a bit more about who we were, who we are now, and what we can become if we strive for a more just and balanced future. www.SourcingMatters.show

agri-Culture
Ep 142 Becky Serres: Ft. Robinson...From Buffalo Soldiers to Longhorn Roundups

agri-Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 36:57


In this week's episode we sit down with Becky Serres, a retired employee of Ft. Robinson State Park in Crawford, Nebraska. We were at Ft. Robinson to film the Longhorn roundup and ran into Becky as she volunteered to saddle up her horse and help herd these 125 head of cattle to their winter pasture.  The Ft. Robinson herd is one of the last few publicly-owned herds of the original style of longhorns remaining in the U.S., what we might call CTLR cattle.Besides the longhorn herd, there is plenty of history at this park as well.  In August 1873, the Red Cloud Agency was moved from the North Platte River to the White River, near what is now Crawford, Nebraska, in the northwest corner of the state. The following year in 1874, the area became a military camp at the agency site.  From 1874 through 1948 it housed Native Americans to German POW's, was remount station during WWI and training dogs and pack animals for the Italy Theatre in WWII.Becky Serres worked there for 30 years, until her retirement last year. She love's the history that her great state of Nebraska and especially that of Ft. Robinson. So, please sit back and enjoy our interview with Becky Serres.Links:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Robinsonhttp://outdoornebraska.gov/fortrobinson/https://stateparks.com/fort_robinson_state_park_in_nebraska.htmlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crazy_Horsehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_SoldierSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/agriCulturePodcast)

Welcome to Florida
Episode 74: Butterflies

Welcome to Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 58:32


This week's episode begins by discussing how Florida's lack of a clean energy plan is costing the state federal infrastructure dollars.Our guest is Dr. Jaret Daniels who leads the lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) research efforts at the University of Florida. Daniels' team can be found working at the world's most prestigious lepidoptera research facility in the world, the McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity inside the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus in Gainesville. The McGuire Center houses 12 million butterfly and moth specimens from around the world.  We discuss collapsing monarch populations, butterfly rescue efforts in Florida, and what you can do to help sustain butterfly numbers in state.Helpful links to learn more:Florida Native Plant Society.Xerces Society, the world's foremost conservation group working to save butterfly and pollinator populations.Why you should NOT use tropical milkweed to attract monarchs to your landscape.Discover the power of backyard pollinator habitats using native plants and their potential to protect biodiversity.This week's episode is sponsored by VisitSarasota.com. Here is a link to the best places to find butterflies across Sarasota County.If this topic interests you, listen back to Episode 41 where we spoke to Florida author Jeff VanderMeer who's rewilding his Tallahassee yard and offers suggestions for how you can do the same.

Biophilic Solutions
Front Lawns, Biodiversity & Bylaws: Nina-Marie Lister

Biophilic Solutions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 39:56


This week, Monica and Jennifer sit down with Nina-Marie Lister, Graduate Director and Professor in the School of Urban and Regional Planning at Ryerson University, located in Toronto, Canada. Building off of her captivating presentation at last month's Biophilic Leadership Summit, Nina-Marie lays out the little-known history of the front lawn's hold on North American households, the barriers for achieving greater biodiversity on private property, and the city bylaws that prioritize conformity over environmental health. Nina-Marie holds the Margolese National Design for Living Prize for her work in ecology and design and she was awarded honorary membership in the American Society of Landscape Architects. Her work connects people to nature in cities, through green infrastructure design for climate resilience, biodiversity and human wellbeing.Show NotesAbout Nina-Marie Lister (School of Urban and Regional Planning, Ryerson University)Ecological Design LabPLANDFORMProjective Ecologies: Ecology, Research, and Design in the Climate Age, edited by Chris Reed and Nina-Marie ListerThe Ecosystem Approach: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Managing for Sustainability (Complexity in Ecological Systems) by by David Waltner-Toews, James Kay, and Nina-Marie ListerThe Well-Placed Weed: The Bountiful Life of Ryan Gainey, a film by Steve Branford and Cooper SanchezWild Urban Plants of the Northeast, A Field Guide by Peter Del Tredici Landscape Citizenships, edited by Tim Waterman, Jane Wolff, and Ed Wall

Beyond Blathers
At the Beaty Biodiversity Museum

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 24:02


Come along with us as we explore the Beaty Biodiversity Museum at the University of British Columbia! We're on the hunt for the insects, fish, and fossils you can find at Blathers' museum. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Olivia is also open for commissions for adorable pet portraits, pins, and custom illustrations — take a look at the highlight on our Instagram! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

agri-Culture
Ep 141 Dr. Jeffrey Perry and Cornell University: A New Take on The Millennial Falcon

agri-Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 41:51


Some of us associate Cornell University with the famous birding department and nest cams (that's you, Elara).  Some might think of Cornell as the home of the Cornell Small Farms Program newsletter (also Elara).  And some might think of Cornell as the school with the neat restaurant program (El…wait - what?!?).  No matter what you associate with this prestigious Ivy-League school, it's probably good.  Way back in 1868 Ezra Cornell said “I would found an institution where any personal can find instruction in any study.”  We think the university took that to heart, with excellent results.Dr. Jeffrey Perry's presence at the 2021 FFA convention was a perfect match, because not only is he a guy with really interesting ties, he's a guy who is obviously cuckoo (still on birds a little) about education.  He spoke with us about Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, about the University as a whole, and why it's a great place to be.  Here is one man who obviously epitomizes the CALS webpage statement:  “Intellectual Exploration:  We work together to provide new answers and ask new questions.”  …no matter what the field might be, we might add.  And here we thought they were just about birds. Links:https://cals.cornell.edu/jeffrey-perry https://www.ffa.org/ https://convention.ffa.org/ https://www.audubon.org/content/pacific-flyway https://www.audubon.org/conservation/project/california-working-lands https://www.cornell.edu/about/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornell_University https://www.dfa.cornell.edu/accounting/investedfunds/currentltiprates https://finaid.cornell.edu/detailed-breakdown-of-estimated-cost-attendance https://news.cornell.edu/content/nobel-laureates-affiliated-cornell-universitySupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/agriCulturePodcast)

Mongabay Newscast
Let it grow: Natural forest regeneration's amazing reforestation power

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 65:46


Initiatives to plant billions and even trillions of trees have been popping up like seedlings after a rainstorm. These are important in tackling climate change and biodiversity loss, but what about using natural regeneration, where one allows a forest to regrow using its native seedstock, in such efforts?   On this episode we discuss the amazing power of letting forests regrow, and when tree-planting is necessary, plus what we know about the differences between planted and naturally regenerated forests with two guests: University of California professor Karen Holl describes the conditions that are conducive to natural regeneration of forests and shares inspiring examples ranging from current experiments to historical events like in Costa Rica and the Northeast United States. And researcher/restoration consultant Robin Chazdon discusses the decision-making process that goes into successful reforestation projects, and whether today's tree-planting campaigns are likely to be beneficial in the long run. Related resources: ”Is planting trees as good for the Earth as everyone says?” ”Beyond tree planting: When to let forests restore themselves” Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
All-Island Climate and Biodiversity Research Network launched today

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:47


Professor Yvonne Buckley, Vice President for Biodiversity and Climate Action at Trinity College, discusses the launch of the All-Island Climate and Biodiversity Research Network.

Big Picture Science
Your Inner Tree

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:31


Declining biodiversity is a problem as fraught as climate change. Loss of habitat, monoculture crops, and the damming of waterways all lead to massive species extinction. They tear at life's delicate web, and threaten a balance established by four billion years of evolution. Can we reassess our relationship to Nature? We consider logging efforts that make elephants part of the work force, and how to leverage the cooperative behavior of trees. Becoming Nature's ally, rather than its enemy. Guests: Suzanne Simard – Professor of Forest Ecology at the University of British Columbia and author of “Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest.” Carl Safina – Professor of Nature and Humanity at Stony Brook University and founder of the Safina Center, and author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.” Jacob Shell – Professor of Geography and Urban Studies at Temple University, and author of “Giants of the Monsson Forest: Living and Working with Elephants.”  

Planet Pod's Podcast
Biodiversity in Crisis

Planet Pod's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:02


How linked are the Climate Crisis and the Nature Crisis? We talk to Professor Andy Purvis of the Natural History Museum about managing nature rather than mining it, Greta, over consumption, lobbying, shifting baselines and how we can encourage the behaviour change that nature so desperately needs. Amanda goes on location to see first hand the threat to one small woodland rich in biodiversity and a superhighway for invertebrates is at risk of destruction. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Science Weekly
Cop26: can our seas save us?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 12:16


The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian's award-winning environment team. Today, the Guardian's biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, talks to one of the world's leading marine ecologists, Dr Enric Sala, about the role our oceans can play in preventing climate catastrophe. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

Today with Claire Byrne
The Gathering

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 25:52


Brid Smith- PBP TD for Dublin South Central, Dr. Cara Augustenburg, Senior Fellow in Environmental Policy at UCD & Member of the Climate Change Advisory Council, Christopher O'Sullivan- Fianna Fail TD for Cork South-West and party spokesperson on Environment, Climate Action and Biodiversity, Mick Clifford- Special Correspondent, Irish Examiner

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: Lost chameleon reappears

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 5:07


The rare Champman's pygmy chameleon has been missing in the wild for over two decades. First described in 1992, it was finally seen in a dwindling patch of rainforest in the Malawi Hills in 2016. Researchers say there are likely more. However, they are unable to travel the long distances between the shrinking patches of their forest home.  Scientists' findings of the rare chameleon call for conservation of the chameleon's habitat, which has seen an 80% deforestation rate over the past 40 years.  This episode features the popular article, "Rare pygmy chameleon, lost to science, found in dwindling Malawi forest," by Liz Kimbrough: https://news.mongabay.com/2021/08/rare-pygmy-chameleon-lost-to-science-found-in-dwindling-malawi-forest/ Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Photo Credit: Chapman's pygmy chameleon by Krystal Tolley Liz Kimbrough is a staff writer for Mongabay. Find her on Twitter: @lizkimbrough_

Biophilic Solutions
Creating Outdoor Citizens with Appalachian Mountain Club's John Judge

Biophilic Solutions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 49:11


This week on Biophilic Solutions, we speak with John Judge, President and CEO of the Appalachian Mountain Club, the oldest conservation organization in the United States. The mission of the Appalachian Mountain Club is to foster protection, enjoyment, and understanding of the outdoors in order to create a world in which nature is fundamentally valued. AMC achieves this mission through education, outdoor programming, and robust research and conservation efforts to tackle climate change in the Northeastern U.S. In this episode, we talk to John about shifting the way we interact with the natural environment, how we can all put nature at the center of decision-making, and what it means to be an outdoor citizen. Show NotesAppalachian Mountain Club, outdoors.org The Outdoor Citizen: Get Out, Give Back, Get Active by John Judge (2019)Adventures via the Appalachian Mountain ClubDragonfly Mercury Project (U.S. National Park Service)Maine Woods InitiativeBecome a Member of the Appalachian Mountain Club Appalachia, America's longest-running journal of mountaineering and conservationShop the Appalachian Mountain Club

The RegenNarration
100. Wanted Land Doctors: Rehydrating landscapes, reversing desertification & rebuilding wealth

The RegenNarration

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 76:55


Tens of millions of ‘pests' degrade lands and waters in Australia alone – pigs, goats, camels, buffalos, donkeys. Cruel, wasteful, expensive, mostly futile and often counter-productive culling programs are no solution. But what if it didn't have to be this way? What if some of those large wild herbivores could be harnessed towards regeneration? This is the story of a family that has regenerated an incredible patch of country, and for 20 years that has incorporated and relied on wild donkeys. The bond these animals share with this Station family is clear. But the state department recently ordered the family to gun them down. It's a painful flashpoint. One of the great stories of regeneration is on the line, and by extension, the potential for next generations to build on it, further restoring landscapes at scale for all our benefit. Chris Henggeler and his family manage Kachana Station in a remote pocket of the East Kimberley, only accessible by foot or air. They took responsibility for this desertified and abandoned country, and have achieved so much. Yet with still vast lands desertifying around them, and so much opportunity to build on models like Kachana, Chris gave a presentation earlier this year called ‘Wanted Land Doctors'. It was a powerful invitation for the next generations to join the fray, and how rest of us can help them do it. The model areas at Kachana feel like an oasis. But imagine this being the norm. Something very special is happening here. And a significant aspect of it is in jeopardy, when it could be a great catalyst for further regeneration. As Judith Schwartz, renowned author of The Reindeer Chronicles, says: we could be a world leader off the back of developments like this. And she's not alone. My family and I spent a couple of days here with the podcast last time, back in 2018, and felt transformed. We spent ten days this time, to delve more deeply into this great tale of regeneration, and see for myself whether the donkey shoot order is a necessary evil, or as Chris argues, an enormous error in regeneration, at a time when we can least afford it. I've gone the full distance on this one, with a couple of parts to release, as a) it's so rare I'm here, b) it's so vitally important to discuss, and c) there just might be opportunities stemming out of this with some of you. In the main episode here, we head out to the Station in the old Cessna light plane, before a short evening stroll on arrival. Then come morning, Chris and I head out into the gorge behind the homestead for an extended walk. This episode was recorded at Kachana Station in the East Kimberley, in the far north east of Western Australia, throughout the week of 13 September 2021. Title slide image: Chris Henggeler on our gorge walk at Kachana Station (pic: Anthony James). You'll find an extensive selection of photographs on the episode web page. Music: The System, by the Public Opinion Afro Orchestra. The tune accompanying the intro is by Jeremiah Johnson. Get more: Tune in to the special Extra to this episode out shortly, and the closing chapter to our time at Kachana, out next week. And to hear more from our first visit to Kachana Station back in 2018, tune into episode 25. The Kachana Station website - https://www.kachana-station.com/ And a blog and sequence of short videos with Chris on a webinar hosted by Biodiversity for Livable Climate (which also took place while we were at Kachana) - https://bio4climate.org/2021/10/23/kachana-station-a-home-for-donkey-led-restoration/ Thanks very much to the generous supporters of this podcast, for making it possible. If you too value what you hear, please consider joining them by becoming a patron of the podcast. Just head to the website at https://www.regennarration.com/support, and follow the prompts. Thanks for helping to keep the show going! And thanks for listening.

Defender Radio: The Podcast for Wildlife Advocates and Animal Lovers
The Switch: Hugelkultur and Biodiversity, with Sam Ceci

Defender Radio: The Podcast for Wildlife Advocates and Animal Lovers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 11:20


Samantha Ceci is helping create biodiversity in a monocultured woodlot by switching to Hugelkultur! Sam, a Master of Resource and Environmental Management Candidate at Dalhousie University, utilized the German horticulture method to increase biodiversity – and therefore create habitat for wildlife and pollinators, reduce carbon footprints at the school and generally be a really awesome educational opportunity. Sam joined The Switch to share how she developed the project and how people around the world can utilize this traditional method. The project was made possible in part due to a grant from the WWF Go Wild School Grant. Links Follow Sam Ceci with Conservation With Sam https://www.instagram.com/conservationwithsam/ Check out the CTV News Atlantic Clip with Sam and her Hugelkultur project: https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=2265227 Want to suggest topics for The Switch? Reach out to us at DefenderRadio@Gmail.com, by visiting DefenderRadio.com or engaging host Michael Howie on social media via Instagram (www.instagram.com/howiemichael), TikTok (www.tiktok.com/@howiemichael) or Facebook (www.Facebook.com/DefenderRadio).  The Switch is produced by The Fur-Bearers (www.TheFurBearers.com), a charitable non-partisan organization whose mandate is to advocate on behalf of fur-bearing animals in the wild and in confinement, promote coexistence solutions in communities and protect the habitats of fur-bearing animals across Canada. You can follow The Fur-Bearers on Instagram (www.instagram.com/furbearers), Twitter (www.twitter.com/furbearers) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/FurFree). 

Dugongs And Seadragons
SCCS-NY Workshop “Dugongs and Sea Dragons: Using Game Play and Storytelling to Engage Diverse Conservation Voices” Part 1 – Workshop Introductions.

Dugongs And Seadragons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:01


Hey folx and welcome to a special series of Dugongs and Seadragons. We are between season 1 and two right now and during this time The dugongs and seadragons crew had an opportunity to do a workshop on how to use table top roleplaying games like Dungeons and Dragons to help engage people in conservation.   The workshop was done virtually at the Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York, through the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History. The workshop was 2 and a half hours long, but we have edited it into three 25-40 minute episodes to be release over the course of November.   We really hope you enjoy learning about how the crew here at Dugongs and Seadragons have managed to come up with a way to use our passion for D&D into a way to share our passion for the ocean and conservation.   For those of you just joining us on D&SD, we want to thank you for taking the time to listen to the important research we have been doing to see if we are really having an impact on marine science and conservation education. For are already devoted listeners, please note that the editing of this workshop was limited to removing the Um's and Uh's so you are going to get to see a glimpse into all the random shenanigans we chatter about during an episode, and if you want to listen to more of these randomness, you can sign up for our patreon, where we keep a library of all the unedited episodes. This month's adventure is also a cannon to the Dugong and Seadragons' world, and takes place between season 1 and season 2.   Please support Dugongs & Seadragons on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DugongsAndSeadragons

Sentientism
81: "Ethical value flows from reality" - Pablo Perez Castello - Sentientist Conversations

Sentientism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 98:07


Pablo (@PabloPCastello & on LinkedIn) is a Research Assistant at the Cambridge Centre for Animal Rights Law & a Junior Fellow of the Animals & Biodiversity programme of the Global Research Network (GRN) think tank. He is a PhD candidate at Royal Holloway (UoL). His research in Philosophy focuses on understanding the importance of human language in human dominion over animals. He also investigates the role animal language can play in relation to the participation of animals in political decision-making processes & the construction of zoodemocratic systems. His interests include ecofeminism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, critical disability studies, animal law, conservation, continental philosophy & critical animal studies. In Sentientist Conversations we talk about the two most important questions: “what's real?” & “what matters?” Sentientism is "evidence, reason & compassion for all sentient beings." The video of our conversation is here on YouTube. We discuss: 0:00 Welcome 1:30 Pablo's Intro - interdisciplinary, intersectional research re: human & non-human animals, their languages & potential zoodemocracy. 3:51 What's Real? - Born into an atheist family - Wittgenstein's "Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus" & the mystical sense of Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky - "Becoming sensitive to a dimension of reality that I thought had been hidden to me" via a purely scientific perspective - Are poetry, music, arts & feeling beyond science even while they are aspects of reality (not the mystical)? - Being grounded in our embodied existence - "Ethical value flows from reality"... "Sentience matters because it is real... there are beings that actually suffer" - Interests, preferences & relationships are all grounded in who those beings are - Derrida's "The Animal That Therefore I Am." What is it like for a cat to see me naked?! - Alterity. Appreciating the "other" in their own terms. Levinas - Science & naturalism & personal experience - Feminist thought & context - Language, categories, relations, community & power - "Western" binaries. Those with/without reason. Barbarians & the civilised. - Can relations & communities & cultures exist in their own rights, independent of entities or are they patterns of info processing in the minds of sentients? - Is the bond between cow & calf intrinsically valuable, separate from the impact on the cow & calf? - Science & scientism - Claire Jean Kim's "Dangerous Crossings". Understanding all perspectives including the context of our own. Mutual avowal - Lori Gruen & entanglement - The ancient, global, various roots of sentiocentrism & naturalism - Consilience vs. silos of knowledge ...and much more. Full show notes at Sentientism.info and on YouTube. Sentientism is “Evidence, reason & compassion for all sentient beings.” More at Sentientism.info. Join our "I'm a Sentientist" wall via this simple form. Everyone, Sentientist or not, is welcome in our groups. The biggest so far is here on FaceBook. Thanks Graham.

GZero World with Ian Bremmer
Man-Made Crisis: How Do We Survive on the Planet We Warmed? UN Environment Chief Explains

GZero World with Ian Bremmer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 28:02


Fires, floods, and droughts. Climate change is already happening but so far humans have been slow to react. Will the UN Climate Conference (COP26) produce lasting change or just more hot air? On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks with Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the UN Environment Program. Plus, a look at what's driving the United Kingdom's fuel shortage.

Environment China
Updates on Biodiversity and Climate COPs - with Li Shuo and Christoph Nedopil-Wang

Environment China

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 24:00


This year has been packed with China environmental and climate news, and there's no way this podcast could keep up. But today we're going to try! Our guests today are Li Shuo of Greenpeace East Asia and Christoph Nedopil-Wang of Shanghai Fudan University (and Global Bavarian). We're going to tackle the following hot topics: The biodiversity COP in Kunming The upcoming Glasgow COP The China announcement on finance for coal abroad And upcoming climate finance policies

AJ Daily
10-29-21 Beef-cow culling continues; hear from Angus Board candidate Dru Uden; new Missouri biodiversity pilot project to increase conservation habitat; new Food and Farm Facts book

AJ Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:17


10-29-21 AJ DailyBeef-Cow Culling ContinuesAdapted from a release by Paul Dykstra, Certified Angus Beef Board Elections: Hear From Candidate Dru Uden Listen to all Board candidate interviews hereAdapted from a release by Miranda Reiman, senior associate editorMissouri Biodiversity Pilot Project Provides Opportunities to Increase Conservation HabitatAdapted from a release by the Ecosystem Services Market Consortium New Ag Literacy Resource – Sharing the Story of Agriculture with Food and Farm FactsAdapted from a release by the American Farm Bureau Federation Compiled by Paige Nelson, field editor, Angus Journal. For more Angus news, visit angusjournal.net. 

Plant Based Briefing
135: Does it Make Sense to Serve Beef Ramen at COP26 by Sailesh Rao at ClimateHealers.org

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 6:43


Dr. Sailesh Rao at ClimateHealers.org discusses the upcoming climate conference, COP26, and politicians' and the media's unwillingness to address animal agriculture as a leading cause. Please take a moment to rate & review the podcast here. Thank you!

Mongabay Newscast
Indigenous bioacoustics: listening to the land for conservation and tradition

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:09


Indigenous-led conservation initiatives are being aided by the growing field of bioacoustics, with many communities around the world creating listening networks that monitor their lands and help them advocate for their conservation. We speak with two Indigenous leaders and scientists on this episode -- Stephanie Thorassie of the Seal River Watershed Alliance in Manitoba, and Angela Waupochick, a researcher of forested wetlands for Menominee Tribal Enterprises in Wisconsin -- about their projects and how bioacoustics techniques are aiding them.  We hear sound clips of bears and birds shared by Waupochick and also Jeff Wells of the National Audubon Society, which  partners with the Seal River Watershed Alliance to study the region's importance to wildlife toward establishing a new, 12-million-acre Indigenous Protected Area. Further reading: • ”Indigenous-managed lands found to harbor more biodiversity than protected areas” • Canada working towards new future for Indigenous-led conservation (Indigenous Protected Areas) Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Episode artwork: Polar bears at the mouth of the Seal River. Photo by Jordan Melograna of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative.   Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

Crazy Town
Bonus: Oceans of Knowledge with Sylvia Earle

Crazy Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 40:49


Sylvia Earle is a legend in ocean exploration and conservation. She comes ashore in Crazy Town to discuss some of her experiences in the depths, the state of the world's oceans and marine biodiversity, the limits to growth, the wonders and disappointments of technology, and her belief in the accumulation of knowledge as a pathway for change. Sylvia's new book is called Ocean: A Global Odyssey.Support the show (https://www.postcarbon.org/supportcrazytown/)

Climate 21
Sequestering Carbon, Increasing Biodiversity, And Alleviating Poverty - A Chat With Rebalance Earth's Walid Al Saqqaf

Climate 21

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:20


A few weeks back I had IMF Assistant Director Ralph Chami on the podcast talking about how he came up with a way to put a monetary value on the ecosystem services performed by keystone species such as whales in the wild initially and subsequently also by forest elephants. If you haven't heard that podcast, do check it out, you will not regret it.In today's episode, I invited Walid Al Saqqaf, co-founder with Ralph of Rebalance Earth, an organisation working to operationalise Ralph's work of putting a financial value on keystone species, starting with forest elephants in Gabon.We had a great conversation about how Rebalance Earth is using a private blockchain to track the flow of funds to ensure the integrity of the system, how they're using sensors to track the species and paying the sensor owners (thereby turning conservation projects into money-making ventures), and how they're opening up their platform for others to introduce more keystone species. This was a truly fascinating episode of the podcast and I learned loads as always, and I hope you do too.If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page, head on over to the Climate 21 Podcast Forum, or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).And if you want to know more about any of SAP's Sustainability solutions, head on over to www.sap.com/sustainability, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover the show. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane!Music credit - Intro and Outro music for this podcast was composed, played, and produced by my daughter Luna Juniper

American Planning Association
Fighting Climate Change in Cities With Biodiversity and Nature-Based Design

American Planning Association

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 65:20


In this episode of the People Behind the Plans podcast series, host Courtney Kashima, AICP, is joined by Rasmus Astrup, partner and design principal at Danish urban design and landscape architecture practice SLA. Rasmus was a co-presenter during the 2021 National Planning Conference at a session titled, “Strategies to Combat Extreme Heat”. Rasmus and Courtney discuss the importance of biodiversity and nature-based solutions to address the needs of cities to mitigate against the effects of climate change and specific issues like extreme urban heat. The two also discuss a few of the projects that his firm worked on from places around the globe like Toronto, Abu Dhabi, Copenhagen, and Detroit. They also dig into the significance of local knowledge and expertise when taking on projects as well as how to deal with the disproportionate impacts on more vulnerable populations. Episode URL: https://planning.org/podcast/fighting-climage-change-in-cities-with-biodiversity-and-nature-based-design/ This episode is sponsored by Tyler Technologies

Raising Your Antenna
Health Equity Issues are Environmental Issues

Raising Your Antenna

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 40:25


I'm not sure that the climate change and sustainability community would include issues related to the pandemic, biodiversity, health equity, and modern slavery in their definition of ESG. Yet, today on RYA, we address all of these issues with our guests Chris Kline (Global Senior Principal for Sustainability and ESG at Cardno), Natalie Egnot (Epidemiologist at Cardno Chemrisk), and Seth Yoskowitz (Interim CEO, International Development at Cardno).For those who are not familiar, Cardno is a global infrastructure, environmental, and social development company operating in more than 100 countries. It is a truly remarkable organization that partners with governments, NGOs, and corporations to address most, if not all, of the vexing environmental, health, and social challenges that persist globally. You will learn a lot on this episode, including: whether solar panels contribute to noise pollution. Spoiler alert: they do not.Tune in as we discuss:The impact of climate change on the developing world, and the measures being taken to stave off those outcomesHow Cardno is addressing all three ESG categoriesThe definition of modern slavery, and how Cardno helps its corporate clients address this crisis

The Pulse
New fronts in the fight against climate change

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:28


The search for solutions to address climate change is urgent. People want action now, something that will move the needle. But every solution that's on the table has potential unintended consequences or tradeoffs involved. For example, wind power sounds like a great, clean option, but wind farms need space — where should they be located? A plan to construct them in the ocean is upsetting many fishermen and conservationists. Efforts to mine the ocean floor for precious metals needed to make batteries for renewables are scaring marine biologists. And an audacious plan to cool the earth through geo-engineering is making lots of folks very anxious. On this episode, we explore climate solutions, their potential drawbacks, and how we can carefully weigh the risks and benefits. Also heard on this week’s episode: We talk with environmental researcher Forrest Fleischman about why planting trees may not be the climate cure-all we think it is. Fleischman is an associate professor of environment and natural resource policy at the University of Minnesota. How do we cut fossil fuel emissions? One idea from the Biden administration is opening large-scale commercial offshore wind farms. But in New Jersey, Susan Phillips reports the planned wind farms occupy some of the most fertile fishing grounds in the nation, which has sparked a major fight. Erik Cordes, professor and vice chair of biology at Temple University in Philadelphia, joins us to discuss the pivotal — yet often forgotten — role the deep ocean plays in protecting us from some of the worst effects of climate change, along with a new threat facing it: deep sea mining. While countries struggle to cut carbon emissions, some scientists say it's time to study a more controversial, short-term measure — reflecting more sunlight away from the earth to cool the planet. Alan Yu reports. People spend a lot of time and effort fighting invasive plant species and trying to return landscapes to their previous state. Samantha Chapman, professor of biology at Villanova University and co-director of its Center for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Stewardship, joins us to discuss rethinking that approach.

Real Organic Podcast
Michael Phillips: Restoring Degraded Lands With Biodiversity + Fungal Networks

Real Organic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:57


#035: Author, holistic orchardist, and fungal network devotee Michael Phillips shares his thoughts on promoting outrageous biodiversity to restore degraded lands and letting every part of nature play its intended role. To watch a video version of this podcast please visit:https://www.realorganicproject.org/michael-phillips-restoring-degraded-lands-with-outrageous-biodiversity-episode-thirty-fiveThe Real Organic Podcast is hosted by Dave Chapman and Linley Dixon, engineered by Brandon StCyr, and edited and produced by Jenny Prince.The Real Organic Project is a farmer-led movement working towards certifying 1,000 farms across the United States this year. Our add-on food label distinguishes soil-grown fruits and vegetables from hydroponically-raised produce. It also identifies pasture-raised meat, milk, and eggs as compared to products harvested from animals in horrific confinement (CAFOs - confined animal feeding operations).To find a Real Organic farm near you, please visit:https://www.realorganicproject.org/farmsWe believe that the organic standards, with their focus on soil health, biodiversity, and animal welfare were written as they should be. But the current lack of enforcement of those standards is jeopardizing small farms that follow the law. The lack of enforcement is also jeopardizing the overall health of the customers who support the organic movement; customers who are not getting what they pay for at market but are still paying a premium price. The lack of enforcement is jeopardizing the very cycles (water, air, nutrients) that Earth relies upon to provide us all with a place to live, by pushing extractive, chemical agriculture to the forefront.If you like what you hear and are feeling inspired, we would love for you to join our movement by becoming one of our 1,000  Real Fans!https://www.realorganicproject.org/1000-real-fans/To read our weekly newsletter (which might just be the most forwarded newsletter on the internet!) and get firsthand news about what's happening with organic food, farming and policy, please subscribe here:https://www.realorganicproject.org/email/

Forward Thinking Founders
749 - Lorea Coronado-Garcia (Spoor) on Building Next Generation Biodiversity Monitoring

Forward Thinking Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 10:26


 Lorea Coronado-Garcia is the cofounder of Spoor. Spoor is building next generation biodiversity monitoring that enables industry and nature to coexist.★ Support this podcast ★

ESG Now
The ESG Weekly: Biodiversity Comes to Kunming and Taiwan's Semiconductors are Thirsty

ESG Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 21:43


As international delegates thrash out new targets to save biodiversity, the food industry could quickly become a pariah. And for Taiwan's all‐important semiconductor manufacturers, water shortages are raising uncomfortable questions.

PRI's The World
UN biodiversity summit kicks off in China

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:39


Delegates from around the world are meeting this week in Kunming, China, in the first part of a high-stakes UN biodiversity summit. The goal is to create a kind of Paris Agreement to protect the globe's plants and animals over the next decade. And, a harsh new bill is being proposed in Ghana that would punish members of the LGBTQ community as well as their supporters and advocates. Also, dozens of State Department nominees are being stalled in the US Senate. Only about a quarter of national security positions have been filled to date.