Podcasts about Chevron

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  • 976PODCASTS
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  • May 12, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Chevron

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Latest podcast episodes about Chevron

BC Museums Association Podcast
Queer(y)ing Museums Episode 4: Special Episode on Ukraine with Andrew Kushnir

BC Museums Association Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 46:32


In this special episode of Queer(y)ing Museums, Tanya and Desirée chat with Andrew Kushnir (he/him) - a gay, Ukrainian Canadian playwright, actor, educator and activist living in Toronto/Tkaronto.  Throughout this conversation, we weave through a variety of topics including, what is the "war within a war" happening in Ukraine right now for LGBTQIA+ community and how is the LGBTQIA+ movement intertwined in Ukraine's fight for sovereignty? Further, how can the museum, cultural and heritage sector support Ukraine and the LGBTQIA+ community at this critical time?   0:00- Intro/background to collective heritage loss in Ukraine 3:15- What is gay heritage, how can heritage be a verb and how does history live in our bodies? (The Gay Heritage Project, This is Something Else, Project Humanity) 9:00- 15:53 - The arts and crisis 16:02- 21:50 - Current war in Ukraine and how the LGBTQIA+ community is affected  21:53- We Support LGBTQ Ukraine Fund and the Chevron initiative 30:00- What is the role of the museum, cultural and heritage sector?  43:44- What is your vision for queer or trans futures?    To donate to the We Support LGBTQ Ukraine Fund, visit: https://veritascharityservices.com/campaigns/we-support-lgbtq-ukraine-fund/   

TD Ameritrade Network
Energy Stocks To Buy Now: CVX, VET, NXE

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:17


Chevron (CVX) stock price today is up over 1%. "Energy stocks are doing well currently. Chevron had a record quarter according to the last earnings report. Warren Buffet has an interest in the CVX stock for the long term," says Nicolas Piquard. The current CVX stock annual dividend yield is 3.45%. Also, Vermillion Energy (VET) stock price today is down over 3%. Vermilion Energy is an international oil and gas producer based in Canada. Finally, NexGen Energy (NXE) stock price today is down almost 2%. "NexGen Energy is a play on the future of energy. The uranium exploration and development company can play a role in energy independence," Piquard adds.

Work Stoppage
Ep 104 - Cops Have Always Been Strikebreakers

Work Stoppage

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 90:44


There's so much to cover this week we had to pull Starbucks out for its own episode, watch for that in the patron feed later this week. We start by following up with the striking Chevron workers in Richmond, CA, where the oil conglomerate has hired local cops to act as strikebreakers. After a few more quick-hit follow up stories, we discuss a strike at Case New Holland in Wisconsin and Iowa, where 1000 members of the UAW have hit the picket lines to fight a two tier system. In Amazon news this week, the company's newly announced abortion benefit leaves out the workers who need it most, the NLRB files a massive complaint arguing captive audience meetings are illegal, and Chris Smalls testifies on Capitol Hill. Boston teachers have been fighting for a new contract for months and have turned to creative tactics since they are banned from striking. The Connecticut state legislature banned companies from holding captive audience meetings in the state this week, and bus drivers in DC won major wage gains after just 3 days on strike. If you like the show, please support us at patreon.com/workstoppage. We couldn't do the show without your support, and patrons get access to evergreen Overtime episodes and periodic Shop Floor Discussion episodes on current issues too long to cover in our regular episodes. Join the discord: discord.gg/tDvmNzX Follow the pod @WorkStoppagePod on Twitter, John @facebookvillain, and Lina @solidaritybee.

Madison / Savile Inspired Podcast
How to Become the Authority in Your Industry

Madison / Savile Inspired Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:33


Learn from Beate Chelette how she turned her passion into a global business and eventually selling it to Bill Gates in a multimillion dollar deal. I learned so much from Beate in this episode and I'm excited to share it with all of you! Beate will go over the best and fastest way to Grow Your Authority in Your field.  In business, as a leader and visionary, you begin with a Strategy, then a System, then Grow your Authority starting with Mindset. Her clients include Amazon, Reckitt (the maker of Lysol), Chevron, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, the Women's Legislative Caucus of California Cal State University Dominguez Hills, Shelter Inc., Mental Health First Aid and thousands of small businesses.She is amongst the “Top 100 Global Thought Leaders” by PeopleHum and “One of 50 Must-Follow Women Entrepreneurs” by HuffPost.Beate is the author of the #1 International Award-Winning Amazon Bestseller “Happy Woman Happy World – How to Go from Overwhelmed to Awesome”–a book that corporate trainer and best-selling author Brian Tracy calls “a handbook for every woman who wants health, success and a fulfilling career.”More on Beate CheletteBeate Chelette is the Growth Architect and Founder of The Women's Code and provides visionaries and leaders with strategies, blueprints and results-oriented, tangible tools and techniques that give clear steps to improve business systems, strengthen leadership skills and teams so that you can scale your impact.A first-generation immigrant who found herself $135,000 in debt as a single parent, Beate bootstrapped her passion for photography into a highly successful global business and eventually sold it to Bill Gates in a multimillion-dollar deal. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beatechelette/?hl=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/beate.cheletteLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/beatecheletteTwitter: https://twitter.com/BeateCheletteWebsite: https://beatechelette.com/What do you think?If you love what you are hearing, don't forget to SUBSCRIBE and LEAVE A REVIEW.  I would love to hear your thoughts! Share with me your thoughts, comments, feedback or suggestions on topics/stories you would want to hear about in the future. You can leave comments in the REVIEW section of the podcast if you are listening on iTunes or send us a message on our website HERE.Follow Madison / Savile on LinkedIn, FaceBook and Instagram or sign up on our website for exclusive offers and updates.Follow me Diana Nguyen on LinkedIn. 

R.O.G. Return on Generosity
83. Pamela Slim - Shape the World Through Your Work

R.O.G. Return on Generosity

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 29:58


83. Pamela Slim - Shape the World Through Your Work  “You have to really know how to tell the story about how your experience has really crafted for this work that you want to do. I call Body of Work the love letter to creation. It really centers what it is that you're building and being very deliberate about what you want to bring to life. And then everything else is secondary.” Guest Info: Pamela Slim is an author, business coach and the co-founder with her husband Darryl of the Main Street Learning Lab in Mesa, Arizona. A former corporate director of training and development at Barclays Global Investors, Pam focused her first decade in business as a management consultant, working with large companies such as HP, Charles Schwab, 3Com, Chevron and Cisco Systems. Since 2005, Pam has advised thousands of entrepreneurs as well as companies serving the small business market such as Keap, Progressive Insurance, Constant Contact and Prezi. Pam partnered with author Susan Cain to build and launch the Quiet Revolution. Pam has written three books: Escape from Cubicle Nation (named Best Small Business and Entrepreneur book of 2009 from  Porchlight Books), Body of Work (2014 with Penguin Portfolio) and her latest, The Widest Net (2021 with McGraw Hill, named Best Marketing & Sales Book of 2021 by Porchlight Books). In 2016, Pam launched the Main Street Learning Lab in Mesa, Arizona, a grassroots, community-based think tank for small business economic acceleration. http://pamelaslim.com/ke In The Widest Net, she explains how to build strong diverse relationships, identify and connect with new partners, expand markets, generate leads, and find new customers in places you may never have considered. With this book as a guide, you'll learn how to connect with potential clients and customers using the true breadth of the marketplace, which she calls an ecosystem of living connections. The Widest Net shows how to: Search outside your own lens/bias/routine/history to target ideal customers. Attract the interest and attention of new leads by learning more about them authentically. Develop products and services suited to these customers. Sell through a trusted reciprocity framework where your customers become part of your ecosystem and you each help the other grow. Build and sustain loyalty and trust with new customers. Nurture a diverse and resilient customer base by identifying and adjusting to the ideal customer target over time. Pam is frequently quoted as a business expert in press such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, Forbes, Entrepreneur, Information Week, Money Magazine and Psychology Today. Favorite Quote: "We all need each other." R.O.G. Takeaway Tips: Questions to contemplate: What are your values? The core beliefs you have about what matters most. What are your ingredients? Skills, experiences, perspectives, hidden talents?  How can you leverage them?  What makes you uniquely positioned in your organization and in the market? What are you creating? What are you investing in that will last long beyond your tenure. How can you center on what you are creating? What do you need? To make the creation work. To get exposure for it. To improve it. What's the work you want to do? Where are your customers? What ecosystem (AKA watering holes) do you want to join? What impact did you want to make? Looking back – What impact have you already made?  What matters most are the ways we purposefully bring our full self: values, ingredients, creations, desires, all of it into the work for a mission greater than ourselves. Resources: PamelaSlim.com The Main Street Learning Lab The Widest Net Body of Work: Finding the Thread That Ties Your Story Together Escape From Cubicle Nation Pamela Slim Bio Open letter to CEOs, COOs, CIOs and CFOs across the corporate world Coming Next: Episode 84: We will be joined by Ron Tite. Credits: Pamela Slim, Sheep Jam Productions, Host Shannon Cassidy, Bridge Between, Inc.

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung
S&P Öl, BP, Chevron, Gold, Infineon, Rheinmetall, Freenet - Märkte am Morgen

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 13:57


Die ersten Handelstage im Mai sind für den DAX bisher schlecht verlaufen. Der Leitindex notiert deutlich unter der Marke von 14.000 Punkten. Dabei dürfte es zunächst bleiben. Die Vorgaben von der Wall Street sind schwach.

Alles auf Aktien
Showdown in Schwedt und Rettung in der Rezession

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:55


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Daniel Eckert und Philipp Vetter über die schwarze E-Commerce-Woche und die Gewinner aus der Energiebranche. Außerdem geht es um Amazon, Zalando, Netflix, Crowdstrike, Illumina, Nike, Under Armour, Delivery Hero, HelloFresh, Chevron, RWE, Shell, Eni, den iShares Oil & Gas Exploration & Production (WKN: A1JKQL, den WisdomTree NASDAQ 100 3x Daily Short (WKN: A3GL7D), den WisdomTree DAX 30 3x Daily Short (WKN: A1VBKG) und den Xtrackers S&P 500 2x Inverse Daily Swap (WKN: DBX0B6). Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Hörtipps: Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Außerdem bei WELT: Im werktäglichen Podcast „Kick-off Politik - Das bringt der Tag“ geben wir Ihnen im Gespräch mit WELT-Experten die wichtigsten Hintergrundinformationen zu einem politischen Top-Thema des Tages. Mehr auf welt.de/kickoff und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. +++Werbung+++ Hier geht's zur App: Scalable Capital ist der Broker mit Flatrate. Unbegrenzt Aktien traden und alle ETFs kostenlos besparen – für nur 2,99 € im Monat, ohne weitere Kosten. Und jetzt ab aufs Parkett, die Scalable App downloaden und loslegen. Hier geht's zur App: https://bit.ly/3abrHQm Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Emprendeduros
EP. #107 | Hablemos del riesgo más grande en la economía

Emprendeduros

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 67:57


¡Emprendeduros! En el episodio de hoy Rodrigo y Alejandro nos dan una actualización de mercado donde discuten la reciente caída del mercado, el anuncio del Fed y sus consecuencias y la guerra de Rusia y Ukrania. Después hablan los reportes de ingresos de esta semana incluyendo Airbnb, Uber, Lyft, Exxon y Chevron. También hablan de la junta anual de Berkshire Hathaway. Después hablan de los nuevos problemas de Apple en Europa. Finalmente nos dan la actualización de Cryptos donde hay varias noticias que tocar.

Robert McLean's Podcast
Quick Climate Links: Nicholls emerges as the most uninsurable electorate because of climate change

Robert McLean's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 4:56


Shepparton's new multi-million dollar courthouse (pictured) is, along with the rest of the city, at risk of being uninsurable because of risks posed by climate change -  Shepparton proper is on a flood plain and so threatened with flooding. Yes, Shepparton is a benign place, but it is strikingly flat and while for decades that has been a bonus allowing for extensive irrigation, it is now a burden as widespread flooding under a new climate regime could bring major flooding. You can read about this dilemma in the SBS story - "One in 25 Australian properties will be uninsurable by 2030 due to climate change, report warns"; or in the story by Climate Councillor, NIcki Hutley, in a Melbourne Age story "Climate change is making our homes uninsurable"; or a story from The Guardian - "Flood and cyclone-prone areas in eastern Australia may be ‘uninsurable' by 2030, report suggests". The report from the Climate Council - "One in 25 Australian homes uninsurable by 2030: Climate Council launches cutting edge digital climate-risk map". And on the ABC it was: "Climate change means 1 in 25 homes could become uninsurable by 2030, report warns". Other Quick Climate Links for today are: "OUR WARMING PLANET: CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION"; "Climate Impacts: Special IPCC report knowledge share"; "EPA: Investigate increase in toxic pollution!"; "Introducing the Climate Justice Legal Project"; "WOTCH vs VicForests: protecting threatened species after the bushfires"; "The Earth is getting hotter due to human activities that release heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere"; "What Is "Loss and Damage" from Climate Change? 6 Key Questions, Answered"; "ACT2025 Presents: Developing Countries Lay Out Demands Ahead of COP27 Climate Talks"; "Delivering on the Glasgow Climate Pact in a changing world"; "Firm releases guide helping enterprises reduce value chain carbon emissions"; "Labor says power prices are going up. The Coalition says they aren't. Who's right?"; "Policymakers Must Focus on These 6 Areas to Slow Down Climate Change"; "Beyond electric cars: how electrifying trucks, buses, tractors and scooters will help tackle climate change"; "Loy Yang Breakdown Burns AGL Energy"; "Voters believe they're doing their bit on climate but want government to do more"; "Tasmania slowed logging and became one of first carbon-negative places in the world"; "Mangroves killed during Black Summer bushfires near Batemans Bay are not growing back"; "Find out what threatened plants and animals live in your electorate (and what your MP can do about it)"; "Our Warming Planet"; "Introduction to 24/7 Carbon-Free Energy and Hourly Matching: What, Why and How"; "Caesars bets on solar, breaks ground on three projects in Atlantic City"; "Did California actually hit 97% renewables in April? Yes and no"; "Your Kids Can Handle Dangerous Ideas"; "Strong Winds Keep Fueling New Mexico Wildfire"; "Ethiopian drought leading to ‘dramatic' increase in child marriage, Unicef warns"; "Exxon Mobil and Chevron report big jump in profits because of higher oil and gas prices"; "A Black Woman Fought for Her Community, and Her Life, Amidst Polluting Landfills and Vast ‘Borrow Pits' Mined for Sand and Clay"; "Why the Debate Over Russian Uranium Worries U.S. Tribal Nations"; "Why Americans Became More Vulnerable to Oil Price Spikes"; "Climate action is critical for health equity. Community health clinics are key - and need more support."; "Despite COP26 pledges, the world is losing way too many trees"; "Impact of energy-draining ‘vampire devices' overstated, says tech expert"; "Tasmania goes into carbon negative, with researchers saying native forests must be preserved"; "India Swelters Under Intense Heat Wave"; "India, Germany ink $10.5B deal for climate action targets"; "India's power consumption spiked to all-time high of 132.98 billion units in April due to heatwave"; "‘Not a plan': Cannon-Brookes, AGL chief clash over future of Australian energy giant"; "Adbri lays down new targets to tackle cement's carbon problem"; "Voters believe they're doing their bit on climate but want government to do more"; "Mike Cannon-Brookes says large AGL shareholders back his bid to stop energy giant's demerger"; "I've worked in agriculture all my life. Who can I vote for to protect Victoria's food bowl?"; Enjoy "Music for a Warming World". Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/climateconversations

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The rise of the tyrannical left has been outted by the purchase of just one company by one man

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 11:00


Live from the No Panic Zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America—God Bless You and lets do this! This is the Steve Gruber show—and I am here to tell you the truth—the New Dr. of Democracy—and my prescription will cure this nation—BUT you have to follow Doctors orders!   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— Vladimir Putin is reportedly going to undergo surgery for cancer soon—and putting a hardline military KGB official in place—until he returns—like that will ever happen—   TWO— Warren Buffett snubs his nose at The Green New Deal—and goes big in energy—in fact Berkshire Hathaway—bought billions of dollars in Chevron and other big oil companies—my bet is on Buffett—   THREE— The rise of the tyrannical left has been outted by the purchase of just one company—by one man—   It seems the acquisition of Twitter by Elon Musk has sent progressives running with their hair on fire in every direction—but they are the ones that kept attacking free speech and silencing people—they were the ones on the hunt to de-platform anyone they could and cancel as many as possible—   Now they seem shocked that someone with a hell of a lot more money than all of them combined came back and said no—this is America—and the Freedom of Speech is fundamental—not only to this country and millions of legal citizens—but as a beacon of hope to the world—   It is remarkable to hear these fools screaming that it should be illegal for Musk to have such a company in his possession—when they never batted an eye over Jeff Bezos and other billionaires owning all kinds of major news outlets like the Washington Post—Twitter is just a place where people talk about whats on their minds—its not a news site—nor should it be treated that way—BUT people who post there—no matter how nutty and outlandish—should be allowed to do exactly that—    And until the left goes after the National Enquirer—and its headlines about bat boy being abducted by space aliens to impregnate a new generation of space people— they will need to keep quiet about a social media platforms that lets kooks like AOC and the Chinese Communist Party post right alongside the mullahs of Iran—while claiming they want to protect us from disinformation and misinformation—   Which brings me to—the new—at least they claim its new—the new ministry of truth unveiled by the Department of Homeland Security last week—which they are actually calling the Disinformation Governance Board or something like that—when in reality it is the Governments Disinformation Board—designed to silence anyone it disagrees with—while amplifying the propaganda they want you to believe—   BUT guys—I'm good—I don't need the government telling me whats true—you know like 17 intelligence agencies claiming the Russian Dossier about Donald Trump was true—and that Hunter Bidens laptop was false—   Trust me—I'm all set on the government setting the standard for what is true and what isn't—   This whole bizarre Orwellian proclamation—about a government agency to regulate disinformation and misinformation to protect us all—BUT really protect the communities of color it claims are really being negatively affected—    Seriously—what are they distracting us from? The coming food crisis—stacked on top of the self made energy crisis? Or the coming planned invasion at our southern border—   Or are they keeping us off balance with this insanity—which has no place at all in America—or any nation for that matter—are they keeping us off balance—to drop some really big bombshell on our heads?   I mean it is truly hard to believe—anyone in Washington would with a straight face offer up a government agency to determine for you and me what's true—completely at odds with what America is—unless they were trying to keep something a whole lot bigger hidden from you—   Until we find out what that is—remember this—I believe Freedom of Speech is the most critical founding principal of this nation and cannot be touched—especially by the government—   So lets start here—  

Tortoise QuickTake Podcasts
Energy Podcast: Energy markets traded lower with broad markets, but still posting solid positive performance YTD

Tortoise QuickTake Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 8:35


In this week's energy podcast, Senior Portfolio Manager Quinn Kiley discusses:Dramatic volatility occurring across all markets driven by concerns over China's zero-COVID policy lockdowns, shrinking U.S. GDP and a hawkish federal reserveOil majors ExxonMobil and Chevron both reported earnings slightly below expectationsDistribution and dividend increases announced by multiple midstream companiesDownload Transcript

Marketplace Minute
EU energy ministers to consider Russian oil sanctions - Morning Briefing - Marketplace Minute - May 2, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 1:50


European leaders meet as Germany says it's on track to wean itself off Russian oil; Buffett reveals new investments, including in Apple, Chevron, Occidental Petroleum; Russia backs off bond payments standoff; votes to be counted in another Amazon unionization effort- May 2, 2022

POLITICO Energy
Big Oil's profits keep increasing. How about their supply?

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 6:55


Last week, Chevron and Exxon Mobil reported their quarterly earnings skyrocketed because of soaring oil prices. POLITICO's Ben Lefebvre discusses whether those Big Oil companies will pour that money into new drilling while fuel prices remain high and as Democrats' criticism ramps up.   Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Ben Lefebvre is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer.  Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

Aujourd'hui l'économie
Faut-il taxer les super-bénéfices des compagnies pétrolières ?

Aujourd'hui l'économie

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 4:06


Les sociétés pétrolières engrangent des bénéfices records grâce à la hausse du prix du pétrole. La publication des résultats mirifiques du premier trimestre relance le débat sur une taxe exceptionnelle sur leurs profits. Au moment où les prix à la pompe s'envolent, le pactole de l'industrie pétrolière choque et suscite la convoitise. Selon une estimation de Bloomberg, le jackpot sera de 34 milliards de dollars sur les trois premiers mois de l'année pour les cinq plus grandes compagnies pétrolières au monde. Des résultats trimestriels historiques. Du jamais vu depuis 2011. TotalEnergies, qui a ouvert le bal des résultats, le 28 avril, a réalisé en trois mois la moitié de son bénéfice de toute l'année 2021 – si on exclut les provisions annoncées pour amorcer un retrait partiel de Russie. Le géant américain Chevron a quadruplé son bénéfice. Pour l'autre super-major américaine, ExxonMobil, le bénéfice a seulement doublé à cause des provisions pour son départ de Russie. Vladimir Poutine, avec sa guerre à l'Ukraine, a propulsé le baril à 114 dollars en moyenne au premier trimestre. Résultat, il récupère d'une main les actifs des compagnies privées occidentales et il leur rend sous forme de bénéfices exceptionnels de l'autre. Des bénéfices qui doivent profiter aux consommateurs, estiment des élus démocrates aux États-Unis C'est aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni que le débat sur la taxation de ces revenus exceptionnels est le plus virulent. Aux États-Unis, deux élus démocrates ont fait cette proposition de taxe exceptionnelle il y a un mois. Ils veulent la redistribuer directement aux ménages. Mais l'administration fait la sourde oreille. Le débat porte surtout sur l'usage de ces super-bonus. Le gouvernement américain souhaite qu'ils soient réinvestis dans la production locale et non à l'étranger et non plus simplement redistribué aux actionnaires. C'est pourtant l'option retenue. Les dividendes sont en hausse tout comme les rachats d'actions qui permettent de doper le cours de bourse. À Londres, le ministre britannique des Finances Rishi Shunak a laissé entendre la semaine dernière qu'il pourrait mettre en place cette surtaxe sur les compagnies n'investissant pas suffisamment dans les gisements en voie d'épuisement de mer du Nord. Une ouverture sans doute destinée à rassurer l'opinion publique, puisqu'en réalité BP comme Shell ont déjà provisionné des dépenses d'investissement dans cette région. La proposition soutenue par les travaillistes a donc très peu de chances d'aboutir. On attend cette semaine les résultats des deux compagnies cotées à Londres. Cela pourrait relancer le débat. Dans l'Union européenne, seule l'Italie a osé imposer un impôt temporaire sur les énergéticiens Rome doit dégager 4 milliards de revenus avec ce nouvel impôt avec la bénédiction de l'Union européenne. Bruxelles encourage ses membres à les taxer pour financer les aides apportées au consommateur final. Mais la plupart des États membres préfèrent discuter avec ces entreprises devenues des interlocuteurs indispensables pour résoudre la crise énergétique. En France, TotalEnergies accorde une ristourne de 10 centimes sur le litre de carburant et son patron Patrick Pouyanné reste réservé sur les investissements pour augmenter la production. Ils se font à des coûts trop élevés pour supporter une demande amenée à diminuer. Avec le changement climatique, les compagnies se préparent non pas au pic de production, mais au pic de la demande. La compagnie française privilégie désormais les investissements dans le gaz naturel liquéfié et les renouvelables. ► EN BREF À suivre aujourd'hui : la réunion d'urgence des ministres européens de l'Énergie Il sera question une nouvelle fois du gaz russe, pour préciser comment les compagnies européennes doivent régler la facture à Gazprom. Et surtout faire le point sur les pistes pour changer de fournisseurs. La Hongrie a fait savoir qu'elle opposera son veto à des nouvelles sanctions sur l'énergie.

Alles auf Aktien
Buffetts milliardenschwere Aktienwette und das Ende der FAANG-Ära

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 16:50


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Holger Zschäpitz über die Angst vor dem Zinshammer, Saisonende für eine Börsenweisheit und Anlagetipps von Elon Musk. Außerdem geht es um Twitter, Berkshire Hathaway, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Google, Chevron, Occidental Petroleum, WisdomTree Brent Crude Oil 3x Daily Short (WKN: ​​A3GL7F), Deka Impact Aktien (WKN: A2PYY4), Deka Nachhaltig Global Champions (WKN: DK0V55), Vanguard ESG All Cap (WKN: A2QL8U), Deka Nachhaltig Aktien (WKN: DK1A47). Und abstimmen beim Deutschen Podcastpreis könnt ihr hier: https://www.deutscher-podcastpreis.de/podcasts/aaa-alles-auf-aktien/ Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Hörtipps: Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Außerdem bei WELT: Im werktäglichen Podcast „Kick-off Politik - Das bringt der Tag“ geben wir Ihnen im Gespräch mit WELT-Experten die wichtigsten Hintergrundinformationen zu einem politischen Top-Thema des Tages. Mehr auf welt.de/kickoff und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. +++Werbung+++ Hier geht's zur App: Scalable Capital ist der Broker mit Flatrate. Unbegrenzt Aktien traden und alle ETFs kostenlos besparen – für nur 2,99 € im Monat, ohne weitere Kosten. Und jetzt ab aufs Parkett, die Scalable App downloaden und loslegen. Hier geht's zur App: https://bit.ly/3abrHQm Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

Closing Bell
Closing Bell: Ugly end to April, Chevron CEO on earnings, debating Apple's next move 4/29/22

Closing Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 49:40


The major averages closed sharply lower to finish out a rough month for the bulls. Tony Dwyer from Canaccord and Charlie Bobrinskoy from Ariel break down the action, and whether or not they'd recommend buying the dips. Analysts Colin Gillis and Amit Daryanani debate the best way to play Apple's pullback. Meantime Chevron CEO Mike Wirth discusses the outlook for the oil giant as shares move lower on the back of earnings. And Gary Dvorchak from Blueshirt Group talks about Chinese internet stocks -- one bright spot amid the carnage.

Squawk on the Street
Apple and Amazon's Big Tech Earnings Impact, Big Oil's Results and the Russia Effect, and Robinhood Takes a Hit. 4/29/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 43:32


On the final trading day of April, Carl Quintanilla and Jim Cramer explored market reaction to big tech results: Apple's view on supply constraints overshadow the company's quarterly beat, while Amazon tumbles on a quarterly loss and its slowest growth in two decades. Exxon Mobil and Chevron shares also down despite a surge in profits -- Exxon announced a $3.4 billion charge related to its planned exit from Russia. Also in focus: Intel down sharply on earnings, Robinhood shares slump on declines in revenue and monthly active users, why Chinese stocks are rallying, and Tesla jumps after Elon Musk said he plans no further sales of the stock in wake of his deal to buy Twitter.

SAE Tomorrow Today
107. Rail Decarbonization Hits a Turning Point

SAE Tomorrow Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 33:44


Progress Rail is on a mission to zero emissions. . The locomotive manufacturer put the first battery-electric locomotive into service for a Brazilian mining company in 2020, and next year they'll be hauling iron ore in Australia. Meanwhile, Union Pacific is adding 10 of these battery-powered rail vehicles to its fleet as part of the largest investment in battery-electric technology by a U.S. Class I railroad. . Beyond electric, Progress Rail, A Caterpillar Company, is working with Chevron to develop a locomotive powered by hydrogen fuel cells and collaborating with the Canadian National Railway to test renewable fuel blends, including biodiesel. It's also developing “smart cruise control” that uses machine learning to optimize train performance and energy efficiency. . Self-described rail geek Michael Cleveland, Director of Advanced Energy at Progress Rail, talks about the company's quest to lead the transition from diesel to fuel systems that promise to make trains cleaner, quieter, and more reliable. .  We'd love to hear from you. Share your comments, questions and ideas for future topics and guests to podcast@sae.org. Don't forget to take a moment to follow SAE Tomorrow Today (and give us a review) on your preferred podcasting platform. . Follow SAE on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Follow host Grayson Brulte on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram.

Bob Sirott
Associated Bank Market Outlook: 4/29/22

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


On April 29th, 2022, Steve Grzanich shares today's potential market drivers: March’s personal income and spending figures Chicago’s PMI numbers Consumer sentiment index Earnings from Chevron and more

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast
Euro Market Open: APAC stocks gained after the firm lead from the US; DXY pulled back from recent highs

Ransquawk Rundown, Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 3:49


APAC stocks gained after the firm lead from the US but with advances in the region capped by disappointing earnings from Amazon and Apple.European equity futures are indicative of a higher open with Eurostoxx 50 +1.5% after the cash market closed higher by 1.1% yesterday.DXY has pulled back from recent advances but retains 103 status, activity currencies outperform G10 peers.Crude futures held on to yesterday's gains after Germany dropped its opposition to an EU embargo on Russian oil.Looking ahead, highlights include EZ Flash CPI and GDP, US March PCE, US Chicago PMI, CBR Announcement, Speech from SNB's Jordan, Supply from ItalyEarnings from BBVA, BASF, AstraZeneca, NatWest, AbbVie, Exxon, Chevron, Bristol-Myers and Colgate-Palmolive.Read the full report covering Equities, Forex, Fixed Income, Commodites and more on Newsquawk

The Katie Halper Show
Freed Chevron Prisoner Steven Donziger & Amazon Watch's Paul Paz y Miño On What's Next

The Katie Halper Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 42:41


For the entire discussion, to receive bonus content & to help make this program possible, please join us on Patreon at: https://www.patreon.com/thekatiehalpershow Link to the Callin discussion on Friday April 29th, 2022 at 1pm EST featuring Paul Paz y Miño! - https://www.callin.com/room/suing-the-cia-with-paul-paz-y-mio-mOpBqTeQrS Steven Donziger, is free at last, for now. What's next? Find out from Steven Donziger (the human rights and environmentalist lawyer who served a six month prison sentence for successfully suing Chevron for poisoning the water in the Ecuadorian Amazon) and Paul Pan y Miño of Amazon Watch. https://substack.com/profile/7445653-steven-donziger The prosecution of Donziger, which has been condemned by the United Nations, Greenpeace, Amnesty International, Amazon Watch, and 64 Nobel Laureates, is a literal corporate prosecution. After the Southern District of New York refused to prosecute Donziger, the judge assigned a corporate firm which had represented Chevron to go after him. The judge also made the unusual move of handpicking the judge to oversee the case and chose a judge who is part of the Right Wing Federalist Society which gets funding from.... you guessed it... Chevron! Paul Paz y Miño, Associate Director at Amazon Watch, has overseen its Clean Up Ecuador campaign since 2007. He has been a professional human rights, corporate accountability and environmental justice advocate for over 25 years. He has been Colombia Country Specialist for Amnesty International USA since 1995, served on staff at Human Rights Watch/Americas in 1995-1996, and was the Guatemala/Chiapas Program Director at the Seva Foundation for seven years.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Israelis take masks off during Strauss salmonella scare

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 15:54


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Health and science writer Nathan Jeffay and environmental reporter Sue Surkes join host Jessica Steinberg for today's podcast. Jeffay looks at lifting of indoor mask mandate in Israel and what that means for Israelis in all walks of life and locations. He also updates us on the current salmonella contamination scare with  numerous Strauss and Elite brand chocolate bars and ice cream products removed from shelves. Surkes discusses the case of Jewish American lawyer Steven Donziger who was freed Monday after 993 days of detention, including 45 days in prison, for his fight against the oil giant Chevron over a massive oil spill in the Ecuadorian rainforest. She also delves into an upcoming carbon credits story regarding a collaboration between the Society for Protection of Nature in Israel and a company of sustainability entrepreneurs, who want to ensure habitats for waterfowl and other aquatic creatures. Discussed articles include: Israel's indoor mask mandate ends after two years Strauss confirms salmonella traces found in foods as products pulled off shelves Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Israelis, some wearing protective face masks and some not, as Israel lifts the restrictions on wearing a mask outdoors, April 21, 2021. (Miriam Alster/FLASH 90) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan
Steven Donziger vs. Big Oil

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 53:15


This week, after nearly 1,000 days of arbitrary detention, the environmental and human rights lawyer Steven Donziger was released from house arrest. On this week's podcast, Donziger talks to Intercept investigative reporter Sharon Lerner and Ryan Grim about his decadelong legal battle with Chevron over land contamination in Ecuador. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

CommSec
Morning Report 26 Apr 22: US sharemarkets were firmer on Monday

CommSec

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 4:57


The board of Twitter has agreed to be taken over by Elon Musk for US$44 billion in cash. Elon Musk intends to convert the social media platform into a private company. Shares in Twitter rose by 5.7%. Chinese shares and shares of mining and energy stocks fell on concern about the health of the Chinese economy. Shares in Chevron fell 2.1% with shares in Exxon Mobil down by 3.4%. Investors await quarterly results from Alphabet, Apple, Microsoft and Amazon over the week. Around a third of S&P 500 firms are due to report this week. At the close of trade, the Dow Jones index was up by 238 points or 0.7%. The S&P 500 index rose by 0.6%. And the Nasdaq index gained 166 points or 1.3%.  This report is approved and distributed in Australia by Commonwealth Securities Limited ABN 60 067 254 399, AFSL 238814 (CommSec) is a wholly owned but non-guaranteed subsidiary of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia ABN 48 123 123 124, AFSL 234945 and a market participant of ASX Limited and Cboe Australia Pty Limited (formerly Chi-X Australia Pty Limited), a clearing participant of ASX Clear Pty Limited and a settlement participant of ASX Settlement Pty Limited.  Any advice contained in this report is general advice only and is not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold any securities, property, real estate or financial products, and has been prepared without taking account of the objectives, financial situation or needs of any particular individual. Before making any investment decision, you should consider your own investment needs and objectives and consider seeking financial advice. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. This report is produced by Commonwealth Securities Limited based on information available at the time of publishing. We believe that the information in this report is correct and any opinions, conclusions or recommendations are reasonably held or made as at the time of its compilation, but no warranty is made as to accuracy, reliability or completeness. To the extent permitted by law, neither the Bank nor any of its subsidiaries accept liability to any person for loss or damage arising from the use of this report.  

The Catchup
Goodbye Electric Cars, Hello Hydrogen?

The Catchup

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 53:38


This week, John and Denison discuss the future of electric vehicles. With hydrogen power growing in popularity and usage, is battery power already a thing of the past? More and more, auto industry and oil industry giants are investing research and development into hydrogen power. The reason why? It could be even more cost-effective, consumer friendly, and environment friendly than its current electric counterparts?If that's the case, then what is the reason for our investment into electric vehicles? Are they a stop gap for strict rules brought on by the EPA? The government is mandating high fuel economy standards for car companies in the US, all in an effort to combat global warming, and doing so sooner than expected. Is the switch to electric just a temporary fix until hydrogen infrastructure is more prominent?Hydrogen offers quicker fill-up times, and emits only water and water vapor. So what's the drawback? The initial harvesting of usable Hydrogen is much less eco friendly than the creation of batteries. So, is there a solution? Is Hydrogen really the wave of the future? Or are electric cars here to stay? Plus, how you can get involved and control the direction of each episode of The Catchup! There's a lot to discuss. Let's get into it!Follow us: FacebookInstagramYouTubeOfficial WebsiteEmail us: TheCatchupCast@Gmail.comSupport the show (https://www.nosignalrocks.com/the-catchup-podcast/)

Círculo de Espera - Toros de Tijuana
EPISODIO 489 - Arranca la temporada 2022 de la LMB con una gran fiesta en el estadio Chevron previo al duelo ante los Diablos Rojos.

Círculo de Espera - Toros de Tijuana

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 26:05


Rising
Kevin McCarthy Caught On Tape Saying Trump Should Resign After Jan. 6, CNN+ Shuttered, And More: Rising Fridays 4.22.22

Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 86:14


Today on Rising, CAUGHT ON TAPE: Kevin McCarthy said Trump should resign after Jan 6, BUSTED lying (00:00)This is the key to the new labor movement: Ryan Grim (11:11)Team Blue's culture war DELUSION is bad for the party & the COUNTRY: Emily Jashinsky(22:01)Deep Fakes of Zelensky, Putin go viral, changing Propaganda Warfare (38:08)Macron vs. Le Pen: Could a far-right victory be a GIFT to Putin?(47:06)Chevron threw me in prison for taking on their human rights abuses: Steven Donziger (56:01)Joe Biden, Dems have JOKER-PILLED Americans into apathy about politics: David Sirota (1:05:59)CNN+ SHUTTERED less than a month after launch(1:17:16)Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillMore about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers.

Stories from Home: Living the Just Transition Podcast
Season 2 Ep. 2 - Real Climate Solution or False Promise? Here's How to Tell.

Stories from Home: Living the Just Transition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 42:48


This episode, we talk to Bineshi Albert, co-executive director of CJA, about her experience at last year's United Nations Climate Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland – and how “net zero” and “carbon capture” are FALSE solutions to climate change that distract us from what we really need to do. If those are false solutions, how do we cut through the noise to REAL solutions that actually tackle the problems causing climate change– and not at the expense of people and all living creatures of the planet? We answer these questions with our trusted guides Basav Sen (Climate Change Policy Director at the Institute of Policy Studies), Doria Robinson (Executive Director of Urban Tilth), and Chris Rodriguez (Community Organizer at Ironbound Community Corporation). Doria shows us how a “cultural revolution” to local food systems and reconnecting to our geographies is key to Just Transition. Chris fights greenwashing and new polluters in Newark, New Jersey, both through community action and policy change, and Basav gets into the weeds on how to decipher real climate solutions from those that might sound good but don't really solve the problem. News clip from Democracy Now on Chevron fire in Richmond, California: https://www.democracynow.org/2013/8/6/chevron_to_pay_2_million_for Music by Monica Atkins, co-executive director of the Climate Justice Alliance. The track is titled “Love, Black, Warrior,” by Surreal. Find more of her work on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-361229213 Learn more about the three CJA member organizations featured in this episode: Institute for Policy Studies: https://ips-dc.org/ Urban Tilth: https://urbantilth.org/ Ironbound Community Corporation: https://ironboundcc.org/ Learn more about: Climate Justice Alliance Statement on the Intergovernmental Climate Change Panel's Report: https://climatejusticealliance.org/un-ipcc-climate-report/ The Glasgow Climate Pact / COP26: https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-glasgow-climate-pact-key-outcomes-from-cop26 Climate Justice Alliance Statement on COP26: https://climatejusticealliance.org/cop26-statement/ COP26 and “Net Zero”: https://climatejusticealliance.org/cop26/ False Climate Solutions: https://climatefalsesolutions.org/welcome/

The Tech Humanist Show
How Tech Harms – and Can Help Heal – the Climate

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 45:09


On this week's episode, we're talking about one of the most urgent issues facing humanity today, and how we can reframe our mindset around it to better encourage and allow ourselves to take action. That issue, of course, is climate change. Technology has created a lot of the problems we face, but is also coming up with some of the most innovative and inventive solutions. Solving this is going to take creativity, collaboration, and a willingness to change, but that's what we're all about here at the Tech Humanist Show! What is our individual responsibility to tackling these problems? What are the most exciting solutions on the horizon? Who should we be holding to account, and how? Those answers and more on this week's episode. Guests this week include Sarah T. Roberts, AR Siders, Tan Copsey, Anne Therese Gennari, Christopher Mims, Art Chang, Dorothea Baur, Abhishek Gupta, and Caleb Gardner. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Hello, humans! Today we're talking about a problem that technology is both a major cause of and perhaps one of our best potential solutions for: climate change. By almost any reckoning, the climate emergency is the most urgent and existential challenge facing humanity for the foreseeable future. All of the other issues we face pale in comparison to the need to arrest and reverse carbon emissions, reduce global average temperatures, and begin the work of rebuilding sustainable models for all of us to be able to live and work on this planet. By late 2020, melting ice in the Arctic began to release previously-trapped methane gas deposits. The warming effects of methane are 80 times stronger than carbon over 20 years, which has climate scientists deeply worried. Meanwhile, the Amazon rainforest has been devastated by burning. The plastic-filled oceans are warming. Coral reefs are dying. Experts are constantly adjusting their predictions on warming trends. And climate issues contribute to other socio-political issues as well, usually causing a big loop: Climate disasters create uninhabitable environments, leading to increased migration and refugee populations, which can overwhelm nearby areas and stoke the conditions for nationalistic and jingoistic political power grabs. This puts authoritarians and fascists into power—who usually aren't too keen on spending money to fix problems like climate change that don't affect them personally—exacerbating all of the previous problems. UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson showcased exactly this type of position before a recent UN climate conference, claiming the fall of the Roman empire was due to uncontrolled immigration as a way of refocusing people's fear and attention away from climate change. Marine Le Pen of France went so far as to say that those without a homeland don't care about the environment. Similarly out-of-touch and out-of-context things have been said recently by right-wing leaders in Spain, Germany, Switzerland… the list goes on and on. Perhaps the most psychologically challenging aspect of all this is that even as we begin to tackle these issues one by one, we will continue to see worsening environmental effects for the next few decades. As David Wallace-Wells writes in The Uninhabitable Earth: “Some amount of further warming is already baked in, thanks to the protracted processes by which the planet adapts to greenhouse gas…But all of those paths projected from the present…to two degrees, to three, to four or even five—will be carved overwhelmingly by what we choose to do now.” The message is: It's up to us. We know what's coming, and are thus empowered to chart the course for the future. What we need are bold visions and determined action, and we need it now. At this point you may be thinking, “I could really use some of that Kate O'Neill optimism right about now…” Not only do I have hope, but many of the climate experts I have read and spoken with are hopeful as well. But the first step in Strategic Optimism is acknowledging the full and unvarnished reality, and the hard truth about the climate crisis is that things do look bleak right now. Which just means our optimistic strategy in response has to be that much more ambitious, collaborative, and comprehensive. As Christiana Figuere and Tom Rivett-Carnac wrote in The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis, “[To feel] a lack of agency can easily transform into anger. Anger that sinks into despair is powerless to make change. Anger that evolves into conviction is unstoppable.” One of the things slowing progress on the climate front is the people on the extreme ends of the belief spectrum—especially those in positions of power—who believe it's either too late to do anything, or that climate change isn't happening at all. Technology exacerbates this problem through the spread of false information. Thankfully by this point most people—around 90% of Americans and a higher percentage of scientists—are in agreement that it's happening, although we're still divided on the cause. The same poll conducted in October 2021 by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, found that only 54% of Americans believe humans contribute to climate change. A separate study conducted that same month looked at 88,125 peer-reviewed climate studies published between 2012 and 2020, and determined that 99.9% of those studies found human activity to be directly responsible for our warming planet. It's important, however, not to write off the people who aren't yet fully convinced. Technology, as much as it has given us near-infinite access to information, is also a tremendous propagator of mis- and disinformation, which is fed to people by algorithms as immutable fact, and is often indistinguishable from the truth. Sarah T Roberts, who is Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where she also serves as the co-founder of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry, explains further. Sarah T Roberts: “When I think about people who fall victim to conspiracy theories, what I see is a human impulse to make sense of a world that increasingly doesn't. And they're doing it in the absence of information that is way more complex and hard to parse out and might actually point criticism at places that are very uncomfortable. They sense a wrongness about the world but they don't have the right information, or access to it, or even the ability to parse it, because we've destroyed public schools. And then the auxiliary institutions that help people, such as libraries, and that leaves them chasing their own tail through conspiracy theories instead of unpacking things like the consequences of western imperialism, or understanding human migration as economic and environmental injustice issues. Y'know, you combine all that, and people, what do they do? They reach for the pablum of Social Media, which is instantaneous, always on, easy to digest, and worth about as much as, y'know, those things might be worth. I guess what I'm trying to do is draw some connections around phenomena that seem like they have come from nowhere. It would behoove us to connect those dots both in this moment, but also draw back on history, at least the last 40 years of sort of like neoliberal policies that have eroded the public sphere in favor of private industry. What it didn't do was erode the public's desire to know, but what has popped up in that vacuum are these really questionable information sources that really don't respond to any greater norms, other than partisanship, advertising dollars, etc. And that's on a good day!” The fact is, there are a number of industries and people who have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo. Not all of them engage in disinformation schemes, but some corporations—and people—who are interested in fighting climate change aren't willing to look at solutions that might change their business or way of life. Too much change is scary, so they look for solutions that keep things as they are. AR Siders: “Too much of our climate change adaptation is focused on trying to maintain the status quo. We're trying to say, ‘hey, the climate is changing, what can we do to make sure that everything stays the same in the face of climate change?' And I think that's the wrong way to think about this.” That's AR Siders, assistant professor in the Biden School of Public Policy and Administration and the Department of Geography and a Core Faculty Member of the Disaster Research Center. Siders' research focuses on climate change adaptation governance, decision-making, and evaluation. ARSiders: “I think we need to think about the idea that we're not trying to maintain the status quo, we're trying to choose how we want our societies to change. I often start talks by showing historic photos, and trying to point out, in 1900, those photos don't look like they do today. So, 100 years in the future, things are going to look different. And that's true even if you don't accept climate change. Even if we stop climate change tomorrow, we might have another pandemic. We'll have new technology. And so our goal shouldn't be to try to lock society into the way it works today, it should be to think about, what are the things we really care about preserving, and then what things do we actively want to choose to change? Climate adaptation can be a really exciting field if we think about it that way.” And it is! But as more people have opened their eyes to the real threat looming in the near-horizon, disinformation entities and bad actors have changed their tactics, shifting responsibility to individuals, and away from the corporations causing the majority of the harm. So let's talk about our personal responsibility to healing the climate. Tan Copsey: “We always should be careful of this trap of individual action, because in the past the fossil fuel industry has emphasized individual action.” That's Tan Copsey, who is Senior Director, Projects and Partnerships at Climate Nexus, a strategic communications organization. His work focuses on communicating the impacts of climate change and the benefits of acting to reduce climate risks. You'll be hearing from him a lot this episode. We spoke recently about climate change solutions and responsibilities across countries and industries. He continued: Tan Copsey: “I don't know if it's true but apparently BP invented the carbon footprint as a way of kind of getting people to focus on themselves and feel a sense of guilt, and project out a sense of blame, but that's not really what it's about. Dealing with climate change should ultimately be a story about hope, and that's what I kind of try and tell myself and other people.” Speaking of, Shell had a minor PR awakening in November 2020 when they tweeted a poll asking: “What are you willing to change to help reduce carbon emissions?” The tweet prompted many high-profile figures like climate activist Greta Thunberg and US congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to call out the hypocrisy of a fossil fuel company asking the public for personal change. In truth, research has found that the richest 1% of the world's population were responsible for the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide as the poorer half of the world from 1990 to 2015, with people in the US causing the most emissions per capita in the world. Now, this doesn't mean to abandon personal responsibility. We should all make what efforts we can to lower our carbon footprint where feasible—whether by reviewing consumption habits, eating less meat, driving less, or anything from a wide variety of options. There's interesting psychological research around how making sustainable choices keeps us grounded in the mindset of what needs to change. I spoke with Anne Therese Gennari, a speaker, educator, and environmental activist known as The Climate Optimist, about the psychology behind individual action, and how the simple act of being more climate conscious in our daily lives can make the world a better place in ways beyond reducing our carbon footprints. Anne Therese Gennari: “Do our individual actions matter… and I think it matters so much, for 4 reasons. The first one is that it mends anxiety. A lot of people are starting to experience climate anxiety, and the first step out of that is actually to put yourself back in power. Choosing optimism is not enough. Telling ourselves, ‘I want to be optimistic,' is gonna fall short very quickly, but if we keep showing up for that work and that change, we're actually fueling the optimism from within. And that's how we keep going. The second one is that it builds character. So, the things that you do every day start to build up your habits, and that builds your character. Recognizing that the things we do becomes the identity that we hold onto, and that actually plays a huge part on what I'll say next, which is, start shifting the culture. We are social creatures, and we always look to our surroundings to see what's acceptable and okay and not cool and all these things, so the more of us that do something, it starts to shift norms and create a new culture, and we have a lot of power when we start to shift the culture. And then lastly, I'll just say, we always plant seeds. So whatever you do, someone else might see and pick up on, you never know what's gonna ripple effect from your actions.” No one person can make every change needed, but we can all do something. Every small action has the potential to create positive effects you'll never know. One surprising piece of information is that some of the things we're doing that we know are bad for the environment—like online delivery—may have more of a positive environmental impact than we thought. While the sheer amount of product that we order—especially non-essential items—is definitely exacerbating climate change, there are some positive takeaways. Christopher Mims, tech columnist at the Wall Street Journal and author of Arriving Today, on how everything gets from the factory to our front door, explains how, especially once our transportation and delivery vehicles have been electrified, ordering online may be a significantly greener alternative to shopping in stores. Christopher Mims: “The good news—you would think all of this ordering stuff online is terrible for the environment—look, it's bad for the environment in as much as it makes us consume more. We're all over-consuming, on average. But it's good for the environment in that, people forget, hopping into a 2 or 3 thousand pound car and driving to the grocery store—or a store—to get 5 to 15 pounds of goods and driving it home is horribly inefficient compared to putting the same amount of goods onto a giant box truck that can make 150 stops (if you're talking about a UPS or an Amazon delivery van), or a few dozen if you're talking about groceries. The funny thing is that delivery has the potential to be way more sustainable, and involve way less waste than our current system of going to stores. Frankly, physical retail is kind of a nightmare environmentally.” That's only a small piece of the puzzle, and there are still social and economic issues involved in the direct-to-home delivery industry. More important in regards to our personal responsibility is to stay engaged in the conversation. A both/and mindset is best: embrace our own individual responsibilities, one of which is holding companies and entities with more direct impact on the climate accountable for making infrastructural and operational change that can give individuals more freedom to make responsible choices. Tan Copsey again. Tan Copsey: “It is about political action and engagement for me. Not just voting, but it's about everything that happens in between. It's about community engagement, and the tangible things you feel when there are solar panels on a rooftop, or New York begins to move away from gas. I mean, that's a huge thing! In a more existential sense, the news has been bad. The world is warming, and our approach to dealing with it distributes the benefits to too few people. There are definitely things you can do, and so when I talk about political pressure, I'm not just talking about political pressure for ‘climate action,' I'm talking about political pressure for climate action that benefits as many people as possible.” So, if part of our responsibility is to hold our leaders to account… what changes do we need? What should we be encouraging our leaders to do? Since we're talking about political engagement, let's start with government. Tan spoke to me about government response to another global disaster—the COVID-19 Pandemic—and some of the takeaways that might be applied to battling climate change as well. Tan Copsey: “What's really interesting to me about the pandemic is how much money governments made available, particularly the Fed in the US, and how they just pumped that money into the economy as it exists. Now, you can pump that money into the economy and change it, too, and you can change it quite dramatically. And that's what we're beginning to see in Europe as they attempt to get off Russian gas. You're seeing not just the installation of heat pumps at astonishing scale, but you're also seeing real acceleration of a push toward green energy, particularly in Germany. You're also seeing some ideas being revisited. In Germany it's changing people's minds about nuclear power, and they're keeping nukes back on.” Revisiting debates we previously felt decided on is unsettling. Making the future a better place is going to require a great deal of examination and change, which can be scary. It's also something federal governments are designed not to be able to do too quickly. But that change doesn't have to work against the existing economy; it can build with it. It might be notable to people looking at this from a monetary perspective—the world's seven most industrialized countries will lose a combined nearly $5 trillion in GDP over the next several decades if global temperatures rise by 2.6 degrees Celsius. So it behooves everyone to work on these solutions. And what are those solutions? AR Siders spoke to me about the four types of solutions to climate issues. A lot of her work involves coastal cities, so her answer uses “flooding” as an example, but the strategies apply to other problems as well. AR Siders: “So the main categories are, Resistance, so this is things like building a flood wall, putting in dunes, anything that tries to stop the water from reaching your home. Then there's Accommodation, the classic example here is elevating homes, so the water comes, and the water goes, but it does less damage because you're sort of out of the way. Then there's Avoidance, which is ‘don't build there in the first place,' (America, we're not very good at that one). And then Retreat is, once you've built there, if you can't resist or accommodate, or if those have too many costs, financial or otherwise, then maybe it's time to relocate.” We'll need to apply all four strategies to different problems as they crop up, but it's important that we're proactive and remain open to which solution works best for a given issue. City governments have tremendous opportunities to emerge as leaders in this space. Studies project that by the end of the century, US cities could be up to 10 degrees Fahrenheit warmer in the afternoon and 14 degrees warmer at night, meaning cities need to start taking action now. Phoenix, Arizona—a city that experiences the “heat island effect” year round—is actively making efforts to minimize these effects. In 2020, they began testing “cool pavement,” a chemical coating that reflects sunlight and minimizes the absorption of heat to curb the heat island effect. Additionally, measures to offer better transit options are on the table, with cities like Austin and New York emerging as leaders in the space. The Citi Bike app in New York City now shows transit information alongside rental and docking updates as acknowledgement that for many trips biking isn't enough, but in combination with buses or trains, biking can simplify and speed a commute as part of a greener lifestyle. Austin's recognition of the synergies between bikeshare and public transit has been praised as a model for other cities, as city transit agencies move away from seeing themselves as managers of assets (like busses), and towards being managers of mobility. I spoke with Art Chang, who has been a longtime entrepreneur and innovator in New York City—and who was, at the time of our discussion, running for mayor—about the need for resilience in preparing cities for the future. Art Chang: “There was a future—a digital future—for New York, but also being open to this idea that seas were rising, that global temperatures were going up, that we're going to have more violent storms, that things like the 100-year flood line may not be drawn to incorporate the future of these rising seas and storms. So we planned, deliberately and consciously, for a hundred-fifty year storm. We softened the edge of the water, because it creates such an exorbitant buffer for the rising seas and storms. We created trenches that are mostly hidden so that overflow water had a place to go. We surrounded the foundations of the building with what we call ‘bathtubs,' which are concrete enclosures that would prevent water from going into these places where so much of the infrastructure of these buildings were, and then we located as much of the mechanicals on top of the building, so they would be protected from any water. Those are some of the most major things. All technologies, they're all interconnected, they're all systems.” Making any of the changes suggested thus far requires collective action. And one of the ways in which we need to begin to collaborate better is simply to agree on the terms we're using and how we're measuring our progress. Some countries, like the United States, have an advantage when it comes to reporting on climate progress due to the amount of forests that naturally occur within their borders. That means the US can underreport emissions by factoring in the forests as “carbon sinks,” while other countries that may have lower emissions, but also fewer naturally-occurring forests, look worse on paper. This isn't factually wrong, but it obscures the work that's needed to be done in order to curb the damage. I asked Tan about these issues, and he elaborated on what he believes needs to be done. Tan Copsey: “Again, I'd say we resolve the ambiguity through government regulation. For example, the Securities and Exchange Commission is looking at ESG. So this big trend among investors and companies, the idea that you take account of environmental, social, and governance factors in your investments, in what your company does. Realistically, there hasn't been consistent measure of this. I could buy an exchange-traded fund, and it could be ‘ESG,' and I wouldn't really know what's in it. And it could be that what's in it isn't particularly good. And so regulators are really trying to look at that now and to try and standardize it, because that matters. Likewise, you have carbon markets which are sort of within European Union, and then you have voluntary carbon markets, which are often very reliant on forest credits sourced from somewhere else, where you're not quite sure if the carbon reduction is permanent or not. And yeah, there is a need for better standards there.” To do this holistically we will need to get creative with economic incentives, whether that involves offsets, green energy credits, or new programs at local, state, or national levels. One of the more aggressive and comprehensive plans for rethinking energy policy came from the EU in summer 2021, just as Germany and Belgium reeled from killer floods that were likely exacerbated by the climate crisis. The EU announced its ”Fit for 55” plans, ”a set of inter-connected proposals, which all drive toward the same goal of ensuring a fair, competitive and green transition by 2030 and beyond.” It's an approach that is systemic, recognizing the interconnectedness of a wide variety of policy areas and economic sectors: energy, transportation, buildings, land use, and forestry. And we need more programs and regulations like this. But until we have those better regulations we need, there are still things business leaders can do to make their businesses better for the environment today, so let's move away from government and talk about businesses. A lot of businesses these days pay an enormous amount of lip service (and money) to showing that they care about the environment, but the actual work being done to lower their carbon footprint or invest in cleaner business practices is a lot less significant. Tan spoke to me about this as well. Tan Copsey: “They need to move from a model which was a little bit more about PR to something that's real. In the past when a business issued a sustainability report, it was beautiful! It was glossily designed… And then when it came to like, filings with the SEC, they said ‘climate change is a serious issue and we are taking it seriously,' because their lawyers read it very, very closely. And so, if dealing with climate risk is embedded in everything you do as a business (as it probably should be), because almost every business, well, every business probably, interacts with the energy system—every business is a climate change business. They should be thinking about it, they should be reporting on it, y'know, when it comes to CEOs, it should be part of the way we assess their performance.” Nowadays, lots of companies are talking about “offsetting” their carbon emissions, or attempting to counter-act their emissions by planting trees or recapturing some of the carbon. But is this the right way to think about things? Dorothea Baur: “Offsetting is a really good thing, but the first question to ask should not be, ‘can I offset it?' or ‘how can I offset it?', but, ‘is what I'm doing, is it even necessary?'” That's Dorothea Baur, a leading expert & advisor in Europe on ethics, responsibility, and sustainability across industries such as finance, technology, and beyond. Her PhD is in NGO-business partnerships, and she's been active in research and projects around sustainable investment, corporate social responsibility, and increasingly, emerging technology such as AI. Dorothea Baur: “So, I mean, let's say my favorite passion is to fly to Barcelona every other weekend just for fun, for partying. So, instead of offsetting it, maybe I should stop doing it. And the same for tech companies saying, you know, ‘we're going to be carbon negative!' but then make the most money from totally unsustainable industries. That's kind of a double-edged sword.” It is notable that one of the key ways businesses and governments attempt to offset their emissions is “planting trees,” which has more problems than you may think. Yes, trees are an incredibly important part of a carbon sink approach, and we definitely need to plant more of them—but there's a catch to how we say we're going to do it. The promise of tree-planting has been such an easy add-on for companies' marketing campaigns to make over the years that there's a backlog of trees to be planted and not enough tree seedlings to keep up with the promises. It's not uncommon for companies to make the commitment to their customers to plant trees first, only for them to struggle to find partners to plant the promised trees. Dorothea Baur lamented this fact in her interview. Dorothea Baur: “It's also controversial, what I always joke about—the amount of trees that have been promised to be planted? I'm waiting for the day when I look out of my window in the middle of the city and they start planting trees! Because so much—I mean, the whole planet must be covered with trees! The thing is, it takes decades until the tree you plant really turns into a carbon sink. So, all that planting trees—it sounds nice, but also I think there's some double-counting going on. It's easy to get the credit for planting a tree, but it's hard to verify the reduction you achieve because it takes such a long time.” It's going to take more than lip service about tree-planting; we have to actually expand our infrastructural capability to grow and plant them, commit land to that use, and compensate for trees lost in wildfires and other natural disasters. Beyond that, we have to make sure the trees we're planting will actually have the effect we want. The New York Times published an article in March, arguing that “Reforestation can fight climate change, uplift communities and restore biodiversity. When done badly, though, it can speed extinctions and make nature less resilient…companies and countries are increasingly investing in tree planting that carpets large areas with commercial, nonnative species in the name of fighting climate change. These trees sock away carbon but provide little support to the webs of life that once thrived in those areas.” And that can mean the trees take resources away from existing plant life, killing it and eliminating the native carbon-sink—leading to a situation where net carbon emissions were reduced by nearly zero. These are problems that require collaboration and communication between industries, governments, activists, and individuals. Beyond those initiatives, companies can also improve their climate impact by investing in improvements to transportation for employees and customers, perhaps offering public transit or electric vehicle incentives to employees, or investing in a partnership with their municipality to provide electric vehicle charging stations at offices and storefronts. Additionally, business responsibility may include strategic adjustments to the supply chain or to materials used in products, packaging, or delivery. Another issue when it comes to offsetting emissions is the leeway the tech industry gives itself when it comes to measuring their own global climate impact, when the materials they need to build technology is one of the chief contributors to carbon emissions. Dorothea Baur again. Dorothea Baur: “The whole supply chain of the IT industry is also heavily based on minerals. There are actually, there are really interesting initiatives also by tech companies, or like commodity companies that specifically focus on the minerals or the metals that are in our computers. Like cobalt, there's a new transparency initiative, a fair cobalt initiative. So they are aware of this, but if you look at where is the main focus, it's more on the output than on the input. And even though the tech companies say, ‘oh, we're going to be carbon neutral or carbon negative,' as long as they sell their cloud services to the fossil industry, that's basically irrelevant.” Currently, AI tech is an “energy glutton”—training just one machine learning algorithm can produce CO2 emissions that are 5 times more than the lifetime emissions of a car. But there is still hope for AI as a tool to help with climate change, namely using it to learn how to more efficiently run energy grids and predict energy usage, especially as energy grids become more complicated with combined use of solar, wind, and water power in addition to traditional fossil fuels. AI can also make the global supply chain more efficient, reducing emissions and speeding up the process of developing new, cleaner materials. One small-scale use-case is “Trashbot,” which sorts waste materials into categories using sensors and cameras, eliminating the need for people to try to sort out their own recyclables. What's clear from every emerging report is that net zero emissions are no longer enough. We need governments and companies and every entity possible to commit to net negative emissions. Cities need ambitious plans for incentivizing buildings that sequester carbon. Companies need logistics overhauls to ensure their supply chains are as compliant as possible, and then some. Tan Copsey: ““What's interesting is when they talk about Net Zero—particularly companies, but also a lot of governments—they talk about Net Zero by 2050. What is that, 28 years. 28 years is still a long time away, and if you're a government, the current president certainly won't be president in 2050. If you're a company CEO, you may not be CEO next quarter, let alone in 28 years, and so we have to have nearer-term targets. You want to be Net Zero by 2050? Tell me how you're gonna get there. Tell me what you're gonna do by 2030, tell me what you're gonna do by next quarter. One of the things that encourages me is things like change in financial regulation, which sounds arcane and slightly off-topic, but it's not. It's about what companies report when, and how investors hold those companies to account to nearer-term action, because that's how we get there.” One of the reasons that corporations do so little to minimize their carbon footprint is that they don't accurately measure their own carbon emissions. Using AI to track emissions can show problem areas, and what can be done to address those issues. Abhishek Gupta, machine learning engineer, founder of the Montreal AI Ethics Institute, and board member of Microsoft's CSE Responsible AI board, spoke to me about an initiative he's working on to help ease this burden by making it easier for developers to track the effect they're having on the environment by incorporating data collection into their existing workflow. Abhishek Gupta: “One of the projects that we're working on is to help developers assess the environmental impacts of the work that they do. Not to say that there aren't initiative already, there are—the problem with a lot of these are, they ignore the developer's workflow. So the problem then is, if you're asking me to go to an external website and put in all of this information, chances are I might do it the first couple of times, but I start to drop the ball later on. But if you were to integrate this in a manner that is similar to ML Flow, now that's something that's a little more natural to the developer workflow; data science workflow. If you were to integrate the environmental impacts in a way that follows this precedent that's set by something like ML Flow, there is a lot higher of a possibility for people taking you up on that, and subsequently reporting those outcomes back to you, rather than me having to go to an external website, fill out a form, take that PDF report of whatever… that's just too much effort. So that's really what we're trying to do, is to make it easy for you to do the right thing.” And Abhishek isn't the only one who sees potential in AI. Dorothea Baur also spoke to me about her belief in AI, although she sees us using it for a different purpose. Dorothea Baur: “AI has huge potential to cause good, especially when it comes to environmental sustainability. For example, the whole problem of pattern recognition in machine learning, where if it's applied to humans, it is full of biases, and it kind of confuses correlation and causation, and it's violating privacy, etc. There are a lot of issues that you don't have when you use the same kind of technology in a natural science context, you know? Where you just observe patterns of oceans and clouds and whatever, or when you try to control the extinction of species. I mean, animals don't have a need for or a right to privacy, so why not use AI in contexts where it doesn't violate anyone's moral rights? And where you, at the same time, resolve a real problem.” Turning AI and algorithms away from people and towards nature is a wise decision in many respects. A lot of our efforts to curb the effects of climate change thus far have overlooked the same people that are overlooked in our data, and in almost every measurable respect, negative impacts of the climate crisis are felt most by marginalized populations and poorer communities. Tan Copsey: “I think that when it comes to climate tech, you need to think about who it's supposed to benefit. There's more than 7B people on earth, it can't just be for the US market, it has to be for everyone.” “The best futures for the most people” really comes into play here—communities of color are often more at risk from air pollution, due to decades of redlining forcing them into more dangerous areas. Seniors, people with disabilities, and people with chronic illnesses may have a harder time surviving extreme heat or quickly evacuating from natural disasters. Subsidized housing is often located in a flood plain, causing mold, and frequently lacks adequate insulation or air conditioning. People with a low-income may also be hard-pressed to afford insurance or be able to come back from an extreme loss after catastrophe strikes. Some indigenous communities have already lost their homelands to rising sea levels and drought. Indigenous communities, speaking of, often have traditional approaches—empowered by millennia of historical experience—to living gently on the planet and a mindset for cooperating with nature that are well worth learning. Seeking leadership on climate issues from Indigenous people should be a priority. An article published by Mongabay on December 21, 2021 gives an example of an initiative in Mexico that is using the knowledge of indigenous communities, and is working. Essentially, the Ejido Verde company grants interest-free loans to local communities to plant and tend pine trees for the tapping of resin, a multibillion-dollar global industry. Younger generations are eager to participate, and fewer people feel the need to migrate away from their homes. According to a paper by the Royal Botanic Gardens of Kew, the only way that recovery can work is if it is based on sound science, supported by fair governance, incentivized by long-term funding mechanisms, and guided by indigenous knowledge and local communities. Speaking of long-term funding mechanisms, let's talk about another group of leaders who have the potential to make a drastic positive impact today: private investors. Activist investors may seem unwelcome, but when they're making priorities known on behalf of humanity, they're ultimately doing us all a service. These people have the ability to help shape company and government policy by letting their dollars speak for us, by investing in solutions and burgeoning industries that we drastically need. That's been happening, such as when the shareholders of both ExxonMobil and Chevron sent strong messages about getting serious with respect to climate responsibility. In Europe, shareholder votes and a Dutch court ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its emissions faster than they'd already been planning. And social and financial pressure is a good way to nudge executives in the right direction, especially leaders who don't make climate-friendly decisions out of fear of pushback from their boards and investors. Tan Copsey: “Investors increasingly should be thinking about the companies they invest in on the basis of their climate performance. And that isn't just, ‘oh, they reduced some greenhouse gas emissions,' because, y'know, you look at a lot of tech companies and they have reduced greenhouse gas emissions, but really they have to do more than that. For businesses in other sectors, it may not be that simple. Certainly there are harder to abate sectors, and so it could be that you are the CEO of a steel company, and your emissions are still gigantic, but the change you can make by introducing, say, hydrogen, and getting rid of coal, or introducing renewable energy plus hydrogen to your—the way in which you do steel, is transformative for the global economy and transformative for the climate system, and in a way investing in that company is more climate-friendly than investing in a tech company; but chances are you have an ETF and you're doing both.” Despite everything I've talked about today, it's important for all of us to remain optimistic. I asked Anne Therese Gennari why optimism is important, and her answer didn't disappoint. Anne Therese Gennari: “Optimism, for scientific reasons, is actually very important. If you look to neuroscience, we need optimism to believe something better is possible, and then find the motivation and the courage to take action right now to get us closer to that goal. And I think there is a huge difference between optimism and toxic positivity, and I think a lot of people who don't agree with optimism associate it with always trying to be happy, thinking good thoughts and hoping things will turn out to the better. And that's why I love to come back to this understanding that ‘awareness hurts, and that's okay.' Because when we tell ourselves that not everything is beautiful, and sometimes things will be painful, we can actually handle that, and we can take that. But from that place of awareness, we can start to grow a seed of hope and tell ourselves, ‘well, what if? What if we did take action, and this happened? What if we can create a more beautiful world in the future? And so, we can paint a picture that's all doomsday, or we can paint one that's beautiful. So which one do we want to start working towards?” And if you find yourself saying, “I really want to be optimistic, but it's too hard! There's just so much bad news out there…” don't fret! You aren't alone. You might even say that's a quite human response. Anne Therese Gennari: “We're human beings, and as a species, we respond to certain kinds of information in different ways. Information that's negative or fear based has a very limiting response in our brains. When we hear something that's overwhelming, like climate change, and we know it's urgent, we might understand that it's urgent, but the action isn't there. Because how our brains respond to something that we don't want to happen is actually to not take action. And it goes back to way back in time, where like, you're facing this dangerous animal, and you're like ‘there's no way I can fight this animal, I can't outrun it, so what am I gonna do? I'm gonna stand here super still and hope that it doesn't see me.' That's literally what our brains think about when something's that overwhelming. And so I think the more urgent the matter is, the more important it is that we actually fuel ourselves with an optimistic future or goal to work towards, because that is the only way that we can actually trigger action.” So let's fuel our minds with an optimistic future to work towards. Despite all the bad news you've heard—even on this episode—there are a lot of hopeful developments happening! The most recent U.N. Climate Conference, COP26, established the Glasgow Climate Pact, which recognizes that the situation is at an emergency level, asking countries to accelerate their plans by calling for provable action by next year. Policy changes, government regulations, and people becoming motivated are all on the rise. Caleb Gardner, who was lead digital strategist for President Obama's political advocacy group, OFA and is now founding partner of 18 Coffees, a strategy firm working at the intersection of digital innovation, social change, and the future of work, spoke to me about what he's most optimistic about, which is right in line with this show's values. Caleb Gardner: “I'm probably most optimistic about technology's ability to tackle global problems like climate change. I'm actually pretty bullish on technology's ability to solve and actually innovate around the reduction of carbon in our atmosphere, electric vehicles, electric grid… and what's great is a lot of that's already being driven by the private sector around the world, so it's not as dependent on government as we think that it is.” So let's talk about some of the emerging technologies that show a lot of promise in mitigating the effects of climate change—and that might make sense to invest in, if you have the means to do so. A team of UCLA scientists led by Aaswath Raman has developed a thin, mirror-like film that reflects heat to outer space through radiative cooling, and can lower the temperatures of objects it's applied to by more than 10 degrees. The idea comes from generations of knowledge from people living in desert climates who learned to cool water by letting the heat radiate out of it overnight. If this film were added to paint and/or applied to pipes and refrigeration units, it could help cool buildings and make refrigeration systems more efficient, reducing the need for air conditioning, which accounts for as much as 70% of residential energy demand in the United States and Middle East. One of the strongest selling points of innovations like this film is that it doesn't need electricity; it only needs a clear day to do its job. Another innovation in reflecting energy back into space comes in the form of ‘cloud brightening,' a technique where salt drops are sprayed into the sky so that clouds reflect more radiation, allowing us to refreeze the polar ice caps. Then there's the new trend of green roofs, in particular the California Academy of Sciences' Living Roof, which spans 2.5 acres and runs six inches deep, with an estimated 1.7 million plants, collecting 100 percent of storm water runoff and offering insulation to the building below. The whole endeavor is brilliantly hopeful and strategic. A massive green roof is completely on brand for a science museum, but that doesn't mean other buildings and businesses wouldn't benefit from them as well. The National Park Service even estimates that over a forty year building lifespan, a green roof could save a typical structure about $200,000, nearly two-thirds of which would come from reduced energy costs. Other building technologies move beyond solar panels and green roofs, with automated building management systems detecting usage patterns of lighting, heating, and air conditioning. There have also been innovations in window insulation, trapping heat during the winter and blocking it out in the summer. ‘Green cement' can be heated to lower temperatures and cuts emissions by a third compared to regular cement. There are new Hydrogen-powered ships whose emissions are water. Electric planes have been developed for short-distance flights. Large floating solar power installations have the potential to generate terawatts of energy on a global scale, and when built near hydropower, can generate electricity even in the dark. Lithium batteries continue to get smaller and more efficient, and can be charged faster and more often than other batteries, making electric vehicles cheaper. And speaking of electric vehicles, they can help with our energy storage problems, with owners buying electricity at night to charge their cars and selling it to the grid when demand is high and cars are unused during the day. Feeding cows seaweed and replacing beef with insects such as mealworms can drastically reduce methane emissions. Scientists in Argentina are working on backpacks for cows that collect their methane, which have shown to collect enough methane from a single cow every day to fuel a refrigerator for 24 hours. To help curb other types of emissions, carbon capture and storage technologies like NZT allow us to capture CO2 in offshore storage sites several kilometres beneath the North Sea. But it's not just about new technologies, or technologies that only work for the richest people. Here's Tan again to elaborate on this idea. Tan Copsey: “This is a really tricky moment, y'know, this is a really bad time to be inefficiently using the resources we have. As we think about climate tech, think about optimizing mobility, as well as copying the existing model. There's a lot of existing tech out there that would make people's lives better—very simple irrigation systems—and so, we shouldn't just think of this in terms of big new exciting things, we should think about it in terms of deploying existing things.” All of this is part of embracing the mindset that says things can change. We need a can-do mindset, but we also need clarity and collaboration. Basically all options need to be implemented if we want to curb the damage that has already been done. Our solutions need to work in conjunction with one another, and support the greatest number of people. To close out, here's Christopher Mims with the last word on putting away the doom and gloom, and remaining optimistic in the face of overwhelming adversity. Christopher Mims: “If you really think about the whole sweep of human history, we live in a time where the pace of especially technological, and therefore in some ways cultural change, is so much faster than ever. We keep inventing new ways to kind of trip ourselves up, and then we have to just adapt so quickly to them. We're constantly playing catch-up with our own technological and social developments. So there's a lot of beating ourselves up over like, ‘woah, how come we didn't do it this way, or we didn't do this right?' or whatever. Sometimes I'm just like, ahh, just chill! We're going as fast as we can. It's very easy to get caught up in the moment to moment, but I think there is this kind of overall arc where, if we don't cook ourselves to death, or blow ourselves up, or distract ourselves to death, we're moving in directions that, once we have fully understood how to live in harmony with the technology that we've created, we'll probably be okay.” Thanks for joining me on The Tech Humanist Show today. I hope you've learned something, and at the very least, that you're going into the future with more hope than you had before.

Círculo de Espera - Toros de Tijuana
EPISODIO 486 - Tome sus precauciones para la gran inauguración de la LMB en los amigables confines del Estadio Chevron, le damos todas las recomendaciones.

Círculo de Espera - Toros de Tijuana

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 29:24


EPISODIO 486 - Tome sus precauciones para la gran inauguración de la LMB en los amigables confines del Estadio Chevron, le damos todas las recomendaciones.

Starting to know - Business
How do leaders develop in their lives? with Beate Chelette

Starting to know - Business

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 42:19


Beate Chelette is The Growth Architect and founder of The Women's Code and designs processes, best practices, and systems for leaders who want to grow, build and scale their business, and achieve measurable results and profits they can count on. Recent clients include Chevron, Merck, the Women's Legislative Caucus of California Cal State University Dominguez Hills, the Greater Los Angeles Realtor Association, Advertising Agency TracyLocke, and thousands of small businesses. Beate's website: https://beatechelette.com/ Starting to Know: https://startingtoknow.com/ Ishu Singh's website:https://ishusingh.com/

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Are EV Owners Happy After One Year of Driving? JD Power 2022 Electric Vehicle Ownership Satisfaction Study With Brent Gruber

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 44:47


Gas prices are going through the roof. Shell and Chevron now command more than $6 a gallon in California. People are asking themselves: Is it time to go electric? Up until now, consumers have been hesitant. Going electric has understandably felt like a big gamble because cars are such a big ticket item. What about range? Will charging be convenient? Is the battery safe from fires? Will I be able to sell my electric vehicle in three years at a decent price? Today, thanks to a new study from JD Power, we have much more clarity on the highs and lows of owning an electric vehicle. JD Power surveyed more than 8,000 EV owners across the United States and, just weeks ago, published the 2022 US Electric Vehicle Ownership Satisfaction Study. The big takeaway from the study: The overwhelming majority of owners say they will not go back to gas-powered cars - even though the EV ownership experience has not always been smooth or easy. Why is that? This episode of the Driving With Dunne podcast reveals what owners might call the magic allure of electric vehicles. #DrivingWithDunne / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

Tortoise QuickTake Podcasts
Energy Podcast: Outcomes from "Gouged at the Gas Station" hearing

Tortoise QuickTake Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 6:22


In this week's energy podcast, Senior Portfolio Manager Matt Sallee discusses:Key takeaways from the House hearing on high energy prices featuring Exxon, Chevron and BPWeekly Department of Energy (DOE) report shows signs of oil price reliefNew LNG projects in Asia underscore the need for US natural gas over the next several yearsDownload Transcript

Administrative Static Podcast
Bombshell in SEC Lawsuit; NCLA's Amicus Brief in ATF Bump Stock Cert Petition

Administrative Static Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 25:00


Bombshell in SEC Lawsuit Mark reveals a bombshell in SEC v. Michelle Cochran. The agency has disclosed that its enforcement staff accessed documents in at least two adjudicatory matters currently in litigation in federal court, including Cochran. NCLA represents Michelle Cochran in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of SEC's in-house Administrative Law Judges, who enjoy multiple layers of protection from removal by President Biden. SEC released a statement this week admitting that “administrative support personnel from Enforcement, who were responsible for maintaining Enforcement's case files, accessed [restricted] Adjudication memoranda via the Office of the Secretary's databases.” This self-described “control deficiency” is actually an outrageous breach of ethics—and possibly law—by SEC that illustrates why the Constitution forbids housing prosecutorial functions and adjudicatory functions in a single agency. NCLA's Amicus Brief in ATF Bump Stock Cert Petition  The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has promulgated a Final Rule that classifies bump stocks as “machineguns” without Congress's delegation of authority to define or redefine that term. Gun Owners of America and several other organizations and individuals filed a petition for a writ of certiorari, asking the Supreme Court to settle widespread disagreement among the lower courts over (1) whether the definition of “machinegun” found in the relevant statute is clear and unambiguous, and if bump stocks meet that definition, and (2) whether courts should apply Chevron deference to an agency interpretation of federal law when the federal government declines to invoke it. Mark discusses NCLA's amicus in support of Gun Owners of America v. Garland. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Squawk on the Street
Morning After the Tech Sell-off, “Buffett Effect” As HP Surges on Berkshire Stake, Shell Issues a $5B Russia Warning and Big Oil Execs Grilled on High Gas Prices 4/7/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 44:02


After two days of stock market declines fueled by Fed-related news, Jim Cramer and David Faber discussed how investors should navigate the tech sector slump following Wednesday's Nasdaq sell-off. On the flip side, the anchors explored what to make of Warren Buffett's big bet on HP Inc.: The stock surged after Berkshire Hathaway disclosed an 11% stake in the personal computer and printer maker. Also in focus: Fed's Bullard on inflation and hiking interest rates, Shell said it sees a Q1 write-down of up to $5 billion due to its pullout from Russia, what the CEOs of Exxon Mobil and Chevron said at a House subcommittee hearing on high gasoline prices, plus the biggest movers -- including what Conagra and Levi Strauss are telling us about the consumer.

The Hydrogen Podcast
Hydrogen Stocks Just Pummeled The S&P 500 In The First Quarter. Find Out What Has Investors Salivating.

The Hydrogen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 10:22


Welcome to The Hydrogen Podcast!In episode 105, With the first quarter of the year over, let's take a look at some hydrogen stocks and see how they're performing all of this on today's hydrogen podcast. Thank you for listening and I hope you enjoy the podcast. Please feel free to email me at info@thehydrogenpodcast.com with any questions. Also, if you wouldn't mind subscribing to my podcast using your preferred platform... I would greatly appreciate it. Respectfully,Paul RoddenVISIT THE HYDROGEN PODCAST WEBSITEhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.comCHECK OUT OUR BLOGhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.com/blog/WANT TO SPONSOR THE PODCAST? Send us an email to: info@thehydrogenpodcast.comNEW TO HYDROGEN AND NEED A QUICK INTRODUCTION?Start Here: The 6 Main Colors of Hydrogen

PBS NewsHour - Segments
U.S. lawmakers grill oil executives about sharp rise in gas prices

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 3:35


Since Russia's invasion of Ukraine, fuel prices have shot up and stayed high. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill Wednesday were laying blame for rising gas prices on executives from BP, Chevron, Shell, ExxonMobil and others. Meanwhile, everyday Americans are feeling the pressure. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Grueter Golf Presents: Low Expectations
Palm Springs is Crazy: The Chevron Experience

Grueter Golf Presents: Low Expectations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 43:12


Jen could've talked for much longer about this trip, so consider yourselves lucky. Kiki & Haley hear allllll about the golf tournament experience, the wild world that is Palm Springs, the clown at The Nest, and the challenges of life on the road. Sign up for our first event of 2022, Girls on Greens in NYC, here!Sign up for Margaritas & Mulligans on 6/25 in Washington, DC here! And sign up for our mailing list at GrueterGolf.com to keep up with all things GG here.  (Scroll to the bottom!) 

POLITICO Energy
The oil industry's defender

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 8:16


The House Energy and Commerce is meeting today with the leadership of BP America, Chevron, Devon Energy, Exxon Mobil, Pioneer Natural Resources and Shell USA. POLITICO's Josh Siegel previews the hearing with Mike Sommers, the president and CEO of the American Petroleum Institute.