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A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

WNYC and PRI


    • Jan 29, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 45m AVG DURATION
    • 607 EPISODES

    Listeners of The Takeaway that love the show mention: amy walter, takeaway, npr, station, excellent show, include, news, flow, friday, segments, depth, coverage, public, covers, radio, issues, variety, current, important, stories.



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    Latest episodes from The Takeaway

    Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2022 9:04

    In the six months since the U.S. withdrew from Afghanistan and the Taliban took control of the country's government, food insecurity has grown more severe for the Afghan population. The UN says that the international community needs to provide billions of dollars to prevent a famine in 2022, but so far the funding has fallen short. The Takeaway speaks with Ali Latifi, a reporter who has written for Insider and Vice, about the current situation and what can be done to remedy it. Click here to read Ali's latest reporting.

    'Simple as Water' Shows the Meaning of Family for Syrian Refugees

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 8:52

    Since 2011, Syria has been engaged in a devastating civil war. More than three hundred fifty thousand people have been killed during the conflict. The war has forced more than six million people to flee the country. These Syrians in forced exile have had to endure overcrowded refugee camps, treacherous journeys by sea, and painful family separations.  Academy Award winning director Megan Mylan is known for her films "Lost Boys of Sudan" and "Smile Pinki." Her latest documentary, "Simple as Water," follows several families of Syrian refugees.  The Takeaway spoke with Mylan to find out more about how she created such a compassionate depiction of people whose stories are frequently sensationalized. "Simple as Water" is available to stream now on HBO Max.

    The Radical Connections Between Art and Incarceration

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 14:06

    Next month, New York City officials will vote on whether to give painter Faith Ringgold permission to move her painting “For the Women's House” from Rikers Island to the Brooklyn Museum. When Ringgold visited the painting in 2019, she found that it was not being well maintained, and wasn't even in view for most people being held at Rikers. The Takeaway speaks with Nicole Fleetwood, inaugural James Weldon Johnson professor of media, culture, and communications at New York University and 2021 MacArthur Fellow, and Russell Craig, a painter based in New York City, about how art is made and displayed in prisons and jails in the U.S.

    The Ongoing Crisis at Rikers Island

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 7:01

    Starting on January 7th, about 200 of those detained at one jail facility at Rikers Island went on a partial hunger strike in hopes to draw attention to the poor conditions at the jail, and also a lack of basic services. You've probably heard of the infamous Rikers Island, which is the main jail complex for New York City. And because it's a jail complex, most people there, about eighty percent of the near 6,000 detainees, are waiting for trial and haven't been convicted of a crime. And although the jail has long been characterized by dysfunction, brutal conditions, and violence, detainees and advocates say that Rikers is in its worst crisis since the 1990's. Along with poor conditions at the jail complex, rising Covid, and issues with correctional officers not showing up for work, violence is also increasing in the jail with reports of detainees hosting fights for entertainment with little intervention from guards. Last year, 16 people died in custody at Rikers — and at least five died by suicide – making 2021 the deadliest year since 2013. The Takeaway spoke with Jan Ransom, a Metro investigative reporter with the New York Times, who has been following what's happening at Rikers.

    Native American Activist Leonard Peltier Pleads from Prison Amid Pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 10:34

    For the past 45 years, Leonard Peltier has been behind bars for a crime he says he didn't commit.  The Native American activist was accused of killing two FBI agents during a shootout on Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota in 1975. Peltier was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences, and he's been denied parole several times since.  Over the years, his imprisonment has been denounced by people like Pope Francis, Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama, and more. Many people expected former President Bill Clinton to grant him clemency, but he didn't — and neither have any subsequent presidents. The U.S. attorney who helped put Peltier in prison has even pleaded with President Joe Biden to grant him clemency. Now, Peltier is begging for help amid the COVID pandemic. According to reporting from the Huffington Post, he says quote “fear and stress” associated with his prison's COVID lockdowns are taking a toll on everyone, including himself. At 77 years old, Peltier has serious health problems including an abdominal aortic aneurysm and diabetes.  For more on Peltier and his activism, The Takeaway spoke to Kent Blansett, the Langston Hughes Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies and History at the University of Kansas and a Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Shawnee, and Potawatomi descendant. 

    Understanding and Addressing Increasing Rates of Suicide Deaths Amongst Black Youth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 22:34

    Last week, Academy Award winning actor Regina King lost her only child to death by suicide. The tragic loss of a loved one to suicide is a pain far too many have endured. We speak with Dr. Michael Lindsey, Executive Director, NYU McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research about rising suicide rates among young people of color. Dr. Lindsey served as Chair of the Emergency Taskforce on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health which presented its research to Congress on behalf of the Congressional Black Caucus to call attention to the crisis of increasing numbers of suicide deaths amongst Black youth in the United States. The study, Ring the Alarm: The Crisis of Black Youth Suicide in America, addressed issues surrounding awareness, accessibility to mental health services, prevention, and policy.  

    A Run Down of the Top Stories in Sports

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 15:22

    This week, David Ortiz was voted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, while Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds did not make the cut. This means that Clemens and Bonds will no longer be on the main voting ballot going forward and their chances of ever making it into the hall of fame are slim. Many baseball fans and writers have voiced their anger over somewhat arbitrarily denying these greats entry into the hall over their use of performance enhancing drugs while allowing many other players who either used steroids or otherwise bent the rules. In other sports news, the Super Bowl is just weeks away, and while much of the current attention is on the big name musicians playing the halftime show, the NFL is still failing to hire and keep Black coaches, cementing its status as a league that profits off of Black athletes without investing in Black leaders at the highest levels. We speak with Burn It All Down co-host Amira Rose Davis about these stories and everything else happening in the sports world as we head towards February.

    Indigenous Children are Overrepresented in Minnesota's Foster Care System 2022-01-26

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 41:33

    Indigenous Children are Overrepresented in Minnesota's Foster Care System Over the course of eight months, Jessica Washington, a reporter with the Fuller Project spoke with Native families, lawyers, and other experts to understand why Minnesota has the highest disproportionality of Indigenous children in the child welfare system in the country. The Takeaway speaks with Washington about her investigation. We also hear from one of Washington's sources, Teresa Nord, who is a Navajo and Hopi Indian descendant, and who has personal experience with the child welfare system in Minnesota.  New York Expands Whistleblower Law We speak with Rachel Green, an associate at Katz, Marshall & Banks LLP in Washington D.C. and a Stanford Law graduate about the recent changes, what they mean, and how they compare to both federal and state protections around the country. The Intersection of Sustainable Farming and Decarceration Sustainable farming in rural North Carolina provides a model for decommissioned prisons, decarceration, and opportunities for youth living on the edge of the criminal justice system. For transcripts, see individual segments.

    Hospitals Are Overwhelmed in Arizona

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 9:10

    COVID-19 infections due to the omicron variant are slowing nationwide. But some states are still seeing high rates of hospitalizations.  Arizona is just one of the states feeling the effects of omicron right now. There, hospitalizations are up 26 percent over the past two weeks, with a daily average of 3,428 people in hospitals. In Arizona and elsewhere, the omicron wave has overwhelmed hospitals and burned out healthcare workers that were already strained due to the delta variant.  For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with one of the healthcare workers living through this surge. Frank LoVecchio is an emergency physician and public health doctor at University of Arizona and Arizona State University. 

    'Simple as Water' Shows the Meaning of Family for Syrian Refugees

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 8:52

    Since 2011, Syria has been engaged in a devastating civil war. More than three hundred fifty thousand people have been killed during the conflict. The war has forced more than six million people to flee the country. These Syrians in forced exile have had to endure overcrowded refugee camps, treacherous journeys by sea, and painful family separations.  Academy Award winning director Megan Mylan is known for her films "Lost Boys of Sudan" and "Smile Pinki." Her latest documentary, "Simple as Water," follows several families of Syrian refugees.  The Takeaway spoke with Mylan to find out more about how she created such a compassionate depiction of people whose stories are frequently sensationalized. "Simple as Water" is available to stream now on HBO Max.

    Understanding and Addressing Increasing Rates of Suicide Deaths Amongst Black Youth 2022-01-25

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 49:19

    Understanding and Addressing Increasing Rates of Suicide Deaths Amongst Black Youth Last week, Academy Award winning actor Regina King lost her only child to death by suicide. The tragic loss of a loved one to suicide is a pain far too many have endured. We speak with Dr. Michael Lindsey, Executive Director, NYU McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research about rising suicide rates among young people of color.  Hospitals Are Overwhelmed in Arizona  In Arizona and elsewhere, the omicron wave has overwhelmed hospitals and burned out healthcare workers.  Humanitarian Crisis in Afghanistan Afghanistan food insecurity crisis affects more than 23 million people, nearly half the country. 'Simple as Water' Shows the Meaning of Family for Syrian Refugees Academy Award winning director Megan Mylan joins The Takeaway to discuss her new film “Simple As Water,” which tells the story of Syrian Refugees displaced around the world.    

    ALERT: The Takeaway Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 2:01

    Instead of bringing you one daily PODCAST, we're trying something different! We're going to send each of our stories down the feed to you, separately, so you can have shorter listens and more choices! This means you'll get multiple Takeaway stories in your feed every day, and you can listen to them in any order that you want, or maybe hold onto one for later if you don't have time.   You won't lose anything, but you'll gain a little bit of control, and just so you know, our big DEEP DIVE episodes will stay on the podcast feed as full episodes, and they'll still be chock full of information.  

    ALERT: The Takeaway Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 2:01

    Instead of bringing you one daily podcast, we're trying something different! We're going to send each of our stories down the feed, so you can have shorter listens and more choices! This means you'll get multiple Takeaway stories in your feed every day, and you can listen to them in any order that you want, or maybe hold onto one for later if you don't have time.   You won't lose anything, but you'll gain a little bit of control. DEEP DIVE episodes will stay on the podcast feed as full episodes, and they'll still be full of information.

    Mitch McConnell's Verbal Separation of African Americans and Americans Sparks Outrage 2022-01-24

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 46:50

    Mitch McConnell's Verbal Separation of African Americans and Americans Sparks Outrage In light of light of the Republicans' blockage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Act, Latino Rebels reporter Pablo Manríquez asked MiSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell whether he had a message to people of color ahead of the midterms. Senate Minority Leader McConnell said, “Well, the concern is misplaced because, if you look at the statistics, African American voters are voting in just as high a percentage as Americans.” The comment ignited a wave of angry responses on social media. Commenters noted that it was just the latest example of how often white people in power don't see Black people and other people of color as Americans. We speak with Manríquez and professor Khalil Gibran Muhammad about McConnell's comment and the response. A Report Reveals Potential Conflicts of Interest in Sheriff Campaigns The report reveals more than $6 million in potential conflicts of interests for sheriffs in 11 different states. These Sheriffs, who are elected officials, received contributions from businesses that stood to benefit from contracts with the sheriffs' offices and jails in their control. The Takeaway speaks with Keshia Morris Desir, Census & Mass Incarceration Project Manager at Common Cause, about the report. A New Guaranteed Income Program Will Launch in Georgia This Year  In Her Hands is a partnership between the the Georgia Resilience & Opportunity (GRO) Fund and GiveDirectly who are planning to supply 650 Black women across Georgia with $850 per month over the course of two years. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Hope Wollensack, Executive Director of the Georgia Resilience and Opportunity Fund and co-director of the In Her Hands Initiative.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    The Past, Present and Future Of The Biden Administration 2022-01-21

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 45:34

    The Past, Present and Future Of The Biden Administration This week, the filibuster and voting rights act fell through in the Senate, and student debt forgiveness, criminal justice and climate change reforms hang in the balance. These failures have had an impact on voters across the country, according to recent polling. So what does that mean for the future of the Biden administration? For the discussion we're joined by Joel Payne, Democratic strategist, host of the podcast, Here Comes the Payne, and CBS News political contributor. NYC Law Granting Noncitizens the Right to Vote Concerns Some Advocates A new law allowing roughly 800,000 noncitizens to vote in local elections went into effect in New York City. Some Democrats and immigration advocates don't see it as a win. Russell Berman, staff writer for The Atlantic, joined to discuss his recent reporting on the law and what it means for the Democrats nationally. Russia's Potential Invasion of Ukraine We spoke with Professor Kimberly Marten about why Russia has chosen this moment to take more aggressive action towards Ukraine, and whether the U.S. and other Western powers have any other options to prevent a military conflict. How Should the Media Be Covering Democracy At Risk? The Takeaway spoke to Margaret Sullivan, media columnist at the Washington Post, and Lewis Raven Wallace, author of The View from Somewhere and the host of the podcast of the same name. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    How Antitrust Laws Are Defining the Facebook Monopolization Case 2022-01-20

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 53:48

    How Antitrust Laws Are Defining the Facebook Monopolization Case: We get the latest on Facebook/Meta antitrust lawsuit, and learn more about what constitutes antitrust with Vanderbilt law professor Rebecca Allensworth.  A Year and a Half After McGirt v. Oklahoma, State Officials Still Want Ruling Overturned: State officials have filed 45 petitions with the Supreme Court asking the justices to either overturn or rule more narrowly on McGirt. This month, the Court has been considering some of those petitions. The Takeaway speaks with Allison Herrera, Indigenous Affairs reporter for KOSU, about the most recent developments. A Word about Wordle: We speak with Associate Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Florida, Matt Baldwin, about why playing Wordle and sharing our results with friends and family is so rewarding. How to Reimagine Judging: Judge Nancy Gertner, argues that judges must be actively involved in revolutionizing the justice system. She also offers up six key recommendations for reimagining judging, including improvements to judicial selection and community engagement.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Dr. Anthony Fauci on How to Make Sense of Omicron 2022-01-19

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 49:38

    Dr. Anthony Fauci on How to Make Sense of Omicron Dr. Anthony Fauci joins The Takeaway to give his take on omicron, vaccinations and testing, and answer questions from listeners. Why the Biden Administration Is Getting Low Marks On Handling COVID Did Biden's handling of Omicron make things worse? How Do We Achieve Vaccine Equity? When we look at education, access, and messaging, we begin to understand the barriers to vaccination. Dads Can Experience Mental Health Issues After Childbirth, Too The Takeaway talked to Aymann Ismail, a staff writer at Slate, about his recent experience with his newborn baby.

    The Filibuster: An Obstruction or Preservation of Democracy? 2022-01-18

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 64:00

    The Filibuster: An Obstruction or Preservation of Democracy? The Takeaway looks at filibuster reform and how it impacts our democracy. What Exactly is An Accident? There are racial and economic disparities when it comes to who dies and who lives in a so-called accident. The Spirituality of Toni Morrison The Takeaway speaks with writer and journalist Nadra Nittle about her book Toni Morrison's Spiritual Vision, which explores Morrison's Catholicism and spirituality. Representative Ayanna Pressley on Voting Rights, Ending the Senate Filibuster, and More The Takeaway speaks to Massachusetts Representative Ayanna Pressley about voting rights, ending the Senate filibuster, the fight to end student loan debt, and more. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    MLK: Activism & The Arts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:29

    In some ways it is impossible to fully celebrate MLK Day in a virtual environment, after all, the movement for racial justice and Civil Rights  has always been about coming together. However, the decision to go digital does honor another aspect of the movement- its creativity and collective action. Hosted by various WNYC radio hosts, this commemorative and uplifting special brings together scholars, cultural and community leaders, and activists to engage in conversations and performance, exploring the many ways the arts influenced the creative nonviolent resistance of Dr. King's activism and how his work is continued today. You'll be hearing excerpts from the Uptown Hall: MLK- Activism And The Arts, our live celebration of the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. recorded on Apollo Digital Stage. Brian Lehrer sat down with award winning children's book author Jacqueline Woodson; Kai Wright spoke with Rashaad Robinson from Color of Change; and WNYC's Jami Floyd, spoke with Garrett McQueen, executive producer and co-host of the Trilluqoy podcast and president of trill werks media. WNYC's host of “all of it”, Alison Stewart was joined by stage and film actress, writer and director, Trezana Beverly and Jonathan McCrory, the artistic director of the National Black Theater. Graphic courtesy of WNYC (WNYC Studios )             

    Guantanamo Bay Detention Center 20 Years Later 2022-01-14

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 43:28

    This week marked 20 years since the opening of Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp, a military detention facility that has been controversial since its inception. We took the entire hour to understand what has happened there and why it matters. Guest 🎙: Wells Dixon, senior staff attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights Earl Catagnus Jr., an adjunct professor in Security and Risk Analysis a Penn State University Brandywine Mansoor Adayfi, former Detainee at Guantanamo Bay and author of the book “Don't Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantanamo” Steve Wood,  former Guantanamo Bay Detention Center guard Carol Rosenberg, Guantanamo Bay Reporter for The New York Times Congressman Adam Schiff, (D-CA 28th District) Chairman of the House Intelligence committee Outgoing Congressman David Price of California

    A Look at New Weight Loss Meds and Weight Related Stigma 2022-01-13

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 49:49

    A Look at New Weight Loss Meds and Weight Related Stigma: The Takeaway spoke with Emma Court, health reporter at Bloomberg News about this new class of weight loss drugs. And maybe you've noticed there is more than a little fat-shaming going on around Covid-19, obesity, and mortality. We also spoke about this with Paula Atkinson, a body liberation psychotherapist and professor at George Washington University, where she teach a course about body justice called Weight and Society. Masking 101: The Takeaway spoke to Dr. Lisa  Maragakis, Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Senior Director of Healthcare Epidemiology and Infection Prevention with the Johns Hopkins Health System, about the latest on masking, which masks are most effective, and more. Why Some Star Athletes Refuse The Vaccine And Get Away With It: We speak with sportswriter Kavitha Davidson about why this mentality from these players matters in the sports world and beyond. Navarro is Back on the Mat for Season 2 of Cheer: We speak with the director and executive producer of Cheer, Greg Whiteley, about what to expect this season and why the docuseries has us all cheering for the cheerlebrities of Navarro. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Biden's ATL Voting Rights Speech 2022-01-12

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 42:30

    Biden's ATL Voting Rights Speech: Mother Jones Senior Reporter and author of Give us the Ballot Ari Berman and Barbara Arnwine, President and Co-Leader of the Transformative Justice Coalition, joined us to discuss the pros and cons of the president's speech and whether the president's speech will move the needle on this issue. Across the Country, Substitute Teachers Are In Demand Giulia Heyward, reporter at the New York Times, joins The Takeaway to discuss the staffing shortage, what it's meant for substitute teachers, and more. The Dangers of Restricting Teachers From Teaching: Last week, during an Indiana state senate committee hearing on an education bill, state senator Scott Baldwin argued that educators “need to be impartial” when teaching about Marxism, Nazism, and fascism. We spoke with Pedro A. Noguera, Dean of the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, about the dangers of placing these limits on educators, and hear from Indiana teacher Matt Bockenfeld, whose comments sparked Senator Baldwin's controversial remarks. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Rep. Adam Schiff on the January 6th Committee and Restoring Trust After Trump 2022-01-11

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 54:57

    Rep. Adam Schiff on the January 6th Committee and Restoring Trust After Trump: The Takeaway speaks with Representative Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and one of the members of the House committee investigating the insurrection, about the work of the January 6th committee and some of the other central issues facing Congress and the Democrats today. Holly Robinson Peete, An Advocate for Autism: Actress, author and “gangsta mom of four” Holly Robinson Peete joins us to talk about her advocacy work for kids on the autism spectrum and her decision to go public about her son's diagnosis. How Researchers Are Using Stem Cells To Learn More About A Rare Form of Autism: We spoke with Dr. Joseph Dougherty,  professor of genetics and psychiatry at Washington University in St Louis about the research that he and his team are conducting.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Disagreements Between Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Teachers Union Result in Closures 2022-01-10

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 47:49

    Disagreements Between Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Teachers Union Result in Closures: The Takeaway speaks with Nader Issa, reporter covering education for the Chicago Sun-Times, about the recent disagreements with the Chicago Teachers Union and the Chicago Public School district, and we hear from teachers and parents.  Bronx Apartment Fire Leaves 17 Dead: We were joined by Jake Offenhartz, WNYC and Gothamist Reporter to discuss the apartment building fire. Sidney Poitier and Professor Lani Guinier Pass Away at Ages 94 and 71: Our host reflects on the legacy of these two figures.  Do We Understand The Full Breadth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Message?: Scott Roberts, senior Director of Criminal Justice Campaigns for Color of Change and Patrisse Cullors, New York Times bestselling author, educator, artist and abolitionist joined us to discuss the complicated legacy of Dr. Martin Luter King Jr. and how there's still so much work to be done to realize his dream in full. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Taking Our Politics Pulse for the Week 2022-01-07

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 50:34

    Taking Our Politics Pulse for the Week Maya King, national politics reporter at Politico, and Sahil Kapur, senior national political reporter at NBCNews, join us for a politics roundtable to discuss this week's top stories New PBS Documentary Explores History of Democracy in the U.S. A new documentary from PBS called Preserving Democracy: Pursuing a More Perfect Union chronicles the pursuit of democracy in the U.S. from the Revolutionary War to the Capitol Riot. Julia B. Chan Discusses her New Role as Editor-in-Chief of The 19th For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    The Anniversary of the Jan. 6th Capitol Riot 2022-01-06

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 52:11

    The Capitol Insurrection's Impact on American Democracy In a recent article for The Atlantic, “Trump's Next Coup Has Already Begun,” staff writer Barton Gellman looks at the events leading to Jan 6., Republican efforts to subvert democracy, and how this could impact upcoming elections.  Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman Shares Her Story of Surviving the Insurrection Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman joins us to discuss her experience during the insurrection at the Capitol last year as well as the upcoming public hearings. A Historian Reflects on How to Teach the Insurrection Professor Hasan Jeffries of The Ohio State University has focused his research on the long history of Black struggle, and his work reminds us that the violence we saw at the Capitol one year ago is not an anomaly—in fact political violence has long been a feature of how white supremacy has asserted itself in this country.   Did the Lack of Civics in American Education Help Cause the Insurrection? Will Bunch, national opinion columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer and  Coshandra Dillard, a senior writer for Learning for Justice, join us to discuss how civics could play a role in preventing events like this in future.  How the Big Lie Led to the Insurrection The core motivation behind the violence we saw a year ago on January 6, is a belief in The Big Lie– the self-serving falsehood perpetrated by former President Trump himself that the 2020 election was stolen. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    The Mayor of Superior, Colorado on 2021's Destructive Wildfires 2022-01-05

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 41:58

    The Mayor of Superior, Colorado on 2021's Destructive Wildfires The Takeaway speaks with Mayor Clint Folsom of Superior, Colorado about the fires and how his community is faring.  Is the Texas Power Grid Ready for Winter? We spoke with Phil Jankowski, reporter covering politics and infrastructure at Dallas Morning News, about the Texas power grid and its readiness for the winter months ahead. A Record-Breaking Covid Spike Is Hitting Puerto Rico Puerto Rico had reported a record 84,000 new cases in December. Is Composting the Future of Death?  Three states—Colorado, Washington and Oregon—have legalized the process of natural organic reduction, or human composting.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Rethinking Public Health Under Omicron 2022-01-04

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 52:49

    Rethinking Public Health Under Omicron  We speak with Dr. Céline Gounder, infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist at Bellevue Hospital in New York City and host of the Epidemic podcast, about what statistics to keep an eye on at the moment and how public health officials should be communicating this information.  How "Clean" Energy Continues To Harm Indigenous Communities What happens when the new threat that tribal nations are confronting is clean energy? We were joined by Nick Estes, a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, and host of The Red Nation podcast. The Power and Necessity of Treating Criminal Defendants with Dignity A conversation with Judge Victoria Pratt about the theory and practice of procedural justice criminal court. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    How Do We Begin to Grade 2021? 2022-01-03

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 57:15

    How Do We Begin to Grade 2021? Political scientist Christina Greer joins us to help grade some of the big political moments of 2021. Voting Rights: The Continued Fight Over Access to Elections Keeping an eye on restrictive voting legislation in the 2022 session is Mother Jones reporter Ari Berman who explains how a 2013 Supreme Court decision set the course for this continued fight for equitable voting rights.   Self-Managed Abortions and the Fight for Abortion Rights A November 2021 study published in The Lancet found that self-managed abortions are about as safe and effective as surgical abortions. We speak with Mary Ziegler, law professor at Florida Sate University, about how the fight over abortion rights could shift to self-managed abortions in the coming year. Former Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs on His New Memoir, His Tenure, and What's Next Former Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, known widely as the guy who did the largest guaranteed income program, talks about his new memoir, “The Deeper the Roots: A Memoir of Hope and Home.”  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Conversations on Identity and Politics in 2021-12-31

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 46:43

    Janai Nelson Janai Nelson, Associate Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund joins us to discuss the banning of books that teach a truthful version of history, and how she will lead the NAACP LDF in Spring of 2022 after the departure of current president, Sherrilyn Ifill.  Arab Americans Are 'White' On The Census. But Should They Be? In the fall of 2021, Boston mayoral candidate Annissa Essaibi George, like many other Arab Americans, chose to identify publicly as a person of color. But the thing is Arab Americans are considered “white” on government forms. That means Arab Americans and people from the Middle East...who descend from countries that span Africa and Asia...are left out of a process that decides the political map, federal funding and medical research. For decades, Arab American organizations have pushed the federal government to adjust official forms to stop what they say is erasure. But the question is, what is a person of color - and are Arab Americans a part of the group? Sarah Gualtieri, historian and professor of American studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California (USC) and Maya Berry, executive director at the Arab American Institute, join The Takeaway to discuss more.  Asian Americans Secure Historic Political Wins Across The Country A report from Politico in 2021 revealed that elected officials from the Asian American and Pacific Islander community were the LEAST represented demographic in American politics, making up less than ONE percent of all people who hold office. But that's starting to change. In fact, this November was a historic election cycle for AAPI communities across the country. Asian Americans will serve for the first time as Mayor in Boston and Cincinnati. 5 Asian Americans were elected to New York's city council this year. Jane Junn, professor at University of Southern California and Arun Venugopal, Race and Justice Reporter at WNYC, join The Takeaway to discuss more.   

    The Takeaway Book Report 2021-12-30

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 59:30

    On the second edition of the Takeaway Book report, our host spoke with some amazing guest about the books they've been reading and writing in 2021. Guest in this episode include: Constance Grady, senior culture writer at Vox, talked about her picks for 2021. Treva B. Lindsey, author of America, Goddam: Violence, Black Women, and the Struggle for Justice discussed her upcoming book. Deep Dive co-host and co-president of the Center for Community Change Dorian Warren told us his favorite books of the year.  Kaitlyn Greenidge discussed her new work Libertie, a work of historical fiction that is one of the most buzzed about books of the year.  Torrey Peters author of Detransition, Baby discussed her national bestselling novel which tells the story of three people, transgender and cisgender, whose lives intersect thanks to an unexpected pregnancy.        

    CDC Cuts Recommended Quarantine Time as US COVID Infections Reach an All-Time High 2021-12-29

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 43:37

    CDC Cuts Recommended Quarantine Time as US COVID Infections Reach an All-Time High Is the policy change about jobs and the economy, or about public health? Deferring Student Debt... Again Black borrowers experience the heaviest debt burden according to Andre Perry, senior fellow at Brookings Metro. He joined The Takeaway to share his research on how dated economic analysis ignores race and what cancelling student debt could do to boost Black wealth.   The Whitewashing of Reggaeton And Why J. Balvin's Apology Falls Flat Artist J. Balvin received a ton of backlash after he received the Afro-Latino artist of the year award from the African Entertainment Awards. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Petroleum Spill In Hawaii Contaminates Drinking Supply For Thousands 2021-12-28

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 41:01

    Petroleum Spill In Hawaii Contaminates Drinking Supply For Thousands We were joined by Mahealani Richardson, anchor and reporter with Hawaii News Now, to discuss what this fuel leak means for the people of Hawaii. A Trucker Faces 110 Years in Prison Because of  Colorado's Mandatory-Minimum Sentencing Rogel Aguilera-Mederos is facing 110 years in prison after a deadly crash. Truck drivers are threatening to boycott the state of Colorado over mandatory-minimum sentencing laws there. Favorite Movie Moments of 2021 We walk listeners through some of our favorite movies of the year with Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and Kristen Meinzer, culture critic and author of How To Be Fine.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    Omicron Today: This Year in Pandemic Policy 2021-12-27

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 53:09

    Omicron Today: This Year in Pandemic Policy Nsikan Akpan, health and science editor for the WNYC newsroom, joined with the latest updates and responses on the Omicronn variant while looking back on some of the policy choices that led to this moment.  Other segments from today's episode include: What is With the Cult of Resilience? The Toll of Fibroids on Black Women Study Finds Women Denied Abortion Access Fare Worse in Life For transcripts, see individual segment pages.      

    Aging While Queer

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 48:57

    Aging While Queer Michael Adams is the CEO of SAGE, the country's largest and oldest organization dedicated to improving the lives of LGBT older people. He discusses the many unique challenges facing our LGBTQ+ elders and what his organization SAGE is doing to provide a life of dignity for this underserved community. Affirming Housing for LGBTQ-SGL Elders Dr. Woody discusses the importance of affirming housing for LGBTQ-SGL elders and how Mary's House serves as a model for inclusive elders of all gender, racial, and sexual identities. Aging While Queer in Puerto Rico After living in Massachusetts to attend university, Wilfred Labiosa returned to his native Puerto Rico, where he established support services for the LGBTQ community similar to those he discovered in Massachusetts. Queer elders in Puerto Rico face isolation, discrimination, and depression. Wilfred discusses how his organization, Waves Ahead, is working to address these issues. Aging with HIV We talk to Tez Anderson, a long-term survivor of HIV, activist and founder of the first and largest group in the world focused on long-term HIV survivors and older adults aging with HIV, Let's Kick ASS (Aids Survivor Syndrome). Pat and Paulette Martin on Finding Love Later in Life We spoke with Pat and Paulette Martin. They discuss the challenges of coming out of the closet, the significance of marriage equality, and how they give back to their community. Check out the full Aging While Queer series page. 

    Journalists Around The World Are Being Jailed And Detained At Record Highs 2021-12-23

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 51:04

    Journalists Around The World Are Being Jailed And Detained At Record Highs Journalists around the world are being jailed at a record high, according to a new report by the Committee to Protect Journalists. Right now the number sits at 293. CPJ's editorial director Arlene Getz and Ohimai Amaize, an exiled Nigerian journalist, joined to discuss.  The True Cost of a Common Cleaning Product Air pollution in a series of southern communities is well above levels deemed safe by the Environmental Protection Agency following a chain of plants making the key chemical in Cascade.  Violence Is Spiking on Airplanes  Since the pandemic started, there's been an uptick in violence on airplanes across the U.S., largely stemming from disputes over masking.  What does the Diplomatic Boycott against the Beijing Olympics Mean? The United States and a few other countries are boycotting the Beijing Olympics by not sending government officials to the games. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

    The Trial of Kimberly Potter 2021-12-22

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 65:34

    The Trial of Kimberly Potter The Takeaway spoke to Associated Press reporter Amy Forliti to discuss the charges being deliberated by the jury and how Minnesotans may react to the verdict.  How Love and Relationships Have Changed in the Time of COVID-19 Dr. Lexx Brown-James, a licensed marriage and family therapist and founder of the Institute for Sexuality and Intimacy, and Logan Ury, the author of the book, “How To Not Die Alone” and director of Relationship Science at Hinge, talk about the changes the pandemic has brought about, give advice for making time for intimacy, and give tips on how to get out there and date for those folks who are looking.  Parenting During the Pandemic The Takeaway spoke with Yasmeen Khan the host and managing editor of a new podcast about parenting called “Childproof,” from Ten Percent Happier, about how parents can raise their kids without losing track of themselves.  The New Matrix is About More Than the Movie The Matrix Resurrections is set to be the first blockbuster directed by an openly trans filmmaker. Emily VanDerWerff, critic at large for Vox joins us to discuss The Matrix franchise. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    A Closer Look at Joe Manchin 2021-12-21

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 53:46

    A Closer Look at Joe Manchin Ken Ward Jr., co-founder of Mountain State Spotlight and distinguished local reporting fellow with ProPublica joined with Evan Osnos, author, staff writer for The New Yorker and CNN contributor, to discuss the political, social and local motivations behind Joe Manchin's decisions in congress.  Military Documents Show U.S. Airstrikes Have Led to Thousands of Civilian Deaths In the American air war in the Middle East, a New York Times investigation reveals flawed intelligence, rushed and imprecise targeting and the deaths of thousands of civilians. Why The Final Frontier Matters A conversation with science journalist Shannon Stirone about the JWST launch, recent discoveries in space, and why space exploration matters. Hollywood's Obsession with Nuns Explained Sister Act is far from the first — or last — movie about nuns. From horror films like 2018's The Nun to the "nunsploitation" films of the 1970s, Hollywood has a habit of depicting the lives of nuns on the big screen. For more on this, The Takeaway with Alissa Wilkinson, film critic and culture reporter at Vox, about why pop culture is so obsessed with nuns.  Migrant Workers At Dubai's Expo 2020 Report Unlivable Wages And Confiscated Passports The World Fair in Dubai has employed migrant workers to build it out, and many are claiming they have been tricked into coming to the city for unlivable wages after paying an illegal fee to local recruiters. Some even claim they've had their passports confiscated, leaving them stranded in a foreign country. We were joined by The Associated Press' Gulf and Iran reporter Isabel DeBre to discuss labor and human rights issues at Expo 2020. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Omicron's on the Move in the U.S. 2021-12-20

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 49:15

    Omicron's on the Move in the U.S. We put the current pandemic moment in perspective with WNYC science and health editor Nsikan Akpan who broke down what's going on with this current Covid surge. The Shady Business Behind Tree Equity We spoke with Vivek Shandas, Professor of Climate Adaptation at Portland State University, about tree equity and how we might get closer to achieving tree equity with funding earmarked in the Build Back Better bill. What's Causing the Rise of Deaths in Jail? We asked Nafeesah Goldsmith and Samantha Melamed to discuss how this is happening. The Facility: A Look Inside ICE Detention During The Pandemic The new documentary The Facility shows the inside of the Irwin County Detention Center in Georgia as the coronavirus pandemic first hit the United States.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    From the Debt Ceiling to Inflation: The State of the U.S. Economy 2021-12-17

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 53:12

    From the Debt Ceiling to Inflation: The State of the U.S. Economy The Takeaway spoke to Heather Long, economics correspondent for the Washington Post and Anne Price, president of the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, to look back on the year in economics and get a sense of what people can expect going forward. How One New Movie Highlights Elder Economic Insecurity Director Sian-Pierre Regis joins us with his mother Rebecca Danigelis who went through job loss at the age of 75. They tell us about the unique way they dealt with her job loss and how it changed their outlook and inspires their current activism. Outgoing Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan on Her City, Why She Chose Not To Seek Reelection The Takeaway speaks with outgoing Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan about the ways she thinks about Seattle, what she hopes is next, and why she chose not to seek reelection. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    In Remembrance of bell hooks 2021-12-16

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 69:02

    In Remembrance of bell hooks Alondra Nelson, the Harold F. Linder Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, shares stories of inspiration discussing bell hooks' impact on Black feminism and looks ahead to her lasting influence.  The Takeaway Book Report The Takeaway community is full of book worms and literary lovers, so we spoke with some incredible authors about their work and some titles to look out for this holiday season.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Alabama Miners Are Still on Strike Nearly Nine Months Later 2021-12-15

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 55:46

    Alabama Miners Are Still on Strike Nearly Nine Months Later On April 1st, 1,100 workers from the Warrior Met Coal Mine in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama went on strike. Now, 258 days later, those workers are still on strike in hopes of forcing the company to address what they call unfair labor practices. The Takeaway spoke with Kim Kelly, an independent journalist and author of the forthcoming book, ‘FIGHT LIKE HELL: The Untold History of American Labor, updated us on what's happening with these Alabama union issues. Kim has been covering the Warrior Met Coal strike since April. The Continuing Strike Against Kellogg's The Striketober work stoppage goes on as the two sides balk on a deal. In response, Kellogg's closer to hiring new employees as permanent replacements. HuffPost labor reporter David Jamieson has the latest and frames this strike within the modern labor movement and the larger context of history.  The Historical Relevance Behind The January 6 Capitol Riot  Are some moments of racialized and political violence in the United States quickly forgotten for a reason? We speak with historian Martha S. Jones about some of the most relevant examples. Isis King on "With Love" and Trans Representation on the Small Screen The series "With Love" features LGBTQ+ love stories for two characters, including one played by Isis King. The Takeaway spoke to her about the new series and her career in Hollywood.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    Private Companies Pledge $1.2 Billion in Investments to Central American Northern Triangle 2021-12-14

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 44:45

    Private Companies Pledge $1.2 Billion in Investments to Central American Northern Triangle Vice President Kamala Harris announced a total of $1.2 billion worth of infrastructure and economic development investments in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras from high-earning corporations like Microsoft, Mastercard and PepsiCo. Oscar Chacón, Executive Director of Alianza Americas says while this public, private partnership is a step in the right direction, more is needed like leveraging the far greater $22 billion in remittances from Central Americans working in the United States.  Food Insecurity in the Military We speak with Shannon Razsadin, President and Executive Director of the Military Family Advisory Network about food insecurity in the military. Happy the Elephant Could Change the Face of Animal Rights Happy finds herself at the center of a legal case that could shift our notion of legal personhood as we know it. An organization called the Nonhuman Rights Project filed a writ of habeas corpus, or claim of unlawful detention, on behalf of Happy, all in an effort to get her rehomed to a sanctuary. Right now, you can only use a habeas corpus petition on behalf of a person. Happy's case will go before New York State's highest court, the Court of Appeals, sometime in 2022. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Jill Lepore, the David Woods Kemper Professor of American History at Harvard University and a staff writer at The New Yorker. She recently wrote about Happy the elephant for The Atlantic.  For transcripts, see individual segments page. 

    "What If We Don't Comply?": Texas Abortion Provider Weighs in on SCOTUS Ruling 2021-12-13

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 50:13

    "What If We Don't Comply?": Texas Abortion Provider Weighs in on SCOTUS Ruling We spoke about the decision with Dr. Ghazaleh Moayedi, an OB-GYN and abortion provider in Texas, and board member with Physicians for Reproductive Health and Texas Equal Access Fund.  The Legal Implications of SCOTUS Ruling on Texas Anti-Abortion Law SB8 We break down the Supreme Court's ruling on the Texas law and how ongoing legal challenges against SB8 could play out in the court. Melissa Murray, Law Professor at NYU, faculty director of the Birnbaum Women's Leadership Network and co-host of the legal podcast called “Strict Scrutiny” joined to help our listeners understand more about the complicated legal path ahead for challenges to Texas's SB8.    Women in the U.S. House Are Targets of Verbal Violence Even as the number of women elected to the US Congress has grown, so too has our awareness of the ways that political critiques far too often track along gender stereotypes and verbal gendered violence. Kelly Dittmar, an Associate Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University–Camden and the Director of Research and Scholar at the Center for American Women and Politics, joined The Takeaway to discuss.    Aging While Queer: Coming out at An Older Age with Chris Bolan  Pat Henschel and Terry Donahue met on an ice rink in Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1940s and fell in love, but spent decades hiding their relationship from the world. Their love story, which also became the two women's coming out story, was made into a 2020 Netflix documentary called “A Secret Love.” As a part of our Aging While Queer series, we spoke with the documentary's director Chris Bolan about the two women's love story and what it's like coming out at an older age.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Deep Dive with MHP and Dorian Warren: Childbirth 2021-12-10

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 56:52

    For this installment of The Takeaway, host Melissa Harris-Perry and friend/collaborator Dorian Warren are tackling the important topic of childbirth. Joining them to discuss the spectrum of childbirth and the possible complications that can arise is Monica McLemore, associate professor of family health care nursing at the University of California, San Francisco. They speak with Dr. Joia Crear-Perry, founder and president of the National Birth Equity Collaborative about maternal mortality. We also speak with Tracie Collins, CEO & Founder of the National Black Doulas Association about how doulas can improve birth outcomes. Lynn Paltrow, Executive Director and Founder of National Advocates for Pregnant Women helps us to understand the criminalization of pregnant women. Josie Kalipeni, Executive Director of Family Values at Work joins us to discuss how paid family and medical leave offers families the time and resources to bond with their newborn children. Finally, Melissa will share a personal story as she speaks with her youngest daughter's gestational carrier.  A woman looks at her newborn. (Canva/ WNYC Studios The Takeaway)  

    The Harm of Spanish-Language Disinformation 2021-12-09

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 47:17

    The Harm of Spanish-Language Disinformation  In 2020, Latinx voters registered and voted in record numbers, now making them the second largest voting bloc in the U.S. Many of these voters are being targeted online with disinformation. Stephanie Valencia, co-founder and president of Equis Research and Nora Benavidez, senior Counsel and Director of the Digital Justice & Civil Rights division of Free Press join us to discuss this problem and potential solutions. Playwright Jeremy O. Harris Doesn't Want You to Get Too Comfortable The Takeaway speaks with playwright Jeremy O. Harris about bringing "Slave Play" back to the theater and the work he's done to change theater world from the inside out. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

    "Remain in Mexico" Border Policy Reinstated Under Biden Administration 2021-12-08

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 53:34

    "Remain in Mexico" Border Policy Reinstated Under Biden Administration  The Takeaway spoke about the reinstatement of the "remain in Mexico" policy with Aura Bogado, reporter at Reveal, from The Center for Investigative Reporting. 16 Thousand Haitians Have Been Expelled From The Dominican Republic In The Last 3 Months  In the last three months, 16 thousand Haitians have been expelled from the Dominican Republic.We are joined by the AP's Caribbean correspondent Dánica Coto, who was just recently reporting out of the Dominican Republic. DOJ Says Redistricting in Texas Violates Voting Rights A conversation with Michael Li, senior counsel for the Brennan Center's Democracy Program about the DOJ's lawsuit against Texas for discriminatory redistricting. "Citizen Ashe" Spotlights a Legend On and Off the Court Co-directors Rex Miller and Sam Pollard join The Takeaway to discuss their film "Citizen Ashe," which explores the life and activism of tennis legend Arthur Ashe. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Why Vaccine Mandates Seem To Cause Backlash 2021-12-07

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 56:40

    Why Vaccine Mandates Seem To Cause Backlash Partisanship explains much of the national division surrounding vaccine mandates, but this divide may highlight another important policy-making challenge--the contemporary American's reluctance to contribute to the public good. We speak with epidemiologist and public health correspondent Gregg Gonsalves about whether anyone is asking not what the country can do for us, but what we can do for our country. Puerto Rico Is a COVID Success Story According to the CDC, the island had fully vaccinated 74 percent of its population as of November 22. That's higher than any other US state or territory. Puerto Rico also has one of the lowest COVID-19 death rates. So how did Puerto Rico become a bright spot in the pandemic? For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with Nicole Narea, immigration reporter for Vox. Diaper Need Is an Invisible Part of Poverty in the U.S. The the issue is wide-ranging: 1 in 3 families cannot afford an adequate supply of diapers for their children. Chabeli Carrazana, an economy reporter for the 19th, recently wrote an article about diaper need in rural Missouri, and explained to The Takeaway just how far-reaching this issue is. We also hear from Representative Barbara Lee, who introduced the End Diaper Need Act of 2021 earlier this year with Representative Rosa DeLauro. Decarceration in New Jersey In October of 2020, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed a law allowing early release of 5,300 prisoners. Under legislation S2519, inmates who were eligible to be released in a year's time could be awarded public health emergency credits during a public health emergency. Incarcerated adults and juveniles were released 8 months early as a result. When Governor Murphy ended the state's public health emergency status during the summer of 2021, early releases ended, too. We speak with Karen Yi, a reporter for WNYC Radio, about decarceration in New Jersey. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.      

    The Last "Fire Camp" For Incarcerated Youth In California

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 11:12

    According to estimates from Cal Fire, more than 4 million acres in the state burned in 2020 and another 3 million have been lost to blazes in 2021. The fires have destroyed thousands of homes and claimed dozens of lives. And the realities of global climate change suggest that this destruction is likely to be a new normal for the state. But because of a firefighter shortage, around 30% of firefighters in the state are inmates or remain incarcerated. But what Pine Grove does is a little different. Pine Grove is a state juvenile justice facility where incarcerated boys and young men between the ages of 17 and 24 are trained to fight fires.  In fact, it's the last “fire camp” for incarcerated youth in the state. To risk their lives fighting fires, they earn between $2.20 and $4 an hour. California firefighters who are not incarcerated typically earn more than $40 an hour. Still, these jobs feel unattainable to the young people of Pine Grove after their release, many of whom are now trained but can't find permanent jobs in the field.  Joining us for the discussion is Sara Tardiff, freelance reporter for Teen Vogue, who looked into the Pine Grove facility and California's incarcerated firefighting industry. 

    Parents of Alleged Michigan School Shooter Also Charged 2021-12-06

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 47:16

    Parents of Alleged Michigan School Shooter Also Charged On Friday, the parents of the 15-year-old who is charged with killing four students in Michigan, were themselves charged with involuntary manslaughter. Professor Jonathan Metzl joins us to discuss the move by the prosecutor. Does it signal a move to hold the parents of shooters more accountable and will others face the same legal consequences? The Last "Fire Camp" For Incarcerated Youth In California To risk their lives fighting fires, they earn between $2.20 and $4 an hour. California firefighters who are not incarcerated typically earn more than $40 an hour. Still, these jobs feel unattainable to the young people of Pine Grove after their release, many of whom are now trained but can't find permanent jobs in the field. Joining us for the discussion is Sara Tardiff, freelance reporter for Teen Vogue, who looked into the Pine Grove facility and California's incarcerated firefighting industry.  Riz Ahmed on "Encounter" and Making Space for His Own Identity Onscreen Riz Ahmed stars in “Encounter,” a film about an ex-Marine who takes his sons on the run, in an attempt to protect them from what he believes is an impending alien invasion. The Takeaway spoke with him about “Encounter” and how he's managed to include more of himself onscreen over time.  Steven Spielberg's Remake of "West Side Story" Hits Theaters This Week The remake does attempt to correct some of the problems of the original film, including its casting, but is it enough? For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with Frances Negron-Muntaner, media scholar and professor at Columbia University. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Will Biden's New Covid Strategy Fix His Low Approval Ratings?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 13:33

    On Thursday President Biden held a press conference on the quickly spreading Omicron variant that's now been found in multiple states. To do that Biden has a new plan - and it doesn't include lockdowns. Instead, the White House wants to focus on vaccinating families, getting every adult a booster shot, and upping the testing on international travelers. The administration is even pushing for free, at-home covid tests covered by private insurance.  To beat the new variant, Biden says it's time for Americans to be united. But Americans across the country aren't exactly “united” in their support for him. Biden's approval rating sits at about 42%, and it hasn't budged even after the House passing his signature piece of legislation, Build Back Better. And when it comes to getting the shot, less than 60 percent of Americans are fully vaccinated against Covid-19 - one of the lowest rates among wealthy nations. So what does all this mean for the White House when it comes to their response against omicron? We discuss with Sheryl Gay Stolberg, a Washington Correspondent covering health policy at the New York Times.

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