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A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

WNYC and PRI


    • Oct 15, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 45m AVG DURATION
    • 519 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from The Takeaway

    State Politics Heating Up Across Country 2021-10-15

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:42


    State Politics Heating Up Across Country Jessica Taylor, the Senate and Governors Editor for The Cook Political Report, and Zach Montellaro, state politics reporter at POLITICO take a look at state politics and gubernatorial races around the country where candidates are debating issues around education, police reform, and abortion rights. New Analyses Show Potential Undercount of Black Population During 2020 Census The findings have brought up concerns that some jurisdictions and civil rights leaders have had about lower-than-expected totals in the 2020 Census. “This might be our greatest undercount since 1960, or 1950,” said Marc Morial, former mayor of New Orleans and president and chief executive of the National Urban League, which sued the bureau last year to stop the count from ending early. Morial joined us to discuss the undercount and the far-reaching implications it could have.  The Experience of Resettling as an Afghan Refugee Fifty-five thousand. That's how many Afghans have relocated to the U.S. since mid-August.According to the Department of Homeland Security, about 40 percent are eligible for special immigrant visas because of the work they did aiding U.S. efforts in Afghanistan. But for other Afghan evacuees, it's unclear what their legal status will be. Many entered the country not as traditional refugees, but instead under a temporary legal process known as parole. That means many of these refugees currently don't have a direct pathway to permanent residency. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with Naheed Samadi-Bahram, Women for Afghan Women's U.S. Country Director. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 


    What's Not So Funny About Dave Chappelle 2021-10-14

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:49

    What's Not So Funny About Dave Chappelle The backlash against Dave Chappelle's recent comedy special for Netflix continues with many Transgender individuals and groups speaking out against it. We're joined by Aryah Lester, deputy director of the Transgender Strategy Center and MX Dahlia Belle, a writer and comedian who penned "Dear Dave Chappelle, Transgender Comedians Can Take A Joke, But Why Are Yours So Unfunny” joined us to discuss the controversy and what Chappelle can and should do better. Aging While Queer Michael Adams is the CEO of SAGE, the country's largest and oldest organization dedicated to improving the lives of LGBT older people. He discusses the many unique challenges facing our LGBTQ+ elders and what SAGE is doing to provide a life of dignity for this underserved community. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Political Cruelty

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:36

    Jan. 6, 2021, file photo insurrections loyal to President Donald Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana/The Takeaway) The Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Political Cruelty Most of us tend to think of cruelty as individual actions motivated by personal hatreds, but Professor Cristina Beltran offers up a definition of civic and political cruelty. Beltran's interest in cruelty was prompted by seeing and hearing what was happening at rallies for Donald Trump a few years ago. For the first Takeaway Deep Dive, host Melissa Harris-Perry and friend/collaborator Dorian Warren explore the phenomenon of political cruelty.   Additional segments: San Fransisco Program Intends to Make Jury Pools More Diverse Julius Jones Awaits Clemency Hearing For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    New Report Sheds Light on Police Foundations 2021-10-12

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:48


    New Report Sheds Light on Police Foundations The new Police Foundation Report from Color of Change, exposes how corporations support Black Lives Matter on one hand and are also giving private money to police foundations. There's no record of how that money is being used to fund police departments around the country which are often a threat to black and brown lives. Scott Roberts, Senior Director of Criminal Justice Campaigns for Color of Change, the nation's largest online racial justice organization joins us to discuss their campaign for accountability and transparency as steps to ensure and redefine public safety. Adults Jailed Black Children for a Crime That Doesn't Exist New reporting from Meribah Knight, Nashville Public Radio and Ken Armstrong, ProPublica investigates Rutherford County, Tennessee where Black children are being jailed at an alarming rate. The investigation explores the arrest of four young girls after a YouTube video surfaced of three boys fighting on the school playground of Hobgood Elementary School. We talk to reporter Meribah Knight about the story of why these kids get arrested at alarming rates and what's being done to stop it.  Newark Replaces Nearly All of Its Lead Pipes Two years ago, lead pipes tainted the drinking water of Newark, New Jersey. The city faced a water crisis on par with what has happened in places like Flint, Michigan, and a number of other cities across the U.S. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with Karen Yi, reporter covering New Jersey for WNYC.  Ruben Santiago-Hudson on the Joy of Bringing "Lackawanna Blues" to Broadway Writer, director, and actor Ruben Santiago-Hudson's one-man show Lackawanna Blues tells the story of Santiago-Hudson's childhood and finds him embodying the many characters who populated his youth, including Nanny, the woman who raised him. The Takeaway spoke with Santiago-Hudson about putting on the show during the pandemic and what his dreams are for the next stages in his career. For transcripts, see individual segments pages. 


    Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? 2021-10-08

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:48

    Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? Join us for this week's political round up with Michael Steele, former Lt. Gov. of Maryland and previous chair of the RNC and Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University, co-host of podcast FAQ NYC, and author of the book “Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration and the Pursuit of the American Dream." Michael and Christina share their thoughts about the debt ceiling extension and reproductive rights as well as the state of voting rights and the Democrat and Republican strategies ahead of the upcoming midterm elections. Why New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas is Fighting for Immigration Reform New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas traveled to D.C. this week and was arrested while participating in that peaceful protest. She joined The Takeaway today to talk about why she's fighting for immigration reform. Jason Rezaian Discuss his new podcast 544 Days Jason Rezaian joins us to discuss his new Spotify Original Podcast 544 Days which chronicles his time in an Iranian prison and what it took to get him out. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Daniel Alarcón On Spanish-Language Media 2021-10-07

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 53:16

    Daniel Alarcón On Spanish-Language Media Celebrated podcaster and writer Daniel Alarcón. Alarcón is the Executive Producer and host of NPR's Spanish language podcast Radio Ambulante. His podcast — which he started in 2012 — features a mix of investigative journalism and interviews, and covers a wide range of topics, from the refugee crisis in Venezuela to “killer bees” in Brazil. Alarcón is also a contributing writer at the New Yorker, a novelist, and he teaches at the Columbia Journalism School. His work dives deep into the social and cultural ties that connect Spanish-speaking populations across the United States and Central and South America. The Takeaway speaks to Alarcón about the importance of Spanish-language media and more. When it Comes to Identity Which Word Wins? Afro-Latinidad, Latino, Latinx and Hispanic are just a few of the terms used to identify people from a large portion of the world including Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. But which one of these is right? Michele Reid-Vazquez, an associate professor in the department of Africana Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, who also serves as the director of the Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Initiative, and Ed Morales a journalist and author of Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture joined to discuss.  U.S. Officials Announce That 23 Species Should Be Declared Extinct Last week, U.S. wildlife officials recommended that 22 animals and one plant within the United States and Guam be marked extinct and gone forever. In total, the extinctions include eight freshwater mussels, 11 birds, two fish, a bat, and a plant. Within the next decade, the issue could get worse due to climate change, but especially due to people taking over or changing habitats and diminishing global biodiversity. For more on this extinction and biodiversity crisis, The Takeaway spoke with Catrin Einhorn, who covers wildlife and extinction for The New York Times. Preview of the Upcoming SCOTUS Term Ian Millhiser, a senior correspondent at Vox, discusses some of the cases the Supreme Court is hearing this term. Its conservative leaning court will consider the fate of abortion rights, gun control, and the power Congress has over government agencies like the EPA and the Department of Labor. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

    Whistleblower Exposes Facebook's Prioritization of Profit Over People 2021-10-06

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:05

    Whistleblower Exposes Facebook's Prioritization of Profit Over People The Takeaway discussed Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen's testimony and about regulating big tech with Cecilia Kang, a national technology reporter for The New York Times. She is the co-author of “An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination.”  The Hidden Biases of Search Engine Algorithms  Dr. Safiya Noble is an Associate Professor at UCLA in the Departments of Gender Studies and African American Studies and she's also the author of a best-selling book Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism. In her research, she has extensively detailed the negative impacts that come from rarely having women of color, particularly Black women, programming algorithms for popular search engines. Dr. Noble joined The Takeaway to discuss her research. Afro-Latino Representation in Children's Books Many Afro-Latinos are taking up the call to make sure the next generation sees representations of themselves in one of the first places they experience images and stories, in children's books. The Takeaway talks with Sulma Arzu Brown, author of "Pelo Malo, No Existe" (Bad Hair Does Not Exist), Charles Esperanza, author of "Boogie Boogie, Y'all," and Yesenia Moises, author of "Stella's Stellar Hair." For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    Detainees Detail Troubling Conditions within New York City Jails 2021-10-05

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 48:50

    Detainees Detail Troubling Conditions within New York City Jails At least 12 people detained in New York City's jail facilities have died this year, amid rising Covid-19 cases and a reported spike in violence and self-harm. At the end of September, Mayor Bill de Blasio toured the Rikers Island jail complex and claimed that the changes the city has made within Rikers are already having a “real impact.” George Joseph, law enforcement reporter for WNYC, has been reporting on conditions within Rikers and he joined The Takeaway to discuss the latest. What Does a Political Leader Look Like? Far too often the images we see in the world around us reinforce a gendered vision of the political world.We asked our listeners what comes to mind when they think of the word "political leader." Evoking narrow, gender-specific definitions of political leadership has very real consequences. We speak with Zoe Oxley, researcher at Union College and author of a new study about girls and political leadership. Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message Award-winning historian and New York Times best-selling author Keisha Blain joins us to discuss her new book, Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America and the relevance of the civil and voting rights icon today. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    Anita Hill's Fight to end Gender-based Violence 2021-10-04

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 29:45

    Anita Hill's Fight to end Gender-based Violence We talk to Professor Anita Hill about her new book, Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence. For transcript, see individual segment page.    

    Congress Avoids a Government Shutdown 2021-10-01

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 47:02

    Congress Avoids a Government Shutdown  Congress has been racing to avoid a government shutdown. Thursday was the final day for lawmakers to pass a funding bill to prevent the government from that fate, and luckily, the House and Senate passed a stopgap measure before the midnight deadline. Also on Thursday, President Joe Biden's massive trillion dollar infrastructure bill got its final vote in the House. Plus, Democrats and Republicans are still split on whether or not to raise the debt ceiling. Nicholas Wu, Congressional reporter for POLITICO, and Pablo Manriquez, Capitol Hill correspondent for Latino Rebels, explained the latest in politics.  Climate Change Influences Voters' Urgency in German Election On Monday, Germans cast the largest share of votes for the Social Democrats, led by Olaf Scholz instead of supporting Armin Laschet, the successor in Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic party. So why did the German people opt for change? We get answers and analysis from Yasmeen Serhan, staff writer for The Atlantic. Dangerous Smoke from West Coast Wildfires is Affecting the Whole Country A recent analysis of federal satellite imagery by NPR's California Newsroom and Stanford University's Environmental Change and Human Outcomes Lab found that dangerous smoke from West Coast wildfires is being carried thousands of miles across the country, and the number of days that some communities are exposed to this toxic smoke is increasing. A reality that could impact all of our health. The Takeaway spoke with Alison Saldanha, an investigative data reporter for NPR's California Newsroom. For transcripts, see full segment pages.    

    Is Noise Pollution a Public Health Crisis? 2021-09-30

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:46

    Is Noise Pollution a Public Health Crisis? Rick Neitzel, professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Michigan, joined The Takeaway to discuss the toll of noise on our bodies and the environment, and what can be done to mitigate the harm. Music or Noise?: The Story of Go-Go in a Gentrifying Neighborhood in D.C.  In 2020, Mayor Muriel Bowser signed a bill that made go-go the official music of D.C. after a resident from a luxury apartment building across the street from a Metro PCS phone store known for loudly bumping go-go music — a funky, hip-hop music rooted in Black culture which was born in D.C. The resident allegedly threatened to sue the owner of Metro PCS, which is T-Mobile. This summer, D.C. officials unveiled a go-go themed mural on the side of that same apartment building where the 2019 noise complaint was made. Natalie Hopkinson, an Associate Professor of Communication, Culture and Media Studies at Howard University and co-Founder of “Don't Mute DC” Movement, talks with The Takeaway all about go-go.  Allure's New and First Black Editor-in-Chief We talk with Jessica Cruel the new and first Black editor-in-chief of Allure magazine about her new gig, diversifying the coverage in the beauty game, and her plans for the magazine going forward. The Importance of Mentoring for Black Girls Susan L. Taylor founder and CEO of the National Cares Mentoring Movement and Dr. Monique Morris, CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color, joined me to discuss the importance of mentoring young Black girls at the individual level and at the community level to provide the proper foundation for them to succeed.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Surviving R. Kelly Show Runner Discusses Verdict 2021-09-29

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:11

    Surviving R. Kelly Show Runner Discusses Verdict On Monday, A New York jury found R&B singer R. Kelly guilty on all 9 counts against him which included racketeering and sex trafficking charges. We speak with dream hampton, showrunner and executive producer of the docu-series “Surviving R. Kelly” about what this conviction means to her and Kelly's numerous victims. Grassroots Organizers Reimagine Public Safety in San Antonio The Takeaway speaks with Ananda Tomas, the current Executive Director for ACT 4 SA about reimagining public safety in San Antonio.  Civil Rights Activist Desmond Meade Named MacArthur "Genius" Like in previous years, the work of this year's fellows reflect the political, scientific, and cultural landscape of the past year. They're doing everything from forecasting viruses to excavating the history of racial violence along the Texas-Mexico border. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with  one of this year's MacArthur fellows. Desmond Meade is a civil rights activist and executive director of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition. Today's Transformational Takeaway Learn more about Betty Reid Soskin, the oldest active National Park Ranger.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Planned Parenthood's Alexis McGill-Johnson on the Women's Health Protection Act 2021-09-28

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 44:13

    Planned Parenthood's Alexis McGill-Johnson on the Women's Health Protection Act On Friday, the House of Representatives passed the Women's Health Protection Act, which would make abortion access a federal right and override the growing number of abortion bans that have been passed at the state level, including SB-8 in Texas. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Alexis McGill-Johnson, the president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. What is the Black Maternal Health Momnibus? The Takeaway is joined by Professor Monica McLemore,  Professor of Nursing, UC San Francisco about the Black Maternal Health Momnibus package and a conversation about the big picture of racial disparities within reproductive health care. What Reproductive Justice Looks Like for the Latinx Community 16 percent of Latinas have not visited a doctor in the last two years. Latinas are the group of women most likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer. And, because of higher poverty rates and lower rates of insurance coverage, Latinas have less access to contraception, and more than 50 percent of pregnancies among Latinas are unintended. Despite these startling inequalities, Latinx communities are often excluded from mainstream conversations about reproductive health. The Takeaway spoke with Lupe M. Rodríguez, executive director of the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Justice.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    What Kneeling in Protest Means To a New Generation of Athletes 2021-09-27

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 47:58


    What Kneeling in Protest Means To a New Generation of Athletes Dave Zirin, Sports Editor for The Nation, talks to The Takeaway about his new book, The Kaepernick Effect: Taking a Knee, Changing the World.  The Takeaway talked with Zirin about the long history of activism by athletes and what this new generation risked as they stood up for equality by taking a knee. State Legislation Seeks to Restrict Rights of Transgender Athletes Texas is just one of many states that have placed restrictions on transgender student athletes in recent years. In total, at least 30 states have introduced similar legislation, with eight having passed these laws. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Katie Barnes, features writer at ESPN.  How Sports Media Coverage Affects An Athlete's Power We take a look at the ways sports media coverage or the lack of it, affects the power that athletes have when they seek to make change through activism. Amira Rose Davis, Co-Host of the feminist sports podcast “Burn it All Down” and Bradford William Davis, an investigations reporter for Insider join us to discuss the way this is seen on both a local and national level. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 


    President Biden's Foreign Policy Agenda 2021-09-24

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 50:14

    President Biden's Foreign Policy Agenda On Tuesday, President Joe Biden declared a quote “new era” for U.S. diplomacy in his first speech as U.S. president to the United Nations General Assembly. President Biden repeatedly sought to reassure U.S. allies that his presidency would not echo the chaos of Trump's four years in office. For that and more, The Takeaway spoke to Robin Wright,  columnist at The New Yorker and Wilson Center Distinguished Fellow, and Daniel Drezner, professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. The Uproar Over Treatment of Haitian Migrants Continues According to the Department of Homeland Security, the number of Haitians in Del Rio, Texas is down to about 7,000 as deportations continue. Some Haitians have turned back to Mexico, or they've been moved to another area for processing. Patrick Gaspard, President and CEO of the Center for American Progress visited the border on Thursday and joined to discuss what he saw there. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    “Other Than Honorably” Discharged LGBTQ Veterans Could Be Eligible for VA Benefits 2021-09-23

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 45:44


    “Other Than Honorably” Discharged LGBTQ Veterans Could Be Eligible for VA Benefits  The Takeaway talks to two LGBTQ veterans about the VA's guidance. Jennifer Dane, is the CEO and executive director of the Modern Military Association of America, and Richard Brookshire, is the Board Chair and co-founder of the Black Veterans Project. He also wrote this piece for the New York Times Magazine, "Serving in the Army as a Queer Black Man Opened My Eyes to Racism in America." Afghanistan's Healthcare System is on the Verge of Collapse Deepmala Mahla, Vice President of humanitarian affairs for CARE, an international humanitarian organization fighting global poverty and world hunger, joins us to discuss this potential disaster. Reforming the System from Within  The Takeaway spoke with Joel Fitzgerald Sr.,  Waterloo's first Black chief of police whose reforms are facing backlash. We' re also joined by Roy Austin, former federal prosecutor and former defense attorney, and Paul Butler, Albert Brick Professor in Law at Georgetown University, former prosecutor and author of Choke Hold: Policing Black Men. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.


    Border Patrol's Sub-Human Treatment of Haitian Migrants 2021-09-22

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 49:11

    Border Patrol's Sub-Human Treatment of Haitian Migrants The Department of Homeland Security is launching an investigation into the treatment of Haitian migrants at the U.S. border after images and video surfaced showing inhumane treatment by Border Patrol Agents. The footage shows agents on horseback chasing migrants and uttering expletives in their direction. We talk with Jenn Budd, a former senior patrol agent with the US border patrol who is now an immigrant rights activist and Franciscka Lucien, executive director of the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti. Humanitarian Crisis Worsens in Ethiopia Ethiopia is nearly a year into a conflict in the northern Tigray region that began last November between the Ethiopian government, forces from neighboring Eritrea, and opposing forces from the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF). There are reports of human rights abuses and sexual violence against civilians and refugees perpetrated by all parties involved in the conflict. Thousands of people have been killed, more than 2 million have been displaced, and for months the UN has been warning of the risk of a humanitarian crisis due to famine and starvation. Pfizer Announces Vaccine Safe and Effective for Children Ages 5 to 11 The Takeaway speaks to Dr. Miriam Laufer, pediatrics infectious disease specialist at the  University of Maryland School of Medicine's Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health expert, about the importance of vaccinating children, the process of authorizing the vaccine, vaccine trials for even younger children, and more.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Redistricting Battle Heats Up Across the U.S. 2021-09-21

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 45:47


    Redistricting Battle Heats Up Across the U.S. Ari Berman, senior reporter at Mother Jones, joined The Takeaway to talk redistricting and gerrymandering around the country, as well as the districts and states to watch in the coming months.  A Look At Colorado's Independent Redistricting Commission  Today's focus is on Colorado, where voters in 2018 widely supported two constitutional amendments that gave independent commissions the responsibility to determine political districts instead of the Colorado legislature. Due to population growth in Colorado, the state will be gaining an 8th congressional district. Twelve commissioners on the Congressional Redistricting Commission are currently determining what that new map will look like. The Takeaway talks with one of those commissioners about Colorado's redistricting process. Commissioner Jolie Brawner, is the vice chair of the Colorado Independent Congressional Redistricting Commission. First Americans Museum Opens in Oklahoma City Allison Herrera, Indigenous Affairs reporter for KOSU and heather ahtone, senior curator for the First Americans Museum and a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation speak with The Takeaway about the work that went into putting the First Americans Museum together. Where are the 710 missing Indigenous Women and Girls in Wyoming? Mary Kathryn Nagle, a partner at Pipestem Law, a firm specializing in tribal sovereignty of Native nations and peoples and a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma joins us to discuss the complex reasons contributing to why indigenous women and girls go missing at such an alarming rate. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.


    What is Citizenship? 2021-09-20

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 45:44

    What is Citizenship? The white grievances aired on January 6th and in the election of Donald Trump can be traced much further back to the founding of the United States and who was originally allowed to be a citizen. But it's not just the right that places these limits around citizenship. Under former President Obama and President Biden, restrictive immigration policies have spotlighted the lack of humanity in how our government treats people from beyond our borders. The Takeaway speaks with historian Mae Ngai about how notions of U.S. citizenship have changed over time. France Pulls Ambassador Out of U.S. Over Submarine Dispute France pulled its ambassador to the U.S. out of Washington, D.C., and compared the Biden administration to its predecessors. The matter at hand: a submarine deal with Australia worth hundreds of billions of dollars. France had been set to make the sale until the U.S. came in to strike its own deal to sell nuclear powered submarines to our friends down under. France's foreign minister called the move “a stab in the back.” For more on this, The Takeaway spoke with Ryan Heath, host of POLITICO's “Global Insider” podcast and newsletter.  Boston Mayoral Race Heats Up Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George, both daughters of immigrants and longtime city councilors, placed first and second respectively in last week's preliminary mayoral runoff election. For more on the Boston mayoral race, The Takeaway spoke to Saraya Wintersmith, reporter covering Boston City Hall for GBH News. Is Rest Possible for Black Bodies Past Death? The Atlantic magazine's Inheritance project takes a look at American history, black life and the resilience of memory. In the the chapter entitled “What the Body Holds,” journalist Latria Graham talks with us about her piece, “The Dark Underside of Representations of Slavery” which focuses on the fight by Tamara Lanier to get the images of her ancestors Renty and Delia back from the Harvard University archives. She alleges Harvard's licensing of the images amounts to forcing her relatives to continue to work for the university, never giving them a true sense of rest. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Biden Outlines Agenda To Boost the Middle Class 2021-09-17

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 53:13


    Biden Outlines Agenda To Boost the Middle Class President Joe Biden delivered a speech geared toward a tax plan for the middle class. California had its recall election in which Governor Gavin Newsom beat out Republican frontrunner and recall candidate Larry Elder. The Takeaway hosts a politics roundtable with Dave Weigel, a national reporter covering politics for the Washington Post. Brendan Buck is a Republican strategist at Seven Letter and a former aide to Republican speakers of the House John Boehner and Paul Ryan. and Maya King, a politics reporter at Politico.  Political Power Struggle Continues in Haiti  Haiti is still struggling to recover a month after a major earthquake and storm hit the country and killed more than 2,000 people, with hundreds still missing. Meanwhile, Haiti is also dealing with a profound political crisis after the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in July. This week, that political struggle came to a new head when a prosecutor accused the current leader of the country, Prime Minister Ariel Henry, of being involved with the killing. The Takeaway was joined by Jacqueline Charles, Caribbean Correspondent for the Miami Herald to discuss the ongoing power struggle.  Why Larry Elder's Run Has People Talking About Black Republicans Leah Wright Rigueur, author of The Loneliness of the Black Republican; Joe Watkins host of “State of Independence” and former aide to President George H.W. Bush; and Ron Christie, former special assistant to President George W. Bush, join us to discuss what Elder's campaign means for Black Republicanism in the U.S., and the long and complicated history between Black Americans and the Republican party. For transcripts, see full segment pages.


    Senate Hearing Highlights FBI mishandling of Gymnasts Abuse Claims 2021-09-16

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 50:52


    Senate Hearing Highlights FBI mishandling of Gymnasts Abuse Claims On Wednesday, the U.S. Senate held a hearing to examine the extent to which the FBI mishandled its investigation into the sexual abuse committed by Larry Nassar against hundreds of gymnasts while he was a physician for the women's national gymnastics team. Several of the most accomplished gymnasts who were abused by Nassar testified at the hearing, including Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney, Maggie Nichols and Aly Raisman. We speak with Rachael Denhollander, a former gymnast who was the first to publicly come forward against Larry Nassar. What Constitutes An Apology to Survivors of Sexual Abuse? On Wednesday, FBI director Christopher Wray apologized to the survivors of former USA gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar's abuse, saying that he is sorry members of his agency didn't do more to stop Nassar when they had a chance. Officials at the highest levels of our government don't issue apologies often, but to survivors of abuse, Wray's words may feel hollow. Beyond saying sorry, what has the FBI actually done to hold itself accountable after its mishandling of the Nassar case? We speak with playwright and author V (formerly known as Eve Ensler) about what truly constitutes an apology to survivors of abuse. What Deepfake Technology Means for Women Countless deepfake apps and platforms have emerged that essentially allow users to make nonconsensual porn videos of women with little to zero coding skills. This technology can do everything from “stripping” the clothes off of women to face-swapping a female celebrity's face onto a porn actor's body. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Rebecca Delfino, law professor at LMU Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, and Karen Hao , the senior AI editor at MIT Technology Review.  Slice of Life.  From the mundane to the profound, we're compiling your responses and sharing them with the world. Listen below. Slice of Life- 09/16/21   For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 


    Vaccine Inequality Between Wealthy and Poor Countries 2021-09-15

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 42:44

    Vaccine Inequality Between Wealthy and Poor Countries  The Takeaway talks about the worldwide vaccination gap between high- and low-income countries with Apoorva Mandavilli, science reporter at the New York Times, and Lawrence Gostin, a professor of global health law at Georgetown University, director of the World Health Organization Center on National and Global Health Law, and author of the forthcoming book “Global Health Security: A Blueprint for the Future.” The Water Crisis facing Iraq and Syria A new report by 13 aid groups notes that the water crisis in Syria and Iraq could leave 12 million people without access to drinking and agricultural water. It is also disrupting electricity across the region as dams run out of water. It could potentially lead to an “unprecedented catastrophe” in the region. Joining us to discuss this is Nirvana Shawky, CARE's regional director for the Middle East and North Africa. The Evolution of Black TV  Though there were countless Black characters in front of the camera, behind the scenes was a different story. From the writers rooms to the executive suite, Black creators were few and far between. In decades since, it's gotten better but there's still much work to be done. The Takeaway spoke to  Hannah Giorgis, culture writer for The Atlantic, and Kim Bass, creator of Sister, Sister and Kenan and Kel. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

    Labor Unions Divided Over Vaccine Mandate 2021-09-14

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 52:26

    Labor Unions Divided Over Vaccine Mandate The Takeaway turns to Steven Greenhouse, former New York Times labor reporter and the author of “Beaten Down, Worked Up: The Past, Present and Future of American Labor,” to talk us through these divisions in labor unions. We also speak with Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers, about the division on vaccine mandates that she's seeing among teachers unions across the country.  Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board Recommends Commutation for Julius Jones On Monday, the Oklahoma parole and pardon board heard the commutation hearing of Julius Jones. In a 3-1 vote the board recommended commuting Jones' death sentence to life with the possibility of parole. Jones, who was convicted of the 1999 killing of Paul Howell continues to maintain his innocence. The final decision now goes to Governor Kevin Stitt. Joining us to discuss the long road to this recent decision is Daniel Forkkio, CEO of Represent Justice, an organization that uses the power of the media to engage audiences in reimagining the justice system, and creating real demand for change. Black Homebuyers Are Being Left Out of Pandemic Housing Boom During the pandemic, there's been a massive real estate boom in the U.S., as many people looked to leave crowded cities like New York City for the suburbs. But for Black Americans, the boom has been more like a bust, as they've been priced out of this pandemic-fueled housing frenzy. Housing inequity is nothing new in this country; there's a deep history of discrimination in the housing market against Black Americans. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Anne Price, president of the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.   

    Corporations Stay Silent on Abortion 2021-09-13

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 55:43


    Corporations Stay Silent on Abortion  Dating sites Match and Bumble—both based in Texas—are among the few companies to speak out against the law. Shar Dubey, the CEO of Match Group, told employees in a memo quote “The company generally does not take political stands unless it is relevant to our business. But in this instance, I personally, as a woman in Texas, could not keep silent.” The rideshare apps Lyft and Uber have also spoken out, in part because their drivers are among those that can be sued under the new Texas law. For more on all this, The Takeaway spoke to Scott Sonenshein, professor of management at Rice University, and Emily Stewart, senior reporter at Vox. How does Catholicism inform the politics and policy of the U.S. Government? The Takeaway speaks with Massimo Faggioli, Professor of Historical Theology at Villanova University and author of “Joe Biden and Catholicism in the United States.” And also with Matthew Wilson, Associate Professor of Political Science at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas and Director for the Center of Faith and Learning. Muslim Women reflect on 9/11 20 Years Later Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, founder of MuslimGirl.com and Mona Eltahawy, journalist and author of The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls join us to discuss the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and what it's meant for them as women of Muslim descent to deal with the aftermath of racism, hatred, and feeling like outsiders in the country they call home. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 


    Millions of Americans Lost Unemployment Insurance This Week 2021-09-10

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 46:06


    Millions of Americans Lost Unemployment Insurance This Week This past Monday — Labor Day — 7.5 million workers lost their COVID-era expanded unemployment benefits, even as the pandemic continues on.  President Joe Biden decided not to extend the benefits before they were set to expire. For more on this, The Takeaway spoke to Heather Long, economics correspondent for the Washington Post, and Annelies Goger, Fellow at the Brookings Institution.  How Islamophobia Has Impacted Sikh Communities Although there's no correct target for the hate and violence that occurred, misdirected Islamophobic violence against Sikh Americans has continued for two decades. The Takeaway spoke with activist and author Valarie Kaur about what the post 9/11 era has meant for Sikh Americans and her new documentary Divided We Fall: Americans In The Aftermath. California Voters Will Decide Whether Gov. Gavin Newsom Stays or Goes On Tuesday, California voters will decide whether Gov. Gavin Newsom will stay in office or be removed in a Republican-driven recall election. There are 46 candidates that are running to replace the Governor; however, recent polling shows support for the governor to stay in office. The Takeaway spoke with Libby Denkmann, senior politics reporter at KPCC in Southern California about how the recall election works and what the latest polling says. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 


    The Long Road to Justice 2021-09-09

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 49:41


    The Long Road to Justice Attorney Ben Crump joins The Takeaway to discuss the long road to justice for victims of state violence. Scott Roberts, Senior Director of Criminal Justice Campaigns for Color of Change, also joins to discuss the work to keep the victims' memories alive and in national discourse.  A Look at Police Violence Against Black Women and Queer People  The Takeaway speaks with Andrea Ritchie, a co-founder of Interrupting Criminalization, an initiative that aims to end the criminalization of women and LGBTQ people of color. She's also the author of “Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color.”  Why #FreeBritney Matters to Disability Rights Advocates The Takeaway speaks with Haley Moss, an attorney and autism advocate, who has been following and writing about Britney Spears's conservatorship. Haley also wrote this article on how Britney Spears's conservatorship is a disability rights issue. "Blindspot: The Road to 9/11" Chronicles Events Leading Up to 9/11 Attacks Jim O'Grady, a reporter at WNYC and host of the podcast Blindspot: The Road to 9/11, joined The Takeaway to discuss.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.


    Do We Need Public Access to Drug Testing? 2021-09-08

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 48:33


    Do We Need Public Access to Drug Testing?  The recent drug-related deaths of actor Michael K. Williams and comedian Fuquan Johnson highlight the need for public access to drug testing. These cases are being investigated to see if Fentanyl played a role. Carl Hart, author of Drug Use for Grown-Ups: Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear and Kassandra Frederique, executive director of Drug Policy Alliance and nonprofit working to end the war on drugs, join us to discuss the need for the government to provide public access to drug testing and how that can save countless lives.  How Do You Talk to Your Kids About 9/11? Many of adults have memories about where they were when the planes crashed into the Twin Towers. But for an entire generation of kids and teens, 9/11 is less of a memory, and more of a whisper. That's because they were either infants at the time of the attacks, or had yet to be born. So we wanted to know how our listeners – parents and teachers – talk about 9/11 with the kids in their lives.  Maine Shifts Cost of Recycling from Consumers to Companies Maine recently passed landmark recycling legislation that shifts the cost of recycling from individual taxpayers to companies that create the packaging. Several other states are considering similar so-called “extended producer responsibility” legislation.   How Communities are Recovering from Ida in New Orleans, New Jersey and New York In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida that hit the Gulf Coast as a Category 4 hurricane and blew through the Northeast causing heavy rainfall that caused extensive flooding, The Takeaway checks in on several communities that were impacted.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.


    Gun Violence, Trauma, and the Mental Health Crisis We Face 2021-09-07

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 46:18

    Young People Are Facing a Mental Health Crisis From school shootings to the COVID-19 pandemic, students are facing a serious mental health crisis right now. According to data from the CDC, between March and October 2020, the number of mental health-related ER visits rose by 24 percent for 5- to 11-year-olds and by 31 percent for 12- to 17-year-olds. Why Japanese American Internment Matters Today Author Susan Kamei joins us to discuss her new book When Can We Go Back to America? The book chronicles the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Kamei takes us through why it's so important to know this history and tells the story through the memories of over 100 American citizens who lived through this tragedy. Slice of Life Recently, we put a call out to our listeners to send audio of the everyday sounds of their lives. From the mundane to the profound, we're compiling your responses and sharing them with the world.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Labor Day "Rebroadcast" 2021-09-06

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:09

    The Colorado River is Facing a Water Shortage  The federal government declared the first-ever water shortage for the Colorado River. There will be mandatory cutbacks to prevent Lake Meade, the largest reservoir by volume in the US, from reaching critically low levels. These measures will bring exceptional challenges to farmers and Indigenous communities who are particularly vulnerable to water scarcity throughout the Colorado River system, and it will surely complicate the water supply which reaches nearly 40 million people.  An Inside Look at Anti-Union Meetings The article, “Anatomy of an Anti-Union Meeting,” gives a unique look inside at a 2019 union drive at a plant-based meat company in North Carolina, No Evil Foods, and the tools that management used to undermine the union drive. Before the vote scheduled in February of 2020, management hired a consulting firm that specialized in union avoidance and held mandatory meetings for employees. When The Takeaway reached out to No Evil Foods for comment, here's what Mike Woliansky, co-founder and CEO of No Evil Foods, said:  "There is more to the story than what The American Prospect chose to report, both on the union effort and our recent financial challenges. Throughout the pandemic, we tried our hardest to keep the business operating. Despite significant investment in COVID protocols, which were successful as we had zero COVID-19 cases spread among our production team, we too felt the challenges of operating during the crisis. We gave all our employees a permanent $2.25/hr. raise during the pandemic, even while we were struggling financially and facing serious logistical issues, because it was the right thing to do. This put the average wage on our production team at $17/hour, which is very competitive for our area. We initially considered tying the raise to attendance, but quickly realized that policy was not reflective of our values, and after employee feedback we adapted the policy and made the pay increase for everyone regardless of their attendance or performance. We are people, and we make mistakes – and when we realize that we've made a mistake, we move to correct it. None of those realities are reflected in The American Prospect story." The Battle of Blair Mountain 100 Years Later This year marks the 100th anniversary of the largest labor uprising in the United States, the Battle of Blair Mountain. In August 1921, 7000-10,000 coal miners began marching together against corruption by the coal company, making it the biggest labor uprising in the history of the United States. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Texas Abortion Providers Grapple with New Reality Under Restrictive Law 2021-09-03

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 47:19

    Texas Abortion Providers Grapple with New Reality Under Restrictive Law On Wednesday, one of the most restrictive ever abortion rights laws in the U.S. went into effect in the Lone Star state. Called SB8, it bans most abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, before most people even know they're pregnant. While it doesn't' reverse Roe v Wade, it does circumvent it.  The Legal Questions Surrounding Texas's Restrictive Abortion Law  At midnight on Wednesday, the Supreme Court of the United States effectively overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4, page-and-a-half, unsigned, decision delivered without the court receiving briefings or hearing arguments.  Before Roe v Wade there was the Jane Collective We take a look at how activists worked to provide abortions prior to Roe v. Wade with a look at the Jane Collective, a group that operated out of Chicago and performed thousands of abortions between 1969 and 1973. Melissa speaks with her mother about her work in Washington between 1969-1971 and Laura Kaplan, author of a book about the collective, The Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Feminist Abortion Service. A New Jersey Bill Could Expand Reproductive Healthcare Continuing the discussion of abortion access, The Takeaway looks at New Jersey's Reproductive Freedom Act that would expand reproductive health and abortion access in the state. In October of 2020, a coalition of organizations called Thrive New Jersey worked with state legislators to introduce the bill. It has been stalled in the legislature for almost a year now, but after Texas' restrictive abortion law went into effect this week, there has been a new push for New Jersey's Legislature to take action. For segment, see individual segment pages.    

    Louisianans Could Face Mental Health Crisis in Aftermath of Hurricane Ida 2021-09-02

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 52:01

    Louisianans Could Face Mental Health Crisis in Aftermath of Hurricane Ida In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, concerns remain about the nearly 1 million people without power and how the storm will impact Louisiana's healthcare system. Most immediately, much of the attention is on the ongoing Covid-19 crisis in the state, which has one of the lowest vaccination rates in the country, and the strains that people who need medical attention after Ida could place on an already overwhelmed hospital system. Wendell Pierce Reflects on Hurricane Ida New Orleans native son and actor Wendell Pierce joins us to discuss his attempt to get his father to safety ahead of the storm, the destruction of an important jazz landmark, and his efforts to continue revitalizing his beloved city.  How Mississippi is Dealing with the Aftermath of Ida Amid the Pandemic Hurricane Ida was brutal to Louisiana, but battered Mississippi as well. Mississippi experienced flash floods and at least two deaths from the storm. And as of Thursday morning, tens of thousands were still without power.      Hurricane Ida Causes NYC to Declare a State of Emergency Late Wednesday night, Hurricane Ida barreled into NYC causing record levels of rainfall which led to emergency flash flooding in the streets and subways. Mayor Bill de Blasio has declared a state of emergency. How Hurricane Ida is Impacting Incarcerated Youth in Louisiana I​​n 2005, after Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana, incarcerated people at the New Orleans Parish Prison were left to fend for themselves as toxic water filled prison cells and deputies deserted en masse. Incarcerated people are often forgotten during disasters and young people in prison are particularly vulnerable. The Takeaway checks in on the how the aftermath of Hurricane Ida is affecting prisons in the New Orleans area, as hundreds of thousands of people are still without power.   For transcripts, see individual segment pages.    

    No, the COVID-19 Vaccines Do Not Affect Fertility 2021-09-01

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 49:31

    No, the COVID-19 Vaccines Do Not Affect Fertility  There's been a false claim circulating around that's had quite the staying power: that the COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility. There is zero science supporting this, but despite that, it's become concerningly widespread. How to Talk to a Science Denier According to the latest numbers from the CDC about 52% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated with the Covid-19 vaccine. But what about the other 48%? How do we get the skeptics, anti-vaxxers and conspiracy theorists on board to take the vaccine? Cuban Doctors Use Social Media to Protest Conditions During Pandemic At the end of July, The Takeaway checked in on Cuba after historic demonstrations erupted across the country where thousands were protesting the severe economic crisis, the mismanagement of the pandemic, and government restrictions on civil liberties and freedoms.  The Deep Value of Financial Therapy The WNYC Studios podcast Death, Sex, and Money recently aired a series of conversations that highlight the value of speaking openly in relationships about financial decisions. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    What Hurricane Ida Means for New Orleans 2021-08-31

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 45:54

    What Hurricane Ida Means for New Orleans Sixteen years after Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana braced for yet another potentially devastating storm. On Sunday, Hurricane Ida slammed into Louisiana, making landfall as an "extremely dangerous" Category 4 storm. Though it was downgraded to a Category 2 storm, the hurricane brought catastrophic flooding, high storm surges, and 150mile per hour winds to low-lying coastal communities like New Orleans. The storm surge was so powerful that it even temporarily reversed the flow of the Mississippi River.   How A U.S. Vet Feels on Our Last Day in Afghanistan Tim Kudo, a former Marine captain who served in Afghanistan and Iraq, recently called the U.S. evacuation “ill-planned” and “a catastrophe for the Afghan people whom we have betrayed” in an op-ed for The New York Times. We speak with him about his take on the messy withdrawal. Kabul: American Withdrawal, U.S. Drone Strikes, and ISIS-K On Monday, the last U.S. military flight left Afghanistan -- a day ahead of the August 31st deadline. This early departure came just days after a suicide bombing at the Kabul airport on Thursday. It was one of the country's deadliest terrorist attacks, killing roughly 170 Afghan civilians and 13 American service members. Black Content Creators Organize One Day Boycott Against Twitch  Black digital content creators are boycotting the Twitch social media platform on Wednesday, September first with #ADayOffTwitch. According to the content creators this action came about because of the ongoing harassment of marginalized streamers in the form of “hate raids.” We spoke to Raven, a content creator and activist on Twitch, who is one of the creators of #ADayOffTwitch boycott.    For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    The Supreme Court Ended Biden Administration's Eviction Moratorium 2021-08-30

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 48:00

    The Supreme Court Ended Biden Administration's Eviction Moratorium For months, the Biden administration has been extending a federal eviction moratorium to protect tenants struggling to pay their rent during the pandemic, but now, the eviction moratorium is over. What Resettlement Looks Like for Afghan Refugees Amid the chaotic evacuation of U.S. troops and allies from Afghanistan, the US State Department has prepared to bring around 50,000 Afghan refugees into the U.S. for resettlement. Some conservatives have criticized the plans despite the extensive security checks that are required for refugees to relocate within the U.S. However, in the face of those partisan complaints, refugee agencies in states across the country have already started the complicated resettlement process for recent Afghan arrivals.   "This Land" Tackles Potential Threat to the Indian Child Welfare Act This month marks the season two debut of the award-winning, documentary podcast “This Land” which is produced by Crooked media and hosted by Rebecca Nagle. She joined to discuss the new season which centers around a federal challenge to the Indian Child Welfare act. The ICWA is meant to protect Native Children by giving their tribes and family a say in the child's placement. This season exposes how the far right is challenging the law in order to advance their conservative agenda. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    The Supreme Court Reinstated Trump's 'Remain in Mexico' Policy 2021-08-27

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 48:05

    The Supreme Court Reinstated Trump's 'Remain in Mexico' Policy  This week, the Supreme Court ruled that the Biden administration must reinstate the Trump-era immigration policy known as 'Remain in Mexico,' which forces many asylum seekers to live in Mexico while they wait for the date of their asylum hearings.Many migrants seeking asylum have had to endure unsafe and inhumane conditions in Mexico during that interim period. How the Biden Administration is Responding to Deadly Terrorist Attacks in Kabul On Thursday, two terrorist attacks by the Kabul airport killed dozens of Afghans and at least thirteen U.S. service members. U.S. officials say that an Afghanistan based affiliate of ISIS was behind the attack. With less than a week until the August 31 deadline that the U.S. says all U.S. military members will be withdrawn from Afghanistan, these deadly attacks and the potential of more in the coming days greatly complicate the situation for the Biden administration. A Win for Felony Offender Enfranchisement in North Carolina A North Carolina judicial panel declared that roughly 56,000 formerly incarcerated individuals “can register to vote and cast ballots.” This specifically applies to individuals who are felons, served their time and are out on parole. It would also include people “convicted of a federal felony” but have probation as their punishment. State lawmakers who are defendants in the case promise to file an appeal. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Are Disasters Natural? 2021-08-26

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 45:14

    Are Disasters Natural?  Wildfires. Flooding. Hurricanes. These all come to mind when one thinks of natural disasters. There have been many this year including the most recent flooding in Tennessee where at least 21 people died and many more are still missing. But just how natural are these disasters? What role does disaster preparedness have in mitigating the damage done if there isn't equity in the system? What to Pack in Your Go-Bag for When Disaster Hits If a disaster hit your home tonight, tomorrow, or next week, have you thought about what you would bring with you, and what you would leave behind? Broadway's Latest Season Centers Black Theater Artists Broadway producers are doing something a little different this season: actively supporting and celebrating the work of Black artists. All seven of the news plays premiering this season on Broadway were written by Black playwrights, a testament to the activism displayed by Black theater artists over the course of the pandemic. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Policing Fatness in Black and Queer Bodies 2021-08-25

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 49:57

    Policing Fatness in Black and Queer Bodies  Earlier this month, Pop Royalty Lizzo and Cardi B released a video for their new song Rumors which debuted at number four on the Billboard Hot 100. But what should have been a celebratory moment for Lizzo was ruined by the internet haters, who unleashed a toxic stream of offensive and racist comments about Lizzo's body. The Battle of Blair Mountain 100 Years Later This year marks the 100th anniversary of the largest labor uprising in the United States, the Battle of Blair Mountain. In August 1921, 7000-10,000 coal miners began marching together against corruption by the coal company, making it the biggest labor uprising in the history of the United States. Trans Athlete Bill Hearing During Most Anti-LGBTQ Year in Texas Legislative History  On Tuesday the Texas House, which is currently in a ‘special session,' held a hearing on Senate Bill 2, the bill that would ban transgender student athletes from playing sports. The Takeaway spoke with Landon Richie, an 18-year-old trans activist who has grown up in the state, about his experience and the barrage of anti-trans legislation.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    How Full FDA Approval of Pfizer Vaccine Could Impact the Fight Against COVID-19 2021-08-24

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 49:16

    How Full FDA Approval of Pfizer Vaccine Could Impact the Fight Against COVID-19 On Monday, the FDA fully approved Pfizer-BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine for people ages 16 and older. A poll released by the Kaiser Family Foundation at the end of June found that three out of ten unvaccinated adults said they would be more likely to get vaccinated if the FDA granted its full approval to one of the vaccines.  COVID Cases Surge in Alabama As ICU's Run Out of Beds  The delta variant of COVID-19 is hitting hard in the Southern United States. Alabama has seen a 59% increase in hospitalizations over the past two weeks, with ICU's at 100 percent capacity. The Takeaway spoke with Sarah Nafziger, vice president of clinical support services at University of Alabama Hospital. Julius Jones Fights for Commutation  On September 13, 2021, the Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board will decide whether to commute the sentence of Julius Jones who has been in prison for 20 years. Jones maintains his innocence saying, “I have spent the past twenty years on death row for a crime I did not commit, did not witness, and was not at.” At issue in Jones' case are a potential racist juror, ineffective counsel, and the fact that no witnesses were allowed to testify for Jones to present his alibi.    A Host of Problems for Jeopardy!  Mike Richards, who is the executive producer of Jeopardy!, was recently named host of the beloved quiz show. But after an article from the Ringer revealed offensive and misogynistic comments made by Richards as the host of a podcast called The Randumb Show, he announced that he would be stepping aside from the hosting role of Jeopardy!. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    The Colorado River is Facing a Water Shortage 2021-08-23

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 50:47

    The Colorado River is Facing a Water Shortage  Last week, the federal government declared the first-ever water shortage for the Colorado River. There will be mandatory cutbacks to prevent Lake Meade, the largest reservoir by volume in the US, from reaching critically low levels. These measures will bring exceptional challenges to farmers and Indigenous communities who are particularly vulnerable to water scarcity throughout the Colorado River system, and it will surely complicate the water supply which reaches nearly 40 million people.  What U.S. Immigration Policy Means for Haiti's Recovery  Last week, Haiti was struck by both a 7.2 magnitude earthquake and tropical depression, leaving close to 2000 dead and many more injured or missing. Thousands are without shelter, as more than 80,000 homes were destroyed in the earthquake. Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Grace are further complicating relief efforts in Haiti. On top of all that, Haiti was already struggling with the COVID-19 pandemic, gang violence, and a political crisis made worse by the recent assassination of its president. Despite this turmoil, the Biden administration is still turning away Haitians who want to flee the country because of recent events.  Georgia State Board of Elections Moves Ahead With Review of Fulton County  In March, Georgia Republican lawmakers passed a sweeping new elections law. The law provides a pathway for the Georgia State Board of Elections to review and possibly suspend a local election board, and install a temporary administrator to oversee election administration. How the OnlyFans Ban Disrupts Content Creators On Thursday, social media platform OnlyFans said that it would ban, “any content containing sexually explicit conduct,” starting in October. Banned content includes photos and video. The reason given by the company is that it was at the request of their, “banking partners and payout providers.” For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    A Look at What Happened to Capitol Hill Bomb Threat Suspect 2021-08-20

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 43:56

    A Look at What Happened to Capitol Hill Bomb Threat Suspect  On Thursday, 49-year-old Floyd Ray Roseberry of Grover, North Carolina surrendered to Capitol Police after an hours-long standoff at the Library of Congress. Earlier in the day, Roseberry posted a video to social media claiming he had explosives. In a press conference following his surrender, U.S. Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger, indicated Roseberry had suffered personal losses in his family.  Should Politician's Apologize? On Monday President Joe Biden said, “I am President of the United States of America, and the buck stops with me,” when discussing Afghanistan. He also noted he was “saddened by the facts” of the current crisis but did not apologize for any failure on the part of the US. Our round table discussion will address past instances when presidents publicly apologized or noted lessons learned, when they didn't, and how that ultimately affects how they're seen by voters.  From Baking to Painting Murals: Protesting Can Take Many Forms   Following the murder of George Floyd, millions of people across the globe took to the streets to protest police brutality and systemic racism. But people also protested in more unique ways like baking.     

    A Critique on Western Media Coverage of Afghan Women 2021-08-19

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 43:05


    A Critique on Western Media Coverage of Afghan Women  How can media outlets do better when covering Afghanistan in this moment? Gaming Culture is Toxic Toxic gaming culture is back in the spotlight once again, after the state of California filed a lawsuit against the gaming giant Activision Blizzard in late July. Gorsuch and Thomas Call to Reexamine Landmark Press Freedom Case The landmark press freedom case New York Times v. Sullivan (1964) is under attack by Supreme Court Justices Neil Gorsuch and Clarence Thomas.


    Congresswoman Lee on Afghanistan 2021-08-18

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 45:29

    Congresswoman Lee on Afghanistan On September 14, 2001, Congresswoman Barbara Lee was the lone voice and vote against rushing to war in Afghanistan. Your Questions Answered About the Delta Variant, School Re-openings and Child Hospitalizations Covid-19 infection rates are reaching pre-vaccine levels in the US, with ​​more than 900,000 new cases reported last week. School Nurses Are in Short Supply During the Pandemic According to one study from the National Association of School Nurses, 25 percent of schools nationwide did not have a school nurse. The Delta Variant is Taking a Toll on Our Mental Health How do we deal with burnout when we're hitting yet another pandemic wall? For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Afghanistan: What Happens Now? 2021-08-17

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 52:45

    Afghanistan: What Happens Now? Late last week the Taliban swept across the country of Afghanistan capturing major cities before taking over the capital of Kabul on Sunday after President Ashraf Ghani left the country. This action comes more than two weeks before U.S. Troops are due to leave the country. This sent thousands fleeing to the airport and the borders in an attempt to escape Taliban rule. After two decades, what if anything was accomplished by this war and will the interpreters, guides and others that helped the U.S. get themselves and their families out to safety. Edwidge Danticat on the Devastation in Haiti  Over the weekend a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti, leveling buildings in the western region of the country and killing around 1300 people. Hundreds are still missing and heavy rains from tropical depression Grace make relief efforts more complicated. COVID-19 Has Spurred A Caregiving Crisis The number of older and disabled Americans that require long-term home-based assistance is growing exponentially and the cost for many families can be overwhelming. This is creating what some are calling a caregiving crisis. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.    

    In the Wake of Haiti's Quake 2021-08-16

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 45:18

    In the Wake of Haiti's Quake On Saturday, August 14, a powerful earthquake struck the island nation Haiti. Registering a strength of 7.2, this quake is even larger than the 2010 quake which killed nearly a quarter million Haitians.  New Census Numbers will affect redistricting According to the latest census data that was released on Thursday, the U.S is diversifying and the white population is shrinking. We discuss whether demographics equate to one's destiny and how the new numbers can affect political representation in the months and years to come. The Victory Fund's Push to Increase LGBTQ+ Political Power As redistricting gets underway, the LGBT Victory Fund—a national organization dedicated to electing LGBTQ+ people to office—is pushing to keep LGBTQ+ neighborhoods united as maps are redrawn, thereby strengthening their collective voting power.  Why Indigenous Viewers and Critics Are Celebrating "Reservation Dogs" Last week, a new dramedy called “Reservation Dogs” premiered on FX. Set on Indian Territory in northeastern Oklahoma, the show is part of a renaissance among Indigenous creatives in Hollywood. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    Does Bipartisanship Still Work? 2021-08-13

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 44:37

    Does Bipartisanship Still Work? A conversation on the history of bipartisan legislation, changes in ideology, and whether true bipartisanship is actually dead. Fights Over Voting Rights and Mask Mandates Heat Up in Texas This week, Texas House Speaker Dade Phelan signed arrest warrants for 52 Democrats who have refused to return to the state Capitol during the two special sessions called this summer. What the July Jobs Report Tells Us About Economic Recovery Last week, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released its July jobs report, which showed a .5 percent drop in the unemployment rate to 5.4 percent. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Why Was the Sexual Harassment Investigation Cuomo's Tipping Point? 2021-08-12

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 45:28

    Why Was the Sexual Harassment Investigation Cuomo's Tipping Point? Governor Andrew Cuomo's resignation on Tuesday means Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will serve as the next Governor of New York. She will become the first woman in the state's history to serve in that position. Governor Whitman on New York's Incoming Governor Governor Andrew Cuomo's resignation on Tuesday means Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will serve as the next Governor of New York. She will become the first woman in the state's history to serve in that position. Illinois Leads the Country in Banning Interrogators Lying to Minors In July, Illinois became the first state to ban police from lying and using deception tactics in interrogations with minors. Illinois Senate Bill 2122, was signed by Governor of Illinois J.B Pritzker, and will go into effect in January 2022. Advocates for the bill say that people under 18 years old are two to three times more likely to falsely confess to a crime than adults.   For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Andrew Cuomo is Stepping Down, But the System That Supported Him Remains 2021-08-11

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 44:06

    Andrew Cuomo is Stepping Down, But the System That Supported Him Remains On Tuesday, in a move that came as a surprise to many observers of New York politics, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced his resignation. Cuomo's decision to step down comes in the wake of Attorney General Letitia James's report detailing allegations made by 11 women who say that Cuomo sexually harassed them and created a toxic work environment. Will Restaurant Employees Go Back to Work? 2020 was a devastating year for the restaurant industry and its employees as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 110,000 places closed their doors either temporarily or permanently, and food industry sales fell 240 billion dollars. Farmers Markets Build Community Across the U.S. They're places where you can not only buy locally-grown fruits and vegetables but also connect with your wider community.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.  

    The Plight of Afghan Interpreters 2021-08-10

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 50:50

    The Plight of Afghan Interpreters The race is on to get Afghan interpreters, guides, and contractors, as well as their families out of the country. A Look at Feminist Foreign Policy in Afghanistan As the Taliban takes over more territory in Afghanistan, Afghan women's rights organizations are calling on foreign governments to take a feminist approach to foreign policy. How Actor Winston Duke Brought All of Himself to "Nine Days" Actor Winston Duke has had standout roles in major movies including “Black Panther” and “Us,” but this summer he's starring in a much more intimate film called “Nine Days.” For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    The Weight of Student Loan Debt Amid the Pandemic 2021-08-09

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 45:56

    The Takeaway for Monday, August 9, 2021. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    What the Cuomo Sexual Harassment Report Means for Democrats Nationwide 2021-08-06

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 44:45

    What the Cuomo Sexual Harassment Report Means for Democrats Nationwide This week, the New York attorney general released a report detailing allegations that Governor Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women and created a culture of “fear and retaliation.”  Politics, Power, and Abuse In 2019, Professor Vanessa Tyson publicly accused Virginia Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax of sexual assault. The Ohio Special Election and the Future of the Democratic Party On Tuesday, Shontel Brown, the chairwoman of the Cuyahoga County Democratic Party, won the special election primary in Ohio's 11th Congressional District. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

    Alabama Union Coal Mine Workers Enter Fifth Month of Strike 2021-08-05

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 52:47

    Alabama Union Coal Mine Workers Enter Fifth Month of Strike More than 1,000 union miners from Warrior Met Coal in Brookwood, Alabama, are striking for higher pay and increased benefits. An Inside Look at Anti-Union Meetings New reporting from "The American Prospect" tells the inside story of anti-union action in a plant-based meat company known as No Evil Foods. Should Police Unions Be Busted or Saved? There's a rift in the labor movement about how to effectively pursue police reform. Responses to DaBaby's Homophobic Remarks Show Push and Pull of Progress in Hip Hop For queer, Black fans of hip hop, offensive comments like the ones made by DaBaby are upsetting. But the rise of openly queer stars like Lil Nas X also shows how far the genre has come.

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