Podcasts about Coast guard

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Maritime security organization of a particular country

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Coast guard

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Best podcasts about Coast guard

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Latest podcast episodes about Coast guard

The Transition
Leveraging Technology As A Force For Good With James Samuel, Founder & CEO of PLURIBUS Inc.

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 49:55


In the following episode of the Transition, I interview former Air Force Fighter Pilot, Engineer, and now Tech Entrepreneur, James Samuel, Founder & CEO of PLURIBUS Inc., a big data, geospatial analytics company headquartered in McLean, Virginia, which is leading the world in the new industry of identity based navigation. James recently launched Pluribus's first product, ANJEL Tech, an app that turns any smartphone into a powerful bodycam. James launched the app to provide security and safety, for black and brown lives, in response to violence, police misconduct, racial injustices across the country. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne To learn more about ANJEL Tech & Pluribus Inc. visit: https://www.anjel.tech/ Apply For The Breaking Barriers in Entrepreneurship Workshop Series here: https://bunkerlabs.org/breaking-barriers/

Buddhability
Episode 51: What it means to value your life

Buddhability

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:55


Today we're talking about the amazing difference that a month of chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo can make in your life, told through the story of Alex McClintock, of Hawaii. Alex is currently a diver in the Coast Guard, one of the hardest careers to train for, but his story starts in his early 20s when he felt completely stagnant. After dropping out of college and feeling increasingly lost, Alex decided to try chanting for one month, just to see what happened. He quickly realized that he didn't value his own life, and as he took the steps to build his confidence, he changed everything.Note: To join our 31-day chanting journey beginning January 18, 2022, sign up here.CHEAT SHEET1:13 Introduction to Alex1:24 Why Alex decided to try chanting for a month5:08 Two things that changed right away10:04 How he decided to join the Coast Guard12:46 What the struggle to value his life looked like17:00 Alex's journey through dive school23:25 How his Buddhist practice turned him into a person of action29:23 The struggle to pass exams after dive school34:37 The role of the Buddhist community in his transformation38:27 His favorite Buddhist quote40:34 Advice for anyone who wants to value their life more greatlyReferences: “On Rebuking Slander of the Law,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 444 The New Human Revolution, vol. 16, p. 28

EmotionAL Support
Kevin Hines - Best Selling Author, Global Public Speaker, and Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker

EmotionAL Support

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:22


In the Year 2000, Kevin attempted to take his life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. Many factors contributed to his miraculous survival including a sea lion which kept him afloat until the Coast Guard arrived. Kevin now travels the world sharing his story of hope, healing, and recovery while teaching people of all ages the art of wellness & the ability to survive pain with true resilience.  Join us as we bond over our mutual diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder, chat about survival, learn more about Kevin's comic book origin story, and the importance of support from friends and family.  *This episode has a trigger warning.* https://www.emotionalsupportpod.com/ @emotionalsupportpod https://www.kevinhinesstory.com/ @kevinhinesstory Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Women of the Military
Joining the Coast Guard in a recession - Caroline Walsh

Women of the Military

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:10


Thank you to our sponsors:Sabio Coding Bootcamp is a top-ranked coding Bootcamp that is 100% dedicated to helping smart and highly motivated individuals become exceptional software engineers.  Visit their website www.Sabio.la to learn how you may be able to use your GI Bill benefits to train at Sabio.  Your tuition and a monthly BAH stipend may be paid during your training period. USA Girl Scout Overseas virtual troop is a great way for girls to learn new skills, meet girls from all over the world, and have fun no matter where they are or where they move. Adults can also volunteer with Girl Scouts and is a great way for adults to continue learning, serving the community, and meeting friends no matter where they move. You can learn more about joining or volunteering with USA Girls Scouts Overseas by heading to their website USAGSO.orgConnect with Caroline:Instagram: carolinenoelle_artWebsite: carolinenw.comHer book  (affiliate link): Fairly Smooth OperatorMentioned in this episode:Armed Service Arts PartnershipCheck out the full show notes at https://www.airmantomom.com/2022/01/joining-the-coast-gaurd/Thank you to my Patreon Sponsor Col Level and above:Kevin Barba, Lorraine DiazGet your Women of the Military Podcast gear here.Thank you Patreon members for your support. Become a Patreon member today! Click here.  

The Super Human Life
Ep 110: Trafficked At 21 By Coast Guard Boyfriend w/ Hannah Blair (A Survivor's Story)

The Super Human Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 58:18


Human trafficking stories don't always happen the way we imagine them or how they're depicted in the movies. In fact, most times these cases start right at home and involve people that we know and love.    This week, to honor and recognize Human Trafficking Awareness Month, I have on the show with me Hannah Blair, a survivor of sex trafficking at the age of 21. Hannah was a small town girl who was trafficked by her boyfriend who was in the coast guard.    In this episode you'll hear Hannah describe:   - How her upbringing and previous abuse conditioned her to next expect anything was wrong with trafficking   - Tactics her ex-boyfriend used to prime her for trafficking   - Her experience and reaction the first time she was trafficked   - How a friend at lunch one day revealed to here what was going on   - Her survivor story to freedom   - And so much more   I know this can be a difficult conversation to be a part of, so I want to let you know how grateful we are for you tuning in this week.  Check out the links mentioned in the show:   Megan Lundstrom - Survivor leader out of Colorado - https://theaverycenter.org Find Your Lane Course - Rebecca Bender Initiative - https://rebecca-bender.mykajabi.com/find-your-lane Event in Atlanta - Leadership Gwinnett Justice Day - https://www.leadershipgwinnett.com/event/justice-day-4/ Zera House - http://zerahouse.org --- Connect with Frank and The Super Human Life on Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesuperhumanfrank/   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/584284948647477/   Website: http://www.thesuperhumanlifepodcast.com/tshlhome   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjB4UrpxtNO2AFtDURMzoKQ  

Light Hearted
Light Hearted 156 – Bob, Ann, and Dominic Trapani, Owls Head, Maine

Light Hearted

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 60:03


The growing limestone trade in Midcoast Maine led to the establishment of a light station at Owl's Head, at the entrance to Rockland Harbor, in 1825. A tall lighthouse wasn't necessary because of the height of the promontory. The light is exactly 100 feet above sea level. The present 30-foot brick lighthouse tower replaced the original one in 1852. Owls Head Lighthouse. Photo by Dominic Trapani (do not use without permission). The station was automated in 1989 and the last Coast Guard keeper was removed. In December 2007, the lighthouse tower was licensed to the American Lighthouse Foundation (ALF). Then, in late 2012, it was announced that the keeper's house had also been licensed to the American Lighthouse Foundation and that it would serve as the organization's headquarters. Bob Trapani and daughter Gianna next to the still active fourth-order Fresnel lens in Owls Head Lighthouse. Ann Trapani Bob Trapani, Jr., has served as the executive director of the American Lighthouse Foundation since 2005. As associate director of the American Lighthouse Foundation, Ann Trapani is involved in many aspects of the organization's operation. Bob and Ann's son Dominic, at the age of 23, has already established himself as one of the top photographers of the Maine coast. Dominic Trapani In this interview, Ann, Dominic, and Bob discuss the special experience of working at Owls Head Lighthouse in all kinds of weather conditions, the photographic beauty of the Penobscot Bay region, and the day to day operation of the interpretive center and gift shop at the light station. Owls Head Light Station in August 2019. Photo by Jeremy D'Entremont.

The Transition
An Air Force Veteran and Registered Nurse's Journey To Build A Medical Device Company For His Patients with Brian Mohika, Founder of CathWear

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 54:23


In the following episode of the Transition, I interview Air Force Veteran Brian Mohika, Founder of Cathwear, a medical device company that produces medical underwear designed for use with patients with leg bags, removing the use of the velcro straps and improving quality of life for patients.On the show, he opens up about his successes and fails, including the fallout with his business partners, why it's important for his to company to employ his family and those in his communities, and also why it's important for entrepreneurs not to give up, no matter bad things may seem. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne To learn more about Cathwear visit: https://cathwear.com/ Apply For The Breaking Barriers in Entrepreneurship Workshop Series here: https://bunkerlabs.org/breaking-barriers/

Daybreak Insider Podcast
January 12, 2022 - The U.S. Coast Guard comes to the rescue

Daybreak Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 10:15


The U.S. Coast Guard comes to the rescue in Florida. A Senate hearing on COVID gets heated. Baseball's winter lockout shows signs of thawing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Transition
Reflecting Back and Looking Forward After 50 Episodes of The Transition

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 59:51


To kick off 2022, I reflect back on the last year and a half of hosting the Transition, and where I'm hoping to take the show this year. To discuss the show with me is Jamison Aweau, Bunker Labs Head of Product and Brand. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne Apply For The Breaking Barriers in Entrepreneurship Workshop Series here: https://bunkerlabs.org/breaking-barriers/

StoryCorps
Sign Me Up

StoryCorps

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 12:24


In this episode, Jeanine Menze and La'Shanda Holmes talk about becoming the first and second Black female pilots in the U.S. Coast Guard, what led them to the military, and ultimately, each other.

Section 10 Podcast
Episode 446: Punctual Pat

Section 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 172:24


The gang's all here (Jared, Coley, and Jake) for the last episode of 2021. We kick off the episode by going through some hypotheticals of what would happen if a major league pitcher showed up late for his start and what the consequences would be. Jared talks about his love for the Coast Guard and how he's always ranked them equally amongst the other branches of the military. Jared and Coley compare the contracts of Rick Porcello and John Lackey's careers with the Sox before moving into some Clay Buchholz discussion. Pat joins the show and we break down the miscommunication that caused him to be two hours late. Pat talks about his infamous outing against the Angels and gives an interesting anecdote about his interaction with Clay Buchholz in the dugout after he was pulled. Pat also gets into the nuances of pitching and talks about his best/worst pitches as a major leaguer. We end with everyone's New Year's resolutions for 2022. Happy New Year!

Voices in Advocacy Podcast
Best of 2021: Our memorable interview with Gail Adams.

Voices in Advocacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 38:40


Best of 2021: We look back on this memorable interview with Gail Adams of International Association of Geophysical Contractors. Gail comes with extensive high level Washington DC experience and during this interview she explains advocacy as an art and discusses what one needs to know about a person's real advocacy why. Gail has more than 20 years of experience in the environment and natural resources public policy arena and working with states and local government. She has more than 30 years' experience in public affairs, non-profit organizations, and governmental affairs. She is the former Director of the Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs (OIEA) for the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), Immediate Office of the Secretary. Her responsibilities were to establish and maintain relationships between the Department of the Interior and Governors, state and local elected officials and the more than 6000 stakeholders and organizations that represent interests related to DOI. Prior to her appointment, Gail served as the Governmental Affairs Officer for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on loan from FEMA to the U.S. Coast Guard. Gail received the Coast Guard Distinguished Service Award, the highest public recognition given by the Commandant of the Coast Guard for her work on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. As the Oil Spill Governmental Affairs Officer, Gail oversaw Intergovernmental Affairs, Congressional Affairs, the Non-Governmental Organization Interaction Unit, VIP and International visits as well as some aspects of Community Relations for the entire Gulf Coast. She also served as the governmental affairs advisor to the three Coast Guard Federal On-Scene Coordinators as a member of their Command Staff for the response. She is the former Director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, Department of External Affairs for FEMA's Louisiana Transitional Recovery Office headquartered in New Orleans.  As the IGA Director, Gail headed intergovernmental operations for Louisiana offices for Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav and Ike. Gail also coordinated all foreign delegation meetings coming to Louisiana to learn lessons of response and recovery efforts.   This podcast is dedicated to the art of advocacy. Contact Voices In Advocacy at: www.VoicesinAdvocacy.com 480 488-9150 At Voices in Advocacy, we work with organizations that want to inspire, educate, engage, and activate their supports to become even better influential advocates.

The Transition
Creating A New Type of Athletic Wear for Modern Day Women Warriors with Air Force Veteran and NFL Cheerleader, Haley Marie McClain Hill, Founder of Torch Warrior Wear

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 57:49


In this episode of the Transition, I'm joined by Hailey Marie MCclain Hill, NFL Cheerleader, Entrepreneur, and soon to be Transitioning Air Force Officer. Hailey reached out to me via instagram, after coming across the show on the Bunker Labs website, and asked for some advice regarding her venture, Torch Warrior Wear, an L.A. based clothing brand for modern day women warriors. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne Learn more about Torch here: https://torchwarriorwear.com/ Check out the 2021 Bunker Labs Holiday Gift Guide here: https://bit.ly/3nYoVoC

Radio Cayman News
6pm News for 29 December 2021

Radio Cayman News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:38


Police investigate a church break-in and ask for the public's help to find a stolen car. A vessel in distress gets a helping hand from the Coast Guard. A look at the state of the financial services industry. Organisers of an annual tradition - find a way to celebrate and share in spite of Covid restrictions. #rcnews #radiocayman #caymanislands #caymannews --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rcnews/message

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, December 23, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


For the first time in 45 years, the Coast Guard will get a new icebreaker. Also, what a decline in caribou means for subsistence and sport hunters.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
How the Coast Guard deals with sexual assaults aboard U.S. flagged ships

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 20:01


Sexual assault and harassment at sea has been a problem for cadets at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. Twice in recent years it's had to interrupt its Sea Year program, under which students spend time on U.S. flag merchant vessels to gain experience. Recently one mariner I interviewed said the Coast Guard is lax in dealing with reported incidents. For the Coast Guard's response, I spoke with Rear Admiral John Mauger, the assistant commandant of the Coast Guard for prevention policy. And with Michael Berkow is director of the Coast Guard Investigative Service. You hear Mauger first.

The New CISO
Managing Your First Zero-Day Attack

The New CISO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 39:50


On today's episode, we are joined by Chris Wolski, the CISO of Port of Houston. He chats about job hunting, the aftermath of an attack and more.   Becoming a CISO A returning guest, the last time Chris was on the show, he was unemployed. From being let go to landing his current position, the process took Chris six months. He chats about what that was like and the normal CISO versus the “Rockstar” CISO. Despite his limited experience in maritime, Chris took a chance and was rewarded.   Socializing as a CISO Via events and even LinkedIn, Chris was able to expand his network. Through his connections, he was able to educate himself well enough in maritime transportation, laws and security to better understand his current job. Overall, Chris encourages you to do your homework on the industry, company and people when job searching.   The First CISO The first CISO at Port of Houston, Chris has faced unique challenges. In part, he's had to convince the port why cybersecurity is needed, and how it can impact cargo movement.   Attacks and Risks Recently, the port had an attack. Having a zero-day used against them, Chris found the experience eye-opening. Thankfully, Chris already had an action plan, as well as a risk metrics to guide him. Within 2 hours, the attack was contained and fully remediated after 10 hours.   The Aftermath of an Attack Although doubted initially, Chris found himself trusted, despite it being done after an incident. He documented everything and encourages other CISOs to do the same. As a result of his work, he was elevated within the organization and the maritime community. There was no doubt of Chris's ability and purpose within the organization. Within two hours, the port saw its ROI. After the incident, they shared what had happened in the hopes of opening up communication. By sharing, Chris can help others avoid what happened to Port Houston.   Getting Help    Due to the severity of the attack, Chris explains why the Coast Guard, FBI and other entities had to offer assistance. While it may be hard to juggle all those organizations, they have access to resources that Chris couldn't have had otherwise. Again, it came down to reaching out to connections.   Indifferent Insiders     Do you need to have a major incident in order for an entire organization to believe in the role of a CISO? Chris explains how equating cybersecurity to something others already know can help convince them of its importance so they can better understand. With Port Houston, Chris compared cybersecurity to physical security to put everyone at ease. Nowadays, cybersecurity impacts everyone. Any machinery, manufacturing and more has computer chips in their parts, which makes them susceptible to an attack. It's important to convey the severity of cybersecurity to others.   The New CISO To Chris, being a new CISO means doing your homework on your industry, company, and the people around you. Be willing to learn and you'll find success.   Links: Chris Wolski - LinkedIn Maritime Security Talk - YouTube Channel Exabeam Podcasts  

The Transition
Data Analytics, Tacos, And A Whole Lot of Life In Between with Marine Veteran James Suh, Founder of Nashville Analytics and Taco Diplomacy

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 66:50


In this episode of the Transition, I'm joined by Marine Veteran James Suh, Founder of Nashville Analytics, a Nashville based analytics firm, and more recently Taco Diplomacy, a pop-up taco shop and soon to be restaurant, committed to bringing the world together, one taco at a time. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne Follow Taco Diplomacy on Instagram here: https://bit.ly/3plRY7z Check out the 2021 Bunker Labs Holiday Gift Guide here: https://bit.ly/3nYoVoC

D3 Nation
Episode 55 - Bring on the Duals!

D3 Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 37:30


ABOUT THE EPISODE For the final episode of 2021 we discuss some big time dual results that took place throughout the month of December. North Central and Coast Guard pick-up some signature wins that will have a huge impact on NWCA National Duals. Alvernia showing their growth in year three with a lot of success this fall semester plus Coe and Loras College position themselves nicely heading into NWCA national duals. We discuss it all in the 55th edition of D3 Nation. FOLLOW THE PODCAST https://anchor.fm/coachbonx2 | Twitter - @D3NationPodcast ABOUT THE PODCAST Hosted by Anthony and Gennaro Bonaventura, former DIII wrestlers at Waynesburg University and current DIII Assistant Coaches (Stevens Institute of Technology & Waynesburg). The D3 Nation podcast mission is to provide DIII wrestling news and updates throughout the year. We also look forward to delivering episodes featuring DIII coaches and wrestlers as special guests to share their stories. We are both passionate about DIII wrestling and want to use this platform to keep the wrestling community educated on what is happening in DIII plus raise awareness of the amazing stories in DIII Wrestling.

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 82: Tango Alpha Lima: A bittersweet goodbye, daring Coast Guard rescue, and MOH Cashe at last

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 47:05


Our big farewell to CV has a little bit of everything. Ashley fosters a lively discussion about using the National Guard as a pivot point during the Jan. 6 Probe. Jeff sings the praises of a daring Coast Guard rescue on the brink of Niagara Falls. CV finally gets his wish as President Biden awards the Medal of Honor to Sgt. First Class Alwyn C. Cashe. RAPID FIRE Three APP-tastic stories of how the military uses mobile technology...for better or for worse. Some surprise guests help bid CV adieu.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
Coast Guard set to adopt employee performance management program

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 16:07


As part of the Homeland Security Department, the Coast Guard is about to adopt an employee performance management program DHS is pushing to its components. For how this will affect employees, Coast Guard human resources specialist Brooke Lawson.

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz
Over $200M In Cannabis, Illicit Substances Seized By U.S. Coast Guard And Partner Nations

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 5:03


Today in cannabis news: A recent report indicates that the international cannabis market is poised to see significant growth in the coming years; the President of Malta officially enacts nationwide recreational cannabis legalization following passage in the Parliament; and personnel with the U.S. Coast Guard confiscates a load of cannabis and illicit substances supposedly worth over US$200 million. It's Tuesday, December 21 and TRICHOMES.com is bringing you the top cannabis news from around the web. You can also listen on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, or Spotify–search TRICHOMES and subscribe.

Women of the Military
Future of Women of the Military podcast and more

Women of the Military

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 31:37


Thank you to our sponsors:Sabio Coding Bootcamp is a top-ranked coding Bootcamp that is 100% dedicated to helping smart and highly motivated individuals become exceptional software engineers.  Visit their website www.Sabio.la to learn how you may be able to use your GI Bill benefits to train at Sabio.  Your tuition and a monthly BAH stipend may be paid during your training period. Grunt Style is an American Veteran-owned and operated company that prides itself in patriotic spirit, with the motto Pride in Self, Military, and Country. Grunt Style makes high-quality clothing, with patriotic themes that wave the American flag with pride. Use the code HUFFMAN to save 10% on your first order. Head over to GruntStyle.comConnect with Amanda:https://www.linkedin.com/in/airmantomom/https://www.instagram.com/airmantomomhttps://www.twitter.com/airmantomomMost popular episodes 20218.  Episode 144: Writing for healing, Carolyn Patrickhttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/07/writing-for-healing/Order True Feathers with my affiliate link7. Episode 108: Empowering Women through Storytelling, Kerri Jeterhttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/01/empowering-women/Learn more about Freedom Sisters Magazine: https://www.magsfast.com/Magazines/Freedom-Sisters/Latest?code=Amanda20216. Episode 116: Flawed but Still Worthy, Allie Brazashttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/02/flawed-but-still-worthy/Order Flawed and (Still) Worthy with my affiliate link5. Episode 151: Attending a Military Academy, West Point, Cadet Holland Pratt and Cadet Hannah Blakeyhttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/09/attending-a-military-academy/4. Episode 161: Overcoming imposter syndrome, Alani Bankheadhttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/11/overcoming-imposter-syndrome/3. Episode 160: Rock the Boat, Danelle Barretthttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/11/rock-the-boat/Order Rock the Boat with my affiliate link2. Episode 112: Becoming a Rear Admiral in the Coast Guard, Melissa Berthttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/01/rear-admiral-in-the-coast-guard/1. Episode 138: Pros and Cons of being a Woman in the Military, round uphttps://www.airmantomom.com/2021/06/pros-and-cons-of-being-a-woman-in-the-military/Check out the full transcript here.  Thank you to my Patreon Sponsor Col Level and above:Kevin Barba, Lorraine DiazGet your Women of the Military Podcast gear here.Thank you Patreon members for your support. Become a Patreon member today! Click here.  

Sailing in the Mediterranean and Beyond
Sailing in the Mediterranean Episode 256 Vessel Documentation Portal: Beware!

Sailing in the Mediterranean and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 11:31


2021 update Beware of maritimedocumentation.us now going under https://vesselrenewal.us/ 2021 New Website and Correspondence images: Here is a link to my page on this company Older website A few years ago I fell for this. I got a letter from marinedocumentation.us looking like an official Documentation Renewal from the Coast Guard. As it turns out I feel was a scam and they took me for $150. The Actual cost to renew my vessel from the US Coast Guard was $26. Learn from me and warn your friends! I reported this government website look a like to the FTC and also its ISP godaddy. but they are still around.....   Want me to go sailing with you? Then contact me! If you have ideas for future podcasts or comments please drop me a note! and PLEASE rate my podcast in iTunes and perhaps write a note. link https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/sailing-in-the-mediterranean/id566678892?mt=2 Sailing! Learn To Sail: Basic Keelboat Certification Lessons for the ASA 101 Exam Exam over 7 hours of Audio Instruction to help you get ready to take the written exam. If you're interested in my sailing instructional audio series here are the links: Sailing! Learn to Sail: Basic Keelboat Certification Lessons for the ASA 101 Exam https://gumroad.com/l/Eiig Sailing! Learn to Sail: Basic Coastal Cruising; Lessons for the ASA 103 Exam https://gumroad.com/l/PvOYK Sailing! Learn To Sail: Bareboat Cruising Certification Lessons for the ASA 104 Exam https://gumroad.com/l/bwXh Sailing in the Mediterranean Website https://www.medsailor.com If you would like to be a guest or have suggestions for future episodes or if you would like Franz to be a speaker at your Sailing Club or fundraiser please feel free to contact me. ©2021 Franz Amussen all rights reserved

Deep Leadership
#0097 – High Adventure Leadership with James Elliott

Deep Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 46:10


Today I'm joined by James Elliott. James is a certified leadership coach and trainer, aerospace safety and quality professional, aviator, and founder of High Adventure Leadership. He is a student of leadership and has been leading teams for more than 25 years in both business and in the Coast Guard. I have known James for several years. We met originally on Twitter and I've always loved his insights on the subject of leadership so I'm excited to have him on the show. High Adventure Leadership _____ Purchase my latest bestselling leadership book now All in the Same Boat - Lead Your Organization Like a Nuclear Submariner Visit our sponsor Bottom Gun Coffee Company use the discount code "DEEP" Become a leader worth following today with these powerful resources: Purchase my bestselling leadership book "I Have the Watch: Becoming a Leader Worth Following" use the discount code "DEEP" Subscribe to my leadership newsletter Follow Jon S Rennie on Twitter Follow Jon S Rennie on Instagram Follow Jon S Rennie on YouTube Follow Jon S Rennie on Substack The Experience of Leadership book

Light Hearted
Light Hearted ep 152 – The Flying Santa of the Lighthouses

Light Hearted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 28:20


The Flying Santa is a tradition that dates back to 1929, serving to express gratitude to lighthouse keepers, Coast Guard personnel, and their families through Yuletide visits by plane or helicopter. The tradition was started by Captain William Wincapaw, a pioneering Maine aviator. To show his appreciation for the people at the lighthouses in Midcoast Maine, he loaded up his seaplane with packages containing newspapers, magazines, and other gifts, and he dropped them at the lighthouses on Christmas Day. The Flying Santa plane over Graves Lighthouse in Massachusetts in 1937. Bickford's restaurants was an early sponsor of the flights. Captain Bill Wincapaw in 1936. Alton H. Blackington Collection (PH 061). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries. The flights got such a positive reaction that Wincapaw expanded them to more of the Maine coast and the other New England states. The popular maritime historian Edward Rowe Snow became involved in 1936, and he kept the tradition going through 1980. From 1981 to 1997, the flights were carried out by the Hull Lifesaving Museum in Massachusetts. A new nonprofit organization, Friends of Flying Santa, was created in 1997. Today, Santa travels by helicopter in the weeks leading up to Christmas to stops from northern Maine to Long Island, New York, bringing holiday cheer to more than 1000 children of Coast Guard families. Edward Rowe Snow with his wife Anna-Myrle and daughter Dolly in the 1950s. (Friends of Flying Santa) This episode of Light Hearted, hosted by Jeremy D'Entremont and Cindy Johnson, looks back at 92 years of the Flying Santa using audio clips of Edward Rowe Snow and his wife and daughter, Brian Tague of Friends of Flying Santa, lighthouse keepers and family members, and more. The Flying Santa helicopter at Portland Head Lighthouse, Maine. (Friends of Flying Santa)

My Family Recipe
Time-Traveling Butterscotch Pie with Jennifer Justus

My Family Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 36:35


The Little Blue Cookbook was a nearly lost family heirloom that Jennifer Justus discovered a few years ago. Decades prior to that, the cookbook's butterscotch pecan pie recipe provided great comfort to her grandmother, who made the dish frequently when she and her husband were relocated by his Coast Guard duties during World War II. Inheriting this piece of history led Jennifer to wonder about her grandmother's inner life and the trials and tribulations she never shared with her granddaughter. This episode explores inheritance, midlife crises, time travel, and of course, pie. Rebekah Turshen, the pastry chef behind Nashville's City House and a friend of Jennifer's joins the conversation to talk about adapting vintage recipes and how she helped modernize this dessert. If you're hungry for more of this story, you can read the original essay “The Butterscotch Pie Recipe Grandma Carried With Her Through the War,” published by Food52. Plus find Rebekah's Turshen's baking tips and recipe adaptation here.My Family Recipe is created by the Food52 Podcast Network and Heritage Radio Network, inspired by the eponymous Food52 column.

RT
Redacted Tonight: Haiti's long fight for freedom with Pascal Robert, EU Denying Africans Asylum

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 27:45


Naomi Karavani is joined by Pascal Robert. He's a contributor to the Black Agenda Report and the host of the ‘This Is Revolution' podcast. They start the conversation on new reporting revealing that the assassins of Haitian President Jovenel Moise were searching for a list of drug kingpins when they raided his home. They also discuss the country's history, the Haitian diaspora in the US, the impoverishment of Black America as a strategy for creating a pool of desperate workers, and Pascal's reasons for optimism. Jaffer Khan talks about how Europe is copying the US' racist “Remain In Mexico” policy with a “Remain In Africa” stance. The EU is funding a massive campaign to deny asylum seekers their right to a safe haven. The campaign includes funding Libya's Coast Guard to keep refugees out of Europe.

The Transition
How-To Acquire Your First 100 Customers

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 32:06


In this episode of the Transition I share some advice on “How-To Acquire your first 100 customers.” For the first hundred, sales and marketing go hand and hand, in order to validate your business model, generate monthly recurring revenue, and maintain a constant feedback loop. I share with you a roadmap to keep things simple and what to focus on. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne Check out the 2021 Bunker Labs Holiday Gift Guide here: https://bit.ly/3nYoVoC

BYO Nano Brew Podcast
Episode 24 - Nano Brewers Reflect on 2021

BYO Nano Brew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 61:52


We hope you had a chance to watch, listen, or participate in BYO's NanoCon held earlier this month. For host John Holl it was great fun to moderate two panels with industry experts, though leaders, and brewers. In addition to their own thoughts and insight we had a lot of great questions and feedback from conference participants, especially during our small brewer panel. For this episode, our last of 2021, Holl wanted to bring three brewers together to talk about shared experiences, how they faced adversity and got through it, and to see what their outlook for 2022 might hold. We cover everything from social media plans, to yeast and hops, customer service, retail, packaging, and more.  For you small brewers putting in the hard work day in and day out it can be hard to get outside of your four walls. So hearing from other brewers or owners in podcast form might help a bit to show there are other people in similar situations. Their perspective might help you with insight into your own nano brewery. Our end of the year panelists are : Sara Ridgel of Policy Kings Brewery, she and her husband Dre are working to waking up the pallets of their Community through creative and innovative sessionable style beers. The opened in 2018 and  she says the brewery's main goal is to always deliver a crushable beer. Eric Christensen is a 26 year veteran of the Coast Guard and started Gypsy Brewing Company with his wife, Heather, in May 2017.  The two-barrel production only brewery serves local clientele in Southern Maryland through draft accounts, markets, and liquor stores. andRiker Wikoff is a co-founder of Red Clover Ale Co. In Vermont, it's a small brewery he started with two brothers-in-law, serving up IPAs and more from their taproom. The BYO Nano Podcast Episode 24 is sponsored by:Blichmann Pro Brewing With superior engineering and unrivaled service, Blichmann Pro Brewing equipment is designed from the ground up to generate a quick return on your investment by getting you up and running as efficiently as possible without sacrificing quality. These systems are versatile and flexible enough to give you room to grow with a modular design that can fit any space. Visit Blichmannpro.com to learn more about our one to ten barrel brewhouse systems and cellaring equipment.BYOJoin BYO online for a series of four-hour-long workshops with deep dives into topics of interest to small-scale pro brewers including Sour Beer Techniques on January 28, Distilling on February 4, and Brewery Taproom Draft Systems on April 8. Details can be found at byo.com/bootcampsBYO Nano Brew Podcast Episode 24Host: John HollGuests:  Riker Wikoff, Eric Christensen, and Sara RidgelContact: nano@byo.comMusic: Scott McCampbell

SOFcast
S2E7 Dr. David Kilcullen - Counterterrorism and Strategic Competition

SOFcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:42


The last 20 years of GWOT and counter-insurgency has dramatically shaped today's force. Dr. David Kilcullen has been at the forefront of those shaping policies and strategies. Dr. Kilcullen joins the hosts of SOFcast to discuss how the lessons learned from GWOT (the good and the bad) will be applied to the future of SOF and where those lessons fit in Strategic Competition. Dr. David Kilcullen is the former senior counter-insurgency advisor to General David Patreus and former Chief Strategist in the Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism at the US State Department. He's also the author of The Accidental Guerrilla, Counterinsurgency, Out of the Mountains, Blood Year, and The Dragons and the Snakes: How the Rest Learned to Fight the West

Boston Harbor Horror
Ominous Convergence

Boston Harbor Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 26:49


Content Warning: Physical violence, gunfire, loud noises, inhuman creatures, harsh language, mature themes, fear and panic, explosions, bodily functions and body horror. A violent attack on crew members from the Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star brings Special Agent Kerri to McMurdo Station to investigate. Written and produced by Mike Gagne of Asylum 94 Productions. Intro Music by Josh Monroe of Graven Rogue Studios. Sensitivity reading courtesy of Jackie Pineda, Dani Urbina and Tara Voshell Kerri Stone: Alexandra Jameson Indira Varma: Ishani Kanetkar OS2 Macready: Harlan Guthrie DC3 Mueller: Vinay P. Nariani EM3 Schaeffer: Tal Minear Captain Nat Freeman: Nikki Paige LCDR Domingo: Mike Cuellar WS Taylor: Jenny Pan Antinanco: Edgar Hernandez Alchemist: Matheus Carneiro Handler: David Pickering Voladora: Vanessa Guadiana Toni Lombardo: Missy Croft Pilot: Warren Towt Maya de la Muerte: Caroline Mincks Transcript available at the following link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1uWvFYuGZ4gXigaA626KB1OG_G6BsDVL8/view?usp=sharing Support the show at https://www.patreon.com/bostonhorror Copyright 2021 Asylum 94 Productions

Radio Sweden
Coast Guard investigates Baltic cargo ship collision, naked protest at Modern Museum, Lucia celebrations in Arvidsjaur

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 2:25


A round-up of the main headlines on December 13th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Frank RadosevichProducer: Kris Boswell

Her Success Story
An Investment of Protection: Supporting Our Heroes in the Coast Guard

Her Success Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 18:40


Susan Ludwig Susan became president of the Coast Guard Foundation in 2016 after serving for three years as Regional Director of Philanthropy in the Northeast. With fifteen years of non-profit fundraising work and two decades of experience working in corporate sales and product management, Susan leads the organization towards a future where all Coast Guard members and their families have the support they need to be prepared for service, build resilience, and excel throughout their lives. In this episode, we discuss: Susan's path into the nonprofit world after two decades of corporate management The many ways that the Coast Guard Foundation helps families and crew members  The benefits of having a Coast Guard member in your local community How the Coast Guard supports morale and mental health What strategic initiatives are being used to grow endowments, and how the Coast Guard Foundation works to cultivate and steward their donor relationships Challenges of being in the nonprofit sector, and how they counter-balanced the issues with Covid How important their 80 member national board of directors has been to their success, especially in the last 20 months What's next for the Coast Guard Foundation, and how they plan to double their support The question that Susan is famous for, and the good that comes from asking often How to help Website: https://coastguardfoundation.org/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coastguardfoundation/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coastguardfoundation Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoastGuardFound YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/CoastGuardFoundation

Ellissinema Podcast
Episode 188: The Hooked Generation - Arrow Video release

Ellissinema Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 30:34


Daisey, Acid, and Dum Dum are a trio of drug peddlers that retreat into the depths of the Florida Everglades with a pair of hostages after killing their Cuban suppliers and members of the Coast Guard. The Hooked Generation stars Jeremy Slate, John Davis Chandler, Willie Pastrano, Steve Alaimo, Cece Stone, Milton Smith, Walter R. Philbin, and more. Music by Chris Martell. Cinematography by Gregory Sandor. Written by William Grefe, Quinn Morrison, and Ray Preston. Directed by William Grefe.

B&H Photography Podcast
The Secret Industry - Shipping and Maritime Photography: The B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 67:00


To take photographs on ships or to work in ports and cover maritime transportation requires a full range of photographic know-how, including portraiture, landscape, product, aerial, architecture, corporate—even adventure-photography skills. And that's just on the first day!   On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast we discuss this type of industrial and corporate photography, which at its core is rooted in documentary and visual storytelling. We welcome to the program photographer Nick Souza and writer and photographer, Todd Vorenkamp.   Nick Souza translated years of photojournalism and sports photography experience into a career as corporate industrial photographer. He has traveled the world on assignments for companies including Maersk, DHL, Kalmar, Konecranes, Sperry Marine, and many others. A specialist in maritime transportation, his photographs have been exhibited at The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. With Souza we discuss the practical tools needed to stay safe and capture compelling imagery for clients. Souza is a Nikon shooter who will not apologize for his love of zoom lenses, including the 24-70mm and 200-500mm NIKKORS.   Todd Vorenkamp is a photographer, writer, and an adjunct instructor of photography at Dakota College at Bottineau. He is a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, a former merchant ship deck officer, and a former US Navy and Coast Guard helicopter aviator. His photo work has been published in Maritime Executive Magazine, Rotor & Wing, and Vertical Magazine, among others. With Vorenkamp we talk specifically about working on huge aircraft carriers and merchant ships and we learn how to maintain creativity on long ocean journeys.    Join us for this fascinating and very practical conversation, supported by Pelican.   Guests: Nick Souza and Todd Vorenkamp Photograph © Nick Souza  

For the Sake of the Child
Coasting to College Debt Free

For the Sake of the Child

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 11:14


Nya shares how joining the Coast Guard is allowing her to graduate college debt free and how she wears the uniform with the same pride as her father.   Show Notes:  https://www.gocoastguard.com/active-duty-careers/officer-opportunities/programs/college-student-pre-commissioning-initiative   Bio: Nya   Nya is currently a junior International Business major at Howard University and an Officer in Training (OT) in the US Coast Guard. She was introduced to service at a very young age growing up as a military kid. Her dad is still active-duty Navy, and her mom runs a nonprofit for military kids, Kids Rank, that is based on giving back to our communities. Nya have seen the impacts of giving back and lived that experience her entire life. As of August 2021, Nya graduated boot camp and is now an active member of the Coast Guard. She was introduced to this amazing opportunity through CSPI (the College Pre Commissioning Initiative) and is now able to continue school as a fulltime student on a full scholarship while being paid as a Seaman working through her local recruiting office. Being surrounded by service, has always been one of Nya's passions. She will be able to finish her education graduating debt free, continue to serve after graduation and become an officer for the Coast Guard.  Nya shares it has been such an amazing experience thus far, and she is looking forward to seeing where it takes her.  

Rover's Morning Glory
Dieter's Conspiracy Corner, Coast Guard diver pulls body from car above Niagara Falls, & more

Rover's Morning Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 189:09


Pope Francis says sins of the flesh aren't that serious. Dad shares bizarre letter daughter received from boss on first day. Transgender swimmer who used to compete as a man, destroys her rivals in weekend race. Male rapist who identifies as woman rapes disabled inmate. Deion Sanders' recruits IG model to school JSU football team. Coast Guard diver pulls body from car above Niagara Falls. Dieter's Conspiracy Corner - Juice Wrld.

Enlisted Point of View
#17- CMDR Charles Cranston Arrested

Enlisted Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 30:30


A little late on the upload, but here is the episode about Commander Cranston the Security Officer who was arrested on base for alleged sex trafficking.Music: https://www.bensound.comiTunes: https://apple.co/2NgpPtNYouTube: http://bit.ly/2NiVr23Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Elb0DFStitcher: http://bit.ly/2EkxYKSGoogle Play: http://bit.ly/2Iq1AupFacebook: http://bit.ly/2Xf2gpZTwitter: http://bit.ly/2XgPven

Sea Control
Sea Control 300 - A New Planning Model for Lower-Threshold Maritime Operations

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 29:57


Links: 1. A New U.S. Planning Model for Lower-threshold Maritime Security Operations, Part 1, by Andrew Norris, CIMSEC, July 2021.2. A New U.S. Planning Model for Lower-threshold Maritime Security Operations, Part 2, by Andrew Norris, CIMSEC, July 2021.

The Transition
Don't Be Discouraged!

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 22:04


On this episode of the Transition, I take off my armor and share some words of encouragement. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne Check out the 2021 Bunker Labs Holiday Gift Guide here: https://bit.ly/3nYoVoC

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 179: Tummypods

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 93:44


Quizmasters Lee and Marc welcome Kyle Anne (http://kyleanne.net) for a general knowledge quiz on Video Games, Movies, Fast Food, Animals, Slogans, Psychology, Toys, World Cup, Geology and more! Round One VIDEO GAMES - What popular and influential golden age video game was used in a 2018 campaign by Highways England to raise awareness on the dangers of tailgating? 90's MOVIES - What sin does John Doe address first in the movie Seven? FAST FOOD - Which fast food chain became the first drive-thru restaurant service in the state of California when it opened in 1948? ANIMALS - Snails, slugs and whelks belong to which taxonomic class in the order Mollusca whose name translates from Greek into to "stomach foot"? SLOGANS - "When there's no tomorrow" is the slogan for what company? AWARDS RECORDS - With 11 wins, who broke cinematographer Donald A. Morgan's record as the most awarded black artist in Emmy Awards history at the 2021 Emmy Awards? Round Two PHOBIAS - Nelophobia is the fear of the fragility of what? PSYCHOLOGY - Factitious disorder, wherein a person feigns illness for no practical reason, is often called by what common name? KINKS - Klismaphilia is the term to describe a type of BDSM fetish play where one is aroused when what procedure is administered to them? AFRICA - Mount Kilimanjaro is located in what African country? 90's TOYS - What pocket typewriter by Tiger Electronics was marketed towards girls in the 1990's and also featured audio recording and playback? 70's MOVIES - Jon Wojtowicz was a pansexual man who attempted to rob a bank to pay for his wife Liz's sexual affirmation surgery in 1972 and was the inspiration for which 1975 film starring Al Pacino? Rate My Question WORLD CUP - The classic black and white Telstar soccer ball was used in the 1970 World Cup to be more easily seen on black and white television. It was made up of 32 interlocking panels of which 2 geometric shapes? Also, which shape is white and which shape is black? Final Questions PUBLICITY STUNTS - Due to a poorly thought out publicity stunt, what was released into the atmosphere in Cleveland in September of 1986, affecting traffic, the local airport and a local Coast Guard search for two fisherman lost in Lake Eerie (among other things)? MEDICAL DEVICES - What is the name for a slender medical device that is used to look inside a body cavity or organ using an attached light? GEOLOGY - What mineral is listed as a 1 on the Mohs hardness scale, the softest mineral in the world? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges December 8th, 2021 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EDT December 9th, 2021 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Ollies Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EDT You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Brandon, Issa, Adam V., Tommy (The Electric Mud) and Tim (Pat's Garden Service) Thank you, Team Captains – Captain Nick, Grant, Mo, Jenny, Rick G., Skyler, Dylan, Shaun, Lydia, Gil, David, Aaron, Kristen & Fletcher Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Justin, Robb, Rachael, Rikki, Jon Lewis, Moo, Tim, Nabeel, Patrick, Jon, Adam B., Ryan, Mollie, Lisa, Alex, Spencer, Kaitlynn, Manu, Matthew, Luc, Hank, Justin, Cooper, Elyse, Sarah, Karly, Kristopher, Josh, Lucas Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Edsicalz, Sarah, FoxenV, Laurel, A-A-Ron, Loren, Hbomb, Alex, Doug, Kevin and Sara, Tiffany, Allison, Paige, We Do Stuff, Kenya, Jeff, Eric, Steven, Efren, Mike J., Mike C., Mike. K If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support." Special Guest: Kyle Anne.

I'll See You In HELL!! A Podcast about movies that kick ass and take names!!!
Navy Seals (1990) - “If I were going to be careful, I'd have joined the Coast Guard.” (Episode 48)

I'll See You In HELL!! A Podcast about movies that kick ass and take names!!!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 50:52


Some incredible high quality action movies came out in 1990, this was NOT one of them. Despite its flaws, it is delightful enough to discuss for about an hour. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seeyouinhell/message

Historical Fiction: Unpacked
Learning About Ourselves Through History–with Candice Sue Patterson

Historical Fiction: Unpacked

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 28:48


Candice Sue Patterson studied at the Institute of Children's Literature and is an active member of American Christian Fiction Writers. She lives in Indiana with her husband and three sons in a restored farmhouse overtaken by books. When she's not tending to her chickens, watching her kids play sports, or helping children discover a love for reading as an elementary librarian, she's working on a new story. Candice has written several contemporary romances, but today we discuss her first full-length historical novel, Saving Mrs. Roosevelt, which released yesterday (December 1, 2021). We talk about the SPARS, the first female-only branch of the Coast Guard, around which this book is centered. Purchase Saving Mrs. Roosevelt on Amazon (affiliate). Purchase Saving Mrs. Roosevelt on Bookshop (affiliate).   Also mentioned: Candice's historical novella, "Beneath a Michigan Moon," can be found in the Great Lakes Lighthouse Brides Collection (affiliate). The book Candice mentioned using for research is The Deans Bible: Five Purdue Women and Their Quest for Equality by Angie Klink (affiliate). The devotional Candice mentioned by Corrie Ten Boom is titled God is my Hiding Place: 40 Devotionals for Refuge and Strength (affiliate). Check out Candice's website, Facebook, and Instagram. Join my community and help support the show on Patreon! Join the Historical Fiction: Unpacked Podcast Group on Facebook! Be sure to visit my Instagram, Facebook, and website. Follow the show on Instagram! Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you click them and make a purchase, you help support my work without paying any more for the product. Thank you for your support!

The Transition
Traction. Startups Need It. Learn How to Get It with Bruce Cleveland, Renowned Venture Capitalist and Author of “Traversing The Traction Gap”

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:42


I'm joined by Bruce Cleveland, Founding Partner of Wildcat Venture Partners, and author of the highly acclaimed book, “Traversing The Tracation Gap,'' where shares the framework developed by the Wildcat team, that helps entrepreneurs navigate the critical go-to-market period between initial product release (IPR) and reaching minimal viable traction (MVT). On the show, you get insight into the mind of a venture capitalist, the considerations you need to know if you plan on venture raising capital, and the road ahead for the high growth start up. Be sure to subscribe to the Transition Newsletter on Substack here: https://bit.ly/37Bb8Ne Purchase Bruce's book here: https://amzn.to/3oc7eTM Check out the 2021 Bunker Labs Holiday Gift Guide here: https://bit.ly/3nYoVoC

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Europe's COVID-19 surge raises new alarms

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:16


In our news wrap Thursday, Germany became the fifth European nation to pass 100,000 deaths as the Czech Republic declared a 30-day emergency and France announced stricter mandates. Also, millions of Americans celebrated Thanksgiving Day with a return to traditions, President Biden met with U.S. Coast Guard members, and Native American activists held an annual day of mourning in Plymouth, Mass. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

CBS Evening News
CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell, 11/23

CBS Evening News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 19:26


On tonight's CBS Evening News podcast -- a CBS News exclusive -- inside America's counter-drug operation. The Coast Guard seizing 26,000 pounds of cocaine. Plus, the new deadly opioid stronger than fentanyl. Also -- Thanksgiving travel at pre-pandemic levels -- behind the scenes as a major U.S. airline braces for a crunch of holiday travelers.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Plane Tales
The Five Hundredth

Plane Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 18:45


In the United States the Coast Guard is a fully paid up branch of the military. Its men and women have served with valour in many conflicts and I'm going to tell you about one such event, the rescue of Misty 11.   The badge of the US Coast Guard   An F100 Fast FAC Misty crew   An OV10 Bronco   Spads escorting a Jolly Green Giant   The jungle penetrator.   Landing in difficult terrain   500 saves   The approach into the valley   The rescue   Technical Sergeant Donald G. Smith   Images under Creative Commons licence with thanks to the USAF National Museum, the USAF, USAF National Museum, USGOV-PD, Digital Public Library of America, Defence Imagery, the US Coast Guard and US Gov.

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

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WTF with Marc Maron Podcast
Episode 1275 - Ricky Velez

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 82:20


Being from Queens is as much a part of Ricky Velez's personality as his humor, his dyslexia and his depression. Ricky tells Marc how he put it all together when he started doing standup in New York City as a teenager, which eventually led to collaborating with Judd Apatow, who produced Ricky's new HBO special. They also talk about Ricky's friendship with Pete Davidson, his failed attempt to join the Coast Guard, and how a TV segment with Bill Nye led to an internet nightmare.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.