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Best podcasts about chris lee

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Latest podcast episodes about chris lee

Locked On Vols
Preview Friday: Chris Lee of Rivals Vandy checks in to Preview the Vols & Commodores

Locked On Vols

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 39:01


The Locked On Vols podcast is your daily show covering Tennessee Volunteers football and basketball with Eric Cain. Friday's show gets you set for game day as we preview Tennessee & Vanderbilt. Chris Lee of Vandysports,com joins in for segment two and Mike Wilson of KnoxNews checks in for a segment three conversation on Tennessee hoops. All that and more on a Friday Locked on Vols. Be sure to participate in #TwitterTuesday by tweeting @LockedonVols or @_Cainer all your questions. Tuesday's show will answer them! DMs are open. Follow the show on those Twitter accounts and also on host Eric Cain's Facebook page: CainerOnAir. And every Friday is 5 Star Friday here on Locked on Vols! Head over to Apple Podcasts and leave a positive review + a 5 star rating and we'll shout you out each and every Friday! Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ A special shoutout to James Manning (@GooseManning5) for his assistance in graphic design. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

VandySports's podcast
Are football and hoops getting better?

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 92:32


It's been a tough stretch for Vanderbilt football and hoops in the last three years, but are there at least faint signs of life? Chris Lee and Seabass discuss what they're seeing, and also give a few stats that maybe point to improvement also. The two also attack a bunch of questions in the mailbag with topics including the offensive line and quarterback play, football recruiting, the madness of the coaching carousel (and coaching salaries) and Scotty Pippen Jr.'s pro stock.

These Football Times
Origin Stories: the pioneers who took football to the world

These Football Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 76:54


The podcast team chat to Chris Lee about his book Origin Stories, in which he charts the growth of the game in each major football country. We discuss the great stories in this fascinating book, exploring tales both familiar and less known from across the globe. 

Wrench Nation - Car Talk Radio Show
#246 Celebrating Life & The Passion for Automotive , Art & Music : Special Guest | FUEL FEST | Cody Walker & Chris Lee

Wrench Nation - Car Talk Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 51:04


Carrying on the incredible legacy of Paul Walker and the REACH OUT WORLDWIDE Foundation, Chris Lee , Cody Walker and the FUEL FEST family truly bring car enthusiasts together for a massive celebration of music, arts and all things cars and trucks !  Join us on this special edition of Wrench Nation as Cody & Chris stop by the show & discuss Paul Walker's life & charitable through the incredible festival going on across the country -Fuel Fest  Grab your Fuel Festival tickets : https://bit.ly/3oxTqSC

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal
Postponing a blockbuster comes at a hefty cost

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:36


As COVID-19 shuttered movie theaters across the country, production companies had few options: release films directly to streaming platforms or hold off on movie releases until the pandemic dust settles. But pressing the pause button can mean multibillion-dollar losses. In today’s episode, we hear from Vulture reporter Chris Lee about how even blockbuster films that are delayed may struggle to break even. Also: The Weekly Wrap; pharmacy chains eye the primary health care market; and even small retailers are getting a head start on holiday shopping.

Marketplace All-in-One
Postponing a blockbuster comes at a hefty cost

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:36


As COVID-19 shuttered movie theaters across the country, production companies had few options: release films directly to streaming platforms or hold off on movie releases until the pandemic dust settles. But pressing the pause button can mean multibillion-dollar losses. In today’s episode, we hear from Vulture reporter Chris Lee about how even blockbuster films that are delayed may struggle to break even. Also: The Weekly Wrap; pharmacy chains eye the primary health care market; and even small retailers are getting a head start on holiday shopping.

Oxford Exxon Podcast
Rippee Writes: Basketball loses to Marquette, Chris Lee + Friday Picks

Oxford Exxon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 121:53


We hit some basketball notes off the top, then Chris Lee of VandySports.com joins us and LBs Greg brings it home with Friday picks.

Talkin' SEC Podcast
CFP Rankings Prediction, SEC Week 11 w/ Chris Lee of Southeastern 14, & NFL Week 10 Takeaways

Talkin' SEC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 49:37


On today's Phillip Jordan Podcast: Segment #1: Predicting the third College Football Playoff rankings Segment #2: SEC week 11 with Chris Lee of The Southeastern 14 and Vandysports.com Segment #3: NFL week 10 takeaways Follow Phillip @PJordanSEC Follow Chris @chrislee70

VandySports's podcast
We react to Vanderbilt's massive facilities announcement

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 50:32


Vanderbilt announced a major facilities upgrade on Friday and Chris Lee and Seabass share their same-day reactions. What do they think of what was done? When does Chris think things will be completed? What's in it of note? We cover a lot of ground in Friday's episode, and also touch on how Jerry Stackhouse's last two recruiting classes have potential to change the program's trajectory.

One Love Art Sessions Podcast

We are joined by Greg aka @grimlytoys for a real fun and introspective conversation about art and purpose. The music in this podcast is produced by Pound aka Chris Lee. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/oneloveartsessions/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/oneloveartsessions/support

The Solarpreneur
Running a $116M Solar Company (then starting again from scratch!) - Jerry Fussell

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 85:10


DOWNLOAD SOLCIETY APP NOW! Speaker 1 (00:00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:00:41):What's going on Solarpreneurs? We have another fantastic episode and we alive here in Las Vegas, Nevada here in, uh, a man of the hour, his mansion here, just hanging out. So we've got Mr. Jerry Fussell on the show, Jerry. Thanks for coming on with us today.Speaker 3 (00:00:57):Yeah. Thanks for driving up too. I appreciate it. It's how far from San Diego? It's like five hours. Five hours. Yeah. So thanks man, for coming up and hanging out. Glad to have you here at the house. And, uh, thanks for jumping on a podcast with me, man.Speaker 2 (00:01:09):Yeah. I love it. And know Jerry has been treating me to pop tarts and a sandwich. Isn't all, all the pizza I can handle here. So, Hey man,Speaker 3 (00:01:18):It's definitely a house that we house door knockers a lot because pizza and Pop-Tarts and sandwiches that'sSpeaker 2 (00:01:26):Okay. I had more, more food than the first door knocking the house I was in. That's true. All we had was eggs. Pretty much.Speaker 3 (00:01:32):We have a lot of those too. Okay.Speaker 2 (00:01:33):So they got it all, but I know it's been an awesome time here, so yeah, we'd been able to shoot some content and just kind of hang out here with Jerry and his guys. And, um, and the other big announcement we have before we kinda jump into things here is, um, Jerry, he, with his company Pi Syndicate, they are the first ever sponsors of the Solarpreneur podcasts. So, uh we're yeah, I'm happy about it. And we're going to let Jerry talk a little bit about that and then also is partnering on it, but, um, just like the summary of it, they are a, well, I guess you can say, well, it's just a summarized version. Do you want to tell our listeners what pipes in the syndicate is real quick?Speaker 3 (00:02:12):Yeah. Yeah. So Pi Syndicate is more of a supportive kind of mastermind. Um, we didn't start a truly make money. I already have some successful solar companies. My, one of my partners, Mikey, Lucas and Austin already have successful businesses. The reason why we started it is because we realized that about 85% of the guys in the industry that are top earners. So the guy's making, you know, over $150,000 a year, ended up leaving the industry and they have no money. They don't own any real estate. They don't have any money in savings. And about half of them owe money to the IRS. So when we talk about why we work, you know, it's a fun job going door to door, selling stuff. There's a ton of reasons why we all work, but when it comes down to it, if it didn't actually pay us any money, we would all stop.Speaker 3 (00:02:57):And that's eventually what happens is guys get burnt out because the money is not, not good enough to overcome the fact that they owe money on taxes or that they haven't really accumulated any wealth. And it's just, you know, just like you and I, we both probably hopped around to different houses. You know, door-knocking across the country, it's not indicative of saving money. It means that we go buy a BMW when we get enough money or we, we go out to fancy dinners or whatever, we're going to spend the money on. Or we buy our wife a $20,000 wedding ring when we propose because we're making money and guys, uh, leave the industry. Eventually majority of people end up not door knocking forever. Some of us love it. Some of us love it for five years and it's time to move on. And the sad thing for us is when they do move on, they put a lot of sweat and work into the job and they leave the industry with nothing to show for it.Speaker 3 (00:03:47):And these are guys making the top one, 2% of income earners in the entire country, and they're not having any money in savings and investments. And so that's, our mission is to change that we want to, within five years of working in the solar industry, have a plan for retirement in place where a guy can walk away from the door to door, industry, Copia, dentist, whatever he wants to do, and still have a substantial financial portfolio with investing and savings and emergency funds and all the things you need. Also a credit score, enough income to buy your first house. You know, all the things that companies don't really educate their, uh, door knockers on and their sales guys on is really the gap that we fill within the industry. We're kind of selective, but at the end of the day, we want to hang out with cool people that are knocking doors.Speaker 3 (00:04:32):It's just the coolest, single job to meet people that live differently, right. That wake up every day, excited to go to work. Cause if you don't, you quit within three months, probably. So if you're there a couple of years and you're a top earner, you're a guy want to hang out with and be around. And so that's what the mastermind is about is hanging out and being together. The reason I'm so excited to sponsor the podcast is because we feel like you're adding value. Whether it be a new guy that's 30 days in the industry, or maybe just thinking about going into solar, I've heard guys tell me that they've listened to your podcast to make a decision, even to accept a job in the solar industry, which is really cool. But then I would say your normal audience is one of two things, either kind of new to solar.Speaker 3 (00:05:16):And they're looking to see what podcasts are out there. And then the other one, which is strange is like the really seasoned guys like me that just want to hear good conversations with guys that are still in the field door knocking. Part of the reason why I respect you so much is because not only do you do a podcast, but you're still out door knocking virtually every day. So the content is fresh. It's, it's exactly what's going on to help you make money. And when you have guests on the conversations you have with them, um, definitely flow very well because you're doing the same job as them. So it's real life questions. It's real life answers about how to make more money, how to be more consistent in solar. And that's what we really preach is consistency and hard work. And that's the same thing.Speaker 3 (00:05:56):The podcast help brings people that listen to it. So we are super pumped to be a sponsor. And we look forward to being a sponsor for years to come and all the success in the world. We know you're going to hit 500 listeners, um, uh, 500,500,000 listeners. Uh, pretty soon as our goal has a sponsor. So we're going to be boosting some of the marketing and stuff to help you get there because literally everyone in solar right now, everyone in door to door needs to be listening to a mentor, tell them how to do their job better. And we feel like you're a great guy to do that for us.Speaker 2 (00:06:26):I love that. Appreciate that, Jerry. Absolutely man. And yeah, no, it goes without saying too, it's like you were saying so many guys just get out of this and reminds me of the NFL or something. We've all heard like guys in the NFL. I think I heard a stat that like, I don't know some crazy number of them are broke within a couple of years after they can't get out of the NFL. And I feel like door to door is very similar in that guy is making insane amounts of money knocking doors, but let's be honest. We're probably not all going to be doing this stower, you know, retirement age. No. So that's, what's so cool about what you're doing with Pi Syndicate is you're teaching guys how to really hang on to that money and turn that money into future investments in keep a hold of it. Because a lot of people that aren't, you know, super smart with itSpeaker 3 (00:07:08):And, you know, to be clear, um, I wasn't super smart with it either. I started out door to door when I was 19 selling, um, cable, internet door to door and it only paid $30 a sale or something like that. But you could go out and sell 10 of them a day. It's still really good money. And then I became a regional manager and started to make even better money. And, you know, a few hundred thousand dollars was flowing in and I was making all this money. And um, then 26 years old came around. I had my first child and, uh, talking with my wife, I decided to go out and get a real job. I had been in door-to-door for about six years was killing it, making hundreds of thousands dollars a year. I had literally had about a million dollar net worth. And I thought I was doing awesome.Speaker 3 (00:07:51):Right? And then I decided, well, I really want to do something. So I got a job at a children's home. I was working on a college degree and within a year I was completely broke. Um, just completely devastatingly broke, you know, eating ramen noodles again, I'm like, dude, I have a professional college level job. And now me and my wife, uh, are back to eating beans and rice. And we're like, is this what real life is supposed to be? But this is what everyone tells you to go. Do you know what I mean? But what happened is I was living a lifestyle based on being a door to door guy and not everyone stays at door to door guy forever. And so that transition for me was extremely difficult when I realized that I, I thought I want to do something out of it. I thought I wanted a real job, um, that everyone talks about.Speaker 3 (00:08:35):And I'm so glad that I found my way back. And so the first time I engaged with a publisher to write a book, I thought, for sure, my book's title was going to be millionaire by 25 and broke by 26. Um, to really explain why to manage your money better, how to take care of your money. Cause it was a hard life lesson, but it's almost identical to the majority of guys in the door to door industry. And we're not talking about the guy that makes it 30 days and quits. We're talking about guys that are making hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, selling solar pest control roofing. Um, they're not going to last forever. They always think that they want to go do something else. And at, at that point, I don't know of a single another occupation without like being a brain surgeon that you can go and make 300 K a year.Speaker 3 (00:09:20):Like it's just not going to happen. Maybe over 30 years of building it up, even being on wall street, building up, being with a trading company or something like that, you can get there, you know, over years of dedication and working hard with your clients, maybe insurance, you know, there's some things that you can build up this business and make hundreds of thousands dollars, but there's nothing I can think of that you can leave door to door, knowing nothing about anything besides sales and make 300 K year. So there's always going to be this turmoil in your life where you decide to get out of sales. And for me it was, you know, I didn't want to work after five o'clock. I wanted to go home at five, o'clock have dinner with my family. I thought that was the American dream, you know, to have, uh, a normal job.Speaker 3 (00:10:00):I'd get off, go home, eat dinner, have a dog, walk the dog. And uh, I learned very quickly over about a year eating beans that, uh, the American dream wasn't so fun. And I decided to go back to work. But I, at the same time realized there's guys that are not going to decide to go back to work. There's going to be guys that are super happy to make 50 to a hundred thousand dollars a year, but their lifestyle is going to have to change. And just like the NFL players, it was hard for me to adapt my lifestyle to the lower income. So when my wife wanted to go out for anniversary, we still spent $250 on dinner. You know, we still bought, you know, $200 shoes instead of $50 shoes. Like all the things that we had trained ourselves to budget for were all incorrect.Speaker 3 (00:10:43):And we had never had to live on a budget being 21 years old and making 200 grand a year. You don't really have to budget. You just spend your money on whatever you want. And then you're like, oh man, I ran out of money. I need to go knock more doors. And you just can't keep the money coming in. Um, it's not a very smart way longterm to live. So my goal is to get with people that are 18, 19 25, really, you could be 35 and this is the first time you're in door to door. And you're like, this is a lot of money. Those are the guys that we want to help. And they're the same audience that you're trying to help too. So I think there's a lot of alignment there just helping guys get to that next level. So we're excited to help them for that.Speaker 2 (00:11:19):I love that. And yeah, we've had a couple of finance guys and things like that. Come on. But yeah, this is kind of the first, um, you're the first people I've seen really put together kind of mastermind style and help people at this level, which is awesome. So that's why,Speaker 3 (00:11:34):You know, yeah. And the whole thing, the whole thing about Pi Syndicate is it's sharing a lot of the resources for my company, but, you know, we made last year was 151 million. And so the revenue is very large, but then that means I spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year on legal, on CPAs and advisors. You know, I spent $400,000 last year on mastermind groups. Um, you guys don't have the resource to do that. You're doing really good Taylor, you're killing it. You're in the top of the industry. You're still not going to go out and drop a hundred thousand dollar retainer on an attorney cause you don't need it. Right. It just doesn't make any sense. Your wife would be like, are we getting a divorce? Why do you need the a hundred thousand dollars retainer? Um, so it's just something that you don't think you need until you need it.Speaker 3 (00:12:15):Right? And so it's much better to have my legal team on standby to have our CPAs answer really hard questions to have my tax strategies that you normally only invest in. If you make, you know, $10 million in profit a year or more, uh, be available to you guys. And we do it in a mastermind setting so that we can share the knowledge, um, pretty openly, but with only guys that we want to hang out with, right? There's some guys in masterminds, I'm sure you've been to events and things. You're like, I'd rather not go hang out with a guy afterwards. So we definitely want to make it a group of guys where we stay together for a really long time. And then we want to see your businesses grow, you know? And, um, I would love to see your podcast. I was saying 500,000 listeners earlier.Speaker 3 (00:12:56):I'm not joking about that. I'd love to see your podcast expand to grow. You know, when people talk about the solar guys are listening on podcasts, that should be at my let you know, Jordan Bell Ford and Taylor Armstrong like that. I mean, that's really, when it comes to selling, how many viewers do you need to have listening? And because it's a lot of valuable things, I literally think anyone not listening to your podcast is probably selling the wrong thing. Like they're, they're probably selling cars. They're probably selling watches at a jewelry store, probably selling cell phones. And they're all listening to the wrong podcasts. They think that ed, my let's going to make him rich or grant Cardone and they're not, solar's going to make him rich and they need to be listening to the right box.Speaker 2 (00:13:33):Okay. There's no doubt about that. I mean, I always say we're the Navy seals of the sells industry. No one's selling like we are so we can learn how to sell solar. Then it's like, I mean, that's why we got so much money in this and yeah, yeah. I can translate to anything else to,Speaker 3 (00:13:46):For sure. Yeah. And we definitely have to get good. We got to hone our skills because, um, it's not about how much money even make per job. It's about how much money you make at the end of the year. And we know that this is the gold rush right now. Um, but the guys that made the most money during the gold rush, you know, you've heard the saying that they sold the shovels and they were the support guys. They built the businesses around it. And so yes, we need to be Navy seals. But the reason to hone our skills that much is because it's not going to pay this much forever five years down the road, let's say the average commission is, you know, a thousand dollars a job then instead of 2,500 or more now, um, that's going to be devastating for someone that hasn't hone their skills.Speaker 3 (00:14:26):If they're used to a 5%, 10% close rate and they think they're killing it because they live in California and they're making serious money per sale, uh, that's not going to be around forever. And so the reason why you have to hone your skills is yes, it's nice to make a million dollars a year. This year, selling solar by having a 40% close rate would be awesome. Right? But the real reason is because, um, in five years you're going to have to close at a 40% rate to make the same amount of money you're making today. So if you, this is the training time, view it as a quick start bonus viewed. As you know, the companies are encouraging you to get out there and sell. It's not going to be like this forever. The whole, the law of supply and demand means that the more people that want to sell solar, the less money the companies will pay to sell for us to sell solar.Speaker 3 (00:15:08):Now they're always going to have all commission jobs. So you're always going to be able to make serious money selling solar, you know, look at the other industries, the pest control, the roofing a thousand dollars per sale is still super competitive. And I really believe that's probably where we're going over the next five years. And so we've got to hone those skills because a lot of us that are selling four jobs a month, five jobs a month, a thousand dollars a sell is not going to cut it. We need to be selling, you know, sitting in three appointments a day and selling, you know, one of those a day. Then we start still making good money. Even with the money being turned down, we're still turning out 200,000 a year or more. Um, even when the industry changes, we also need to prep our skills because there's a few times where your skills mean more than just, um, what you can do with them.Speaker 3 (00:15:53):Navy seals end up retiring from the Navy seals. They go into contracting work and there's companies that will pay them millions of dollars to train other people how to do those skills. So when we talk about honing our skills, it's not just about what you can do with the skills, it's about how you can leverage that to help others. And when we, when we talk about even the big guys in sales grant, Cardone never made as much money as he's making until he made a decision to help other people make money. And, uh, same thing with a lot of the other trainers, right? They could go out. There's only so many hours during the day. So, um, they're only gonna make so much money guys like ed, my left that are worth hundreds of millions of dollars, did it by having thousands of people underneath of him selling stuff.Speaker 3 (00:16:35):And that's really what we have to think is I have to get my skills to a level where I can leverage that to help others and in helping others solve the problem, they're going to give me a small amount of a percentage of the problem I solved. So if you help them make a thousand dollars, maybe they're willing to give you a hundred bucks, but while you can only run five appointments a day, guys that are on your teams, running stuff for you could be running hundreds of appointments a day. So it's just the economies to scale are where it's going to be at. So I encourage the guys, listen to this podcast and, um, and really being interested in solar to hone your skills, stop thinking about even your close rate today. Think about what it'll allow you to build in a year and two years and three years, because the economy is not always going to stay the same. So your skills have to up-level. Yeah,Speaker 2 (00:17:20):No, I agree. A hundred percent. And that's why I talk about on the podcast too. I, I encourage all the people listening. I'd go out and teach your teams to sell, develop that skill, to like present to others, to teach other people, you know, they've got all sorts of things. Like you can go to the Toastmasters, the speaking trainings, things like that. I think that's a huge skill to learn because yeah, we're not always going to be, like you said, making as much as we are in solar necessarily right now. So it's important for people that develop those other skills, which are money-making skills, presenting others, training other people, and then you have a whole different set of skill set you can do when maybe solar isn't as good. So, um, yeah, that's huge, Jerry. And, um, we're going to have your partner Austin in, he's going to also talk about pipes and they get to, so we'll leave, um, some, some stuff for him to talk about that too. Um, but yeah, with you, I wanted to hear, I know you talked about a little bit about your background, how you started in selling, but I wanted to hear, how did you transition, uh, specifically into solar sales? And can you talk about how you started your first company with that? And this is obviously super.Speaker 3 (00:18:22):Yeah, so it was a, it was a rough, um, transition. I had, um, gone home and I was selling ADT as a director level. So nice house, no debt. Um, I had everything we needed was making 200,000 a year, thought it was at the top of my game. Um, and then a solar company kept stealing my top reps. So I managed a three or four state region. Um, and they kept stealing reps and it was always my best ones, always the guys that were making 30 deals a month now, all of a sudden our solar reps. So I decided to go to this company because I'm pretty mad. So I'm just going to walk in, I'm a straight forward guy and say, Hey, stop selling my people. I train these people, you know, it's unfair. And the guy said, let me vent for a little while.Speaker 3 (00:19:06):Then he goes, well, don't you ask yourself why they are selling solar? Don't you want to know how much money you could make selling solar. And so I listened to the pitch and I was like, dang, it it's a good pitch. That's way more money than security. Right. And so I was like, okay, I need to take this seriously. So I go home and I talked to my wife and say, Hey, I think we have to make this transition. I had already noticed some of the writing on the wall. ADT had actually not brought on more customers than it canceled since the time that I've been there over the few years that I've been there. And so that was worrying, you know, if we couldn't outsell the cancels, that's a bad thing. And so how ADT dealt with it as they would acquire other companies and kind of fluff their numbers because they're publicly traded.Speaker 3 (00:19:47):So it never looked like they lost subscribers. Um, but it wasn't because of sales. We could not outsell the cancels. Yeah. And so that doesn't sound sustainable to me. So I had already had some fear that no matter how good we sold, it was just a matter of time, five years, 10 years, 20 years down the road that nobody's going to want to buy security door to door for $60 a month payment. Right. So I was just a little bit worried. So I went home and I talked to my wife and we decided to go ahead and me take an offer, you know, and, and go into that. I accepted the offer within the first 30 days. Um, I thought it was going to make all kinds of money and I made one sale. And some, my wife's like, you gotta tell me what's going on here.Speaker 3 (00:20:32):This is crazy. I would also driving three and a half hours to get to the field. So I was at the time because we were trying to save money. I was like, I'm going to do this as cheap as physically possible. I'm going to drive back and forth, you know, as much as I can. And if I have to, I'll just sleep in the car, get up, knock turf in the morning and, and go at it. I had a, a nice SUV. So I lay a whole air mattress. One of those that you see on Amazon where you pump them up, you know, they cover the seats. I was like, this is going to be cool. Yeah. Just hit the doors. It's parked right there. So I was grinding, right. I was not going like 12 hours a day. And uh, my only break for air conditioning was like, maybe go watch a movie or something like that.Speaker 3 (00:21:10):Well, I was like, if you watch a movie, why can't you just go get a hotel? I'm like, well, maybe it's 12 bucks. Like I don't want to stay in a $12 hotel. That's disgusting. And, uh, but it was a grind right. For a whole month and I made one deal and I thought, this is, this has gotta be over. I think our average commission back then was $1,500. So I traded somewhere around $20,000 a month. In that first month I went down to about 1500. And of course you don't get it until they install it. So they gave me like a little bit and they were like, oh, and you'll get the rest just whenever we don't know. And I'm like, oh, I'm in trouble. ADT was like, next day, you know, somebody would be out there installing it. So I misunderstood that coming into solar.Speaker 3 (00:21:48):Where was, where were you selling that? Kansas city. Okay. Yeah, not a great market. It was only about six years ago. Okay. So, and, um, they had a huge rebate in Kansas city and the rebate had gone away the month I started. So we went from having, I think the state level was up to a $2, a watt rebate then had gone down to a dollar watt and then it kind of went away. Well, $2 watt rebate is huge. So our average sell price was like $3 a watt. And, um, between the rebate and the ITC at the time was 30%. We literally were giving away solar for free. So when I accepted the job, I thought I was going to go door to door and just give it away for free. And then like the week I started, they're like, Hey, the rebate's gone away.Speaker 3 (00:22:28):You really guys, it's not free anymore. You need like 25 to $30,000 on every deal. And I'm like, what? I thought we gave stuff away for free. Well, what's going on with this. And so it kind of changed the game really quickly on me. Uh, I adjusted though. So then, um, once I figured out how to sell, I realized that it was a lot about understanding the benefits, understanding the tax taxes, really understanding how much money they would save because I was so new. It allowed me to adjust faster than the guys that have been doing it two years with this huge rebate and everything. And so the next, uh, three months I had made about a hundred sales, I think 102 sales in the next three months. So it really kicked in and I did really, really well. What's strange is you have these self limiting beliefs though.Speaker 3 (00:23:15):I always believed in ADT that I had to sell 30 deals a month and I really peaked out around the same thing. So it's almost like this mindset that I was a 30 deal a month, a rep I carried over into solar as well. And it's just recently that I realized that mindset's completely wrong listening to some of your podcasts with guys. I think you said recently you had someone on that sold 68 deals in a month. So more than double, more than double what I was selling. So I looked back saying, man, I wonder if I totally just carried over a self-belief from selling security that had nothing to do with solar, but I consistently would put up 30 deals a month. The cool thing about solar is there's commercial too. So my last month I killed it. Um, commission wise, I probably would've made somewhere around 280 5k in 30 days.Speaker 3 (00:24:00):So it was incredible. I went home, talked to my wife, we're super excited. We're like, man, this is it. We're making, we love this company. The company's like, Hey, by the way, we can actually afford to pay you that much. And we're nine months behind on install. And I'm like, oh wow, that's crazy. Some of you listening have probably heard words similar to that before, um, from a solar company. So I decided really quickly to go out on my own. Cause I was like, how much worse can it be if they can't pay me? And it takes nine months to install, I'm sure I can do better than that. So, um, the trouble was, I had to walk away from all of that commission and then, um, didn't have a lot of money in the bank. And so cause you know how far behind commissions are.Speaker 3 (00:24:41):So really I walked away from even more than that. And um, but I had no debt on my house and everything. So we had to sell our house. We had to cash out, 401k, invest, everything we had into starting a solar company. And when you tell your wife that it's time to sell the dream house, to go door to door again and sell more solar, it was a hard conversation. I'm so thankful that she supported me through that though and made that leap. Um, it took about three more years of making really minimal amount of money. I think I pulled maybe $30,000 a year out of my company. Okay. The first six months I, uh, you couldn't hire an EPC like you can now they just really didn't exist. Right? And so I had to hire a, uh, NAVSUP trainer to come in and train me to install.Speaker 3 (00:25:25):So the next six months I installed all my own jobs, uh, realized really, really quickly that I was bad at paperwork. So I had to hire administrative shin assistance and people do net metering. And then I realized I didn't like talking on the phone. So I had to hire, uh, an admin person to answer the phone. Then I had to hire, um, um, a phone sales person to answer all the incoming calls. And I'm like, man, this is crazy. Now I have like 14 people that work for me. I gotta, I gotta start making a lot more sales. So, uh, it was kind of the, you know, they say the, the mother of invention is necessity and that was it. I had to learn how to sell a lot more just to support the company, but selling 30 jobs a month, you know, a lot of solar companies don't even do that much.Speaker 3 (00:26:06):So me myself could go out and support my whole company, but then I just kept growing it. You know, when I brought on other sales guys and, but I stay very conservative. So a lot of owners, you know, brag about their, their fancy watches or the drive fancy cars right away. I always knew this was a long-term play for me. And if I was going to expand faster than my competitors, I had to do it, um, through really being wise with my resources. And so I reinvested almost all the money for three years. We lived on about $30,000 a year. Now I had retired from the military. So I lived in California, man. No, no. I lived in Missouri. Yeah. And started the company headquarters. I also had my military retirement. So the medical and I had some pinching coming. So I had more money that, but out of the company, I only pulled the very minimum that my CPA told me.Speaker 3 (00:26:52):I had to pay myself to be legitimate where I wouldn't have probably pay myself anything. And that allowed me to reinvest in marketing and tools and a better management. And you know, it's kind of crazy there for a while that everyone at my company was making more money than me. But at the same time, I knew that long-term, I was gonna make a lot more money than everyone else. So, you know, that's the old saying that you've all heard, but do things that others aren't willing to do. So that later on you can do a lot. And so that's what was able to happen in my life is that there's three years of really investment allowed us to build out a fully integrated solar company. And we were able to get into things that other companies weren't, you know, we go as far as doing the customer's taxes for up to five years after they buy solar, we do internal financing.Speaker 3 (00:27:35):Um, 2020, we did $50 million in internal solar, solar loans, ourselves without paying finance fees. So you just can't do that without a significant amount of resources, but you only have a significant amount of resources when you don't spend resources. And so it was, um, one of those things that we just chose to stay in Missouri, live frugally, know all of our installers. We have a very different, uh, formula to install. They all live out of Missouri and making 2020 $5 an hour in Missouri is incredible. You know, that they can live really well by their home buy nice cars. They live really well. And so they're willing to travel out of Missouri, take the solar panels and go to Minnesota or go to Florida or go to Texas or go to they'll drive all the way here to Vegas to, to install solar panels. Now we try to rack up several jobs in the same week and our teams are really well-trained.Speaker 3 (00:28:25):So a team of three guys can install a job in one day and so they can stack up, um, you know, two teams can travel out here to Vegas knockout, you know, quite a few jobs in 10 jobs in a week and then travel back, you know? And so it's just a different way to look at business. So we try to solve problems, not necessarily spending more money on it, but how do we actually solve the problem? You know, and the most people would say, well, let's just hire a big EPC in Vegas or California or Florida, because that's easier. Cause that also costs a lot of money. And so we make a lot more money in a lot more profit margin because of that. We're also what I would call a white glove service with doing the customer's taxes. So make sure your benefits to the client.Speaker 3 (00:29:07):We are probably one of the more expensive solar companies in the country, um, which is a hard thing, right? Like it's, it's means that some sales reps don't want to work for us because they want to sell for a more competitively priced company. What we do is a process called value stacking, where we believe that once your value stack exceeds the price, that it doesn't matter what the price is, the client will buy it. So we just try to deliver such a tremendous amount of value that we're still able to sell at a higher price. And then we have a very good margin and then we reinvest that margin. And so last year we were able to break $101 million in revenue. I'm extremely profitable. And uh, we owe no money. We have no debt. We have three years of operating capital on hand at all times now.Speaker 3 (00:29:51):So we're the only, debt-free um, three years worth of capital company. I know of specifically in solar, it's nearly unheard of, um, through COVID we had, um, 24 dealerships that were sub-dealers basically under our brand and we were able to support all of them and their reps through COVID. We're able to support all of our staff, even though we shut down operations for install, all the installers cup paid, all the office workers got paid. Wow. And so it's something we're pretty proud of, but it's also means that while other companies buy Ferrari's, I'm still going to be here in 10 years so they can enjoy their Ferrari's and I'll enjoy my, my safety net, uh, money in the bank. It also allows me to have money to help other companies. So I'm an investor in over 50 companies at this point and, um, own equity in those.Speaker 3 (00:30:36):And so, um, those create passive income streams for me, which help, but it's also just a way that I can help other companies because they need the money. And they, unfortunately, most of them weren't good at saving money. They were the guys buying the Bentleys or Ferrari's. And so they come to me and, uh, ended up needing to, to borrow some funds. And I'm happy to do it as long as it's going to help the company and help them longterm. And obviously it helps me if I can own a chunk of their company as well. For sure.Speaker 2 (00:31:01):And now that's one thing I've noticed about you. Jerry is you're very giving gay. I mean, I'm not part of your company or anything, but I come in here, Jerry treats me like family and he's like, dude, all I'll get you a hotel. First thing he says, when I come into their house here, it's like, Hey, I'll get you a hotel room. We don't have like the best beds and stuff here. I'm like down, like, dude, I'll sleep on my couch, no longerSpeaker 3 (00:31:22):Talking about it. And this is a house for doorknockers I ever real bad, but everyone else has twin size bunk beds. And there's a bunch of, bunch of them upstairs, but we were thinking, Hey man, this guy just drove five hours and now he's going to sleep in a bunk bed. We all kind of had this moment where we're like, we probably should have thought this thing through. So we were like, do you want to hotel? Are you cool? And he's like, no, I'm cool. And then right after he said, he's cool. I see one of our guys carrying in a queen size, like Peloton matches. I'm like, thank goodness that somebody went out and bought a bed for this guy. So, um, but yeah. So thanks for saying that, man. I, I believe in this, this theory about investing where, um, if you're investing in the right people, um, there's no bad investment.Speaker 3 (00:32:04):And so even though it may not make monetary sense today or tomorrow, I invest my time, energy and resources and money into people that I want long-term relationships with. Because even though you don't work for me and you may never work with me, or we may never do anything specifically together, maybe you, um, send me a referral and you're like, Hey, am I coming? He doesn't cover Maine because it's the polar opposite side of the country from San Diego. Could you, do you want this referral in Maine? And absolutely I would. And I'll figure out a way to get in and installed a main, even though my install crews, if they're listening right now, we're like, what's Jerry talking about, I don't want to go to Maine. We would figure it out and make money on it. So I just believe in being very giving.Speaker 3 (00:32:44):And I think people will reciprocate that now I'm not stupid about it. I don't give to everybody. I, I give of my time. Um, most sparingly my time is the resource that I can't get back money. I can make more of time. I can't. And so I invest my time into things like the mastermind into my company and to the people I mentioned or indefinitely into things like this podcast, which I think is going to bear fruit for both your podcast and my companies. So by being a sponsor. And so I look forward to, uh, developing our relationship and um, giving him next week, he's going to email me and be like, Hey man, I really need a new Tesla. I was just wondering if he could spot me 120 K cause it's a plan.Speaker 2 (00:33:23):Yeah. I'm not, that'd be the sponsor. Find me a TeslaSpeaker 3 (00:33:28):It's company is going to be like, why is the side of your Tesla say Pi Syndicate on it? That's really weird.Speaker 2 (00:33:35):Yeah. But no, I, I definitely agree with that cause um, I worked with, you know, several different companies at this point too. And um, we were having conversations before this out. You know, some people are more giving stuff than others. And uh, so I think it pays dividends as long as you're smart about it. Like you're saying is just be that guy. That's not like the cheap guy. That's like, oh, this guy is going to nickel and dime me. But if you're investing into relationships, especially, you know, on business level, um, I think it pays dividends. Like I just, matter of fact, last week I did my, a church mission in Columbia down there and that's one of the things and you know, these south American countries, a lot of them are super poor. And so I get hit up all the time about people, ask them for money and stuff like that. So yeah, you gotta get ready, selects selective. But I just sent, you know, 500 bucks last week for a family's funeral that I knew down there and yeah, like, they're like, oh, um, we'll pay you back. We promise, I know 99% chance. They're not going to be, they're not going to pay me back because you know, yeah.Speaker 3 (00:34:31):I've decided, I've decided that, um, I do sometimes give loans, but if, if it's, if you like that, and I think that you're right, you know, there's a good chance. They won't be able to pay you back. I'm very upfront with it and say, it's a gift. And then say, if you're ever at a time in your life where you can give something to somebody else, go ahead and do that because they're going to feel guilty if it's dead, right. They're good people. I'm sure they are. And eventually that's going to wear on them and it's going to impact their life negatively because they're not going to pay you back. Chances are, um, cause they may not have the resources and stuff like that to do that. And so, so think about doing stuff like that as gifts I give my time, lot, I gift things, not connected to any type of repayment.Speaker 3 (00:35:12):Um, and gifting seems to reward me a lot better than loans. So now in businesses, if you want, um, a hundred thousand dollar loan, I'll do that too, but that's a lot, normally stuff like that as somebody in need it, you know, give it as a gift and um, you'll see dividends of that. It also helps you feel a lot better right away. Like it felt good giving them a loan if you had made the decision to just give it to them as a gift, which is basically, it sounds like what you did. But if you had said that in your head, I'm going to give it as a gift and tell them I'm giving it as a gift. It would have had a little bit more positive impact even in your inside yourself. Um, you know, the gratitude that you felt, being able to help someone.Speaker 3 (00:35:48):And so it's a cool way to, to manage your money like that. That the thing that I, uh, one of the things I talk about when I talk about gifting though, is my time. And so I don't know if you've ever heard a term called time vampires, but I, I definitely believe in the concept that there's some people that just siphon away your time. And so while I'm very free to help people and to mentor them and stuff like that, be selective on who you help. Just like you said, you get hit quite a bit for money, the same thing with time. And you're an influential person. You have a lot of value to add to other people's lives, but you have to start being selective. And one of the rules that I've set for myself is that I only interact daily on a day to day basis with 10 people.Speaker 3 (00:36:29):So if I ever get to a point where I'm talking to someone every single day, I either need to figure out if there's somebody I'm mentoring or if they're somebody that needs to be communicating with one of my 10 people. Um, and I have a wife and four kids. So that means I only have five people outside of that to communicate with on a day-to-day basis. So my, my intimate little work circles about five and it makes for some hard decision-making. I talked to the general manager of solar solutions. Um, she's in training for all intensive purposes. She's the CEO. And, uh, I've talked to her one hour in the last week and she's running a multimillion dollar company for me. And I trust that she's doing a great job. Um, but I don't have time. Day-to-day, she's not by any means a time vampire she's listening, but, um, I don't have time.Speaker 3 (00:37:17):So, but making those decisions, even when they're hard decisions like not to talk to your GM every single day, um, mean that it makes it much easier to make a decision about talking to a friend from high school that just wants to chat about video games or fantasy football. Yeah, I cut. I cut them out pretty quickly because if I don't have time for, you know, my GM, I really don't have time for them either. And so setting up some type of structure in your life to make decisions based on time and who you're going to invest time in is very, very important to go a lot further in life if you invest your time correctly.Speaker 2 (00:37:50):Yeah. I agree. That's a good point. So yeah, for all our listeners, I think it's a good thing to do. If another thing I've talked about is just, you know, a time audit, just really tracking what you actually did with your hours, how you spent your time. It's a lot of times we think we're being super productive, smart with our time, and then we actually check it. We just spent two hours talking about fantasy football to someone or, you know, playing a game on the phone, whatever, things like that.Speaker 3 (00:38:15):Yeah. With strangers now that I, uh, last year I had done the math on, you know, how much money I was making per hour that I worked. And the number was much, much larger than what I had previously thought about it being. And, um, in the last few years, it's led me to really, really feel guilty about wasting my time. So like, I, I love video games. I love world of Warcraft back in the day and things like that. There's zero chance that I could open up a computer, get on world of Warcraft tonight and play for four hours without having this tremendous amount of guilt. You know, just because my time is, I know what my time's worth right now. And if someone would ask me, Hey, would you give me $25,000 to play world of Warcraft? I would say, no, I'm not going to give you 25 grand to play a video game. But that's exactly what we do in investing our time and activities that don't actually generate income or generate a better relationship with those around us is it's time that we're really, really stealing from ourselves. Yeah.Speaker 2 (00:39:12):A hundred percent. So now that's a good, a good point with that. And so going back a little bit at Jerry, um, something I wanted to ask you about, we were talking before we started recording here is just like you're saying, um, so many people just sell their prices low. Um, you said you're like one of the higher price companies that sell solar. And I think that's awesome. I started out with the company that was kind of similar to that. They tried to bundle in like some solar cleaning in some like a, I dunno, yearly checkup type things dated. It kind of found some loopholes around it. And I think it made a few customers mad cause they put in the fine print that they would only do that if the customer like contacted them. And It was kind of a, maybe not.Speaker 3 (00:39:54):Yeah. The whole thing about being the most expensive company is you also have to do the best job. And so you can get away with that. What's crazy is it's easier if you're a good salesperson to sell being the most expensive than it is being the cheapest. The only person that thinks it's easier to sell being the cheapest are bad salespeople. That's what it comes down to. You're probably not listening to this podcast. If you think the only way to sell is by lowering the price. That's probably not your target audience. People are trying to learn. They're trying to get better. We grade sales reps, um, AB and C sales reps, um, see sales reps are sell by being cheap. And that's how we remember it. If the only way that they can sell is by being the cheapest in the room and they're not selling based on anything else.Speaker 3 (00:40:39):Then they're a C sells rep. There is definitely room in the solar industry for C sales reps. So if you sell based on price, don't feel bad about it. Just either educate yourself to get better or find a company that really is the cheapest. And that's where you need to, to be out, to make money. Um, be sales reps are those that, um, really are good at one or two things. They either technical experts or they are expert closers. And it's one of two things they're either the best closer in the whole world. I would refer to like, um, Mike O'Donnell or, uh, Taylor McCartney, you know, incredible closers, but I know more about solar than either one of them. So the other, the other B sales rep is, um, someone that, um, is very, very technical. I would look at, um, you know, um, quite a few people in the marketplace that I would look at Jake Hess would be the one that comes to mind, very, very technical, closer, you know, through, um, his academy.Speaker 3 (00:41:34):He trains people how to be very technical. And then the AA sales rep is those that combine both. So yes, Taylor and Mike can definitely answer those technical questions or they know how to pivot really well. And so they're a sales reps because at the end of the day, phenomenal closers and they know everything they need to know about solar to get the sell closed. Now Taylor's kind of bizarre because he does know it just a little bit, but he's that good of a sales rep that he's still in a sales role. And I was talking about something one day. He's like, I don't even know what you're talking about. It's like, okay, I guess I'm more of a technical sales rep instead of as good of a closer isSpeaker 2 (00:42:11):PESI oh, you asked him one time. Like, I don't even know what an inverter is.Speaker 3 (00:42:15):That's what he told me. That's what we were talking about us. I went different numbers, to be honest, I don't know what you're talking about. He's like, but I sold the last 14 doors I knocked on and I was like, wow, that's a that's okay. There's definitely some benefit. I noticed that they and Jake has been hanging out and I'm like, well, uh, hopefully those guys learn a lot from each other because of your powerhouse. Um, but yeah, and so the sales reps are like that. We specifically hire the sales reps because they have to be good closers and they have to know a lot about the technical side. Cause we have to justify our higher price. And um, explain why we're higher. One of the things is we give her a warranties instead of just fake claims. We also give free maintenance, but we give a 25 year true labor warranty.Speaker 3 (00:42:56):Um, anything that goes wrong. A lot of guys in the solar industry don't realize, but they're selling, what's called a workmanship warranty. And under a workmanship warranty, you would assume that if say a panel stops working, that the company would come out and fix it for free without charging the customer a fee, the truth is a workmanship warranty covers bad workmanship. So if they installed it incorrectly, which caused the panel to stop working a good company would come out and fix it. But a good company would do that for free. Even without a warranty in writing, they would say, yeah, you're right. That's our fault. Let us fix that. So it's pretty much just acknowledging that, Hey, we're a good company, which is, which is nice of them to say there's a 20 five-year workmanship warranty, but, uh, under the warranty and most of the terms of that panel stops working.Speaker 3 (00:43:39):It's the manufacturer's fault. You would have to pay that solar company labor to come out and replace that solar panel. And there's almost zero sales reps that understand that concept. And I guarantee you no homeowner understands that concept. So when they get into these 25 year loans, when you talk about company evaluations and how to evaluate the value of a solar company, those that give away a workmanship warranty are basically locking in that customer on a service plan for the next 25 years, that increases the company evaluation because they know they're going to make X amount of money servicing that system over the next 25 years at a company like mine. It actually decreases our company value because we know that the relationship with that client will just cause, um, cost over the next 25 years. So, um, was very few companies like ours that are giving free labor away, true free labor for the whole time, but we definitely do.Speaker 3 (00:44:32):And so we align ourselves up with even our battery manufacturers are full 25 year warranties. So everything we do as a 25 year warranty or more included with labor too. So even the solar panels and the batteries, if we were to go out of business, uh, they'll hire an electrician to come out and service it. So it's just a different pitch, but a good sales rep always feels more comfortable being the guy saying, I'm the best buy for me, then I'm the cheapest, you know, let's, it's a good deal. Let's do this, you know? So you'll kind of weed, weed out those people that aren't quite as.Speaker 2 (00:45:03):Yeah, I know. Yeah. It's interesting. If you go to these like marketing conferences and stuff, and then the online marketing and they say, there's no competitive advantage to being like, you know, unless I made all of the pack pricing, you're either like the cheapest or you're in the most expensive and you add more value, but there's no like advantage at all as being kind of like middle soSpeaker 3 (00:45:23):No, and you kind of disregard all the middle companies too. Um, and so I, I definitely think one of our strategies is we know we're going to be the most expensive. So we get that out of the way right away. We tell them we are, we actually tell them to shop around. And if they choose to go with a cheaper company, we'll even pay $50 per quote, that they give us from the other companies that they've shopped around with. So we encourage them to give us, go shop around with four quotes and then we'll come back and be the final one in the door, propose our price a hundred percent of the time. They're expecting us to undercut the cheapest bid. Um, cause they think it's a gimmick, right? You're giving me these quotes, you're going to undercut their price and then try to close me a hundred percent of the time.Speaker 3 (00:46:01):We make sure we're more expensive. In fact, if we're not the most expensive person, we raise our price by a thousand dollars and make sure because it's easier to sell in the most expensive. Now, not everyone buys though. And so just like a car lot, you you're the most expensive your Lamborghini dealership or whatever. That's how we treat it. But at the end of the day, if you say it's too expensive and you're getting ready to walk out, we say, hold on, wait a minute. Let's see if we can throw something else in. So we try to do value, add. So we may replace their air conditioner or we may help replace the roof or whatever it is. But very rarely will we do just a straightforward discount. We're never going to be like, okay, you're right. Let us let us price it out for $10,000 cheaper. There's probably not going to be us, but we'll win.Speaker 2 (00:46:42):Yeah. I think that's awesome. Because especially in California, there's no excuse for people to be selling like rock bottom prices. I mean, San Diego, you can sell a system, you know, $6 a watt, super expensive, and you're still saving them. You're still cutting their bill by 30%. Yeah. So it's like these companies that try to sell rock bottom line, what are you guys doing? We're still saving the customers.Speaker 3 (00:47:03):I think we all need to be on the same team, right? Like, um, I think there's places out there for the cheapest guys. The problem is, um, those guys need to go move to Missouri or Kansas or somewhere with 10 cent per watt, kilowatt hours of they want to sell cheap California. You're not competing against each other. You're competing against a utility company. So $6 a watt is completely fair price to charge. If you're versing the utility company, what that allows you to do as a company is make more profit. There is absolutely nothing wrong with profit. If you're helping the client, because that means you can take that profit and go make more clients. You can spend more money on marketing. You can spend more money on paying your people. You can spend more money on office space. You can do everything you can to grow.Speaker 3 (00:47:47):And at the end of the day, we all want to have more solar customers. We all believe the solar is good for the environment. And so at the end of the day, our mission is to sell as many people as we can. And people get twisted. People that are new to business think selling cheaper will help them sell more. It absolutely will. Not their resources you gain from selling a fairly priced product. That's beating out your competitor, which is the utility company is the correct price. And so I would never charge somebody. One of my ethical roles is I never charge more than what they're paying on the utility company. So solar solutions is a little different. They have to be able to pay the system off within 10 years through savings. And they have to be able to have a payment that's cheaper than their utility bill from day one, or we won't quote them.Speaker 3 (00:48:30):The system will tell them that they w we don't advise them to go solar in California. That wouldn't happen very often though. It's so good of a deal for everybody. Even as $6 a watt, you should be doing that, just make sure you're not going out and buying Ferrari's. You need to be reinvesting that money in yourself. And for you specifically in your podcast and your recruiting budget to help others come on board, because you're not going to be able to sell a prices like that forever. And we know that. So you use those resources to expand, to grow, to really make a dent in the industry. And it's so cool. I, I learned something from you earlier. We were talking to our guys about how saturated Las Vegas is. I don't think anyone would argue that San Diego's, if not the most saturated market, one of the most saturated markets in the United States, very cool market.Speaker 3 (00:49:17):And you still go out and door knock every day, and you still run into people that need solar and once solar. So it's incredible. We, we need to stop thinking of the scarcity mindset, where we're competing against other solar companies. We're still not even in San Diego. We're not. Um, and the truth is you mentioned it too, but those companies may knock the door once and you're going to knock the door five or more times. And so, um, I'm okay with competition as long as I'm better than them. And it sounds like you're, you're beating them so that that's healthy competition. Um, and so I think that that's a really cool thing to think about. We all need to keep our prices higher because in San Diego, if you can sell $6 a watt in the most competitive thing in the whole United States, that everybody should be pricing their structure out right below the utility company, let's do better than the utility company. But that means I operate in mainly the Midwest states. That means we don't sell as high in Kansas. We don't sell high in Texas. We don't sell as high at all in Tennessee. So it, it just all depends on where you're at, what their pricing is because the utility is the competitor, not, not the other solar companies. Yeah.Speaker 2 (00:50:21):I think that's a good rule to go by though, cause you don't want to charge them way more than they're paying forSpeaker 3 (00:50:26):Electricity. Heard some interesting guys pitch it. And if they knocked on my door, their ride, I probably would've bought it cause they're good enough to pitch, pitch it as an investment. Um, my individual role with investing is I want my money back within 10 years. I want it to completely be liquid. And, and that's really comes into about a 7% compounded interest rate or above. And so, um, I wouldn't personally make an investment that, that wasn't going to happen. I put all my money into investments like that. So why would solar be anything different if I'm going to put it on my house? I still want that kind of ROI. And so, um, I think I just ethically on a personal side, uh, that's translated to the ethics of my company to say, look, we're not going to sell it unless, unless they meet the standard for Jerry thinking, it's a good thing.Speaker 3 (00:51:13):Right? And that's my standard. There's, there's been some guys though that I talked to that view it as a financial investment in states that have very low prices and I don't think they're wrong. And there's also a lot of speculation about the price of utilities, really jumping up over the next three years. A good friend of mine, Mike [inaudible] talks about it. He's extremely convincing, right? Like he's the guy that I've listened to enough where I'm like, you know what, even if they are spending $20 more a month, Mike's probably right. It's, it's going to be okay. It's just not a company thing that we do. So that's our litmus test is we try to price it right below. Um, but definitelySpeaker 2 (00:51:48):Don't price it a dollar 85 watt. I think we can all agree that if you're the guy out there selling at a dollar 85, a watt, you need to listen to the podcast more often and learn how to sell more because there's no reason to do that. And at the end of the day, what I tell customers that are getting an incredible deal as I run the numbers and I say, Hey, your sales reps making $500 on this deal. Uh, who is it? Oh, it a power I've never heard of power. That's interesting. It must be a power app. Um, the sold out for a $500 commission. And I say, think about this, it's a 25 year agreement. Uh, you, you need customer service for the next 25 years. If something goes wrong, right. They're like, yeah, nice. Well, how much do you think the $21 a year is going to buy you in time for that guy to pick up the phone and answer your questions?Speaker 2 (00:52:33):The truth is, think of his commission, like prepaying to have an advocate for you for the next 25 years. And in my opinion, $500 is not enough money for a 25 year relationship. So we need to pay our reps well enough that they're do very good customer service or the company needs to make enough profit that they take that role on themselves. That the rep isn't the one responsible for customer service and taking care of. Cause if we sell somebody a $25,000 system, it is definitely our responsibility to take care of them for the next 25 years. Like that's, that's just the way it is. That's our job. Yeah. So yeah, I just got a call actually like a couple hours ago from Gaia sold four years ago. Call me just barely ins. Yeah. Luckily I made more than 500 bucks, but yeah, that's a good point though. Like I'm only making 500 bucks and it's a guy that's taken up all this time. That's time suck then. Uh, yeah. It's um, like you want to be making, you know, your time worth some money for sure. Yeah. Um, and yeah, the other thing that's, uh, I forget, I forget the question. I was going to ask you where I was going with.Speaker 3 (00:53:41):Well, we were talking a little bit, uh, before we started and you were, you were basically saying, um, you know, why did I step away from solar solutions? And, um, you know, I thought that was a really interesting question that I wanted to say for the podcast. Yeah. So the reason why is because I, I believe that the solar industry is at its peak right now. I think it's incredible. It's the new gold rush. Everyone we know in sales should be going into solar right now. It is the biggest opportunity. If you're not telling your friends and family members and neighbors, neighbors, that they should be selling solar, and they're working at a library or they're working at Starbucks, you're doing them a disservice. You should be so convicted that it's time to get into solar, that I needed to transition what I'm doing to align with that.Speaker 3 (00:54:26):So if I believe everybody should get into solar, that I need to build a company that isn't one of the most difficult sales processes that requires a rep like you with all your knowledge, to go out and sell for $6 a watt, I would need to do something more moderate. So energy co is meant to recruit anybody. You know, we're here at a recruiting class. I'm glad that you're able to say Hey to them while you were here. And there's some kids are now in this class that are 18 years old. There's not a lot of solar companies. I'd be excited about hiring a 18 year old. Right. And I had to go back to a training model that allowed me to recruit literally anybody off the street. Like I worked in a Starbucks that teacher, the person that's struggling. Cause they got a degree in psychology and they haven't worked since they graduated.Speaker 3 (00:55:12):They're like, what just happened? I paid all this money for a degree and I don't have a job. I wanted to go back to the days, like when we worked at security or pest control that literally anybody could do it. Right? Like you just had to knock doors. Solar gets more complicated than that sometimes. And so our whole concept here at energy co is a division of labor. So we split it into the, the setter, the educator and the closer they work together as a team, you know, there's a whole bunch of people that can set cause anybody can set just like in pest control security. He just got to say, even if they're terrible and they're like, Hey, do you want solar? Eventually somebody's going to say yes. Whereas the educator's a little bit harder. You've got to explain the one-on-ones and how solar works.Speaker 3 (00:55:51):But there are a whole bunch of second grade teachers out there that would absolutely love to make money per job. Um, in 30 minutes of work, right? And then our closers are definitely the rarest people. It takes a very specific skillset. And so w

VandySports's podcast
What we learned from an opening-night hoops win

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 38:40


Chris Lee and Andrew Allegretta share observations on Vanderbilt's 91-72 win over Alabama State to open the hoops season. Topics include how Jordan Wright and Myles Stute stepped up to help Scotty Pippen Jr. with the scoring burden, Jamaine Mann's double-double and what we saw from freshmen Peyton Daniels, Gabe Dorsey and Shane Dezonie. Plus, the two preview the Kentucky football game.

Nashville SportsRadio
Chris Lee 11 - 10 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 14:10


Chris Lee joined The George Plaster Show.

Reshaping Education - Higher Ed, Online Education, Bootcamps, ISAs, and More
A Pivotal Moment for Bootcamps w/ Chris Lee (Launch School) & Jesse Farmer (Dev Bootcamp)

Reshaping Education - Higher Ed, Online Education, Bootcamps, ISAs, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:35


 Topics discussed: Launch School founding Mastery-based Learning Async vs Live Programs Future of Bootcamps  Job placement vs personalized education Building a sustainable business Bootstrapping vs VS Bootcamps are not dying; however, they are adapting. We discuss what it will take for bootcamps to thrive over the next decade.Twitter:https://twitter.com/cgleehttps://twitter.com/jfarmerRelevant links:Reshaping Education Podcast Keep up with us: Ish Baid, Founder & CEO of VirtuallyWill Mannon, Course Director of Forte Academy

Beyond The Story with Sebastian Rusk
How Neuroscience Works With Mental Health - Dr. Chris Lee

Beyond The Story with Sebastian Rusk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 33:55


Dr. Chris Lee is the founder of "Wired For Worthy" and is a Neuroscience expert who focuses on helping people rewire their brains so they can achieve high performance, focus, and happiness in their life.Connect with Dr. Chris here: https://www.instagram.com/drchrislee/

Soul Seekr
#110: Neuroscience & Psychedelics w/ Dr. Chris Lee

Soul Seekr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 75:34


We get deep today with Dr. Chris Lee on how the brain works! We talk about how the brain works with psychedelics and with healing modalities. We also talk about the importance of integration work when working with plant medicines!Dr. Chris Lee is the founder and CEO of Elemental Shift, a neuroscience-based consulting company educating on brain-based creativity, productivity, motivation, and research-based strategy for a healthier mindset. He has consulted with 8 figure stockbrokers on Wall Street to technology companies in California using custom biometric and neurofeedback data to build more resilient companies from the inside out.He has served over 1,500 individuals and is currently working on getting his neuroscience-backed mindfulness technique into the United States Prison systems.Enjoy!LINKS & RESOURCESWant to Start Your Own Podcast? I've used Buzzsprout for all of my podcasts & love it! It's the easiest platform to get your podcast onto all the major apps... iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, etc... It's FREE to sign up, but if you decide to upgrade to one of the paid plans later,we'll each get a $20 Amazon gift card! That's a pretty sweet win-win deal if you ask me!  Use this link: https://cutt.ly/ScbUtFWWizard Teams (Virtual Teams For YOU Managed by US) | https://cutt.ly/xmVsYTe Check out my Review of Pixar's "SOUL" Movie | https://cutt.ly/OmVsUNe Wizard Websites - Learn to Build a Website w/ Virtual Assistants | https://bit.ly/3lCw2kU Defiant Mushroom Coffee (Use "Sam15" for 15% OFF!) | https://defiantcoffee.co/ Permission to Podcast (Simply Show Up & Record): https://bit.ly/2N2NUoI Connect w/ Dr. Chris Lee: https://doctorchrislee.com/ Dr. Chris Lee on LinkedIn: https://cutt.ly/fRBPUnC Dr. Chris on IG: https://cutt.ly/vRBPASMOura Ring (Code DrChris): https://cutt.ly/NRBPKmUMuse Headband (Code DrChris): https://cutt.ly/jRBPXBA FREE Guide on How to Uncover Your Gifts & Share them | https://buff.ly/3gmml7t Spiritual Blogs & More | https://buff.ly/2Sq6Gtl Start Your Dream Business | https://buff.ly/2xpy2ITFreeup | https://cutt.ly/txFc7eV For reliable VA's. (you'll also get a $25 coupon PS. It's free to sign up!)SwagStore | https://cutt.ly/bbeEK0Q LET'S BE SOCIALJoin the journey — come hangout on social mediaInstagram | https://www.instagram.com/samkabert/ Join the Soul Seekr Facebook Group | https://buff.ly/2yi8ldA Twitter | https://twitter.com/soul_seekr_ LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/kabert/  YouTube | https://buff.ly/3e4kXUO  ASK me ANYTHING: Email is Sam@CloneYourselfU.com and you can book a FREE business strategy call with me by going to Calendly.com/CLONE.THANK YOU!SamSupport the show (http://soulseekrz.com/medicine)

One Love Art Sessions Podcast
Hussle + Motivate

One Love Art Sessions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 64:17


It's another NFT episode! This time we are joined by Raven Trammell - a visual artist originally from Holland, Michigan but currently located in Los Angeles, CA. From documenting protests to capturing some of the biggest artists in the world on stage, their portfolio varies in subjects and compositions. During the conversation we talk about their come up, current and past projects, and upcoming events. For more information please follow them: @raven50mm and @50mmcollective The music in this episode was produced by Pound aka Chris Lee. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/oneloveartsessions/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/oneloveartsessions/support

PowerMizzou.com Podcasts
Opposition Research Presented By Edward Jones: Vanderbilt

PowerMizzou.com Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:29


Gabe DeArmond talks with Chris Lee of VandySports.com to preview this weekends game between the Tigers and the Commodores.

PowerMizzou
Opposition Research presented by Edward Jones: Vanderbilt

PowerMizzou

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:29


Gabe DeArmond talks with Chris Lee of VandySports.com to preview this weekends game between the Tigers and the Commodores.

VandySports's podcast
What to make of a near-miss at South Carolina

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 53:04


Chris Lee and Seabass share impressions of what the South Carolina near-miss meant, answer a bunch of mailbag questions and try to remember when they first met.

VandySports's podcast
Talent or coaching?

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:55


Chris Lee and Seabass talk Vanderbilt football and focus mostly on what's gone wrong in a 2-4 start, including a discussion of how much that's gone wrong can be blamed on the talent left to coach Clark Lea.

Gamecock Central Radio
Vanderbilt falls on tough times (with VandySports.com's Chris Lee)

Gamecock Central Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:56


GamecockCentral.com's Wes Mitchell and Chris Clark are joined by VandySports.com's Chris Lee to provide insight on South Carolina vs. Vanderbilt from the Commodores' perspective. GC Live is presented by Clint Hammond of Mortgage Network: https://www.mortgagenetwork.com/clint-hammond Clint is the branch manager for the Columbia Mortgage Network. Contact Clint for all of your mortgage needs: chammond@MortgageNetwork.com Phone: 803-771-6933 Mobile: 803-422-6797 Fax: 866-741-1723 As an experienced mortgage professional Clint is available to provide knowledgeable information for all your home financing goals. Let Clint help you identify the financing solution that best meets your specific needs. Links to GamecockCentral Live! will be found on GamecockCentral.com's web platform and discussion forums and will stream live on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, in addition to being hosted on the GamecockCentral.com podcast network. Subscribing (for free) to the GamecockCentral YouTube channel and clicking the "bell" icon next to the subscribe button will turn on your notifications, which means you will be notified each time GamecockCentral Live! drops a new show. #SouthCarolinaFootball #Gamecocks

The Road Home
Accessory Dwelling Units as an Affordable Housing Option

The Road Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 73:52


Tune in this week as we discuss Accessory Dwelling Units. We speak to Robinson Markus, Worker-Owner at Evanston Development Center, and Chris Lee, Design and Development at Backyard ADUs. Click here for Insights from this week's episode. *Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. It means a great deal to the show and it will make it easier for potential listeners to find us.* Thanks! Search #NCHV on social media to find us and email us here at info@nchv.org.

Nashville SportsRadio
Chris Lee 10 - 13 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:15


Chris Lee joined The George Plaster Show.

VandySports's podcast
Four football players to watch for the future

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:32


Vanderbilt play-by-play voice Andrew Allegretta talks about Patrick Smith's good performance vs. Florida, and he and co-host Chris Lee talk about Smith and three other freshmen who could have nice futures at Vanderbilt. Also, the two talk a little Commodore baseball.

The Ortho Show
Hosted by Dr. Scott Sigman – “Olympic Gold: Dr. Chris Lee”

The Ortho Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:22


Dr. Christopher Lee is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine, arthroscopy, joint and cartilage preservation as well as shoulder and knee replacements. He is in private practice in Burbank, CA. Dr. Lee is also the team physician for men and women's USA National Indoor Volleyball Team. He traveled with the team's to Tokyo for the 2021 Summer Olympics, where he was on the court with the women's team gold medal win. Topics include: -We continue to bring you the best of the best in orthopedics, including those with unique experiences. We hear about Dr. Lee's experience as a violinist since an early age. -He is part of the "Tufts University Triple Jumbo." Born and raised in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Lee attended Tufts University where he received awards for both academic and artistic achievements. Dr. Lee subsequently attended the Tufts University School of Medicine where he participated in the MD/MBA program. After completing the Tufts Combined Residency in Orthopaedic Surgery, he then received his fellowship training at the San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship where he trained with international pioneers in sports medicine, arthroscopy and shoulder replacement surgery. -Dr. Lee discusses the long, arduous road to becoming the lead physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball team for both men's and women's teams'. He gives us the insights going to Tokyo for the Olympics, the challenges while there and ultimately, being there for the women's team big gold win. Find out more about Dr. Christopher Lee here.  For MD's, capture quick reflections on each learning below & how it applies to your day-to-day to unlock a total of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CMEs.

One Love Art Sessions Podcast

Art is intimate by nature, but there are forms of creativity that engage the client/customer/collector in a way that's life altering or creates deeper connections. Joining us to discuss these connections are Natalia Zamparini (@natybynature), a muralist, designer, and entrepreneur who has become one of the most sought-after henna businesses throughout the NYC and Tr-State area. And Phe Phe Rose (@phepherose and @brushupyourspace), an artist, designer, and entrepreneur who creates children illustrations, and wall paintings. She also provides personal branding, property branding, and designs spaces. The music in this podcast was produced by Chris Lee aka Pound. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/oneloveartsessions/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/oneloveartsessions/support

VandySports's podcast
It's a win, but Cam Johnson and Ben Bresnahan need the ball more

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:30


Why have Ben Bresnahan and Cam Johnson been nearly eliminated from the passing game? Chris Lee and Seabass discuss that in the aftermath of Vanderbilt's 30-28 win over UConn, plus, discuss Vanderbilt's improving hoops recruiting.

Nashville SportsRadio
Chris Lee 10 - 6-21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 14:02


Chris Lee joined The George Plaster.

Action and Ambition
Nick Arambula and Chris Lee Built a Furniture Company to Create Space for Companionship And Comfort

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:37


Welcome to another episode of Action and Ambition. In today's episode, we are joined by the Co-Founders of Neighbor, Nick Arambula and Chris Lee. Nick's exposure to the furniture industry began at a young age, watching and later helping his mom build a furniture business while Chris was introduced to furniture building while managing a team of carpenters on a factory floor. Both became friends while working at Tuft & Needle and decided to combine their skills and shared values to launch Neighbors, a furniture company specializing in premium outdoor furniture and goods crafted for a long life outside with family, friends, and neighbors. Tune in to find out more on what inspired these friends to build their company from the ground up!

The Mark Moses Show
Chris Lee-Southeastern14.com Interview (10/05/21)

The Mark Moses Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 20:31


The Mark Moses Show is joined by Chris Lee of southeastern14.com to get his thoughts on how good are Alabama & Georgia right now in the SEC, the job Josh Heupel has done so far at Tennessee and should Mark be tough on Dan Mullen right now at Florida.  Listen to The Mark Moses Show weekday afternoons from 3-6 pm on Sports Radio 1560 The Fan & Sportsradio1560.com Follow him on social media @markmosesshow

Stadium and Gale
144: 2 Minutes & 3 Timeouts

Stadium and Gale

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 114:46


Pull up to the same corner, same time this week for a therapy session. We are joined by David Wunderlich to hear his take on where the program is lacking and discuss reasons why it might be. Later, Chris Lee of Rivals stops by to give us a Vandy breakdown and prediction. Make sure to stay tuned for Buy or Sell and our own predictions.

VandySports's podcast
Two stories that explain Vanderbilt

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 75:29


Why does Vanderbilt do things the way it does them? Chris Lee has two stories that explain a lot. Also, will donors view it worthwhile to give to facilities unless other things at the school change? What's Clark Lea's outlook for success, and what needs to change? We hit a ton of topics in an hour-plus episode with Seabass.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 107 Joy Farley & Liza Myers-Borches with Dr. Chris Lee - Mental Health and Emotions

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:17


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Joy Farley & Liza Myers-Borches with Dr. Chris Lee! Dr. Lee is a Neuroscience Researcher and Speaker, Biometric Driven Brain Coaching, using biofeedback to remove limitations and express your genius! 

Holiness Preaching Online
Rev. Chris Lee- “When symbols become sufficient”

Holiness Preaching Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 34:53


Bro. Chris Lee --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/holinesspreachingonline/message

Nashville SportsRadio
Chris Lee 9 - 29 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 14:00


Chris Lee joined The George Plaster Show.

Business RadioX ® Network
Nick Arambula Mike Fretto and Chris Lee with Neighbor

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


Nick Arambula Mike Fretto and Chris Lee with Neighbor Neighbor is a Phoenix based outdoor furniture company. They launched in late 2020 with a teak lounge collection and have since expanded into dining and accessories. Neighbor distributes with Crate&Barrel and Huckberry, but their sales are predominately through their website. They started the company driven by […]

VandySports's podcast
Feels like 2002?

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:19


There are a lot of similarities between Vanderbilt football now and when Bobby Johnson took over in 2002, and Chris Lee and Seabass go over the parallels as well as take a bunch of questions from the mailbag, which is presented by Sutherland & Belk.

VandySports's podcast
Through three games, a few players have stood out

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 22:15


Chris Lee and Kevin Ingram talk about a few of the players who've stood out on offense and defense through three games, plus, talk some about star hoops point guard Scotty Pippen Jr.

Nashville SportsRadio
Chris Lee 9 - 22 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 14:30


Chris Lee joined The George Plaster Show.

VandySports's podcast
Impressions from the Stanford game

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 30:01


Stanford was too much physically and athletically for Vanderbilt in its 41-23 win on Saturday night, and Chris Lee and Mitch Light discuss it (and where the Commodores most need to improve).

Talkin' SEC Podcast
SEC Week 3 Preview with Chris Lee of Vandysports.com & Southeastern 14 | Talkin' SEC

Talkin' SEC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 37:19


Today Phillip Jordan is joined by Chris Lee of Vandysports.com and Southeastern 14 to preview week 3 in the SEC. Phillip and Chris dive deep into the Auburn/Penn State and Alabama/Florida match-ups. Chris also gives his thoughts on the Vanderbilt program as well.

VandySports's podcast
What went right at CSU, what's ahead with Stanford

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:57


Vanderbilt play-by-play voice Andrew Allegretta discusses some things that went well, and some that didn't, in Vandy's 24-21 win at Colorado State. He and host Chris Lee also preview the Stanford matchup ahead.

Robohub Podcast
#338: Marsupial Robots, with Chris Lee

Robohub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


Chris Lee on optimal deployment of passenger robots.

Robohub Podcast
ep.338: Marsupial Robots, with Chris Lee

Robohub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


Robohub Podcast · Marsupial Robots Lilly interviews Chris Lee, a graduate student at Oregon State University. Lee explains his research on marsupial robots, or carrier-passenger pairs of heterogeneous robot systems. They discuss the possible applications of marsupial robots including the DARPA Subterranean Competition, and some of the technical challenges including optimal deployment formulated as a stochastic assignment problem.

VandySports's podcast
Vanderbilt gets a much-needed win at Colorado State

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 34:53


The Athletic's Mitch Light and Chris Lee break down some key things that happened in a 24-21 win over Colorado State. Mitch and Chris discuss coaching styles, the use of more depth (and talk about how coaches make playing time decisions in ways fans don't consider), discuss some things around the SEC, and much more.

VandySports's podcast
The Colorado State game will tell us a lot

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 51:44


Seabass joins the podcast and explains why he's hit a breaking point with Vanderbilt football. He and host Chris Lee rewind some problems from the ETSU game, reflect on how Vanderbilt got here, discuss the offensive line struggles and take several questions from listeners.

Nashville SportsRadio
Chris Lee 9 - 8-21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 14:16


Chris Lee joined The George Plaster Show.

VandySports's podcast
Vanderbilt football players to watch for 2021

VandySports's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 55:10


New play-by-play man Andrew Allegretta joins the podcast. He and host Chris Lee begin the show by talking about his acclimation to Nashville, then, get into things (and players) they liked during fall camp. Andrew answers a few listener questions about broadcasting, talks about things going on with the VUCommodores app this year, and lists a few things he'll be watching for during the ETSU game.

Oxford Exxon Podcast
Rippee Writes: Vanderbilt and MSU previews

Oxford Exxon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 101:08


Finishing off our season preview series, Chris Lee of the Vanderbilt Rivals site joins to preview the Commodores, the challenge Clark Lea has in front of him and the change in the Vanderbilt administration over the last decade. Then, SuperTalk's Brian Hadad joins to preview Mississippi State in year two under Leach, Will Rogers, the offensive line and more.