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University in Davis, California

  • 1,475PODCASTS
  • 3,166EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 17, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about uc davis

High Theory
Love as Critique

High Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 12:08


In this episode Saronik talks to Manasvin Rajagopalan about critical possibilities in varied literary ideations of love. Manasvin mentions Hannah Arendt's concept of love as destruction, the concepts of Puram and Akam in classical Tamil poetics, Moliere's comedies, Plato's Symposium, the Hebrew Bible, Sappho's poetry, the story of Shakuntala, and The Aeneid. Manasvin is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at UC Davis , where he writes about questions of identity and world building in Early Modern French and Tamil literature. Image: An eighteenth century representation of the Dhanasri Ragini held by The Art Institute of Chicago. Public domain artwork. Music used in promotional material: “The Flute in a Barrel” by Sandro Marinoni and Stefano Roncarolo. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dracaena Wines Podcast
Jordan Fiorentini of Epoch Estate Wines

Dracaena Wines Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 63:28


It's Monday, Let's raise a glass to the beginning of another week. It's time to unscrew, uncork or saber a bottle and let's begin Exploring the Wine Glass! Today, I sit down with Jordan Fiorentini, winemaker for Epoch Wine Estates in Paso Robles. Growing up in Georgia doesn't typically lend itself to becoming a rock star winemaker in California. But Jordan isn't typical.  After falling in love with wine thanks to her father's wine collecting hobby, Jordan followed up her engineering degree with a Masters' degree in Enology from UC Davis.  She traveled to Italy for a harvest, and after falling in love with her now husband, returned to Georgia for a bit before packing it up for California. Jordan was named winemaker of the year, and has had a wine land #25 on Wine Spectator's Top 100 list. Enjoy the conversation! If you would like to go to PasoWineFest on May 21st, use code ETWG_22 for $20 off your ticket.  While you are listening, please take a moment to rate and review Exploring the Wine Glass. Ratings are now available, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Audible! Taking one minute of your time is the only way the algorithms will suggest Exploring the Wine Glass to others.  Slainte! Music: WINE by Kēvens Official Video Follow me on Instagram!   Follow me on Twitter! SUBSCRIBE ON iTUNES STITCHER | iTUNES | GOOGLE PLAY | SPOTIFY | PODBEAN l AUDIBLE Even ask your smart speaker to play Exploring the Wine Glass GIVE US A RATING AND REVIEW STAY IN THE KNOW - GET SPECIAL OFFERS Thoughts or comments? Contact Lori at exploringthewineglass@gmail.com. Please like our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/exploringthewineglass Find us on Twitter, Instagram , Pinterest, and Snapchat (@dracaenawines) Want to watch some pretty cool livestream events and wine related videos. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel.  Find out more about us and our award winning Paso Robles wines on our website.  Looking for some interesting recipes and wine pairings? Then head over to our wine pairing website.  Thanks for listening and remember to always PURSUE YOUR PASSION! Sláinte!  Please support our sponsor Dracaena Wines - Our Wines + Your Moments + Great Memories Use code 'Explore' at checkout to receive 10% off your first order

Dot to Dot Behind the Person
What neuroscience tells us about autism in children - with Dr. Wu Nordahl

Dot to Dot Behind the Person

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 52:56


We discuss the importance of this type of longitudinal research (i.e. research that involves repeated observations of the same variables over periods of time) in understanding how the brain develops in children who have autism and other neurodevelopmental disabilities. As well as exploring Dr. Wu Nordahl's findings we also explore why there is less research carried out on girls and non-binary children with autism. With regard to girls this is in part because of their tendency to mask their natural tendencies and preferences socially meaning it's less often diagnosed, as a result research has predominantly been carried out on boys with autism. Dr. Wu Nordahl has worked really hard to improve the ratio of males to females in her cohorts helping to advance our understanding of some of the neurological nuances the sex differences represent. Christine's research program at the UC Davis MIND Institute utilizes structural and functional MRI scans to study brain development in autism across the life span. Since 2006, she has led neuroimaging efforts of the Autism Phenome Project and Girls with Autism - Imaging of Neurodevelopment study, two integrated longitudinal, interdisciplinary studies aimed at identifying clinically meaningful subtypes of autism. She is particularly committed to evaluating the entire autism spectrum, including girls with autism as well as the entire range of intellectual abilities. In 2021, she and her team initiated NeuroTeens, a social support group for neurodivergent girls and non-binary teens. 

My Ag Life Daily News Report
Episode 333 | May 13 | Maximizing Soil Quality and Health, UC Davis Strawberry Breeding Program

My Ag Life Daily News Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 30:07


On today's show, learn about maximizing soil quality by maximizing soil health and we report on the UC Davis Strawberry Breeding Program and an upcoming field day.   Supporting the People who Support Agriculture Thank you to our sponsors who make it possible to get you your daily news. Please feel free to visit their websites. The California Walnut Board – https://walnuts.org/ Phycoterra –https://phycoterra.com/ Verdesian - https://vlsci.com/ Rango - http://www.rangonow.com/

That Pop Culture Show!
That Pop Culture Show 022: Bruce Baum, Comedian

That Pop Culture Show!

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 43:20


According to the man himself, if it was possible to stuff Daffy Duck, some oatmeal, and Benjamin Franklin into a blender and hit the puree button, one might pour out a helping of Bruce Baum. Unfortunately, we may never know for sure. After attending UCLA and UC Davis, Bruce was part of a community of comedians at the Comedy Store in the 1970's that included Jay Leno, David Letterman, Robin Williams, and other icons of comedy, many of whom appeared in his own student films and short films at the time. Bruce went on to become a sketch comedian on Sunday Comics and Comic Strip Live and then a two year sting on ABC's America's Funniest People. Known for his "Babyman" character, he went on to play him in his film, The Adventures of Babyman: Born To Be Raised. Bruce has served as a creative consultant on ABC's Whose Line Is It Anyway?, and appeared as himself on The Simpsons, Hollywood Squares, Full House, Growing Pains, Comedy Central, HBO, Showtime and more. Through extensive exposure on television, film, radio, and live performances, Bruce Baum has built a solid national audience, headlining regularly in Las Vegas, and top venues (and some not so top venues) around the globe. Check out That Pop Culture Show here on this channel every week, with new episodes debuting on Fridays. That Pop Culture Show is a weekly round table talk show with celebrity guests, collectors and experts talking about and celebrating pop culture. Join hosts Kody Frederick and Jason DeBord with guests from the world of pop culture, including film, television, rock 'n' roll, sports, contemporary and street art, comic books, geek culture and more. Each episode features a profile of the guest, a discussion of current pop culture topics, and a close look at an artifact of collectable the guest has brought in to share. This includes in-depth looks at prized pieces of memorabilia, works related to their careers, or any other interesting artifact that has meaning to them in their lives. Please like and subscribe to support our efforts to celebrate pop culture.View the video version of this via our youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_IxuDHC8f7KIA0KOe1J-6A

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Aaron Carroll and The Authors of "Can Legal Weed Win" Daniel Sumner and Robin Goldstein Episode 601

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 97:55


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Dr Aaron Carroll is one of my closest friends and one of the finest people I know. He is one of the most reasonable and thoughtful guys as well. He is a professor of pediatrics and associate dean for research mentoring at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He is also vice president for faculty development at The Regenstrief Institute. And now Aaron is the Chief Health Officer at IU. Dr. Carroll's research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care and areas of health policy including cost-effectiveness of care and health care financing reform. He is the author of The Bad Food Bible and the co-author of three additional books on medical myths. Check out Aaron's amazing New Podcast Series! In partnership with the National Institutes of Health, we've launched a new series on the culture of science and reproducibility.   Subscribe to his YouTube Channel Buy his books Read him at The NY Times   ------------ Can Legal Weed Win? Two economists take readers on a tour of the economics of legal and illegal weed, showing where cannabis regulation has gone wrong and how it could do better. Cannabis "legalization" hasn't lived up to the hype. Across North America, investors are reeling, tax collections are below projections, and people are pointing fingers. On the business side, companies have shut down, farms have failed, workers have lost their jobs, and consumers face high prices. Why has legal weed failed to deliver on many of its promises? Can Legal Weed Win? takes on the euphoric claims with straight dope and a full dose of economic reality. This book delivers the unadulterated facts about the new legal segment of one of the world's oldest industries. In witty, accessible prose, economists Robin Goldstein and Daniel Sumner take readers on a whirlwind tour of the economic past, present, and future of legal and illegal weed. Drawing upon reams of data and their own experience working with California cannabis regulators since 2016, Goldstein and Sumner explain why many cannabis businesses and some aspects of legalization fail to measure up, while others occasionally get it right. Their stories stretch from before America's first medical weed dispensaries opened in 1996 through the short-term boom in legal consumption that happened during COVID-19 lockdowns. Can Legal Weed Win? is packed with unexpected insights about how cannabis markets can thrive, how regulators get the laws right or wrong, and what might happen to legal and illegal markets going forward. Robin Goldstein is an economist and author of The Wine Trials, the controversial exposé of wine snobbery that became the world's best-selling guide to cheap wine. He is Director of the Cannabis Economics Group in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis. He has an AB from Harvard University, a JD from Yale Law School, and a PhD in economics from the University of Bordeaux. Daniel Sumner is Frank H. Buck, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis. He grew up on a California fruit farm, served on the president's Council of Economic Advisers, and was Assistant Secretary of Economics at the US Department of Agriculture before joining the UC Davis faculty. He has a BS from Cal Poly and a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

The Back Doctors Podcast with Dr. Michael Johnson
235 Dr. Brian Joves - Minimally Invasive Options for Chronic Back Pain

The Back Doctors Podcast with Dr. Michael Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 31:56


Dr. Brian Joves gives a presentation that includes information on indirect spinal decompression, spinal cord stimulation, and radio frequency ablation. Dr. Brian Joves is double board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Pain Medicine. He specializes in spine and chronic pain disorders and is the Chief of Pain Management for Hill Physicians.  Dr. Joves completed his ACGME accredited Fellowship in Pain Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles/ WLA VHA, and his residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of California, Davis. He earned his Medical Degree from Drexel University College of Medicine, his Master's degree in Medical Sciences from Boston University School of Medicine, and his Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Biology from UC Davis.  Dr. Joves believes in a comprehensive approach to pain management: emphasizing education and physical modalities, while utilizing medications, interventions, as well as complementary/alternative medicine approaches to achieve functional restoration and improve his patients' quality of life. His professional interests include neuromodulation including spinal cord stimulation, peripheral nerve stimulation, and dorsal root ganglion stimulation to treat neuropathic pain disorders.  Dr. Joves believes strongly in education. He has helped develop the Spine & Nerve Podcast and YouTube Channel, works with pain medicine fellows across the country as a mentor, and lectures nationally on neuromodulation therapies. In his spare time, Dr. Joves enjoys spending time with his wife Ashley and their three sons, running and other types of fitness activities, along with exploring the region's great food, craft beer and wine. Resources: spinenerve.com Spine and Nerve YouTube Spine and Nerve Podcast Show sponsor: The Cox 8 Table by Haven Medical  

Growing the Valley
ETa with Mallika Nocco

Growing the Valley

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 36:27


Mallika Nocco (Specialist at UC Davis) discusses ETa with Phoebe, as well as some research she is doing to try to develop a method for managing irrigation in an orchard with remote sensing. Thank you to the Almond, Pistachio, Prune, and Walnut Boards of California for their kind donations. Thank you to Muriel Gordon for the music.The views, thoughts, and opinions expressed are the speaker's own and do not represent the views, thoughts, and opinions of the University of California. The material and information presented here is for general information purposes only. The "University of California" name and all forms and abbreviations are the property of its owner and its use does not imply endorsement of or opposition to any specific organization, product, or service.Follow us on Twitter! @SacOrchards and @SJVtandv

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Best of Insight | Congressman Jerry McNerney | CA GOP Chairwoman | Celebrity Chef Martin Yan

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


We are revisiting Insight's best conversations this year. Congressman Jerry McNerney discusses retirement. Jessica Millan Patterson, Chairwoman of the California Republican Party, lays out priorities for the Midterms. Celebrity chef Martin Yan on his culinary donation to UC Davis. Today's Guests Seven-term Congressman Jerry McNerney (D), representing portions of Sacramento County, San Joaquin County, and Contra Costa County, on his decision to not seek reelection in California's newly drawn 9th district.  Jessica Millan Patterson, Chairwoman of the California Republican Party, discusses the CA GOP's priorities for the midterm election.  World-renowned celebrity chef Chef Martin Yan talks about his donation of 3,000 cookbooks, his first wok, and thousands of photographs from his world travels to UC Davis, his alma mater.

Ghizal Hasan Podcast
Matadors' Pre-Game, with Dave Serrano - May 8th, UC Davis

Ghizal Hasan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 6:57


Conversation with CSUN Head Coach Dave Serrano, ahead of Sunday's Mother's Day Matinee, against UC Davis, at Matador Field, Northridge, CA. Audio Courtesy CSUN Matadors' Sports Properties & Learfield.

Ghizal Hasan Podcast
Matadors' Pre-Game, with Dave Serrano - May 7th, UC Davis

Ghizal Hasan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 6:42


Conversation with CSUN Head Coach Dave Serrano, ahead of Saturday's game against UC Davis, at Matador Field, Northridge, CA. Audio Courtesy CSUN Matadors' Sports Properties & Learfield.

We Need To Be Doing That
EP 60: Quincy Amarikwa

We Need To Be Doing That

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 29:44


Quincy Amarikwa is an American soccer player who played college soccer at UC Davis, leading his team to the second round of the NCAA Tournament for the first time in school history in 2008. Amarikwa was drafted in the third round of the 2009 MLS SuperDraft by the San Jose Earthquakes. We discussed entering the sport, his playing career + what he's up to now.

Ghizal Hasan Podcast
Matadors' Pre-Game, with Dave Serrano - May 6th, UC Davis

Ghizal Hasan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 6:50


Conversation with CSUN Head Coach Dave Serrano, ahead of Friday's game against UC Davis, at Matador Field, Northridge, CA. Audio Courtesy CSUN Matadors' Sports Properties & Learfield.

VIN Foundation: Veterinary Pulse
The Future's So Bright Series - Dr. Bree Montana and Dr. Jose Pla on the importance of telling your veterinary practice story

VIN Foundation: Veterinary Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 42:32


Listen in as VIN Foundation Executive Director Jordan benShea has a conversation with Dr. Bree Montana and Dr. Jose Pla in the next episode of the podcast series, The Future's So Bright, the ins and outs of selling a veterinary practice. Jose takes us through the important aspects of sharing the story of your practice. What financial documents do you need? Do you need your tax records? And how important is production? What are minority partnerships? He also does a deep dive into the below five big categories of what needs to be considered when you are getting ready to sell your practice:   Top 5 categories to have when considering selling your veterinary practice: Lease information Financial records, make sure they are clean Make sure that practice management software is able to print out financial reports Think about your exit plan, are you willing to work and for how many years? Pay to have a professional evaluator ahead of selling, ideally 2 years   Most importantly, we want to hear from YOU our listeners, to know what topics YOU want to hear about from experts. Please email us to share your thoughts: podcast@vinfoundation.org.   GUEST BIOS: Dr. Bree Montana Bree Montana, DVM, CCFP graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a Bachelor of Science degree focused in the field of Biology followed by a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from The Ohio State University's College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduation from veterinary medical school, Dr. Montana worked exclusively in small animal outpatient and emergency hospitals while pursuing additional medical training in the latest technologies. Dr. Montana has advanced training in ultrasonography, echocardiography, chemotherapy, dentistry, emergency medicine and surgery, transfusion medicine, class IV laser therapy, pain management and rehabilitation. A past member of UC Davis' College of Veterinary Medicine's External Advisory and Admissions Boards, and a past Board member of the VIN Foundation, Dr. Montana is the Director of the VIN Foundation's Vets4Vets® programs. When not practicing medicine, Dr. Montana will generally be found playing with her daughter Ember and their ponies, hiking with her huskies, and skiing or snowboarding with her husband.    Dr. Jose Pla Dr. Pla obtained his DVM degree from Cornell University in 1995 and his MBA from Rutgers University in 2018. As a practicing veterinarian he has a special interest in feline medicine, behavior, nutrition and gastrointestinal diseases. As a businessman he has been the owner or co-owner of five veterinary practices and a  founding partner of Companion Animal Practices North America. Since obtaining his MBA, Dr. Pla shifted his focus to entrepreneurial ventures, practice management education and private practice transition consulting. He is an avid sailor, scuba diver and wanna-be photographer. Activities he shares with his wife and two sons.    LINKS AND INFORMATION: Veterinary Pulse Podcast on VIN: https://vinfoundation.org/podcast_v VIN Foundation application access for VIN: https://vinfoundation.org/vinapp   You may learn more about the VIN Foundation, on the website, or join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.   If you like this podcast, we would appreciate it if you follow and share. As always, we welcome feedback. If you have an idea for a podcast episode, we'd love to hear it!

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
Heart Failure Very High For Obese Women With Late Menopause

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 1:41


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/XrVLddsBZcc   Obese women experiencing menopause after age 55 were 3 times more likely to experience often-deadly heart failure compared to women with normal body weight.  Cardiovascular researchers at UC-Davis analysed the risk of congestive heart failure for 4441 women in 4 communities across the US including those in Minnesota, Maryland, North Carolina, and Mississippi looking at the apparent impact of excess weight and obesity.   Their analysis showed that frank obesity increased heart failure risk more than 11 fold for those with late menopause at 55 years or older and more than 8 fold for those with earlier menopause at 49 years or younger.  The study confirmed previous findings that even women with normal body weights were at risk for heart failure if their periods ceased at 45 years or younger since such women tended to put on weight as they aged.   The bottom line: carrying excess weight strains the heart.  This life-giving muscular organ can only take so much abuse before it wears out.   So what you say.  I'll just get a transplant. Don't count on it. Fact is, available replacement hearts are relatively scarce and the waiting list is long.   https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.121.024461   #heartfailure #obesity #menopause #transplantation  

Status/الوضع
Samia Errazouki on Morocco's Summit with Israel

Status/الوضع

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 58:01


At the end of March 2022, in a bold and historic step backwards for the cause of peace in the Middle East, Morocco was one of four Arab countries meeting in a special summit with Israel and the US. Although distant Iran was central to the discussions held during this meeting, the central issue of Palestine never broached during this summit, which took place in the heart of historic Palestine. Khalil Bendib spoke with Samia Errazouki, a journalist formerly based in Morocco and a PhD candidate in early modern Northwest African history at UC Davis, about Morocco's participation in this summit and what might be motivating the Moroccan regime to go against the wishes of its own people. Courtesy of Voices of the Middle East and North Africa (VOMENA).

Adverse Reactions
Wildfire Smoke Isn't Monkey Business

Adverse Reactions

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 26:54


Because of natural exposure to wildfire smoke, nonhuman primates have provided an increased understanding of the long-term effects of smoke inhalation during infancy, shares Lisa Miller, University of California Davis (UC Davis). Dr. Miller also discusses with co-hosts Anne Chappelle and David Faulkner the importance of animal models in human health research and how nonhuman primates can be good models for vaccine testing, as was the case with COVID-19. About the GuestLisa A. Miller, PhD, is a Professor for the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and serves as the Respiratory Diseases Unit Leader for the California National Primate Research Center. She also is the principal investigator or co-investigator for 15 active research grants.Dr. Miller's research focuses on investigating the impact of environmental exposures (air pollution, allergens, microbes) on pulmonary and immune system development during the first year of life. She uses both cell culture approaches and animal models to address questions related to mucosal immune mechanisms in pediatric populations, with an emphasis on understanding the etiology of childhood asthma and susceptibility to infectious disease.Dr. Miller earned her BS and PhD from UC Davis and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
131: Virus Detection in Grapevines

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 27:46


With the prevalence of Leaf Roll Three, Red Blotch, and other viruses, accurate and timely detection of viruses in grapevines has never been more imperative. Alan Wei, Owner and Lab Manager at Agri-Analysis LLC in Davis California explains how his lab is using next generation sequencing (NGS) to find new viruses. Currently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the widely accepted method for testing for viruses. This process tests for one gene at time. Next generation sequencing allows labs to test multiple genes at a time and get results much faster. References: 20: Dr. Mark Fuchs | Red Blotch Virus in Grapevines 49: Stopping the Spread of Red Leaf Viruses 71: New Techniques to Detect Grapevine Leafroll Disease Agri-analysis LLC Donate: Juan Nevarez Memorial Scholarship Grape Program at Foundation Plant Services Leafroll 3 Virus (GLRaV3) AKA Grapevine Leafroll Disease in Washington Next Generation Sequencing (Deep Sequencing) PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) Testing Red Blotch Virus SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  My guest today is Alan Wei, who's owner and lab manager of Agri Analysis LLC in Davis, California. Alan, thanks for being on the show. Alan Wei  0:10  Thank you very much, Craig, for hosting me. And I'm very delighted to be here. And I want to use this opportunity to say hello to listeners as well. Craig Macmillan  0:19  So Alan, I want to have you on the show, because I want to talk about anything that's new and exciting in the world of grapevine virology, and a lot of research and a lot of development in industry with labs like your own. So, what's what's what's happening out there, what's going on with detection of viruses these days? Alan Wei  0:36  There is a International conference on grapevine viruses that's held every three years. So last time was 2018, in Chile. And the second, the following time was supposed to be 2021 in Greece, and unfortunately, that was canceled due to the obvious reasons, and then was supposed to be happening this year. And by the way, is not happening, and it's postponed until next year. So as a result, we have not, the researchers in this field have not been able to meet to report the latest grapevine viruses. Just to mention something that in the literature, for example, there are two or three new DNA viruses being discovered and reported. In fact, in grapevines, but their practical consequences are known. So we probably don't want to get in too much into them. Craig Macmillan  1:33  Maybe not, but I think this is an interesting thing because for instance, red blotch, caught everybody by surprise. And so how are these new...how are these these new viruses, how are they found, if you are looking forward, you're looking for other things, what kind of technology they're using to find this new stuff? Alan Wei  1:49  Typically, they're found by deep sequencing, also known as NGS Next Generation Sequencing. Researchers are always trying to look for the frontiers of why viruses virology by applying these methods and find this new viruses, but their practical impact needs to be validated, study to further be before we alarm growers. And red blotch was found a similar way. With the exception that the red blotch phenomena, and the disease was known to growers for years without the assay and the way the branch was first reported, or discovered through NGS that was, you know, the "wow" moment to growers. Yeah, we do now know what is causing this read leaf in my vineyard. Craig Macmillan  2:43  Tell me a little bit more about NGS, it sounds like this is gonna be an important technology for us, this deep sequencing. Alan Wei  2:48  Yeah, definitely. Deep sequencing is very widely used in the research community. And, when was that, in December meeting hosted by FFPS, they reported that NGS is going to be accepted by regulators like APHIS as a alternative way of testing materials coming from overseas. Which means shortened time and rapid, faster deployment of foreign important materials in in this country, or practically to growers hands. Yeah, the technology is definitely upcoming, and we're looking to possibly deploy it for routine use. We need to hear more feedback before we really do it. Craig Macmillan  3:41  This is obviously a very complicated technology, but like in a sense, can you explain what it is? Alan Wei  3:48  PCR is the way that accepted method in testing viruses or microbial in general. Compared to PCR, which tests one gene at a time, NGS would allow you to test multiple genes at a time. Because through the use of small, small redundant primers, which amplify many sometimes millions of hundreds of millions of fragments of the gene, which can parallelize sequenced with that data, and coupled with information, analysis, informatics, you can extract new new information from your sample, including new viruses, new bacteria. Craig Macmillan  4:38  So essentially, I've got a sample of plant material. And I run it through this NGS process, and it comes back and says, hey, there's genetic material in here that doesn't belong here. This is not grapevine, or hey, visit genetic material that's associated with some virus or something like that. And that's the flag that I get. And I get it from the whole picture. I'm not doing it like like you say gene by looking at for specific genes, I'm getting a kickback, I'm saying hey, there's there's a variety of things or whatever genes we weren't, wouldn't even thought to look for. Alan Wei  5:10  Exactly, exactly. You're right. And then that gene can be not not only you find genes and not belong to the grapevine, which we considered as, you know, the background gene, by further analysis of that, that special gene, you can assign them to, to pathogens, basically, different types of pathogens. Craig Macmillan  5:30  Gotcha. Yeah, that definitely speeds up the process a lot and makes it possible to catch things in finer net than we ever would have been able to do before. So that's pretty exciting. Alan Wei  5:38  Yes, def definitely. Craig Macmillan  5:40  Coming to red blotch, this is continues to be, you know, a very hot topic, obviously, it continues to be an issue in the field and continues to be an issue in other places. Is there anything new that we've learned regarding the Red Blotch Virus in any realm, anything about how it moves, its symptomology, new means of detection, anything like that? Alan Wei  6:08  I have a list of articles that just simply published during the past a couple of years, and researchers from you know, several major universities have really dived deep into the physiology, the virology, their impact on wine quality, in aspect of, of a rather large virus. They're really fascinating. From a practical standpoint, though, the progress has been less because what was reported to us few years ago remain the same, which which you know, very well. Which means rogueing, you know, rogueing your infected vines as aggressively as possible. Sourcing for clean materials as diligently as possible to prevent any viruses infecting material being planted. And once they do present in your vineyard take them out as quickly as possible. And also, although we know the Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper is the vector for red blotch. And folks don't recommend you spray against this particular insect because it is not a very efficient transmitter of the virus. Grapevine is not its preferred host. So those information were already known through talks by various speakers in the past. Craig Macmillan  7:33  We were talking about spread. And this is something that is absolutely puzzling to me, in years of field checking, I had never once seen this Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper. But I have talked to people who have. And they apparently are very reclusive, they will move away from you, the signs of the damage and very subtle, they do this little kind of girdling thing in the leaves. I just feel like there's just kind of be another vector. I mean, just I just feel to kind of be another vector. I mean, is there is there anything new in that world? I mean, we've identified the one but it seems kind of mysterious. And I'm thinking about the spread at the Russell Ranch, that finish and plant services ranch where we've not only identified it, but they were able to see that was spreading, attributed to the Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper, correct me? Alan Wei  8:19  I completely agree with you. Yeah, we don't see too many of our tree hoppers in the field. Yet spread in Russell Ranch has been phenomenal. It's more like, more exponential increase year after year, since 2018. So it is a mystery. If some of you, listeners, went to the seminar by UC Davis in early December, particularly the presentation by Professor Kent Daane, then the entomologists have been looking at a number of potential hosts. But unfortunately, they either have not been proven yet or, most of them were disproven to be a potential host. So we're still in that regard., virtually in the context of Russell Ranch, it is a complete mystery. You would think through the very aggressive management by FPS, you know, any presence over vectors were eliminated. And any source of vectors were eliminated. We have but yet they see this exponential growth in terms of infected vines, which, which stopped Russell Ranch from operation, basically. Craig Macmillan  9:40  Yeah, exactly. And I was actually looking at a table for one of your publications earlier today, and it looks like it went from zero to exponential like there was no nothing was detected for a couple of years or two. Then blammo! And I've been thinking about the same thing happening in other vineyards, I'm familiar with. And obviously just underlines how big of a threat red blotch is because we don't understand, you know, a lot, there's a lot we don't understand about it. So that means you got to sample. That you should rogue vines when you see them. But also you got to be sampling. Are there any is there anything new in the way of sampling protocols? Because I know that the distribution of the virus varies quite a bit between different parts of the plant different times of year and whatnot. So it's easy to miss it. What's the what's the best recommendation these days, if I wanted to test some lines, asymptomatic vines for red watch? Alan Wei  10:31  Yeah, we still recommend growers to sample cane materials, because in our analysis, you know, relative concentration in different parts of the vine, the cane materials has highest concentration of virus tighter level. And we also suggest growers to consider combine cuttings from different vines to make a what's called a composite sample. Therefore, they can you know, cost, testing costs can be reduced, and their testing budget can be maximized. And of course, you know, the testing objectives dictate how high your sample. Sometimes growers want to test the individual vines to really zoom in to which vine is exactly is infected, that you can only do that by testing individual vines. But the composite testing gave you the first level of screening. To see if you composite ten vines into one sample, and the entire sample would be positive. But if you want to zoom in which vine, but you're gonna want to use positive so that you can take it out, then you will do individual testing after the first round over the course screen, if you will. Craig Macmillan  11:44  Yeah, so the strategy would be basically like test the vineyard. And then if you find that something, then you drill down, and you can get it down to decide kind of what area where the individual vines are. That's a very, very smart technique. It's a really great idea. How sensitive are the detection techniques these days? So like, if I've got a if I have 10 vines out of 1000, and I sample and I sampled 10 vines, and I hit one of them, one of the infected ones, is that enough to show up in in the in the analysis? Alan Wei  12:15  Yeah, definitely. So if there's only one out of 10 cuttings is positive, and that means practically you're diluting the by 10 times, it is very much detectable. Craig Macmillan  12:27  Is there a lower detection limit? Alan Wei  12:28  Yeah, when there's a theoretical detection limit, and then there's a practical detection limit. If we do a back of the envelope calculation, a PCR method would allow you to detect one copy without the problem. But then of course, practically, there are other considerations such as whether you know, the one copy, you can sample that one copy into your PCR tube to begin with, because you know, if there's a one copy per microliter, and the way you want to use a two microliter in a PCR mix, you may or may not be able to transfer that one copy from a sample to the PCR tube to begin with. And even if you do, there may be potential inhibitors that present in grapevine material that could potentially influence your sensitivity as well. So there's a practical detection limit, and there's their theoretical detection limit issues. But overall, you know, we have found the red blotch detection to be not a problem, because typically the virus titer is high enough to be detected, even if you compounded multiple vines or cuttings into one sample. Craig Macmillan  13:33  That's good. That's very, very useful, very, very useful. I would love to move on to kind of other viruses because it's red blotch is not the only game in town these days. Leaf Roll complexes and Leaf Roll viruses, there's still a problem correct? Alan Wei  13:44  Especially Leaf Roll Three is very much that the top of our problems still and because you know the vaccine is very well known. It's very prevalent. Inoculum widespread to the percentage of vines tested positive for Leaf Roll Three that are coming through our lab is roughly about 15 percent. So Leaf Roll Three is very much prevalent. There have been some really nice talks, organized before the pandemic was by the Lodi growers group. There are some talks from including from South Africa. Recently from Red Blotch symposium where there's some presentations on Leaf Roll Three as well. So Leaf Roll Three is very much a serious problem. And growers need to be very vigilant against the Leaf Roll Three from from new planting materials to management of existing vineyards. Craig Macmillan  14:37  So let's say I've got a vineyard and I'm seeing some symptoms. I'm seeing some red leaves or I'm seeing some bronzing or I'm seeing something, and I've looked at the nutritional situation, I've ruled out either toxicity or deficiency. So I'm not thinking hey, you know, maybe this is a virus issue. Can you take samples of vines and just bring them to a lab and say, please help me? Can you tell me what this might be? I know we just talked about the deep sequencing. Is that, I'm not gonna say that technology. But like if I brought you some material and I said this has got a problem, how would you go about diagnosing it? Alan Wei  15:14  Oh, definitely. That's what we do every day. Most of our work is focused on helping growers find out what is possible cause of a programmatic vine in their vineyard. They will send in the samples, either individual vines or composite samples. We have a panel, what's called a combo panel that covers the 11 viruses, 11 major viruses. Leaf Roll Roll 1, 2, 3, 4, and two or three viruses, and of course, Red Blotch, and Fan Leaf, Pierce's. And then also Pinot Gris virus. That is the most frequently requested a panel. And by doing that panel, we typically find out if it's a virus issue. Craig Macmillan  15:58  That's very useful. It's very, very good to know. In relation to grapevine viruses, or just diseases overall, what is the one thing you would recommend to the listeners that they should keep in mind? Alan Wei  16:08  I think that you already touched on this earlier. You know, one thing is, if they see problems in the vineyard, they should consider the sample and test to validate whether they're viruses or not. And if they're considering to plant new materials, they should be very vigilant to to ask questions of the nurseries, and also do their own independent homework. And the you will be interviewing Dr. James Samp in another session. He can tell you more about how he go about sourcing for cleaning materials for his clients, which are very quality conscious. Craig Macmillan  16:47  Yeah, we're really looking forward to that conversation, Much like I was looking forward to this one. You know, this reminds me of something. You hear the word tighter a lot. And I don't think I fully understand what it means. I know that it's important and seems to be coming up a lot. Can you explain the concept and why it's important and what it means for us practically? Alan Wei  17:09  Yeah, I'm so glad you brought this topic up. You know, you and I have been serving on AVF committee, Grant Review Committee for a number of years. And last week, we had our review meeting for this year, and the subject came up. You know, we can talk about different aspects of Red Blotch impact in wine quality, wine physiology, you know, readily and so on and so forth. If we want to contribute one single factor of all of this different symptomology, it would be the virus tighter level. The virus tighter means the number of particles in the vine. If the vine is only infected with a smaller number of particles, its response to the virus is going to be different than the vines that are infected with larger or large number of particles. In our experience, the virus level in different vines can be very much different. I'm not talking about different by you know, 50 percent, or two or three fold. I'm talking about several orders of magnitude. There is a poster right behind me, which you cannot see. But we did a measurement of three infected vines. One, with clean, non effective. Another one is chosen for medium Red Leaf symptom. Another one, it's very heavily Red Leaf symptom. And virus level, the obviously the non infected vine was zero. And then the mediumly infected vine was about one or 200. And then heavily infected vine, was one hundred thousand in relative copy numbers. So this tells you that you know, this virus kinda level concentration level in the vine, really affect symptomology as well as the vine performance and the barrel quality and obviously, eventually, wine  quality. If we read the scientific literature, lots of studies report Red Blotch positive, Red Blotch negative, they did not talk about the virus tighter level. That's why we were so glad to see last week one of the research proposes to study the virus tighter level on different aspects of vine physiology and berry quality. I just think it was so so so important because the virus tighter will make it make a huge difference. Craig Macmillan  19:39  So we may be moving from a world of infected or not, to not, to more sick, less sick. Alan Wei  19:47  Yes, absolutely right. That is actually how we protect ourselves against the human viruses as well. You know, our vaccine does not completely protect us from infection. But it does protect us from viruses being propagated in high numbers in our body. Therefore, our symptoms of the infection in the individual is much less. And the ability for that individual to infect others are much less. Simply because of the lower virus tighter level in an infected person and similarly is true in grapevines. Craig Macmillan  20:24  So plants and animals are obviously very different organisms and where an animal has an immune system plants do not, they do not have an immune defense system. Is that correct? Alan Wei  20:35  Yes, you're right, correct. But they do have basic defense system against foreign organisms. One of them is the RNAi system. So speaking of that, you know, the simple symptomology in response to Red Blotch, and most of it is a total response, as a result of virus infection. The RNAi defense system gets activated. For example, the accumulation of the sugar of the raisin should be gradually, in a normal process, will be gradually moving towards the berries. But in Red Blotch, in fact, in vines, they are accumulated in leaves. Not moving toward the sugars. And the same for anthocyanins. That's why we see this red leaf. And those red color should be you know, in the berries, but they're not. They get stuck together, accumulating in leaves. It's fascinating. Unfortunately, we are still at the beginning of understanding all of this. Some reports are gradually coming out. Craig Macmillan  21:40  And so I want to make sure that I understand kind of how this works. So there's a grapevine that becomes infected. However way. The virus is very, very tiny bits of genetic material. Unlike, unlike a bacteria, which has a cell wall. Viruses don't have that they're just genetic material. The plant recognizes that somehow. And then RNA is the material that is produced from genes, the genes or have a have a sequence and then when that is reproduced that goes out into the world as RNA. Is that right? Alan Wei  22:17  Yes, the RNA is inside the host. And in response to a virus infection. And the defense mechanism get activated, which involves what is called enzymes. These RNA into smaller pieces, typically 20 nucleotide long. And they are, they are the what's called the interference RNA, or RNAi which inhibit the host from propagation inside the plant. Craig Macmillan  22:48  This is just, we need to wrap up for time, but I just have been thinking about this for years. And that is, where do these viruses come from? Where, how do they, how do they show up? What are these plant viruses? What? Are they jumping from other plants as a mutation of one into another? Or...do we know? Do I have any idea where these things come from? Because it seems like it's not just a question of finding it. Seems it's got to come from someplace. Alan Wei  23:14  Yeah, that's that's a really good question. I you know, you have biology, you have a load viruses, and obviously, RNA. Some viruses are readier to evolve, to change, to mutate. And that's why we see so many different mutants in the COVID virus family. And this is Red Blotch, is a DNA base virus, which have shown less mutation. And so far, we only seen two mutants, two clay types. And they practically they don't have much difference. As far as the, you know, the origin and the evolution. We need to have folks like Mark Fuchs to answer that. Craig Macmillan  23:55  At Cornell. Well, that's fantastic. That's that's our future. That's where, that's where we're going. Well, I think we've covered everything. Where can people find out more about you? Alan Wei  24:03  We have a website, agri-analysis.com. And then they could call us or email us anytime. We're here to help growers to build a better and clean vineyard so that they can make the best wine possible for the for their clients. Yes, sorry, Craig for the background noise. I think folks who are preparing samples as we speak. Craig Macmillan  24:26  I want to thank you Alan, our guest today has been Alan Wei, Owner and Lab Manager at Agri-analysis, David California. Thanks so much. This is really fascinating conversation. Alan Wei  24:35  Thank you very much Craig for hosting me. Continue to the great job. I'm so glad you're back at the Vineyard Team. You guys. You guys are wonderful team and doing great job. I'm very pleased to be here. Craig Macmillan  24:44  Thank you. I appreciate that.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 893 A Matter Of Taste Exploring The Differences Between Palates | Wine2Wine Recorded Sessions

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 43:16


Welcome to Episode 893; A matter of taste: exploring the differences between the palates of Chinese and Chinese American wine professionals, Alice Wong IWA, Gus Jian Zhu MW Welcome to Wine2Wine Business Forum 2021 Series. The sessions are recorded and uploaded on Italian Wine Podcast. wine2wine is an international wine business forum, held annually in Verona Italy since 2014. The event is a key reference point for wine producers and a diverse variety of wine professionals eager to develop and grow their wine business worldwide. About today's session: There are many ways of examining a specific market. Yet, one cannot have a comprehensive understanding of the wine market without knowing the cultural context. This presentation is going to be a cultural tour that explores the similarities and differences between the palates of Chinese and Chinese American wine professionals. More about the Speaker Alice Wong IWA‘s involvement in the wine industry is multifold, including education, writing, event management, and judging. With an immense interest in Italian wines, Alice became an Italian Wine Ambassador in 2018. She has worked with various Italian government bodies to promote Italian wines in Hong Kong. She has also spoken on behalf of Italian wine consorzio at various B2B platforms. In 2020, her wine education company Vino Missionari proudly became the first provider to launch the Italian Wine Maestro Course in Asia. Connect Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bebefat Instagram: @bebefatpt LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alice-wong-2254672/ More about the Moderator Gus Jian Zhu MW is the first Chinese national Master of Wine. He entered the wine world as a wine educator under the guidance of Fongyee Walker MW and Edward Ragg MW, the founders of Dragon Phoenix Wine Consulting. In 2017, he graduated with the Master of Science degree in Viticulture and Enology from UC Davis. Gus' commitment to the academic field of wine is evidenced by his MW dissertation about the sensory science of wine; and by co-authoring a review paper, “A Quarter Century of Wine Pigment Discovery”, published in the Journal of Food and Agriculture. Connect: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gus.zhu Instagram: @guszhu Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, cin cin!

Volts
Volts podcast: Fran Moore on how to represent social change in climate models

Volts

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 62:15


One of my long-time gripes about the climate-economic models that outfits like the IPCC produce is that they ignore politics. More broadly, they ignore social change and the way it can both drive and be driven by technology and climate impacts. This isn’t difficult to explain — unlike technology costs, biophysical feedbacks, and other easily quantifiable variables, the dynamics of social change seem fuzzy and qualitative, too soft and poorly understood to include in a quantitative model. Consequently, those dynamics have been treated as “exogenous” to models. Modelers simply determine those values, feed in a set level of policy change, and the models react. Parameters internal to the model can not affect policy and be affected by it in turn; models do not capture socio-physical and socio-economic feedback loops.But we know those feedback loops exist. We know that falling costs of technology can shift public sentiment which can lead to policy which can further reduce the costs of technology. All kinds of loops like that exist, among and between climate, technology, and human social variables. Leaving them out entirely can produce misleading results. At long last, a new research paper has tackled this problem head-on. Fran Moore, an assistant professor at UC Davis working at the intersection of climate science and economics, took a stab at it in a recent Nature paper, “Determinants of emissions pathways in the coupled climate–social system.” Moore, along with several co-authors, attempted to construct a climate model that includes social feedback loops, to help determine what kinds of social conditions produce policy change and how policy change helps change social conditions.I am fascinated by this effort and by the larger questions of how to integrate social-science dynamics into climate analysis, so I was eager to talk to Moore about how she constructed her model, what kinds of data she drew on, and how she views the dangers and opportunities of quantifying social variables. Get full access to Volts at www.volts.wtf/subscribe

UC Davis (Video)
Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

UC Davis (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

Science (Audio)
Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

Science (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

Health and Medicine (Audio)
Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

Health and Medicine (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

Health and Medicine (Video)
Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

Science (Video)
Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Pandemic Engineering: Tools for Lowering Risk and Spread of Infection

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 58:19


UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose of respiratory aerosols, including the highly effective and relatively low-cost do-it-yourself air cleaner for respiratory aerosols that has become known as the "Corsi-Rosenthal box." [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37997]

FOCUS on Agriculture
Episode 71: Sarah Klopatek - Sustainability and Beef Production

FOCUS on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 39:58


Dr. Sarah Klopatek is a sustainability and cattle systems scientist at UC Davis. As a scientist, she explains why it is often difficult to reduce complex questions to a simple answer, leading to her statement, "myopia is the death of sustainability." Her most recent publication explores the differences in nutritional profiles in beef from cattle raised in a variety of grain- and grass-fed systems. In our fascinating conversation she explains these differences, as well as the environmental impact of the production systems. To learn more about Dr. K's work, you can follow her on Twitter @DrBeefBabe or connect on LinkedIn.

Science Friday
Dog Breeds And Dog Behavior, Polar Science Update, Decarbonizing Transportation. April 29, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 47:35


Your Dog's Breed Doesn't Always Determine How They'll Behave The dog world abounds with stereotypes about the personalities of different breeds. The American Kennel Club describes chihuahuas as “sassy,” and malamutes as “loyal,” while breed-specific legislation in many cities target breeds like pit bulls as stereotypically aggressive. But do these stereotypes say anything true about a dog's personality and behaviors? New research in the journal Science looked at the genomes of thousands of dogs, both purebred and mutt, plus owner reports on personality traits. And their findings were more complicated: Yes, many behaviors have a genetic or heritable component. But breed, it turns out, may be a poor predictor of many things, including aggression or friendliness. Guest host Umair Irfan talks to co-author Elinor Karlsson about the complexities of genetics, personality, and breed in our best friends.   Life At The Poles Is Changing. What Do These Frozen Regions Forecast? It's been a spring of alarming headlines for the coldest climates on Earth, from record heat waves at both poles, to a never-before-seen ice shelf collapse in East Antarctica. But what can we say for sure about how the Arctic and Antarctic are changing under global warming? In this Zoom taping, guest host Umair Irfan talks to two scientists, Arctic climate researcher Uma Bhatt and Antarctic biological oceanographer Oscar Schofield, about the changes they're seeing on the ice and in the water, and the complex but different ecologies of both these regions. Plus, answering listener questions about the warming polar regions.   Can Hydrogen-Fuel Cells Drive The Car Market? If you've been shopping for a new car recently, you may have been struck by the number of electric vehicles available from different manufacturers. According to Kelley Blue book data, Americans bought almost twice as many EVs in the first quarter of 2022 compared to the first quarter of 2021, with battery-powered electric vehicles reaching 5% of the new car market for the first time. But electric isn't the only alternative to the traditional gasoline or diesel powered car—there are also hydrogen fuel cell car options, such as the Mirai, a hydrogen fuel cell car from Toyota. In those vehicles, compressed hydrogen is used in conjunction with a catalytic fuel cell membrane to generate the electricity to drive the vehicle. Cars using the technology can have a 300-mile range, with fuel-ups taking as little as five minutes. And while today much of that hydrogen comes from fossil fuels, there is the potential for it to come from electrolysis of water via renewable energy, such as solar or wind. But there are big technological and infrastructure challenges to solve before fuel cell technology could compete with the battery-powered electric car. Joan Ogden, a professor emeritus of environmental science and policy at UC Davis, joins Umair Irfan to talk about the requirements for building the refueling infrastructure that would make fuel cell vehicles a more attractive option to consumers.   Is It Possible To Decarbonize Shipping? It's said that 90% of all goods at some point travel on a ship. Much of that transportation is on container ships, gargantuan vessels that carry thousands of the 20-foot or 40-foot shipping containers that serve as the foundation of the global economy. But those big cargo ships have a massive energy appetite, and the “bunker oil” fuel they devour is notoriously dirty. If the global shipping industry was a country, it would be the sixth-largest greenhouse gas emitting country in the world. Lee Kindberg, head of environment and sustainability for North America for the shipping giant Maersk, joins Umair Irfan to talk about the company's efforts to reduce its carbon footprint. Maersk recently placed an order for a dozen methanol-fueled cargo ships, the first of which it plans to launch next year.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

Ag News Daily
April 29, 2022: Krisper Kill Technologies with Dr.Alison Van Eenennaam

Ag News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Today we are joined by Dr.Alison Van Eenennaam from UC-Davis to learn about Krisper technologies, including the new Krisper Kill. She shares resources for diving deeper into this topic including multiple TV series and movies!

Small Town Dicks Podcast
Tourist Season

Small Town Dicks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 35:16


A German couple comes to hike and enjoy the beautiful Big Sur coastline. As they wander through the backroads, they encounter their worst nightmare - a couple of predators out looking for a soft target. Detective Lins is called to investigate the aftermath and finds a story of tragedy as well as miraculous survival.The detective: Retired Detective Lins began his 31-year-career in law enforcement when he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Military Police Corps in 1967 after he graduated from UC Davis. He served two years at the United States European Command in Stuttgart Germany, where he was promoted to first lieutenant, and commander of the military police station. Later, as a captain, he commanded the first post stockade annex at the now defunct Fort Ord in CA. His most memorable investigation in Europe was solving the case of the bananas missing from a 4-star general's kitchen. Detective Lins went on to spend two decades as a deputy sheriff with the Monterey County Sheriff's Department, first as a patrol deputy and then as a detective working major crimes for 14 years. His final 7 years in law enforcement were as a District Attorney Investigator for the Monterey County DA, where where his assignments included major crimes and child sexual assault. During his law enforcement career he investigated over 40 death cases, with the majority being homicides. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aggie Overtime – The Inside Scoop on UC Davis Athletics
EVO WoW Podcast - Tatiana Arias, Managerial Economics grad from '20 and current District Territory Manager for Techtronic Industries

Aggie Overtime – The Inside Scoop on UC Davis Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 21:13


EVO WoW Podcast - Tatiana Arias, Managerial Economics grad from '20 and current District Territory Manager for Techtronic Industries.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Elon Musk Purchases Twitter | Organ Transplant Equity | Sol Blume Festival | ‘Tiny Desk Contest' Favorites

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022


What's at stake with Elon Musk's purchase of Twitter. A new initiative for organ transplant equity. Sol Blume R&B Festival in Sacramento. Favorite NPR "2022 Tiny Desk Contest" entrants from Northern California. Today's Guests Dr. Andy Jones, UC Davis writing professor, journalist and social media expert, discusses what's at stake with Elon Musk's purchase of Twitter and why it should still matter to people who don't use social media. Dr. Martin Cadeiras, Medical Director for the Heart Transplantation Program at UC Davis Health, explains a new initiative for organ transplant equity. Rhonda Smith, Executive Director of the California Black Health Network, discusses advancing health equity.  CapRadio News Editor Kris Hooks previews the Sol Blume R&B Festival this weekend in Sacramento. Jasmine Vu, with CapRadio Member Engagement, selects their favorite NPR "2022 Tiny Desk Contest" entrants from Northern California.  Arson Whales "Zephyr & Sycophant" eggcorn "Observer Effect" The Little Army “2021” Maya Unagi “Deep Red”

Fine Wine Confidential Podcast
EPISODE # 36 WILLIAMSBURG WINERY/PATRICK DUFFELER;FOUNDER & MATTHEW MEYER;WINEMAKER

Fine Wine Confidential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 61:46


Patrick Duffeler purchased his tract of land called Wessex Hundred just outside of Williamsburg, Virginia in 1983 and would start to plant his vineyard in 1985.  Patrick was born in Belgium and after gaining his degree in Economics & Finance from the University of Rochester, New York he started his professional career with Eastman Kodak. He would go on to work in the International Division of Philip Morris in Switzerland as the Director of Marketing and ultimately become President of Fragrances Selective. It was in 1983 that his wife Peggy had convinced them that he needed to slow down and after an exhaustive search they landed in Williamsburg, Virginia.  Along with producing world quality wine Patrick Duffeler has an amazing country Inn called Wedmore Place and several restaurants on the Estate at Wessex Hundred.His winemaker Matthew Meyer came to Williamsburg via California where he earned a degree at UC Davis in both Oenology and Viticulture and after a short stint at Grigich Hills Wine Cellars was recruited by Heitz Wine Cellars and learned directly from Joe Heitz.  Matthew moved to Virginia and took the position as Winemaker in 2002 and has been producing some of Virginia's highest quality wines ever since.HIGHLIGHTS OF THE INTERVIEW: a). Matthew recounts his introduction to wine as a young boy when he father was a Burgundian wine drinker vs Claret even though they were from Englandb). He talked about what a gift it was to work for Joe Heitz early in his career.c). He relays his father who was a big Burgundy aficionado would send him bottles of Burgundy because he said he would ruin his palette drinking all that California wine.d). When I ask Matthew about Climate Change he points to the continued issue with late frosts in the Spring and how they are getting later and later.e). Patrick brought an interesting perspective to the art of tasting wine and how when he learned to be a Perfumer when he was running an Internation Fragrance company the professionals told him that they couldn't smell and sniff fragrances and remember more than 18 before they got fatigued. He said the same for wine at the most.  Tasting a 100 wines in one sitting you only remember maybe 3 or 4 at the most.f). Matthew surprised me with his answer to my question about what was that one bottle of wine you had that made you go, that's it, now I get it.  Wine can be that ethereal.  g). Patrick's answer to that question was quite different as he tells the story of his Father taking them to a great restaurant in Perigord and he was served Foie Gras with Monbazillac.h). Matthew shares his theory about why Ca wine is so much higher in Alcohol than it was several decades ago.  he ties it to the new Rootstocks since AXR1 has been replaced.i). Patrick has a thought provoking story about what he calls "the Miracle after Midnight" part of winemaking in France.Much, Much more.  this interview is packed with stories and interesting opinions.  Listen below or read the transcript.

Ken's Nearest Neighbors
How "Bridges" Bring You Data Science Career Clarity (Sadie St. Lawrence) - KNN Ep. 96

Ken's Nearest Neighbors

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 63:57


Sadie St Lawrence is the Founder and CEO of Women in Data, the #1 Community for Women in AI and Tech. She has trained over 350,000 people in data science and has developed multiple programs in machine learning and career development. Sadie was named 10 Most Admired Business Women to Watch in 2021, and has been listed as a Top 21 Influencer in Data.  Her work has been featured in USA Today, Dataversity, and she is the recipient of the Outstanding Service Award from UC Davis.  In addition, she serves on multiple start-up boards, and is the host of the Data Bytes podcast. In her free time, you will find Sadie painting abstract art or sitting in the sun daydreaming about the future. 

Aggie Overtime – The Inside Scoop on UC Davis Athletics
EVO WoW Podcast - Autumn Miller - Softball alum and mental health practitioner

Aggie Overtime – The Inside Scoop on UC Davis Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 19:36


Autumn Miller - Softball alum and mental health practitionerSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chisme That Matters Podcast
Chisme 56: Using Body Movement to heal from Body Shaming | Maria Paula Ahumada-Recocha Vibes

Chisme That Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 56:56


Have you ever been told growing up, " estas llenita" or "estas gordita" "you should lose a little weight",? A lot of us did and it was quite traumatic. Body shaming is something that we experience since we were young and we carry on until adults. The world is cruel sometimes and negative comments will always exist but at the end of the day it is up to us to decide if we want negativity define us. On this chisme I chatted with Maria Paula Ahumada, a confidence coach and the founder of Recocha Vibes, a movement/space that help women reclaim their bodies through dance. We spoke about how she has been body shamed since she was a young girl and even now as a confidence and body movement coach. Thanks to dance and movement she has been able to heal from body shaming and help others do the same. Maria Paula Ahumada is a dancer, confidence coach, content creator, influencer, and model. She is a former PhD graduate student from UC Davis where she graduated with her Masters once she realized she had a higher calling. She now empowers women to reclaim their bodies and tap in to their inner light through dance and confidence building. As a survivor of sexual assault and experiencing the trauma of loosing a parent, Maria Paula understands the power of healing through movement. Therefore, by empowering women to play and take up space through movement she helps them take their confidence to the next level. She loves to use dance as a way to honor her ancestors and let her inner child play and is passionate about sharing that with as many women as possible. You can follow her on www.recochavibes.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chismethatmatterspodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chismethatmatterspodcast/support

Obsessed with Wine
Episode #9 - Benjamin Eyer - Admeo Inc., Beaverton, Oregon

Obsessed with Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 66:06


The casual wine drinker may not appreciate the amount of science that is involved in making wine these days.  This is why I have decided to focus this episode on the science of wine and winemaking.  Winemaking has become so scientific that winemakers are required to be well versed in aspects of chemistry and biology.  This is one of the reasons UC Davis' Viticulture and Enology program is so popular among wine professionals.  UC Davis is known for its cutting-edge research in these subjects, so it attracts people from all over the world.  This week's guest, Benjamin Eyer, graduated from the University of Pittsburg with a master's degree in Organic Chemistry.  Instead of going to medical school, he decided to follow his passion for wine.  Benjamin started his wine career by getting his Winemaking Certificate from UC Davis and traveling to Chile to learn how to work in a winery.   Then Benjamin joined Frank Family Vineyards in Napa, CA as an intern before moving to the pacific northwest.  In Oregon, Benjamin joined Trisaetum Winery and A to Z Wineworks as an intern to further his experience and grow as a winemaker.  Finally, Benjamin was named winemaker at Landlines Estates where he made wine for over four years before moving on to Montinore Vineyards in Forest Grove, Oregon.  After making wines for over eight years, Benjamin decided to make a career change and joined Admeo Inc. in Beaverton Oregon.  Admeo Inc. provides wine testing kits and machines that wineries use to analyze their wines starting when the grapes first arrive at the winery after harvest and all the way through fermentation and bottling.  These machines allow the wineries who can afford them, to test their wine samples much more efficiently and accurately which allows them to get the results of the analysis much quicker.  In this episode, Benjamin and I discuss his wine journey that brought him to Admeo Inc, some tests that winemakers do to fermenting juice and why, and we discuss some wines he is especially proud of making when he was at Montinore Vineyards in Oregon.  

IMF Podcasts
Giovanni Peri on the Economic Impact of Ukrainian Migration

IMF Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 26:07


The war in Ukraine has sparked one of the biggest refugee crises of modern times. So, can Europe afford to accommodate the millions of people coming across its borders? Giovanni Peri says while a crisis of this scale will imply significant upfront costs, the European Union is doing right by investing in the human capital of refugees. Peri heads the Global Migration Center at UC Davis, and in this podcast, he says Ukrainian migrants are an opportunity for many European countries that are experiencing aging populations and labor shortages.  Transcript: https://bit.ly/3jY7cMn  

Dead Doctors Don't Lie Radio
Dead Doctors Dont Lie 22 Apr 2022

Dead Doctors Don't Lie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 54:00


Monologue Dr. Joel Wallach begins the show discussing his discovery of the cause, prevention and reversal of MS (multiple sclerosis). Contending that Americans spend 85 billion dollars on treatment of MS. Also stating the he also has figured out how to deal with sudden infant death syndrome. Pearls of Wisdom Doug Winfrey and Dr. Wallach discuss a news article regarding a UC Davis study. Finding that a high saturated fat and sugar laden diet often called the Western diet can increase the risk of psoriasis. Others studies have linked the Western diet to increased risk of obesity. Callers Marylin thinks she has protein in her urine. Joseph's daughter has eczema and is seeing black dots in her eyes. Robert has questions about avoiding nitrates in foods. Rose has high blood glucose levels and low thyroid function. Call Dr. Wallach's live radio program weekdays from noon until 1pm pacific time at 831-685-1080 or toll free at 888-379-2552.

Angel Invest Boston
Qiuyan Xu, PhD, Entrepreneur and Angel Investor- Gravitate AI

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 52:07


Why angel-scale biotech is so promising: Learn More Qiuyan Xu, PhD is a statistician, an entrepreneur and a colleague at Walnut. We talked about the startups she has invested in, her immigrant journey and the work she does at Gravitate AI (https://www.gravitate.ai) Sponsors: Purdue University entrepreneurship & Peter Fasse, patent attorney at Fish & Richardson Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Qiuyan Xu, PhD, Statistician, Entrepreneur and Angel Investor Qiuyan Xu Talks About Her Investment in AOA Diagnostics Qiuyan Xu Talks About Her Investment in Octagon Therapeutics What Sal Daher Looks for in an Academic Founder Qiuyan Xu Wonders About the Long Holds in Life Science Investments “It's an important thing to remember now that the early-stage, angel-scale life science investing is really, really just beginning to take off.” “There are some angels who have done very successfully, with just a handful of companies.” “Weeding out the obvious losers. I think it makes a lot of sense.” We Still Know Surprisingly Little in the Life Sciences Qiuyan Xu Came to the US in 2003 to Study Statistics at UC Davis “...I got my PhD in 2008, in statistics, in the middle of a recession.” What Drove Qiuyan Xu to Become an Entrepreneur Qiuyan Xu's Company Is Gravitate AI (https://www.gravitate.ai/) Gravitate AI Helps with Data Cleaning & Automation as Well as Customizing Open-Source AI Solutions How Qiuyan Xu Became an Angel Investor Contagious Enthusiasm Qiuyan Xu's Advice to Angel Investors “You're urging angels to step right in, but at the same time, exercise control and have a budget.” Advice to Founders Topics: robotics / AI, discovering entrepreneurship, angel investing strategies  

Farm City Newsday by AgNet West
AgNet News Hour, Tuesday, 04-19-22

Farm City Newsday by AgNet West

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 40:18


Get the latest agriculture news in today's AgNet News Hour, hosted by Danielle Leal. Today's show covers the difference between seasonal vacuumed manure,  tree nut coverage pulling ahead of field crop acreage for the first time and UC Davis is among the best universities in the world for Ag and Veterinary Sciences. Tune in to the show for these news stories, interviews, features and more.

The Integrative Health Podcast with Dr. Jen
Episode #35 Dr. Michael Huang California Senate Candidate: A Warrior in a White coat

The Integrative Health Podcast with Dr. Jen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 44:13


Dr. Michael Huang: God, Country, Liberty, and RespectMichael grew up in Taiwan and immigrated to the US in his teens and worked his waythrough school to support his family and pay for his education. After completing amission for his church, he attended UCLA majoring in Biochemistry, then St. Georgeschool of medicine. Michael conducted cardiovascular research at Stanford Universitywith various clinical rotations throughout the US and England. Dr. Huang obtained hismedical degree in 2001 and completed his internship at Indiana University andresidency at UC Davis in Family Practice and was selected as House Staff President tohelp lead teams of physicians through their medical training.Dr. Huang's practice philosophy focuses on solving the root cause of disease, byconstant learning and mastering a wide range of diagnostic and surgical skills. Thisenables Dr Huang to act as his patients “race engineer” to better health and happiness.In 2020, Dr. Huang became alarmed by the rapid spread of Covid-19 miss-informationand dismissal of evidence-based medical practice with rapid adoption of baselessmandates rooted by fear and ignorance. Dr. Huang kept his clinic open and treatednumerous patients that were given up by their physicians and denied basic medical careresulting in successful treatment of thousands of Covid-19 patients. Dr. Huang hasfilled the vacant role of a health advocate for thousands of people in California andacross the state line as they seek refuge from the harms and collateral damages of illadvised Covid 19 measures.https://www.huangsenate.com/https://www.instagram.com/michaelhuangmd/

Ethnically Ambiguous
We Are Mona Shahab

Ethnically Ambiguous

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 61:46


In episode 247, the girls are joined by comedian, writer, performer, and director Mona Shahab! We get into her upbringing and immigration to the US, her parents work in politics, her career path, and so much more! Follow Mona on Instagram and Twitter at @MonaTheShah. Also check out Mona's work on her website!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wrestling Changed My Life Podcast
#329 Urijah Faber - UFC Hall of Famer and Former World Champ

Wrestling Changed My Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 33:48


Urijah Faber is a UFC Hall of Famer, former WEC World Champ, and a 2x NCAA Qualifier for UC Davis. Enjoy!

Aggie Overtime – The Inside Scoop on UC Davis Athletics
EVO WoW Podcast - Anna Geissbuhler, women's lacrosse alum and Senior Product Operations Manager One Medical

Aggie Overtime – The Inside Scoop on UC Davis Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 30:17


EVO WoW Podcast - Anna Geissbuhler, women's lacrosse alum and Senior Product Operations Manager One MedicalSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

VOMENA at KPFA
April 8, 2022: Samia Errazouki on Morocco's Summit with Israel

VOMENA at KPFA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 58:05


In a bold and historic step backwards for the cause of peace in the Middle East last Sunday, Morocco was one of four Arab countries meeting in a special summit with Israel and the US. Although distant Iran was central to the discussions held during this meeting, the central issue of Palestine never broached during this summit, which took place in the heart of historic Palestine. Khalil spoke with Samia Errazouki, a journalist formerly based in Morocco and a PhD candidate in early modern Northwest African history at UC Davis, about Morocco's participation in this summit and what might be motivating the Moroccan regime to go against the wishes of its own people,

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Sacramento Police Chief Kathy Lester | Increased bear activity in Tahoe | Native American Speaker and Documentary Series

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022


Sacramento Police Chief Kathy Lester discusses the rise in gun violence. An expected increase in black bear activity in the Tahoe Basin following last summer's Caldor Fire. UC Davis Native American and Indigenous speaker and documentary series. Today's Guests Sacramento Police Chief Kathy Lester joins us to talk about the recent acts of gun violence in the city and her plan to address the crisis moving forward. Tahoe Bear expert Toogee Sielsch provides more details on the expected rise in black bear activity in the Tahoe Basin following last summer's Caldor Fire.  Dr. Juan Avila Hernandez, Professor of Native American Studies at UC Davis, joins us to discuss the department's Spring guest and documentary series focusing on indigenous traditions and healing through the telling of native people's stories. 

Down to Earth: The Planet to Plate Podcast
Making the regenerative transition

Down to Earth: The Planet to Plate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 61:38


Jessica Chiartas is a PhD soil bio-geochemist who's working to catalyze the transition from "conventional" to regenerative agriculture. She's a postdoctoral researcher at the Innovation Institute for Food and Health at UC Davis and fellow with Food Shot Global, and is UC Davis partner for the California Farm Demonstration Network. She's lead Soil Scientist at Kiss the Ground, and the founder of Soil Life Services and a new project called Soil Life. On this podcast we talk about her work with Regen1, a California-based organization whose goal is to "transition one million acres in northern California to regenerative by 2025 and build an adaptive framework that scales worldwide." Jessica explains the complexity and challenges of doing this work.

Beach Weekly
Beach Sports S1E5: Softball turns season around, Dirtbags score 28 runs, and the Acura Grand Prix

Beach Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 5:53


In this week's episode, the Beach's softball team are currently enjoying a successful month of April going 5-1. This coming off a forgetful start to the season. The Beach has since turned it around and their last game against UC Davis was their first loss since March 27. The women's beach volleyball team are coming off an exceptional performance at the Stanford Invitational. They took down ranked opponents #8 Stanford and #16 Pepperdine. Women's tennis continue to struggle dropping their third straight match, this time at the hands of Cal State Fullerton. The Dirtbags set a historic school record with a lopsided score 28-2 against Cal Poly, with the record of biggest score differential in a game and most hits (32) in a game. They were unable to fight off Cal Poly, though, dropping two games in the three game series. #2 Men's volleyball are unable to overcome #10 UC Davis following a sweep in the first game of a split home-away series. The 3-2 loss in the second encounter still has the Beach atop the standings in the Big West as the regular season nears its end. The Acura Grand Prix returns to Long Beach converting the streets of Downtown Long Beach into a race track. The event was held over the weekend over three days, culminating in the big Sunday race. Daily 49er Social Media Editor Kristina Agresta comes on the show to discuss the Grand Prix. New episodes will drop every other Monday. Like, comment, and follow us on your favorite platform for more content! Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beach-weekly/id1488484518?uo=4 Google Podcasts https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9kMzEwMjEwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/4HJaqJep02kHeIQy8op1n1 Overcast https://overcast.fm/itunes1488484518/beach-weekly Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/daily49er

Cowgirl Problems
Debunking Cattle Myths with Sebastian Mejia Turcios

Cowgirl Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 46:33


Sebastian Mejia Turcios developed a deep passion for cattle and agriculture early on during his upbringing in Honduras. He followed his love for agriculture to Costa Rica and eventually made his way to the United States. Currently a Ph.D. student at the renowned UC Davis, ranked among the best in the world for agriculture studies, Sebastian is debunking myths about the U.S. beef industry. On this episode he shares he deep love for cattle, his advocacy journey, sharing research based narratives and more. Instagram - @semejiaturcios Podcast Hosted by - @courtdehoff http://courtenaydehoff.com