Podcasts about Serbia

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Country in the Balkans

  • 2,594PODCASTS
  • 5,285EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST
Serbia

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Serbia

Show all podcasts related to serbia

Latest podcast episodes about Serbia

Bertcast's podcast
# 531 - Nikola Djuricko (Stranger Things) & ME

Bertcast's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 96:40


Today, I sit down with Stranger Things break out star, Nikola Djuricko. Nikola Plays Yuri in the new Stranger Things season and I met him while shooting my movie in Serbia. Today, we talk about growing up in Serbia, becoming an actor, Serbian basketball, shooting Stranger Things, Winona Ryder, and much more!     Follow Nikola Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nikoladjuricko    This episode is brought to you by Better Help. Get 10% off your first month with the discount code “BERT”. Get started today at http://www.betterhelp.com/bert    This episode is also brought to you by Lectric eBikes. Go to http://www.lectricebikes.com for $100 off any eBike purchase.    This episode is also brought to you by Private Internet Access. Go to http://www.privateinternetaccess.com/Bertcast for %82 off!    For all TOUR DATE & MERCH click HERE: http://www.bertbertbert.com  Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/bertkreischer  Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/BertKreischer  Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/bertkreischer  Youtube: http://www.Youtube.com/user/Akreischer 

Orthodox Wisdom
The Life of St. Sebastian of San Francisco and Jackson (V/V)

Orthodox Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 26:40


The first Orthodox priest born in America, St. Sebastian of San Francisco and Jackson is an Apostle to America for having served across its vast land in countless parishes amongst Orthodox and non-Orthodox people of all ethnic backgrounds. Born in San Francisco in 1863, he helped establish the first Serbian Orthodox parish in the Western Hemisphere in Jackson, CA in 1894. He served tirelessly in America and Serbia where he reposed in 1940 at the Zhicha Monastery. In 2007 his holy relics were transferred back to Jackson, CA and in 2015 he was formally canonized a Saint by the Orthodox Church, confirming what the faithful had known for some time--that St. Sebastian's last wish had been granted him: “the Kingdom of Heaven without end.“ This is part five of five of the Life of Saint Sebastian and has been generously offered by our brother Sergius. In part four we read the end of his earthly life and here were read the events surrounding the translation of his relics and his then possible canonization that later happened in 2015. 1. Read the Life of St. Sebastian here (link to PDF at top of page): http://orthodoxinfo.com/general/archi... 2. Read his Catechism "The Holy Orthodox Church" here: https://books.google.com/books?id=5jJ... 3. On the canonization of St. Sebastian and St. Mardarije, including Troparion and Kontakion: https://westsrbdio.org/canonication/ 4. Akathist: https://www.stsavajackson.org/akathis... This channel is dedicated to sharing the writings and lives of the Saints of the Orthodox Church. Glory to Jesus Christ! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/orthodox-wisdom/message

Serbian Radio Chicago Podcast
NOVO! PROF DR MILOS VESIN - HRVATI TRAGOVIMA KRVI ISPISUJU SVOJU 'ISTORIJU' 8.5.22

Serbian Radio Chicago Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 15:47


SRPSKI RADIO CIKAGO – PROF DR MILOS VESIN• 27 GODINA OD STRAVICNOG ETNICKOG CISCENJA SRBA IZ HR• ZVERSKI ZLOCIN NA TZV AUTOPUTU BRATSTVA I JEDINSTVA• KO JE SPASAVAO SRPSKU DECU IZ DALMACIJE• PERFIDNI BISKUPI IZ HRVATSKE, LOGORI ZA DECU U NDH I PIROVANJE BEZUMLJA • MANASTIRI KRKA, DRAGOVIC I KRUPA SVEDOCE 800 GODINA O SRBIMA U HR• MOLITVA ZA PLEMENITU SRPKINJU SASU I PONOSNOG SRBINA CEDOMIRA VIDOVICASERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO IS A KEY PLAYER AMONG THE ETHNIC BROADCASTERS IN THE U.S. AND IS CONSIDERED THE NUMBER ONE MEDIA OUTLET IN THE SERBIAN-AMERICAN AND BALKAN COMMUNITY IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CANADA.SERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO BROADCASTS DAILY FROM 3PM TO 4PM CST ON WNWI AM 1080, CHICAGO.HTTPS://WWW.SERBIANRADIOCHICAGO.COMHTTPS://WWW.SERBIANRADIOCHICAGO.NETSupport the show

Serbian Radio Chicago Podcast
NEW! ALEKSANDAR RAKOVIC - MI SMO JAKA I ZRELA SRPSKA NACIJA 8.4.22

Serbian Radio Chicago Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 59:05


SERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO – PROF DR ALEKSANDAR RAKOVICNAUCNI SAVETNIK U INSTITUTU ZA NOVIJU ISTORIJU SRBIJE• TEMELJNI UGOVOR I MONTENEGRINSKA HARANGA• SPC JE 800 GODINA PRISUTNA U CG• DRITAN ABAZOVIC ZASLUZUJE ZAHVALNOST SRPSKOG NARODA• ZDRAVKO KRIVOKAPIC NAJVECA PREVARA OD RAZBIJANJA YU• VLADA CG NECE BITI SRUSENA• HRVATI PROTERALI 500.000 SRBA I IZVRSILI GENOCID NAD SRBIMA• PORODICA PREDSEDNIKA ZORANA MILANOVICA OD PARTIZANA DO USTASA• REZOLUCIJA O GENOCIDU NAD SRBIMA• UJEDINJENJE SRBIJE, CG I RS U JEDINSTVENU DRZAVUSERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO IS A KEY PLAYER AMONG THE ETHNIC BROADCASTERS IN THE U.S. AND IS CONSIDERED THE NUMBER ONE MEDIA OUTLET IN THE SERBIAN-AMERICAN AND BALKAN COMMUNITY IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CANADA.SERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO BROADCASTS DAILY FROM 3PM TO 4PM CST ON WNWI AM 1080, CHICAGO.HTTPS://WWW.SERBIANRADIOCHICAGO.NET HTTPS://WWW.SERBIANRADIOCHICAGO.COMSupport the show

Goffeng På Leting
Hva skjer med Serbia og Kosovo? Sylo Taraku forklarer.

Goffeng På Leting

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 34:59


Det har vært gnisninger på grensen mellom Serbia og Kosovo i det siste. Hvorfor nå? Hvor farlig er det? Hva skjer om det virkelig smeller? Jeg kontaktet Agendas Sylo Taraku, som dukket opp på kort varsel for å forklare.Om du synes episoden avsluttes litt brått, så er det riktig. Vi snakket om en del uplanlagte ting også. Men det ble litt vel rotete, selv for denne podcasten. Men Sylo kommer tilbake igjen. Med ham er det mye interessant å prate om.

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Fixing and Flipping Properties While Being Halfway Around The World

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 24:10


Welcome back! Today's guest is Alicia Jarrett, Alicia is an experienced leadership expert helping women in business and real estate educators to increase their performance, and inspire growth and accountability using proven rock-solid methods. Alicia has been a strong female business owner and entrepreneur for almost 15 years, helping leaders of all levels to maximize their performance and increase their potential.    [00:00 - 06:29] How to do business from anywhere in the world with real estate investing success Alicia Jarrett is a global real estate investor based in Australia who conducts her deals in the US. She co-owns multiple businesses, including Global Citizens Holding Land Scouts, Supercharged Offers, and Wilda for women in business.   [06:29 - 13:01] Remotely Scaling Your Real Estate Business Covid has been one of the worst things in history But one of the good things that have come out of it is that a lot of people have gotten used to working remotely now. Even down to our title companies and some of the counties we work with, they've all gotten very sophisticated. The miss about scaling is that adding more people just adds more cost.  To overcome this, start doing business remotely by getting on the phone with people from Australia and establishing relationships. Once they got the first person in place, it became easier to find other partners and do business   [13:01 - 19:28] Real Estate Marketing Tips from Supercharged Offers How the real estate market can be unpredictable and how this can lead to more sellers and buyers in a recession. Supercharged offers help real estate investors by providing them with a consistent pipeline of deals. One of the biggest problems for real estate investors is inconsistency, which can lead to deals not being closed or returns not being realized on investments quickly enough.     [19:29 - 24:09] Closing Segment Reach out to Alicia Links Below Final Words         Tweetable Quotes “You don't have to do it all yourself. If you find the right people to partner with, be okay to let go of control of some things, as long as those things are done well, and spend your time and energy on the stuff that makes you money” - Alicia Jarrett ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Alicia visit their website www.superchargedoffers.com You may email her at alicia@superchargedoffers.com  or call her team through (888) 538-5478     Connect with me:   Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on. Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below: [00:00:00] Alicia Jarrett: a lot of people are like, well, I have to do business in the state that I'm in, or I know I have to be able to go and see the properties. [00:00:05] Alicia Jarrett: No, you don't. You can do business from anywhere in the world. We have done deals on ski slopes in France, on yachts and Croatia. And all the way here from Australia. So you do not need to be in the same location as your deals, as long as you know what you're doing, how to run your due diligence, how to have boots on the ground when you need it. [00:00:23] Alicia Jarrett: And making sure that you've got the right people on your team. Other than that, You don't need to be anywhere near your deals as long as the deal stacks up and the numbers stack up. You're all good.  [00:00:43] Sam Wilson: Alicia Jarrett is a global real estate investor based in Australia who conducts her deals in the us. She co-owns multiple businesses, including global citizens holding L Scouts, supercharged offers and Wilder for women in business. Alicia, welcome  [00:00:57] Alicia Jarrett: to the show. Thank you so much, Sam. Great to be here. Pleasure's mind all the way from all the way from the future. [00:01:03] Sam Wilson: Absolutely. Yes, you are coming from the future. That's funny. I hadn't heard that before. Yeah, I know. it's June 29th for you.  [00:01:09] Alicia Jarrett: I would assume it sure is. Yeah. Yeah. June 29th, 6:00 AM. And tomorrow's looking pretty good for you, Sam. I can tell you that much.  [00:01:16] Sam Wilson: Great. Great. What's the stock market doing? [00:01:18] Sam Wilson: I guess it's not open yet. Shoot. open to find out where I should place my bets tomorrow. Yeah. It's only June 28th for me. It is a pleasure to have you on the show. There are three questions I ask every guest who comes to the show in 90 seconds or less. Can you tell me, where did you start? Where are you now? [00:01:32] Sam Wilson: And how did you get there?  [00:01:34] Alicia Jarrett: Yep. Where did we start? We started doing so we are based in Australia as people can probably tell them from my accent. We started doing some houses way back in like 20 years ago here in Australia, just to get some investment properties up and running. But then when we wanted to take that full time, we ended up going into the us. [00:01:50] Alicia Jarrett: We did some fix and flips with houses. We then went into vacant land, which is now our asset class that we do. Where are we now? We are now doing multiple vacant land deals per month. We've got a team of three full time customer service people in that business. We now have our own real estate marketing business based in the us because. [00:02:08] Alicia Jarrett: We saw that there was a huge gap in the market of how people know how to do good marketing. That's got 14 people in it and we're about to launch a new app called enable letters.com. So, yeah, we've grown a lot in five years, Z .  [00:02:20] Sam Wilson: So, so say that. What was the last business that you're involved in? [00:02:23] Alicia Jarrett: The last one we're about to launch a new app it's coming watch this space. It's called neighbor letters.com and we're launching a  [00:02:30] Sam Wilson: neighbor letters. Yep. Got it. Okay. Sorry. I'm hard. Not only am my heart of hearing. I'm not very bright. So forgive me. So neighbor  [00:02:37] Alicia Jarrett: letters is the Aussie accent is a thick one. [00:02:40] Sam Wilson: it's all good neighbor letters. So what is that?  [00:02:44] Alicia Jarrett: So that is an app where a lot of real estate investors, when they get a property under contract or they wanna sell that direct to market or they wanna just send out any types of coms to people in an area where they have properties. A lot of people send out neighbor letters, but the process to do that is very very onerous. [00:03:01] Alicia Jarrett: You've gotta go and, find out who are your neighbors are and download. And cleanse that list and put that into a mail merge and get that sent to a print house. And a lot of the times it's small print runs which a lot of print companies won't do. So a lot of times people print it themselves and then they have to take it to the post office. [00:03:16] Alicia Jarrett: We're building a service where you can actually, and in like six clicks or less and in about six seconds, get your neighbor letters all sent out. So we're really big on, on data. What's the point of enabler letters is when you've got a property. So regardless of what property that is, maybe it's vacant land or a house or any other kind of asset class, sometimes your best buyers are people that already live in the area. [00:03:37] Alicia Jarrett: Right. They know the area well, right. The neighbors. The people surrounding the property and particularly for info, lots as well, like a lot of different real estate investors. If they've got an info lot with vacant land, the first people they'll reach out to is the people on that street or the people surrounding that house because they know the area better than anyone. [00:03:55] Alicia Jarrett: And if you can put the right offer in front of them, a lot of the time people in the area are like, yep. I want that  [00:04:02] Sam Wilson: I? Absolutely. Yeah. I'm proved that you're AB the house I'm standing in was my neighbor's. And I, oh, there you go. I was like, and there's my next office. Great. Okay, cool. And I would what we call it here in Memphis is securing your borders. [00:04:14] Sam Wilson: It's yeah, it's exactly right. Like, and I wanna own my whole neighborhood if I could.  [00:04:20] Alicia Jarrett: Yep. Correct. It's like a monopoly board.  [00:04:22] Sam Wilson: yeah, a hundred percent. I, yeah, if I can not control the wrong word, but I guess it's probably exactly what I mean. So why not just come out and say it, but if I can control who living next to me and I get to pick my neighbors by all means  [00:04:33] Alicia Jarrett: I plan on doing so and someone doesn't build a McMansion right. [00:04:36] Alicia Jarrett: Next. To you that, that is an IO. Like, you get control over that. Right. So, yeah. Yeah. Maybe's where it's at. That's AB you know that's coming. We can talk about that on a whole nother podcast.  [00:04:46] Sam Wilson: no, right. I know. I'm sorry. I got distracted by it. It was like, oh, that's really fascinating. Haven't heard of that. [00:04:51] Sam Wilson: Forgive me. The point of our conversation here today is really to find out how you have scaled your companies, especially being halfway around the world. I mean yep. And having a vacant land, investing business, doing fix and flips, I can. I've only done one fix and flip where I never saw the property in person. [00:05:09] Sam Wilson: Like how in the world did you do that?  [00:05:12] Alicia Jarrett: Yeah. Good question. I'm gonna start before I answer that. I'm just gonna start by dispelling a myth here if that's okay, Sam, because we speak to real estate investors all day long in our marketing business. And a lot of people are like, well, I have to do business in the state that I'm in, or I know I have to be able to go and see the properties. [00:05:28] Alicia Jarrett: No, you don't. You can do business from anywhere in the world. We have done deals on ski slopes in France, on yachts and Croatia. And all the way here from Australia. So you do not need to be in the same location as your deals, as long as you know what you're doing, how to run your due diligence, how to have boots on the ground when you need it. [00:05:46] Alicia Jarrett: And making sure that you've got the right people on your team. Other than that, You don't need to be anywhere near your deals as long as the deal stacks up and the numbers stack up. You're all good. So how did we scale? I guess where we started Sam, if I can go back to the beginning, cuz I just mentioned their boots on the ground. [00:06:00] Alicia Jarrett: So when we first started doing business in the us, we spent a fair amount of time in the us. Every couple of months we were over there. Meeting with realtors, title companies, going, checking out areas getting to know the lay of the land and putting the right people in place to, to be able to then step away and have the right people there. [00:06:19] Alicia Jarrett: So number one, get the right people on your team. Get the right boots on the ground. Once we did that, we were then able to do pretty much everything remotely. And if there's one thing, Sam. Unfortunately, Covid been one of the worst things in history we've seen, but one of the good things that has come out of it is that a lot of people have gotten used to working remotely now. [00:06:38] Alicia Jarrett: And even down to our title companies and some of the counties that we work with, they've all gotten very sophisticated. Let's say not too sophisticated, but they've all gotten better in kind of doing things, without having to be there in person. So when we scaled, I think the thing. [00:06:55] Alicia Jarrett: The miss about scaling. A lot of people go, we gotta scale by adding more people. And doing more of the same scaling is not about necessarily adding people to your business. Like that just adds more cost scaling really at the end of the day is looking at how do you. What's the process in systems. [00:07:14] Alicia Jarrett: And how do you do business and how do you do more of that without necessarily adding more cost? And that's all about efficiency? So sometimes I hear people go, I wanna scale my business. And the first thing that they say, Sam is, I'm gonna go and hire a VA. I'm like, that's not scaling. That's just managing people. [00:07:31] Alicia Jarrett: so, it's it's an interesting approach that people think about when they hear the word scale.  [00:07:36] Sam Wilson: You said, you came here to the states, which, I mean, God bless you. Flying back and forth from Australia is not a short hop. But you came back and forth quite a bit in the early days to kind of establish your, your industry partners, your title companies, your lenders and everybody else maybe early on boots on the ground would sound like it would be a challenging piece of the equation or piece of the puzzle. [00:07:56] Sam Wilson: To solve. How did  [00:07:57] 615audio1805131727: you  [00:07:58] Alicia Jarrett: overcome that easiest puzzle to solve? So we actually started that remotely. We just got on the phone to people from Australia and we said, Hey, we're real estate investors. We're gonna be investing first of all in Florida. We're looking first of all for realtors to be on our team. [00:08:12] Alicia Jarrett: So that we've got some Intel about different areas in Florida. And we just got on the phone to different realtors and said, this is what we're doing. We're planning on coming over. Are you the kind of realtor that's interested in working with an investor? That's got some interesting strategies we wanna put into play. [00:08:28] Alicia Jarrett: Most realtors. This is going back five years ago. I think the story would be different now, but most realtors didn't even bother returning our phone calls. Ones that did we still do business with today? And one in particular has been on our team since day one. He, his name's Michael Cassidy and he's amazing. [00:08:44] Alicia Jarrett: And he went out and helped us buy our first few properties and one of the first fix and flips we did, we actually went over and did like demo day together. Because we wanted to get to know our contracting team and all of that. And he's been with us since day one. We now JV with him on a number of deals and through that, and here's the thing. [00:09:00] Alicia Jarrett: Once you get the first person in place, the easiest question then becomes, okay, so we're working with you and this is working well. Who do you know? Who's some title companies that you've worked with that, that you trust. Who's some probate attorneys that, that you've worked with, that you trust. who's some real estate attorneys you've worked with that you trust. [00:09:19] Alicia Jarrett: And the list goes on. So we got introduced to quite a few people because of that existing relationship. And that's the same in pretty much if I think about the multiples now of people that we work with, a lot of, it's not what, it's who, you know, And are you willing to ask for an introduction? [00:09:34] Sam Wilson: that's a great point. That's a great point. And that's, you're leveraging their Rolodex. I mean, it's like, yeah. Yeah.  [00:09:40] Alicia Jarrett: Who do you, and that it's, what's good for you is good for them. It's kind of that I use the word ecology. It's good for you. It's good for me. And it's good for the greater good. [00:09:47] Alicia Jarrett: and if we can approach business with that lens that, Hey, if you help me, I'll bring you more deals. And that has happened. So in our team, if I think about our title company, our realtors, our probate attorneys, I've introduced them now to. Hundreds of real estate investors as a result of just me having a network with them. [00:10:04] Alicia Jarrett: So right. What goes around, comes around  [00:10:06] Sam Wilson: Sam that's absolutely right. Absolutely. Right. That's really cool. I love hearing that. That's possible. How did you guys not end up. I mean, the old phrase that there's a reason, like, there's the word con and contractor, like, how did you not end up, with a bad contractor along the way, or maybe you did, like, that was that well, we did  [00:10:24] Alicia Jarrett: at our last house. [00:10:25] Alicia Jarrett: This is why we changed asset classes. Our last house that we did, it was at that time as well, Sam. Everybody wanted to get into single family homes and do fix and flips. And I'm gonna blame HGT for that. Everyone wanted to be the next chip and Joanna Gaines and no, all good, all wonderful. [00:10:41] Alicia Jarrett: But that was at the time when getting contractors and keeping them was getting really tough because people were just paying through the roof for, good resources. Yep. Finding good off market deals was getting really tough. And the last house that we did. Our contract team and our head contractor didn't do the right things. [00:10:58] Alicia Jarrett: And we started to see some cracks forming in, in the business. And we started to see some cracks forming in our strategy as well. And it was like, okay, now's the time to go time out. Let's revisit our strategy. Let's look at where this asset class is going. Cuz all real estate goes in cycles. We know. [00:11:14] Alicia Jarrett: And let's look at what might be an easier asset class. And that's when we started vacant land about four and a half years ago now. So we haven't looked back vacant land. Don't really need contractors. Sam. It's so easy. right.  [00:11:26] Sam Wilson: Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. That's that's brilliant. I love the transition. [00:11:30] Sam Wilson: That's about the same time. It's funny. That's the same time I got out of single family housing as well. I was doing tons of fix and flip at that point and it was just like, wait, there's. Competition's increasing margins are getting squeezed. Contractors are harder to come by. It just it just kept  [00:11:45] Alicia Jarrett: ING all those things, right? [00:11:46] Alicia Jarrett: Yeah. We were the same.  [00:11:48] Sam Wilson: Yeah. I said I'm I'm done really in this and which I, by and large. I done any single family did this house, but that's that again? This is my now my market I guess, I guess it doesn't really count. Tell me about this. You guys moved into vacant land. I've had a few people come on and really talk to us about their vacant land investing and kind of what the nuances of vacant land. [00:12:08] Sam Wilson: That's really cool. Do you guys take a different spin? On vacant land maybe than what some of I've talked to some people who come out and they do rural vacant land. What do you guys do in the  [00:12:18] Alicia Jarrett: vacant land space? Yep. We do it all. So I'll never say no to a deal because again, if the numbers add up and there's a, there's the appropriate exit strategy for that deal, we will do it. [00:12:26] Alicia Jarrett: So we do info lots. We do acreage. We do rural. We do commercial. We'll do any kind of vacant land because where there's a seller. There's often, always a buyer. Right. And so we don't, we haven't really narrowed our strategy down except this year we are, we're definitely this year going after a small to medium acreage. [00:12:44] Alicia Jarrett: That's just on the perimeter of some the cities that, that we operate in so that we can subdivide and do some forced appreciation on those as well. But we still do lots. We still do farmland we do it all. And it's a thing, I guess, we, five years ago we started to do business in Florida. [00:13:01] Alicia Jarrett: Interestingly enough, Sam, we still stay in Florida. We haven't had the need to go out right into other states and do business yet. And the reason is because we've now built up a reputation. We've got a buyer list that is huge. We've got realtors. We've got this network now. So if we get a deal. [00:13:18] Alicia Jarrett: If we wanna do the deal, we've got the right people in place and often we've got buyers in place and some of our buyers are also builders and developers. But if we don't wanna do that deal, I've still got a network that I can pass that contract onto. So we really don't. We really don't say no too much which makes me think maybe we should be getting a bit more targeted with our deals, but where you've got sellers and buyers, the deals be done. [00:13:40] Alicia Jarrett: Right.  [00:13:41] Sam Wilson: right. Right. What does vacant land do in a recession  [00:13:45] Alicia Jarrett: yeah it's interesting. And if, I think back to, after 2008 and what happened there now, we, weren't obviously doing business in the us at that point, but you know, you go back in history and every time a recession happens, the same kind of cycle still happens. [00:13:59] Alicia Jarrett: So first of all, I think a lot of people hear the word recession freak out a little bit. It's like, well, okay what does this mean? Right. We don't because. It's happened so many times in history. It's like, the same stuff goes on in a recession. More people wanna liquidate. So you end up with more people that have their cash tied up in an asset. [00:14:17] Alicia Jarrett: Maybe that asset is vacant land. And all of a sudden they're in a position of, I wanna liquidate that, get my cash out as soon as I can and put my cash into something else. Great. That means you've got more sellers on the market. People tend to freak out and go. Yeah, but no, one's gonna buy in a recess. [00:14:32] Alicia Jarrett: Yeah, they do. They just tend to buy low. So you have a lot of land bankers that will buy in recession times. You have a lot of investors that know that markets go in cycles, and they'll say, I'm gonna hold this for five years and then see what happens. A lot of builders and developers still wanna make money in that time. [00:14:47] Alicia Jarrett: So they'll buy and hold and wait for the right opportunity to then build in those areas. There's still exit strategies, that are there. I think the only thing in a recession is you need to adjust, where you are doing. So if you are buying here and selling here in normal times at a recession that might do this, so you're still buying and selling, but it might just not be at the same levels as to what you might be. [00:15:09] Alicia Jarrett: So, that doesn't scare us,  [00:15:11] Sam Wilson: right? No, I love it. Absolutely love it. Tell me about supercharged offers. What is yeah.  [00:15:16] Alicia Jarrett: It's something I'm very passionate about. So one of the things we recognize Sam early on, when we first got into real estate investing, we went and did all the courses and went to these education seminars that told us how to do deals in the us. [00:15:28] Alicia Jarrett: And same thing happens every time they say, go and download a list, put some mail together, send out some direct mail and wait for the phone to ring. And we did that, but that's what everyone else is doing. Right. Right. That's kind of like the. 1 0, 1 stuff. Right. And so my partner, Matt and I and we still, we, we noticed very early on this inconsistency in our business, because if we weren't mailing all the time, our business started to have gaps in it. [00:15:53] Alicia Jarrett: And we see this time and time again in every real estate group. It's like, people have this roller coaster effective. Oh, we've got a good month. Cuz we did some mailings and we got a bad month cuz nothing's closing. And we just thought, how do we wanna run our business? If we were to really think about running. [00:16:07] Alicia Jarrett: As a business, not just as a hobby. So supercharged offers was simply born out of a need for. To do our own marketing in the way that we choose. And that's making sure that we have a consistent pipeline of deals always happening. So supercharged offers it, we didn't mean for it to become a business, but now we've got customers in over 12 countries all doing deals in the us more than 80 customers that we're working with and we love it. [00:16:31] Alicia Jarrett: So we're basically managing the acquisitions marketing for. And here's what I wanna come back to Sam. A lot of people get into real estate investing cuz they're good at doing deals. They're good at speaking to sellers, they're good at speaking to buyers and they're good at doing a deal. They're not so good at managing data. [00:16:47] Alicia Jarrett: Building websites, doing online ads, making sure their direct mail is consistent. All of that. So supercharge offers does the end to end and I call it the book end. So at one end, you still need to do your research to tell us which areas you wanna go. The other end, when the lead comes through to you, you still need to close that, lead everything in the middle, from your branding, your logo, your website, your content, your online ads, your social media, your data, your direct mail, everything we manage for you. [00:17:16] Alicia Jarrett: So it's a huge time saver to a lot of real estate investors out there. We do all asset classes and everything's very data driven. We've invested really heavily in data in our company, Sam and and we know that data drives everyth. There's gotta be good data and it's gotta be managed  [00:17:29] Sam Wilson: well that is really cool. [00:17:32] Sam Wilson: And that's, that is your real estate marketing company is supercharge correct? Offered. Okay. Okay. And do you also do that on the commercial real estate  [00:17:39] Alicia Jarrett: side? Yeah, we do it for any asset class. We've got people that do self storage, mobile home parks vacant land, single family homes. We can do commercial. [00:17:49] Alicia Jarrett: We've got someone that's actually doing airs strips so for people that have their own planes and they've got air parks that they can go and park to like living on a golf course, but there's an airstrip instead. So we, we, as long as there's data, we can manage your marketing. [00:18:02] Alicia Jarrett: That's really, and we've got database for everyth.  [00:18:05] Sam Wilson: Right. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. I love the idea of a, of an air park. That's that's pretty fun. why not just taxi out and take off. That's good times. So tell me what are some common problems? I know you said there that, people aren't very good at marketing, but there has to be, there has to be some common problems or common things that people are doing incorrectly or doing poorly that you said, look, I can just help you solve it now. [00:18:27] Sam Wilson: And I can do it fast.  [00:18:28] Alicia Jarrett: Yeah. Yep. One of the biggest things I think is inconsistency. You see people, they're all trying to build businesses, or a lot of them are actually just creating another job for themselves instead of building a business know, they wanna leave their current job and start their own company. [00:18:42] Alicia Jarrett: All of this stuff, all these great dreams, but inconsistency is the biggest killer Sam. And so you see people that get started. They'll send out some marketing they'll do a couple of mailings and then they wait for deals to come in and then they've got some deals. So they're spending all their time and energy working those deals. [00:18:58] Alicia Jarrett: And by the time they turn around and get their return on investment, which is often months, they then turn back to their pipeline and it's empty. And so one of the biggest killers in this business, no matter what asset class you're in is inconsistency. And I see it every day. Every day and it really then just comes back to time, and I, I often say to, to a lot of people in our in our customer base, working that, that old, it's an old say now, but are you working on your business or in your business? And a lot of them are still working in it. They're in the minutiae, they're in the detail. They're trying to do everything themselves. [00:19:30] Alicia Jarrett: And it's like, you don't have to do it all yourself. If you find the right people to partner with, be okay to let go of control of some things, as long as those things are done well, and spend your time and energy on the stuff that makes you money,  [00:19:43] Sam Wilson: right? Yeah. No, I think that's great. Especially as you're starting out, it's it's one of those things, I guess, once you get to a certain size, you could probably start bringing on team members. [00:19:52] Sam Wilson: That can then handle that stuff in house, but yep. If it's one, two, or maybe even three of you and you're launching, it's like, oh, this is, there's a lot of moving pieces here and yeah. Yeah, that can  [00:20:04] Alicia Jarrett: be absolutely. And if I can add to that Sam, like we I did everything in the beginning as did my partner, Matt. [00:20:09] Alicia Jarrett: We were both in there learning it, all, doing it all. And because I have a certain rule in our business that we wanna outsource something. Or, hire a team member unless we've done that thing ourselves, otherwise, how do we know what good looks like? Right. And how do we then set that person up to train them, measure them, all of that. [00:20:27] Alicia Jarrett: So, you've gotta get in there and do it first to begin with, but there comes a point in time that you need to let goal of certain things to then create more space, to do more deals or, add more elements to your business to make it.  [00:20:38] Sam Wilson: Yep. Absolutely. I'm gonna throw this term out there for you. [00:20:42] Sam Wilson: And then in the last few minutes we have left. When I say global resources, what does that  [00:20:46] Alicia Jarrett: mean? Yeah, global resources for me, it means if I can actually just, if we could imagine that word global resources, I'm gonna cross out the word global and just put resources as long as you have the right people in the right jobs, doing the right things. [00:21:00] Alicia Jarrett: It really doesn't matter where they're based. We've got people all over the world. We literally have team members in Asia, Serbia, Bangladesh, Australia, us Yeah, that's across five countries, right? and as long as we've got the right people in the right jobs, doing the right things, as I said, it really doesn't matter where they're based. [00:21:17] Alicia Jarrett: It matters about how you set them up for success and systems and processes. These days can allow to do that super easy. How you set up your CRM, how you manage task flow, how you allocate work, how you measure results, all of that. You. You can do from your lounge room in your underwear, if you want. [00:21:36] Alicia Jarrett: right. you don't have to be in the same place as where your resources are. And I, we've got an amazing team and they've all gotten to know each other really well. And it's great. They don't have to be in the same place.  [00:21:47] Sam Wilson: Right. No, that's absolutely fantastic. I mean, it's one of those things that, and it's one of the part of our, one of the businesses I'm involved in right now is that you need somebody with that gifting though, to kind of take all of those. [00:21:58] Sam Wilson: What did you call it? Not resources but take all those processes and procedures. And get it implemented. And that's one thing, in my skill set, I don't have that. I just don't have it. I'm not an operator. It's like, I suck at that. And so you gotta find other team members that go, I gotta, I got a buddy that's joining us, that it just geeks out on it. [00:22:15] Sam Wilson: He's like, dude, this is, I mean, he's like, man, I got charts and spreadsheets. And like, it's just his thing. I'm like,  [00:22:20] Alicia Jarrett: yep. That's own it. That's my partner, Matt. He's his background is in it transition transformation. So he is all. Automation systems processes. And so we've really been able to systematize our business, right. [00:22:32] Alicia Jarrett: He now is implementing systems and processes for other people because people see how we are running our business. Like my land business, I probably work on probably an hour a day. Right. Because the rest of it is systematized. Our team knows what they need to do at every point in time. And it's super crazy. [00:22:46] Sam Wilson: That's fantastic. Alicia, thank you for taking the time to come on this show today. Thank you, Sam. Absolutely. Guess pull back the curtain on your multiple businesses, how you guys have grown. 'em the way that you've partnered up with the right people and got the right seats on the bus showed us that you can buy and invest in even fix and flip real estate from halfway around the world right here in the us. [00:23:06] Sam Wilson: Absolutely fantastic. I love it. If our listeners wanna get in touch with you, what is the best way to do that?  [00:23:11] Alicia Jarrett: Yeah, they can drop me an email direct. So it's, Alicia, which is spelled a L I C I a, no one ever gets that. Right. at supercharged offers.com. They can call my team on (888) 538-5478 or just jump onto supercharged offers.com and they can download a free ebook that can download a free business growth plan to help them with their business strategy. [00:23:34] Alicia Jarrett: They can get in touch with me anyway, or just look me up on.  [00:23:37] Sam Wilson: Fantastic. We'll make sure we include all of those there in the show notes. And certainly again, appreciate you coming on. Thank you, Alicia. Thanks Sam.   

The Greek Current
Greece seeks a delicate balance in the Balkans amid tensions between Serbia and Kosovo

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 10:52


Earlier this week we saw tensions rise in the Western Balkans, as a dispute between Kosovo and Serbia led to protests and reports of gunfire. Amid these tensions, Greece has engaged diplomatically with both sides to help them come to an understanding. As Greece steps up its diplomatic presence in the Balkans, Athens is also upgrading its cooperation with Kosovo. Vassilis Nedos, Kathimerini's diplomatic and defense editor, joins Thanos Davelis to look at whether tensions could boil over between Kosovo and Serbia, and what this would mean for the region. We also look at Greece's diplomatic engagement with the Balkans, its relations with Kosovo, and why those relations hinge to a great degree on Albania and Greek-Albanian relations. Read Vassilis Nedos latest piece here: Athens seeks delicate balance in BalkansYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greece says tourism rebound will help ease cost of energy crisisNew support measures to be announced at TIFErdogan and Putin to Meet in Sochi for 2nd Time in a Month

Centered From Reality
Shots Over Taiwan, Shots Fired in Kosovo & Alex Jones Shot Down

Centered From Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 33:41


The NFL is back, but Alex cannot spend too much time celebrating because the world has experienced a crazy week. He starts by discussing the aftermath of Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan — China fired over a dozen Dongfeng series ballistic missiles into the waters north-east and south-west of Taiwan's main island. While China claimed these were “exercises”, Taiwan has responded and many countries have condemned the actions. Alex goes over whether this is a test-run for how China could seal off the island during an invasion. Next, tensions have hit a low since the 1990s between Serbia and Kosovo. Ethnic Serbs still live in a region in Northern Kosovo and the Kosovar government has tried to allow that region some idnependence. However, the government has now passed new laws involving license plates and entry-exit border policies for Serbians. This had led to protests, road blocks, and literal shots being fired. This is problematic because Serbia still does not recognize Kosovo as a country and Alexsander Vucic, Serbia's strongman leader, has close ties to Putin and has been referred to as “little Putin.” Alex worries that this could become another conflict over territories that has been exagerated by grievance-laced strongmen like Putin, Orban, and now Vucic. Finally, Alex looks into the trial of Alex Jones involving his lies about the victims of the Sandy Hook shooting. Jones will have to pay $4.1 million to the victims. Is this the end of InfoWars? 

Learn About World Cuisine
Serbia for 37 minutes

Learn About World Cuisine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 36:59


Serbia and Serbian cuisine is discussed for 37 minutes with fun facts

Perpetual mOetion With Dr mOe Anderson
Stop Drowning In Timidity: Learn to Build Assertiveness

Perpetual mOetion With Dr mOe Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 58:03


Activist-educator Cara Tuttle Bell is a trained attorney and powerful speaker on sexual harassment and assault prevention. Her work on college campuses dealing with sexual harassment and assault inspired her to train women on how to build assertiveness. She says it is crucial to communication, personal safety, and overall wellbeing. Cara also gives workshops on speaking with authority in salary negotiations, relationships, and work meetings. Her new book "Drowning in Timidity: Women, Politeness, and the Power of Assertive Living" is a must-read, especially for those who think being assertive is synonymous with being aggressive.    In this episode Dr. mOeand Cara discuss these topics: How to be direct without being aggressive Practicing salary negotiation Sexual Harassment in corporate America Why children must be taught assertiveness Bystander intervention in assault prevention Handling sexual misconduct in schools Moral courage, trauma-informed training and more... Visit Cara's website and connect with her online @caratuttlebell today! Transcript (auto generated) [00:00] Cara Tuttle Bell: I also hope that we can move away from this very gendered and loaded idea of assertiveness and understand it for what it really is, which is just being direct, being clear, being fair, considering the competing interests that might be in a meeting or a conversation and engaging equitably with one another. [00:27] Dr. mOe Anderson: Hey, everybody. Welcome to Perpetual Motion, a podcast focused on wellness, personal growth, culture, and relationships. Positive relationships. I'm your host, Dr. Mo Anderson. Bestselling author, award winning podcast host, keynote speaker, and speaker coach. Sometimes I interview expert guests, like today, and sometimes I do a solo show. But my goal is always the same I want to help you. Yes, you review, renew, and re you at the end of each show. I hope you have learned something that will elevate you to the next level of success. If you're new to the show or a returning visitor, let's make this official. Click that subscribe button to be notified of new episodes as soon as they are available. Also, help us grow and reach more listeners by raiding the show and leaving a comment. Just type a little bit. Just a little something, something. All right, stay tuned, because today my special guest is Kara Tuttle Bell. She is a powerful speaker on sexual harassment and assault prevention. What do we need? Some powerful speakers on that. And she also is an expert on why assertiveness is a crucial component of communication, personal safety, and overall wellbeing, she's got a great book. She's the author of Drowning, intimid, Politeness and the Power of a Certain Living. I'll be right back with Kara Tuttle Bell. You can't say Dr. Mo aintellya the fear might suffer the consequences winter's a failure what are you scared of? Why aren't you afraid? I'd rather live like I'm dying to live and die in the day my heart is pure my soul is safe tara, welcome to Perpetual Motion. [02:35] Cara Tuttle Bell: Hi. Thank you so much for having me today. [02:37] Dr. mOe Anderson: This is exciting. I haven't had a guess with your background or for this particular topic. I mean, assertiveness as part of communication is not something that we really think about. In fact, women get criticized for that a lot when they can just be the same way as a guy. And also, sexual harassment, I don't know if it's on the rise or we're talking about it more, but these are such important topics, and I'm glad you're here to help us understand better. Let's start with assertiveness. Why do we need to be more assertive? [03:11] Cara Tuttle Bell: I really hope that we can reclaim assertiveness. I think there are so many reasons that we need to show up and assert ourselves, both for ourselves and for others. I also hope that we can move away from this very gendered and loaded idea of assertiveness and understand it for what it really is, which is just being direct, being clear, being fair. Considering the competing interests that might be in a meeting or a conversation and engaging equitably with one another and I. [03:46] Dr. mOe Anderson: Hope we can as well. And I don't know the history behind it, but I just think about women who run for office or women who are in positions of authority and it seems like they just held to a whole another standard when it comes to confidence and communication. Do you know the origin of that? Is it just the role of women evolving or what the heck? [04:12] Cara Tuttle Bell: I mean, I think we are in the midst of it. I think we are watching this play out. Unfortunately, there are still too few women in these historically maledominated spaces so they remain judged and evaluated by old fashioned norms about male behavior and what we thought male leadership is and male courage looks like and really white male visions of that in most industries, but especially politics, as you mentioned. I think it is very hard for them to walk this tightrope or strike the right balance and get evaluated in the same way. I mean, they're just not we hear it on the news, we see it in the comment section of websites. You see it in headline after headline. You see it on Twitter where women are being judged more harshly for engaging directly, for having stances and opinions, which of course they do. And we should welcome that because I think a lot of people are confusing assertiveness and aggression. [05:19] Dr. mOe Anderson: Yes. And that's what we're getting to. And as you said, that what came to mind is even the subtle ways that this plays out. Even when I hear I'm a speaker, you're a speaker. But I'll hear other speakers so often when they quote someone famous, it's always what Patton said, what Lincoln said, what Ray. I hear women at events for women, women speakers and events from women and they don't have one single quote or statistics or anything from another female or for that matter, from even someone of another culture. I'll go out of my way to try to find something from someone in India or Canada or Australia and it's so ingrained that I think some people don't even recognize that they're doing it before a woman speaker. To give an hour speech and never quote a woman. It just blows my mind. [06:17] Cara Tuttle Bell: It does mine too. I completely agree. And I hope others can work intentionally to really diversify their message and their program and their slides and their images. I mean, you have to do the work and a lot of it is internalized. So I know that we're all busy and these women's speakers are probably like, I've got this presentation tomorrow and they may be finalizing their slides, but it's worth doing, right? It's worth doing because so many people are watching and listening. Now, granted, we are trying to make up for these huge gaps in education, right? Especially like in public education in the US. You probably were taught about a lot of men a lot of military generals, we see a lot of quotes from men's sports coaches as well. They're always a go to. These things are much more present in our mind because we're surrounded by those messages. We get them from day one. I mean, everywhere you go in a restaurant, church is off and on. Church, male leaders. So it's like we've been surrounded by male leadership in a lot of different spaces for the bulk of our lives and we've made so much progress, but we're still working to get towards equity. We haven't landed there yet, so we got to do some of this work of undoing to really be better at inclusion. Right? So it's like diversity and inclusion and belonging, which means we got to correct for the past, we got to address those lingering effects of that kind of socialization. And I mean, I do think asserting ourselves in these spaces, whether it's work, our professional relationships, our community works, our churches, is part of that work. It's part of the action that we can take. [08:06] Dr. mOe Anderson: Right. Very good point. And back to what you said earlier, which leads to my next question. What is the difference between being assertive and aggressive? Because I think a lot of people confuse the two. [08:22] Cara Tuttle Bell: I agree. I think we see both and it can be gendered. We have lots of good studies on this. We are just judging women more harshly. But when you look at these things foundationally, like, what does this mean? What is the definition of these words, then? Aggression? Is that steam rolling? Is that coming at something with force? It could be an abuse of power. It can be physical, it can be verbal, it can be using or depriving someone of resources. It's that misuse and abuse that becomes aggression. Right? It can be violent, it can be the unhealthy expression of anger. I'm actually fine with anger because I'll probably come up in some other answers. [09:10] Dr. mOe Anderson: But we don't want to be constructive or destructive. [09:13] Cara Tuttle Bell: It depends, right? It depends how you use it. I don't want us to live in it so much that we're bitter, but I want to harness anger as fuel so that we have that extra boost of energy to assert ourselves. Asserting yourself means you're showing up, you're being present, you're participating, and that varies. You're participating appropriate to your role in the workplace. You're participating on a committee that you're assigned to. You should be doing the work you're being asked to do and doing it fairly. So there's nothing wrong when I go to a meeting with asserting my own ideas, the agenda, my office and what I'm responsible for, and having that open conversation about whatever the decision is right. [10:02] Dr. mOe Anderson: And how we should make it, advocate for ourselves yes. [10:05] Cara Tuttle Bell: And what we should consider. And then it just sits there. It doesn't mean the other person has that obligation to receive it. But I'm showing up and engaging directly and fairly and equitably. So that, to me, is an assertive communication, which differs from really, if you think of, like, an 80s Wall Street type of movie that American, like, I'm going to call my way to the top dog approach. That's really the misuse of that. That's taking it too far. That's aggressive and it's inequitable, right? [10:38] Dr. mOe Anderson: You made me think about I'm glad you said that anger is okay sometimes because I'm here in the south, and we still have a lot of Southern belle mentality, and even when you are slicing and dicing somebody, you need to be smiling and offering them tea as they die. So many things. I had a couple of folks that I was mentoring at a previous company, and they came here from the East Coast, and they were just having such problems with clients because they were just going in just being normal, really being normal, but not the Southern way. And I was like, hey, you're going to have to and this wasn't male or female, but they were female, so they were getting it double. Like, people aren't responding. I was like, you got to go in this way. You got to come in real low and smooth. You got to ask about their children. We cannot just sit down and start talking about business. We got to drink and eat a little bit. There's so many cultural things in a dish. And then you throw these gender stereotypes and biases on top of oh, my God, it makes me weary sometimes. [11:53] Cara Tuttle Bell: It can be exhausting. And this is why I always talk about politeness, because when I'm talking about assertiveness or Serbia training a lot of women and you're right about south, right? It's a different audience sometimes a lot of Southern women in particular are a little resistant. Part of them wants to embrace assertiveness, and then they're like, but it feels too confrontational. It feels unladylike. I mean, I hear these things from them, and I'm like, okay, that word exactly. [12:24] Dr. mOe Anderson: I know you here. [12:30] Cara Tuttle Bell: It is. It's like, why wouldn't we just be pleasant and don't want to create conflict? We like to smooth things out. I'm currently in the south, and we just have to talk through it. And so I'm like, Listen, I'm all for polite behavior, but I'm really for kindness, right? We should be kind to other humans and patient and all of those things, but not to a fault. Not when it keeps us engaging, not when it keeps us from addressing injustice, not when it means that we're always minding our business while harm after harm and types of discrimination keep occurring. Not when it keeps us from having healthy relationships. So this people pleasing or fear of any sort of discomfort or conflict is the root of so many problems, personal and structural, societal. So I really am always advocating for us to bring assertiveness well beyond your salary negotiation conversation. That's when I think people think, okay, I can visit it for five minutes. I can be assertive for this moment in my life that comes maybe every three to five years, and I'm just going to cram for it, too. They just think, give me a script, I'm going to cram for this the night before. And listen, I'll help you with salary negotiation. I will, okay? So you can come to me for the last minute cramming session. But that's not skill building, right? That's like faking until you make it. That's like, I hope you can be assertive and hold for two minutes the next day when you have the conversation, but probably not because you're not practicing this on a daily basis, and it feels too hard when we make it infrequent and high stakes. And so this is about something that really, I think people should embrace as daily practice. It's self care. It's setting boundaries. It's maintaining those boundaries. It helps us have healthy relationships, and it helps us also be really in touch with those times when people are trying to violate our boundaries, where I want you to have anger, I want you to be in touch with that feeling when it comes up for you so you know what it means, but then harness it for maximum impact. And so that's where the anchor is fine. The anger is probably valid. I mean, there's so many valid reasons to be outraged right now. There's so many. But what are we going to do with that, right? Because I don't want people to live in bitterness and resentment. That's the same outcome of not engaging assertively. That's what happens when people are passive or passive aggressive, is that they're holding onto it. So for me, assertiveness is this balance that helps us be healthy on a daily basis and fair. [15:23] Dr. mOe Anderson: I like that you make that point about clients trying to come to you for the last minute. They come to me with their speeches at the last minute. Like delivering communication is a lifestyle. It's a way of life. It's kind of hard to get to that keynote level in a night. And I would think with salary negotiating, too, with what I think I've seen with people who try that cramming type of thing, is that they overcorrect and all of a sudden they're like, and this is what I wait a minute, what is going on? I can't even hear what you're saying because I don't know you. Who are you anyway? [16:00] Cara Tuttle Bell: It is a burst. It is because it's really like they are really trying to summon up the courage. And so it does come up too quickly, too strong. And then I also see people who just can't hold their position. So even if they can say the two sentences that they've memorized to make the ask, they then undo it with that need for pleasantry, if that's okay with you. Exactly. [16:25] Dr. mOe Anderson: You don't mind, and I'm sorry, and. [16:27] Cara Tuttle Bell: If you think it's okay exactly. Yeah. [16:35] Dr. mOe Anderson: I want this. We got to fix this quickly because I got a granddaughter and I want something different for her. Absolutely. All of the young women there's so much going on, as you said, and we're not going to get into that. But this is pressing, clear and pressing issue. Let's go to being assertive. And I'm just guessing you're the expert on this. Sexual harassment is a problem. It's something you have some expertise in and it's a lingering problem. And I think I'm wondering if being timid as well, in no way am I ever trying to make a woman at thought about anything. But if assertiveness when you talk about your safety and well being, if that can in some ways help you with that. But let's just talk about let's start with why in Twin. Is sexual harassment still Jeffrey Epstein a problem? [17:39] Cara Tuttle Bell: It is. And people ask me this a lot. This is my day job, right? This is the kind of compliance job that I have. So I'm trained as a lawyer and I work on a college campus. And so I'm addressing sexual harassment and assault all day, every day and have for the past eight plus years. And I am very passionate about it and become very assertive. And that's like both the personal and professional journey. I used to be. Shy. Law school really helps. But you also can practice, right? A lot of it had to be a willingness to do the practice. So I wasn't born this way. For your listeners, like, definitely this can be learned. I know it can be because I'm sitting here as the proof and the outrage that I have over the issue helps. Right? I mean, the outrage helps. The anger helps. I try to turn it into fuel to push me through the day, to be able to then bring it in a meeting or whatever it is that I'm working on addressing. And what we think in the field is that we're not seeing like a new epidemic. We're just seeing increased awareness, increased reporting of what has for a very long time been very high levels of this type of discrimination and heart. And it is everywhere you look, it is more common in male dominated professions. And you can look for data on this. This is business data, this is insurance policy data. The more there is a disparity in a profession, the more men outnumber women, the more incidents we have. And it's been this way for a long time, the more vulnerable a person in a role is. And that can be geographic isolation, that can be low pay, that can be low influence or authority in the position. That can be the seasonal nature of a position. Whatever it is, it isn't. Giving them security in a position in relation to other people makes them more likely to experience this type of harm. So it remains prevalent because inequity is prevalent and it's connected to the other forms of discrimination. So where you have racism and ableism and transphobia and homophobia and other types of discrimination you're going to also have gender harassment, sexism misogyny, sexual harassment and sexual assault. Now where assertiveness comes in is that the current best practice that we're trying to implement really across the board k through twelve schools it's been in the military they're introducing in churches. I think we're going to see this more and more across corporate America definitely has taken hold in higher ed is by teaching what's called bystander intervention training and that's because we're all bystanders like it or not I mean we're just here navigating the world and you choose and it is a choice whether to be an active or a passive. Bystander now a lot of us were raised to mind our own business. A lot of us worry about the risks of speaking up or of standing. [21:06] Dr. mOe Anderson: Out sometimes and that boys will be boys thing. [21:10] Cara Tuttle Bell: Oh and then the tolerance yes I. [21:12] Dr. mOe Anderson: Had some incidents and it was just blown off like that's just part of it yes and go out of the dark kind of thing like your right. [21:24] Cara Tuttle Bell: We still hear a lot of blaming for the target they're responsible for receiving the harassment and so where I am glad and can promise that there's been progress is a lot of the prevention messages are not so sexist anymore I mean they were they were just sexist application. They were saying women do this to prevent your own assault and we weren't having when I was in college corresponding messaging given to the male students who all of the data suggests are much more likely to be engaging in perpetration regardless of the gender identity of the victim. So men are from all the data we have and that's across fields so it's criminal justice data, psychology, sociology, women's studies that's not actually in dispute. So we haven't realistically confronted the problem for some time but the public health model now is recommending that we teach a lot of bystander intervention and we are so it is now routine practice at colleges and universities in the United States more and more often showing up yes since like 2014 so they're supposed to be doing it. If anyone has any questions, please feel free to reach out. But we're doing it and it's teaching you some strategies. If you see something, say something but it's also giving you choices. So not everyone has to swoop in like a superhero or be loud or address something directly. They can also create a distraction. You can delegate to someone who's better able or who has authority to try to respond when appropriate. We need to think broadly about delegation so it's not necessarily always law enforcement that we're calling it's what's appropriate for the situation. Right. So sometimes it's me like on campus people can call me because it's my job to go do these things and so if someone feels like they don't know what to say or they don't know what to do, who can you take with you? Who can you delegate to? How can you document something? Documentation, we're seeing having really transformative and activist power in recent years, helping us really confront some harsh realities and prove to the doubters some things that a lot of us knew were happening. So sometimes documentation from afar is the thing we can do safely to address an issue. And that takes some nerve too, right? So all of these things we're hoping to equip people to choose from if they are in the midst of situations at risk for sexual harassment or assault, but it can apply to all forms of discrimination. [24:17] Dr. mOe Anderson: What bothers me with the documentation is in the form of a video. If that falls into that category, is when people are just filming just for the purpose of posting and entertaining and not get help. That is just appalling filming women being raped, assaulted and me. And two, to be clear, this cannot just happen to women assault and harassment. Although, as you said, the data shows, it is for adults predominantly going to be women. But are they teaching them that documentation needs to go somewhere and not just post it and hope somebody sees it? Because that's scary to me. [25:02] Cara Tuttle Bell: It is scary. So I'm always making that qualifier. We know that college students consume a lot of video content from some popular sites. And so just quite directly, I'm like, this is not for that. That is not what we're asking you to do. Consent is really key when we're talking about sexual misconduct. Like consent is key. So if you're filming something without someone's consent and you're posting it somewhere without their consent and you're sharing it without consent, you are part of the problem. That's also increasingly illegal, right? So they shouldn't be sharing social content. So yes, I think that is a very important part of the conversation that cannot be left out. I don't care how long the training is running. It's like if you're going to mentioned documentation, you've got to put those really important caveats around it because that's what came to mind. [25:57] Dr. mOe Anderson: And even I believe it's illegal almost everywhere now to post pics the revenge posting of some intimate photo or whatever that was sent to you. And I'm happy that law enforcement and our lawmakers are stepping up, but again, we're looking at largely male populations to make these decisions. So that speaking up and getting involved in folks like you being there to help make this transition is so important. And I was thinking about as well too, to go back to harassment being a lingering problem. We're talking about learned behavior, confidence and being assertiveness. Isn't this sexual harassment? Learned behavior? I can't imagine. I mean, I have two sons. They didn't come here like that. And then heaven forbid that's going on. But from the movies, to their peers, to whatever is of course enough. Do we have to attack all of these industries, magazines and music and everything? Not attack, but you know what I'm saying. [27:05] Cara Tuttle Bell: You know what you mean. It is very concerning, right? Because young people are always getting so many different messages is contradictory messages, right? And so even if they're raised one way, they could then land in a peer environment where they're getting reinforcement on a lot of negative behaviors. And this is true across the board. This could be drug use. This could be alcohol misuse. This could be for like, how they engage in sexual practices. Do they bully and harass people? So that peer dynamic pushes some young people into behaviors they otherwise normally wouldn't engage in on their own. And they tell us that, right? I mean there's really fascinating research on these topics and getting them to display some moral courage, some assertiveness, that's really tough. That is really tough. So we got to really pull it apart. We work through scenarios. We talked to a lot of them about what leadership is because many of them want to be a leader in some capacity and they want to skip over the work, right? They want to just graduate and be like a successful millionaire entrepreneur in their twenty s. And we're talking about like, what skills aren't you practicing and developing? Particularly these students who have been in the home environment, so they didn't have the social experience of the past few years due to COVID on college campuses, we are seeing a developmental delay. I mean, we are like it is not the same incoming class that we had prepandemic in the interpersonal communication skills. So it really did feel like we had these young students kind of just unleashed once some of the restrictions were lifted and they were coming to us with different questions. I don't like my roommate. I don't know how to navigate this conflict, whether it's conflict or laundry or deciding where to eat in a group. So they're just asking us really basic social questions and for tips that they thought they were past at least a few years ago. Now, I always thought they had room for improvement, but it wasn't such a basic level. So I'm very concerned about their ability to engage in sexual communication, ensure that consent is a part of those things, or know and honor resistance and discomfort when they're seeing it. I mean, people are not really teaching them this consistently. So we don't have consistent sex ed in this country. It really depends where they are. A lot of schools are afraid and that's because the parents complain about the type of content. So I very rarely see a college student who has what I would want them to have had before they get to college, which would be medically accurate. Information about their body, the bodies of others. Consent, education boundaries, warning signs of unhealthy relationships. What constitutes stating violence or exploitation, sexual exploitation, a lot of which that like coercion and blackmailing can occur with phones, pictures, and videos now, because otherwise they get here. And people in jobs like mine, we will try to do what we can, but a lot of times they're 18 when they get here. Right. So we've got to engage in some unlearning to try to then relearn or teach them new skills. And, no, they're not getting enough time with me. They're with their peers most of all. And dosage is key. [30:56] Dr. mOe Anderson: Micro dosage. [31:02] Cara Tuttle Bell: We got to talk about what they're learning. Right. And with the availability of online ***********, are they learning more from **** because they're not getting sex at in schools? That is concerning to me. So then it's not surprising when they're reenacting things they saw online and they tell us stuff like, oh, I think they like that. And I'm like, you can't assume everybody likes that. [31:28] Dr. mOe Anderson: That woman or that man is paid. [31:34] Cara Tuttle Bell: It's all about consent. Yeah. We have to help them unpack these things a little bit and work through it. And you touched on this earlier, and this is really important to say is some assertiveness does deter some bad behavior. Not all. Okay. There's always going to be people who are trying to violate our boundaries and trying to cause harm, who are trying to take advantage of a situation so we can't prevent everything. [32:04] Unknown Speaker: Exactly. [32:04] Cara Tuttle Bell: But there is research to support that strong articulation of boundaries. Clear resistance does disrupt and deter some behavior. It may not prevent them from harming someone else, which I understand. They might then just choose another target. But it is worth a try when we think we're in a situation to nip something in the bud early on. Right. And especially if we're talking about sexual harassment in the workplace. Right. Because if the behavior continues and you get to a place where you're going to want to report it or seek some support, they're going to ask if you were clear about your boundaries. They're going to ask the question, did you tell them this makes you uncomfortable? And no, you shouldn't have to. They should just not commit the harm. I agree with you completely. None of this should be happening. But it is happening, and it's happening often. So I do want to just give people as many tools as possible to be able to reduce harm, appease when that's the best choice for safety or extricate yourself from a situation. [33:18] Dr. mOe Anderson: Kara, what about this? I'm thinking about the gymnasts mobiles and others. I mean, they did everything. They reported it. They went to the authorities. I think they went to the FBI. Oh, my goodness. It honestly makes me think about discrimination with African Americans back with the Tulsa Race rides and everything. Who do you turn to when the people coming for you are the people who are supposed to protect you or the people who are. Ignoring it are the authorities. [33:51] Cara Tuttle Bell: It is true and it is so discouraging, okay? Not every human resources department or law enforcement department, these people who are supposed to be who you can turn to, clearly that's not consistently available or going to guarantee success. I mean, very few times can I offer the people I'm working with anything that feels like justice. And that's really disappointing, right? Because a lot of us are raised to have faith in the systems and these procedures. We build trust like that. You hope that your company cares about you, especially if you've worked there for 20 years. We get so many messages about how we care about all these issues, yet when people value submissions, yes, the statements are lovely, but you got to back that up with action. And I know that sometimes the supportive person is hard to find, but I do know because this is my professional network, right? These are the conferences I go to. There are hundreds or thousands of us who do care, and they may not be at your company, okay? They may not be. And a good indication is, look up your sexual misconduct policy. Is it from has anyone updated it since? [35:08] Dr. mOe Anderson: How would you know? Because they'll change the bottom of the document. They'll change the footer on the front page when you look at it. Can you tell from the content that this is not current with our culture and our beliefs now? [35:26] Cara Tuttle Bell: Yes. Right, because a wave of activism on this was in the early to mid 90s, really prompted by Anita Hills testimony during the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearing. So that was the Wake up call for America phase one. And sadly, a lot of the work stopped then. So my college students, when they go get at their next job, the ones who maintain contact with us or who took my class, they do things like look up the policy and when was the last time the committee met and what would I do if I experienced sexual harassment in the workplace? And some of them are pretty activist and they ask these questions at the interview. That is risky. You may not get the job offer if you're showing yourself to be what might be perceived as a troublemaker at the interview. But if you care too much about some of these causes that could make the employer nervous, it would be better. [36:21] Dr. mOe Anderson: To know then that HR might be the very person you have to go to. [36:29] Cara Tuttle Bell: Yes, you and I are on the same page. I'm like, there is another job. I promise you there's another job. Sometimes the students are so worried, but I'm like, you need to be interviewing them just as much as they are interviewing you. These are signs. They are telling you whether or not this is going to be a healthy or a toxic or replaced culture, whether or not they're going to cover for people or actually address the things that are happening. But if you can't find it at your school or in your church or at your place of employment, do some Internet research, because there are many nonprofit organizations, regionally, nationally, I'd help anyone find them. There are attorneys who take things pro bono. There are all sorts of resources now to help people across industries. It is sometimes hard to find them, but I know that they're there. I know that they're there because those of us who have experienced these things and have had help now want to extend that help to others because the support is not consistently available. [37:32] Dr. mOe Anderson: No, it's not. But there are so many who have, myself included, being victims of sexual harassment. And I think, in addition to Anita Hill, I feel like Tyrone Burke's Me Too movement, even though it's come under a lot of criticism. And yes, there have been people accused for everything who may have been innocent, even Child Protective Services. There's always going to be that small percentage. But Kara I was at after that happened, and people don't realize she had been talking about that for a while and had that hashtag made too, for some years before it got retweeted following the Harvey Weinstein thing. Weinstein weinstein. And I remember being with some girlfriends. We'd gone to a movie and everybody was talking about hashtag me too. And afterwards we were talking and we got to talking about it. And these were professional women over about six of us. And every single one of us had been a victim of sexual harassment and sexual assault. And none of us were in a position that we felt we can do anything about it and have any support. And that was just it took me weeks just to get over that revelation, because you kind of go around just thinking it's just you like perhaps those young gymnasts were doing, not realizing how many people were being victimized. And we kind of cried together. And when you don't deal with it too, just the post traumatic stress of just being there, and some of that resentment, anger, and explosiveness that it happened and that you weren't able to deal with it. So in addition to you guys teaching these courses and you being there as an advocate, an attorney, a trained attorney, is there also counseling now? Are there more mental health services? [39:29] Cara Tuttle Bell: Yes, we're seeing just a dramatic expansion across higher ed, which is good and overdue around all kinds of counseling and well being. Right. So we'll see a center for student wellbeing, you'll see expanded staff and many more culturally relevant and sensitive trainings and staff to surf particular populations. If you look at the hiring, you just see it everywhere, like in many, many states, that there are so many jobs because this is an urgent issue on college campuses, not just sexual assault, but I mean, the mental health and well being concerned. And yes, right. So if someone were to connect with us, we offer them a menu of services. They can work with victim advocates or they can go to the counseling center. And there's some specialization and sexual trauma or aspects of identity that they can seek out. A provider who they feel comfortable with, who they think gets their experience, but also understands what they're processing. We have yoga, we have meditation, we have study skills, we have financial education that can be necessary. A lot of places have hardship funds, student health. So our medical providers have a lot more understanding of sexual trauma, childhood sexual abuse, because those exams, like the exams you're touching the body, I mean, that can be very triggering for a survivor. And consent is just important in providing information. So everything that I'm seeing is getting more trauma informed. The progress is just slower than any of us would like. Law enforcement also has been getting more trauma informed training over the years. A lot of assumptions about doing the work, which led to really a lot of dismissal of some of the reports because if they interview a sexual assault victim in the immediate aftermath trauma, she's still in the space of trauma. Trauma disrupts memory encoding, like how our brain is storing them and putting them together. So it would be difficult while we're in fight or flight, we're in the adrenaline surge. These things last for days, not just minutes and hours. And so they've learned that conducting open ended interviews after three to five sleep cycles is actually much more likely to produce a coherent narrative with fewer gaps. [42:13] Dr. mOe Anderson: I know for a long time they just kind of thought you just get to them right away, they're going to start making up stuff or imagining stuff or they'll forget. But you're saying the memory can actually oh, that's for the person experiencing that, that's horrible too. But with time it sounds like it's kind of scattered pieces and you can start putting it together a little better. [42:38] Cara Tuttle Bell: You can. And if alcohol is involved and often is not always, but alcohol consumption, whether voluntary or used to commit the crime, that further disrupts that memory consolidation and encoding. And so really sleep and being in a safe environment and emergency rooms aren't always feeling safe. They're like hectic and loud and there's people in and out. So conducting an interview, even with good intentions, even when they want to get the information to try to go try to get the offender as quickly as possible, was not producing good results. So we're seeing new approaches being adopted here and there. Again, it's not everywhere. And I would like it to be, to do things like the forensic experiential trauma interview, that's one called Fetty, where it's training them to build rapport, create a really safe condition so it doesn't feel like we're interrogating a victim, ask open ended questions, let them go where they want to go, right? Because the brain is navigating through fear and trauma and that's not linear and it's not going to be linear but at the end of the conversation or several conversations it should be the job of that investigator to put that story together. So we were really often are making the person who experienced the harm be the crime scene and then do all of the work of reconstructing the narrative and that was just not the best way to get at the information. That's really what we now know about the brain and trauma has really changed the approach in ways that better equip any type of investigator who understands this is the neurobiology of trauma who has this training to ask better questions and get a better narrative and since what we're talking about is often word against word that narrative is crucially important. Sometimes there's corroborating evidence but a lot of times there isn't and so getting that good account from the person who was harmed is tough work but it's. [44:44] Dr. mOe Anderson: Tough work worth doing right and not being dismissed. The big message here, whatever age you are is that there are people out there who will help you, who can help you and systematically it hasn't always been the case and there's still going to be some of the old attitudes and processes out there but don't give up. I mean we're seeing things coming out now about and I don't want to keep naming organizations but just people who were children, male and female and things happen and they're just now getting restitution, getting justice and we don't want to see that anymore. [45:24] Cara Tuttle Bell: No, it takes a long time and it's very important to acknowledge that these harms and this discrimination occurs across identity, right? So it occurs across gender. Identity occurs in all communities whether you're class level and across race. We do know that there's disproportionate impact, right? That some people have more vulnerable characteristics that let them be targeted and also that let them justice system then fail them than others. So absolutely none of this is fair and consistent across the board but help is available if you know where to look and if you don't know where to look reach out to me and I will help you. There are people who will help you find it. [46:10] Dr. mOe Anderson: Thank you for that. We're going to give your information to in the show notes and when we get to the end but before we do I want to know we're talking about assertiveness but how do we if we're not naturally that way unbelievably? I'm not a natural extrovert people have a hard time believing I'm not really but I had to learn it because I was trying to get run over but how can we learn? I mean I just went at it and role model somebody but was better, more systematic. I practiced until it became second nature but what's the more strategic or what is the recommended way to learn assertiveness? And I want to couch that in two ways. One is I've got young people around me. How do I teach them assertiveness in my kind little Southern bobble beltway so that they don't get in trouble at school, but also for people that it's not their nature. And there are a lot of adults, male and females, who just don't want trouble. They just rather not see anything. [47:17] Cara Tuttle Bell: I know it's hard to start, okay? It's hard. And it will feel painful. It will. And I didn't know there were tools around when I was doing it. And so I was like, you have to jump in this conversation. It really was faking it until you make it. But now I know that there are lots of books. There are now. A lot of them came out in the 70s. That's where we saw the debut of assertiveness Training, 70s Women movement. And some of them are still really good foundational texts. Now some of it's going to feel really dated and just if you read those and they're cheap, you can get a lot of these at used bookstores for nothing, for pennies. Just let the dated stuff go and take the lessons where you can find them. Then again, as I mentioned, a resurgence in the 90s, so you might see some of these books available from mid ninety s. A lot of them are really focused on women at work, so they're career focused and they're about being ambitious. But there's some good lessons in there still. Now, what I like about recent products is that they're much more inclusive also, so it's not so stereotypical about men and women. And these are tools for everyone. And this is really good because a lot of people come to the assertiveness training workshops and sometimes they're making assumptions that are just for women. But there are men who feel like they're getting run over in meetings and they don't know how to advocate for themselves either. This really is for everybody. So you can Google assertiveness training. There are lots of free resources on the web. There are books, there are workbooks. I mean, I do have my book. It has some exercises in it. I've got a workbook only that's available on Etsy, but there's lots of name of your book? My book is Drowning and Timidity Women Politeness and the Power of Assertive Living. It is available at my website, karatuttlebell.com, but also for Kendall on Amazon. You can purchase it at Walmart or through professional women books. It lives in a couple of different places, so it's available. It does have exercises in it. Start with self reflection, right? You've got to know who you are and what's hard for you. So we know what to work on. So quick questions would be when you are walking across campus, are you the person who always moves out of the way on the sidewalk or do you hold your position on a plane? Do you ever get the armrest? Or do you never get the armrest in your family or, you know, romantic relationships? Do we ever eat where you want to eat or someone else always making the decision, are you watching the movies you want to watch, or are you just going along? And so there's all kinds of questions to just do some self reflection about where am I and where is it worth it? I'm not saying fight every battle. I don't know what I'm having for dinner tonight. And I may not care when I go home and make that decision with my partner. You know what I mean? It may be their night to pick, but the question is, are you ever getting what you want ever? And where is it important for you to do so? We can apply this to romantic and sexual relationships. Who's experiencing pleasure and how often and why not? And assertiveness matters there, too. Are we giving more than we're getting? And you just apply that give and take analysis that it was Sunday. Yes. Whatever relationship we're talking about. Right? Like, are you feeling taken advantage of or does it feel really balanced and equitable so that you start with the self reflection, then you start with the small practice. I want you to start small. I want it to feel doable. I want you to ask for something that's really low stakes, so it doesn't matter if you get the yes or not. And I also want you to get comfortable getting hearing no. You'll survive the no, it's all right. You survived the tough meeting. We survived the uncomfortable phone call. We've survived it over and over. We've survived it all thus far. Excellent. You will survive. And that's why that's nice. In my career, and I've also learned to perform extraversion, even though I have to retreat and recharge. If you learn you can do it, I'll learn I can do it. I'm going to have this burst of energy. I've also become really good about setting boundaries so I have that time to recharge. That also requires assertiveness. I got to tell my friends I cannot go out again. I'm, like, try to limit to two happy hours or two social events a week. Otherwise, I feel too depleted. And some of us can't say no to our friends who love us anyway. They love me anyway. They know I don't go to brunch. Okay? I don't go to brunch. Brunch is too loud, and I don't understand middle of the day drinking, and. [52:07] Dr. mOe Anderson: They'll tease you about it. We know you're not coming. [52:10] Cara Tuttle Bell: Yes, and it's fine then. It's all fine in other ways. Yes. They know I'll fight for them. They know I've got their back. So your relationships should be strong enough to survive that actually, they should be thriving. It's like they should really be seeing you for who you are and letting you be healthy in the ways that you need and so starting small with the practice just really helps you learn to ask if you have kids. I would say make them make phone calls, maybe put the name in at the restaurant. The students are coming in really struggling with just verbal communication, like out loud communication because they're doing it all on their phones. Okay? They want to text or do an online chat. And we're not preparing them for work. Work still requires some phone calls. I mean, at some point, you have to talk to another human. So you can start small in those ways to make them practice talking and to talk to adults and actually talking across the power differential in appropriate ways. But we got to break the scene and not hurt because seen and not heard is how we have a lot of child victimization. That's how we have the gymnasts, which we talked about going on, going on for so long. How do you have hundreds of victims for so long? Well, they did everything right, as you said. They told us and they told us, and they told us, and they told adults, and they told the FBI, you know, and how does this still continue? So I actually want us to raise angry girls. Write that down. Yes. Because the anger is a signal, as we talked about. If you're stressing politeness over their boundaries and well being, they're not going to acknowledge the harm themselves. They're not going to tell you about it. They're not going to seek support. They're going to be stuck in that self blame. And so let anger be the signal. Let assertiveness be the tool. And then the outcome is healthier beings, right, who once they've learned to advocate for themselves and assert themselves absolutely, I want them to have this sense of collective responsibility. And this is part of my message, which I really think was missing in the books of the in the 90s. You've got to advocate for others. That's what changes our communities. You've got to be a bystander who engages or be the witness who goes along and confirms somebody's report who at least acknowledges the harms that are happening everywhere we look and engage collectively. So it's not assertiveness just to get you a raise, which you deserve, okay, get your rates. But that's changing an individual person's existence. That's not creating change in our communities, structural or systemic change. That's not going to bring about gender equity. So we've got to use assertiveness to change our communities and engage collectively as well. And I think that's been missing in too many places, right? [55:32] Dr. mOe Anderson: And we've been so worried about the cost ourselves individually and not thinking about long term the consequences for generations to come, like the inequity with salaries and so many other things. When we think about what the CEOs of the Fortune 500, fortune 100 company, 4% women, all of this is related. It's all related, and it's time we changed it. And start by not being bystanders. Get out there and be advocates and leaders in this area. I love what you're doing. I could just go on and on. We need to do a live or something because I have enjoyed this and your passion around it is wonderful. I learned a lot. I didn't know what was going on on college campuses. I go back for football games and roll out. I couldn't use some of this. Trust and believe. So again, karate. Tuttle Bell, author of Drowning In That You Drowning in Women Politeness and the Power of Assertive living Tools and Tips to help anyone get it. Wherever books are sold, tell them how to connect with you online. That website one more time. Social media. However, we can find you online. [56:49] Cara Tuttle Bell: Sure. The easy way is to find me on my website, which is my name Caratuttlebell.com, and then you can find me on various forms of social media at Karatuttlebell. So I tried to make it easy. You reached out to me on LinkedIn, Instagram, doesn't matter. I'm publicly available. Feel free to reach out. I'm always happy to talk about this, as you can probably tell. [57:09] Dr. mOe Anderson: I can tell. I love it. And I can't wait to call my son and say, brave, angry girl. That's what we're going to be about. Thank you so much. You've been a wonderful guest. [57:21] Cara Tuttle Bell: Thank you so much for having me. [57:24] Dr. mOe Anderson: Wasn't that a great program? I love that episode. I enjoyed it. I hope you did too. Please remember to like, subscribe and share. Learn more about me on my website. Dr. Moanderson.com. That's Moe. You can read book excerpts, watch videos, learn about the services that I offer, and book me for a speaking engagement. I'd love to talk with your group and I'd love to work with you. So until the next time, review, renew, and re you. Thank you.

Orthodox Wisdom
The Life of St. Sebastian of San Francisco and Jackson (IV/V)

Orthodox Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 28:51 Very Popular


The first Orthodox priest born in America, St. Sebastian of San Francisco and Jackson is an Apostle to America for having served across its vast land in countless parishes amongst Orthodox and non-Orthodox people of all ethnic backgrounds. Born in San Francisco in 1863, he helped establish the first Serbian Orthodox parish in the Western Hemisphere in Jackson, CA in 1894. He served tirelessly in America and Serbia where he reposed in 1940 at the Zhicha Monastery. In 2007 his holy relics were transferred back to Jackson, CA and in 2015 he was formally canonized a Saint by the Orthodox Church, confirming what the faithful had known for some time--that St. Sebastian's last wish had been granted him: “the Kingdom of Heaven without end.“ This is part four of five of the Life of Saint Sebastian and has been generously offered by our brother Sergius. 1. Read the Life of St. Sebastian here (link to PDF at top of page): http://orthodoxinfo.com/general/archi... 2. Read his Catechism "The Holy Orthodox Church" here: https://books.google.com/books?id=5jJ... 3. On the canonization of St. Sebastian and St. Mardarije, including Troparion and Kontakion: https://westsrbdio.org/canonication/ 4. Akathist: https://www.stsavajackson.org/akathis... Orthodox Wisdom is now on your favorite podcast platform! This channel is dedicated to sharing the writings and lives of the Saints of the Orthodox Church. Glory to Jesus Christ! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/orthodox-wisdom/message

Factal Forecast
License plate dispute leads to roadblocks, gunfire and rising tensions at Kosovo-Serbia border

Factal Forecast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 11:27


Editors Jimmy Lovaas and Alex Moore discuss a rise in tensions at the Kosovo-Serbia border that recently led to gunfire, plus more on China's military drills around Taiwan, Colombia's presidential inauguration, Moldova's state of emergency and Kenya's upcoming election.These stories and more are also available in our weekly Forecast email and you can subscribe for free.This episode was produced with work from Factal editors Vivian Wang, Irene Villora, Jess Fino, David Wyllie and Alex Moore.  Music courtesy of Andrew Gospe. Have feedback, suggestions or events we've missed? Drop us a note: hello@factal.comWhat's Factal? Created by the founders of Breaking News, Factal alerts companies to global incidents that pose an immediate risk to their people or business operations. We provide trusted verification, precise incident mapping and a collaboration platform for corporate security, travel safety and emergency management teams. If you're a company interested in a trial, please email sales@factal.com. To learn more, visit Factal.com, browse the Factal blog or email us at hello@factal.com.Read the full episode description and transcript on Factal's blog.Copyright © 2022 Factal. All rights reserved.

Comite de Lectura
Escena Internacional con Farid Kahhat

Comite de Lectura

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 21:18


El podcast para suscriptores de Farid Kahhat analiza las noticias internacionales más importantes de los últimos días. Hoy, Farid nos cuenta sobre la visita de Nancy Pelosi, presidenta de la Cámara de Representantes de EE. UU., a Taiwán, las maniobras militares de China alrededor de Taiwán tras la visita de Pelosi, las tensiones entre Kosovo y Serbia tras la prohibición de documentos serbios en territorio kosovar y la victoria del derecho al aborto en un referendo en Kansas, Estados Unidos. Además, nos brinda un análisis sobre la diferencia entre Al Qaeda y el Estado Islámico, a propósito de la muerte del terrorista Ayman al Zawahiri, líder de Al Qaeda. Este podcast es producido con la colaboración de Gabriela Rodríguez. También puedes ver este podcast en YouTube: https://youtu.be/QqzacUHZFv8 Si quieres tener acceso a todos los episodios de este podcast exclusivo, puedes suscribirte a Comité de Lectura usando este link: https://comitedelectura.pe/planes/

Pod Save the World
Zawahiri is dead, Pelosi's in Taiwan

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 70:46 Very Popular


Tommy and Ben cover the drone strike against Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, Speaker Pelosi's trip to Taiwan, the latest news from Ukraine, including the debate over adding Russia to the State Sponsor of Terrorism list, news about Russian intelligence operations in the US, Trump weighs in on Brittney Griner's case, excerpts from a wild profile of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, why there's tensions between Kosovo and Serbia and the first ever international take appreciators. For a closed-captioned version of this episode, click here. For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast. 

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast
Nikola Jokic joins Team Serbia, NBA levels of hate, Jace Frederick on Tim Connelly's Wolves

BSN Denver Nuggets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 61:46 Very Popular


Adam Mares and Eric Wedum come to you from the DNVR Studios to discuss Nikola Jokic joining Team Serbia and run down their Hater's Guide to the season. Then, Jace Frederick from the Pioneer Press joins the show to discuss Tim Connelly's Minnesota Timberwolves. Jokic with Serbian national team - 3:40 The Hater's guide - 9:40 The Historic Hater's guide - 31:30 Jace Frederick - 43:00 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk
Explainer 327: Why is Serbia irate over licence plates?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 7:40


Kosovo intends to implement a policy that requires drivers in the country to use Kosovan licence plates but Serbia isn't happy. Andrew Mueller explains what this is really about. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tanner Talks About Stuff that Happened
The Fourth Great Global Crisis: Update 8/2/2022

Tanner Talks About Stuff that Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 44:25


Tensions around the globe inflame as a great global crisis looms. China and Taiwan, Russia and Ukraine, and Serbia and Kosovo. How could it all coalesce to tear apart civilization as we know it?

Serbian Radio Chicago Podcast
EXCLUSIVE! ADVOKAT DALIBOR KAVARIC - DRITAN ABAZOVIC USAO U ISTORIJU 8.3.22

Serbian Radio Chicago Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 20:44


SRPSKI RADIO CIKAGO – ADVOKAT DALIBOR KAVARICPRAVNI ZASTUPNIK MPC SPC• POTPISAN TEMELJNI UGOVOR DRZAVE CG I SPC• ISPUNJEN DRUGI AMANET MITROPOLITA AMFILOHIJA• MOLIM POBEDNIKE DA ISPUNE I TRECI AMANET• DRITAN ABAZOVIC HRABAR COVEK KOJI DRZI REC• 43. VLADA CG NECE PASTI• ISKLJUCUJEM MOGUCNOST NEMIRA U CGSERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO IS A KEY PLAYER AMONG THE ETHNIC BROADCASTERS IN THE U.S. AND IS CONSIDERED THE NUMBER ONE MEDIA OUTLET IN THE SERBIAN-AMERICAN AND BALKAN COMMUNITY IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CANADA.SERBIAN RADIO CHICAGO BROADCASTS DAILY FROM 3PM TO 4PM CST ON WNWI AM 1080, CHICAGO.HTTPS://WWW.SERBIANRADIOCHICAGO.NET HTTPS://WWW.SERBIANRADIOCHICAGO.COMSupport the show

Change the Story / Change the World
Episode 54: Dijana Milošević - DAH Teatar

Change the Story / Change the World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 56:58


DAH SAYS: "In today's world, we can oppose destruction and violence with the creation of meaning ... we create bold dramatic art to provoke, inspire, and incite personal and social transformation." Be sure to check out our https://www.artandcommunity.com/copy-of-podcast (CHANGE THE STORY COLLECTION OF ARCHIVED EPISODES) on: Justice Arts, Art & Healing, Cultural Organizing, Arts Ed./Children & Youth, Community Arts Training, Music for Change, Theater for Change, Change Making Media. BIODijana Milošević is an award-winning theater director, writer and lecturer. She co-founded the DAH Theater Research Center in Belgrade, and has been its lead director for over 25 years. Dijana has served as the artistic director of theater festivals, the president of the Association of Independent Theaters, the president of the board of BITEF Theater, and a member of the board of directors of the national International Theater Institute (ITI). She has been involved with several peacebuilding initiatives and collaborates with feminist-activist groups. DAH Theater has performed nationally and internationally under Dijana's directing. She has also directed plays by other theater companies around the world. She is a well-known lecturer, who has taught at world-famous universities. She writes articles and essays about theater as well as society. She has won prestigious scholarships such as Fulbright and Arts Link. She is a professor at the Institute for Artistic Play in Belgrade. Notable Mentionshttps://en.dahteatarcentar.com/eu-projects/ (Dah Teatar Research Center for Culture and Social Change): DAH Theatre is an independent, professional, contemporary theatre troupe and artistic collective that uses modern theatre techniques to create engaging art and initiate positive social change, both locally and globally.  Mission: In today's world, we can oppose destruction and violence with the creation of meaning.” Through dedicated teamwork, we create bold dramatic art to provoke, inspire, and incite personal and social transformation. https://nyupress.org/9780976605461/art-and-upheaval/ (Art and Upheaval - Artists on the World's Frontlines:) Author William Cleveland shares r emarkable stories from Northern Ireland, Cambodia, South Africa, United States (Watts, Los Angeles), aboriginal Australia, and Serbia, about artists who resolve conflict, heal unspeakable trauma, give voice to the forgotten and disappeared, and restitch the cultural fabric of their communities. This Babylonian Confusion: The Dah Teatar project “This Babylonian Confusion” is a result of a montage of the actors' materials and the songs of Bertold Brecht. This performance was created from the need of the artists to place themselves in their duty- as artists in “dark times.” Four actors using the characters of Angels say their share against war, nationalism and destruction. [1992] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slobodan_Milo%C5%A1evi%C4%87 (Slobodan Milošivić): was a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Republic_of_Yugoslavia (Yugoslav) and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serbia (Serbian) politician who served as the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_of_Serbia (president) of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Serbia_(1992%E2%80%932006) (Serbia) within https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yugoslavia (Yugoslavia) from 1989 to 1997. Formerly a high-ranking member of the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/League_of_Communists_of_Serbia (League of Communists of Serbia) (SKS) during the 1980s, he led the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_Party_of_Serbia (Socialist Party of Serbia) from its foundation in 1990 until 2003. After Milošević's death, the ICTY and the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Residual_Mechanism_for_Criminal_Tribunals (International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals) found that he was a part of...

Morning Invest
We are watching this all COLLAPSE right before our eyes | Redacted News with Clayton Morris

Morning Invest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 89:10


China just launched a military cyber attack against Taiwan. We are watching the start of a major conflict with China as Nancy Pelosi lands in Taiwan. Serbia is on high alert against NATO provocations.

In 4 Minuti
Martedì, 2 agosto

In 4 Minuti

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 6:30


L'arrivo di Nancy Pelosi in Asia, il confine tra Kosovo e Serbia tra proteste e spari e il regista giapponese detenuto in Myanmar

Miss Mindset

If you are someone who's constantly working towards 'the next big thing', then you're going to want to listen to this episode.Coming to you from Serbia, Bre is here to remind you why the journey is just as, if not more important than the destination.Tune in to hear her chat about:

Es la Mañana de Federico
Florentino Portero explica la tensión entre Serbia y Kosovo

Es la Mañana de Federico

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 12:23


Sara Sanz entrevista al director del Instituto de Política Internacional de la Universidad Francisco de Vitoria sobre la tensión en los Balcanes.

The Duran Podcast
Kosovo crisis. Serbia's warnings, fear or a wider conflict, result in temporary de-escalation

The Duran Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 26:20


Kosovo crisis. Serbia's warnings, fear or a wider conflict, result in temporary de-escalation The Duran: Episode 1342

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Cultural Competency in Healthcare

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


As we see an increasing number of culturally diverse patients in our practices, there is no doubt of the importance of cultural competency in medicine. Specific circumstances and miscommunications have been well documented. But how can we develop an eye to see where a patient’s values and worldview may differ from our own? We will review an approach to cultural competency highlighted by medical missions case studies.

united states canada australia china europe mental health france japan mexico germany russia africa research united kingdom ukraine italy ireland new zealand spain north america healthcare south africa afghanistan brazil nutrition turkey argentina vietnam iran sweden portugal medical muslims thailand colombia chile iraq cuba singapore netherlands nigeria urban indonesia switzerland greece venezuela reunions philippines kenya poland peru south america norway taiwan denmark finland syria south korea costa rica belgium public health haiti austria pakistan jamaica saudi arabia north korea iceland ghana buddhist uganda guatemala ecuador malaysia counseling lebanon nepal ethiopia sri lanka qatar rural romania nursing congo panama hungary bahamas el salvador zimbabwe dentists bolivia honduras morocco psychiatry bangladesh rwanda dominican republic nicaragua tanzania cambodia uruguay hindu malta croatia monaco pharmacy sudan mali belarus bulgaria czech republic physical therapy yemen serbia tribal chiropractic pediatrics senegal dental libya somalia estonia greenland madagascar infectious diseases fiji cyprus neurology barbados kazakhstan zambia mongolia paraguay kuwait lithuania angola armenia macedonia bahrain allergy luxembourg belize namibia slovenia oman slovakia sierra leone liberia united arab emirates mozambique tunisia plastic surgery malawi internal medicine cameroon botswana laos latvia oncology south pacific papua new guinea emergency medicine surgical albania midwife burkina faso tonga azerbaijan togo guyana niger algeria guinea cardiology family medicine south sudan moldova bhutan maldives mauritius dermatology burundi andorra uzbekistan dieticians eritrea naturopathic gambia benin radiology social services grenada occupational therapy anesthesia vanuatu gabon kyrgyzstan endocrinology san marino suriname ophthalmology gastroenterology palau health education physician assistants solomon islands brunei environmental health liechtenstein athletic trainers turkmenistan lesotho seychelles tajikistan swaziland djibouti optometry rheumatology mauritania timor leste hematology central african republic nauru marshall islands nephrology kiribati general surgery cape verde preventative medicine healthcare administration new caledonia french polynesia short term missions guinea bissau international health speech pathology orthopaedic surgery tuvalu dental hygienists allied health cultural competency osteopathic equatorial guinea saint lucia trinidad and tobago french guiana cardiac surgery comoros pulmonology dental assistants bosnia and herzegovina western samoa democratic republic of the congo surgical tech lab medicine laboratory technician domestic missions epidemology
Hoy por Hoy
Hoy por hoy Noticias | Embalses bajo mínimos, ahorro energético y tensión en los Balcanes

Hoy por Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 167:31


Con los embalses al 41% de su capacidad media, varias localidades empiezan a aplicar restricciones en el consumo de agua. El plan de ahorro energético del Gobierno fomentará el teletrabajo y un uso más eficiente del aire acondicionado y la calefacción en los edificios públicos. Y la OTAN advierte de que intervendrá para mantener la estabilidad en Kosovo ante el auge de la tensión con Serbia.

WorldAffairs
The New Story of Old Age: What Japan and the Pandemic Can Teach Us About Living Longer

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 29:08


By 2030, it's estimated one out of every six people on Planet Earth will be over 60. In Japan, nearly 30% of the population is already over 65. But Poland, Romania, Cuba, Serbia, and South Korea? They're some of the fastest-aging societies on the planet, as well.   Ray Suarez chats with Joseph F. Coughlin, founder and director of the MIT AgeLab, about how leaps in technology have led to longer life spans — and why it may be the key to making the most out of borrowed time. Then, Motoko Rich, Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times, shares how this demographic force is already being felt in Japan, the poster “grandparent” for aging societies worldwide.   Support for this podcast episode was provided in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Foundation.   Guests:   Joseph F. Coughlin, PhD, Founder and Director of MIT's AgeLab   Motoko Rich, Tokyo Bureau Chief for the New York Times   Host:     Ray Suarez   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

radiofreeredoubt
Episode 22-27 China-Taiwan, Serbia-Kosovo Assessments, and Comms Action Item Resources

radiofreeredoubt

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 71:34