Podcasts about Catcher

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Defensive position in baseball and softball played behind home plate, facing the field

  • 1,367PODCASTS
  • 2,127EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jun 30, 2022LATEST
Catcher

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Best podcasts about Catcher

Show all podcasts related to catcher

Latest podcast episodes about Catcher

Mad Radio
P&P - Verlander is on FIRE, Did Rockets Botch things with Wall, and Should Astros Upgrade at Catcher

Mad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 49:29


HOUR 2 - Shaun and B-Scott dive into how dominant Justin Verlander has been since his return, assess if the Rockets handled things with John Wall the right way, discuss the idea of the Astros upgrading to a more versatile Catcher, and go through the Headlines.

Mad Radio
P&P - Is it Worth It for Astros to Upgrade at Catcher?

Mad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 17:23


Shaun and B-Scott dive into the idea that the Astros need to upgrade to a Catcher that is good both at the plate and behind it. Would that actually be more trouble than it's worth?

What's Up with Wendy
Johnny Bench, Hall of Fame Baseball Player

What's Up with Wendy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 14:27


My guest is legendary baseball player, Hall of Famer, Johnny Bench. Considered the best catcher to ever play the game, and the heart of the Big Red Machine, Johnny spent all 17 of his seasons with the Cincinnati Reds. He won the Gold Glove Award TEN TIMES, and he won two World Series. But, because of all that time in the sun, Johnny was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common type of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Today, he's cancer free and a vocal champion for efforts to Get Real About Skin Cancer. We chatted about what it's like to be the best catcher of all time, what it was like playing for the Reds for his entire career, who his favorite catcher is now, who he still keeps in touch with, and so much more. Johnny also shares life-saving tips about his journey with cancer, and what you can do to catch non-melanoma skin cancer before it advances. He joins me along with leading board-certified dermatologist and skin cancer expert, Dr. Ariel Ostad.

KNBR Podcast
6-29 Giants Catcher Austin Wynns joins F.P. Santangelo to break down his early Giants career

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 15:26


Austin Wynns joins F.P. Santangelo to talk about becoming a Giant & the art of catching.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jake’s sports talk
Patrick Catcher Twins Organization

Jake’s sports talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 18:32


We discussed baseball life and other topics! Hope you all enjoyed and learned from what we discussed! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jake3367/message

The Zone
Hour 1 - Royals vs As, Melendez vs Perez - the Royals' plan at the catcher position

The Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 44:15


The Zone talks about the Royals' series against the Oakland A's over the weekend. Then, they talked about the defensive struggles of MJ Melendez to begin his career, and how the Royals plan to deal with them. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Growing Cubs: A Chicago Prospect Podcast
106. Who Will Replace Willson Contreras at Catcher and Making Sense of Caleb Kilian

Growing Cubs: A Chicago Prospect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 71:39


It's time for another mailbag episode as listeners went above and beyond in sending in plenty of questions for Greg and Jimmy to answer on the show. The guys spend some time at the beginning of the show talking about the brilliance of the Myrtle Beach Pelicans playoff run (2:05) before digging into the questions. Once there, they chat about Matt Mervis (7:45), Cristian Hernandez (13:10), catchers of the system (25:45), DJ Herz (39:15), and Caleb Kilian (52:10).

Pub Sports Talk
Episode 108 ft. Jeremy Dowdy

Pub Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 97:30


Former A's Catcher, Jeremy Dowdy is back in the pub to share some more MLB Stories, talk College World Series picks, LIV vs PGA, Steph and the warriors brining home the NBA Championship, plus some hockey love. Don't miss out on some great sport bets and an inside look at the Miami Dolphins and how they will do this NFL Season. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/parker-haake/support

The Sports Objective Podcast
Ben Newton, Former ECU Catcher

The Sports Objective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 59:17


Ben Newton, who just concluded his Pirate career, talks about his ECU experience. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thesportsobj/support

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo
Gord Ash the Jays future at catcher, trade targets for the Jays & Aaron Judge arbitration today

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 13:18


Former Blue Jays GM and Brewers VP of baseball operation joins First Up to discuss the Jays future at catcher, trade targets for the Jays, latest with the Brewers, Aaron Judge arbitration today, Ohtani's brilliance and more!

The Sports Objective
Ben Newton, Former ECU Catcher

The Sports Objective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 60:00


Former ECU Catcher Ben Newton talks about his path to East Carolina, his time in the purple and gold and what lies ahead!

Officially Unofficial
Texas Rangers Catcher Sam Huff #153

Officially Unofficial

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 61:37


On this episode we have Texas Rangers Catcher and long time friend of the show, Sam Huff. We discuss his MLB debut in the 2020 season, launching 500 foot Home Runs in the minors, his first big league Home Run, which Texas Rangers jersey is the most elite, playing against Miggy and MUCH MORE! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Con Las Bases Llenas Podcast de Beisbol
Tampa Bay Rays: Rene Pinto, catcher venezolano (ENTREVISTA)

Con Las Bases Llenas Podcast de Beisbol

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 6:07


Rene Pinto, catcher venezolano de los Rays de Tampa Bay, conversó sobre el ambiente que vive su equipo en Grandes Ligas y la situación del mismo. Rene también conversó sobre la posibilidad de jugar en los Navegantes del Magallanes en la LVBP, a pesar de la dificultad actual con la LVBP.

On Deck Circle
Is Wilson Contreras the Best Catcher Rest of Season ? (Ep 62)

On Deck Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 37:57


Dave Eddy, the Director of Dynasty Baseball at https://fantasysixpack.net is joined as always by Jason Beckner and Nick Zaniboni. "Dynasty Court" is back in session. This week Dave and Jason debate over whether Willson Contreras is the best Catcher the rest of the season. Nick delivers the final verdict. Other topics on this week's episode include: - Riley Greene getting promoted with the Detroit Tigers - Oneil Cruz getting promoted with the Pittsburgh Pirates - Manny Machado hitting the IL(4:00) - Mookie Betts hitting the IL - "Down on the Farm" Jason walks us through a breakdown of Spencer Steer IF with the Triple-A St. Paul Saint (Minnesota Twins) You can check out Dave's Dynasty Baseball rankings for yourself: https://fantasysixpack.net/2022-dynasty-baseball-rankings/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ondeckcircle/support

DJ & PK
Johnny Bench, Hall of Fame Catcher

DJ & PK

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 14:51


Cincinnati Reds legend and MLB Hall of Famer Johnny Bench joined DJ to talk about his advocacy for skin cancer and his career in the big leagues See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KiDNuZ
06.21.2022

KiDNuZ

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 5:46


Catcher's Class Act, Polar Bear Prospects, Summer Solstice, US Open Champ, Project Mootopia and Chores Boost Brainpower! 

Schopp and Bulldog
SBD - Bills QB to pass catcher combo trivia

Schopp and Bulldog

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 22:44


Hour 4: Sneaky Joe tests the guys on the Bills QB to pass catcher combos that have exceeded 1000 yards since 2000.

Supertalk Eagle Hour
Golden Eagles catcher Graham Crawford joins the show followed by PinebeltSports Editor Andrew Abadie

Supertalk Eagle Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 41:23


Dedicated to Southern Miss sports! Weekdays 1 - 2 p.m. on select SuperTalk Mississippi stations. This show is a production of SuperTalk Mississippi Media. Learn more at SuperTalk.FM

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins
Assessing the 2022 Marlins with TakesWereMade

Locked On Marlins - Daily Podcast On The Miami Marlins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 67:34


@TakesWereMade_ joins the show - 60 minute run time. We get into everything! Offense, Catcher, Bullpen, Rotation, Trades, Extensions, you name it - we covered it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast
7am Hour - Take On Woods - Don't Do This - Alfaro The Everyday Catcher

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 43:56


Ben & Woods kick off the 7am hour with a little Take On Woods as we look to qualify another listener for our monthly grand prize trip to Las Vegas. Then we get to "Don't Do This" before discussing whether or not Jorge Alfaro has done enough to win the everyday starting catcher job? Listen here!

Catcher's Corner
Catcher's Corner: Father's Day Waiver Wire Special

Catcher's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 80:10


Sami (@Believe_Sami) and Eric (@SamskiNYC) welcome Chris Torres (@TorresTakes) to discuss whether or not Sami is being replaced on the podcast and what to do about current breaking news, like injuries to Ozzie Albies and Liam Hendriks. Then they discuss the catcher waiver wire landscape and look ahead for which fringe starting hitters have good upcoming weekends. All music in this episode is made by Brooklyn hip-hop artist Dan Dillinger, whose new album can be found on Spotify Timestamps 4:00 - Trending News Breakdown Fernando Tatis Jr. not healing as the Padres want Ozzie Albies fractured foot. Which 2B can you add to replace him? Jon Berti, Cesar Hernandez, Matt Reynolds, Ezequial Duran, Cavan Biggio Liam Hendriks to the IL. How much FAAB for Graveman? Corey Knebel is out as closer. Would you add Dominguez over Graveman? Edward Cabrera to the IL. Yoan Moncada has a great day. Does it matter? Leody Tavares gets called up: Taveras, Jarren Duran, or Edward Olivares? Oneil Cruz is coming up. Is he? I mean, really, is he? 39:00 - Catcher Landscape: We get in on the talk about the current crop of streaming catchers Gabriel Moreno Christian Bethancourt Cal Raleigh Jose Trevino Omar Narvaez Carson Kelly Elias Diaz Brian Severen 48:30 - Fringe Starters with Good Weekend Schedules: Are they playable? Didi Gregorius Bryson Stott Alec Bohm Seth Brown Hunter Dozier Andrew Benintendi Nomar Mazara Jurickson Profar Jake Cronenworth Jorge Alfaro Ji-Man Choi Vidal Brujan Dylan Moore J.P Crawford? Orlando Arcia Adam Duvall Michael Chavis Marcell Ozuna --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eric-samulski/support


Interview with Kyle Silvestro CEO of SyTruth about healthcare technology and value-based care models

STAB!
STAB! 296 – Who Is Part Of The Twelve?!

STAB!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 53:23


In this sugar encrusted deep state sponsored episode of the STAB! show, your host – clearly in the pocket of big sucrose – Jesse Jones welcomes a dish fighting panel of Jordan Gannon & Tyler Kinney to share their three GPAs, bootlegs of Catcher in the Rye, The Good Place & Top Gun, campaign speeches … Continue reading »

Heat Ratio Sports
Heat Ratio LIVE: Jalen Hurts and Nick Sirianni Flying Under the NFL Radar

Heat Ratio Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 82:56


The Phillies have been on a roll under Rob Thomson and have been playing a new style of Baseball that relies less on analytics. Will the trend continue to go upward? JT Realmuto's struggle has been overshadowed by the consistent production within the #Phillies lineup. Are you worried about the All-star Catcher? Quick Takes w/Dan Green: We all want Doc Rivers fired, and we were glad to see Joe Girardi go. How about coaches that got fired that you wish you could have back? The 2 Minute Warning w/Al Griffin: The Sixers aren't as far away as you think. Changes ahead? The Final Judgement w/Tony Cutillo: Nick Siriani has been hanging out with coaches Dick Vermeil and Jay Wright as was y to learn how to grow. Is Nick the Next Big Thing? Jigsaw Chronicles: Rita's Water Ice Lids We are usually LIVE from the fantastic Steam Pub in beautiful Bucks County (Southampton, PA). Go check out their wide selection of Beers/Drinks and a unique food menu that will keep you coming back for more. Follow us on TikTok, FB, Twitter, and IG @heatratiosports! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/heat-ratio0/support

Baseball Central @ Noon
“He Looks Like a Catcher”

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 49:07


Blue Jays play by play voice Ben Wagner discusses the Blue Jays following their road trip, notably Gabriel Moreno looking comfortable behind the plate, the club's mindset heading into the Orioles series, and Cavan Biggio's play since rejoining the team (06:14). In an extended edition of "Barker's Back Leg Bits", Jeff and Kevin answer questions on if Moreno could play anywhere else besides catcher, Vladimir Guerrero Jr.'s spot in the batting order, and what Cavan Biggio's role is going forward (29:35). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

Icons and Outlaws
The Beatles

Icons and Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 74:45


In March of 1957, John Winston Lennon formed a "skiffle" group called The Quarrymen. What is "skiffle," you may be asking? It's a kind of folk music with a blues or jazz flavor that was popular in the 1950s, played by a small group and often incorporating improvised instruments such as washboards. On July 6, '57, Lennon met a guy named James. James Paul McCartney, while playing at the Woolton Parish church fete. In Britain, fêtes are traditional public festivals held outdoors and organized to raise funds for a charity. On February 6, 1958, the young up-and-coming guitarist George Harrison was invited to watch the group perform at Wilson Hall, Garston, Liverpool. He was soon brought in as a regular player. During this period, members continually joined and left the lineup. Finally, Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, and Stuart Sutcliffe (a classmate of Lennon at Liverpool Art College) emerged as the only constant members. One day, the members showed up to a gig wearing different colored shirts, so they decided to call themselves 'The Rainbows.' In a talent show they did in 1959, they called themselves 'Johnny and the Moondogs.' Once again, changing their name to "The Silver Beatles," they eventually decided, on August 17, 1960, on the moniker "The Beatles." Why did they choose the Beatles, Logan? They were huge fans of Buddy Holly and The Crickets – as a way of emulating their heroes, they called themselves after an insect. Right?   Well, According to John Lennon, "It came in a vision – a man appeared on a flaming pie and said unto them, 'from this day forward you are the Beatles with an 'A'! Thank you, mister man, they said, thanking him," he said.   Most of the accounts claim that Lennon's love of wordplay led them to adopt the 'a' eventually. Lennon would explain in a 1964 interview: "It was beat and beetles, and when you said it, people thought of crawly things, and when you read it, it was beat music."   After Lennon died in 1980, George Harrison claimed that the name came about differently in the Beatles' Anthology documentary (as is usually the case).   Harrison claimed that the name, 'The Beatles', came from the 1953 Marlon Brando film, The Wild One. In the film, Brando played a character called 'Johnny' and was in a gang called 'The Beetles.'   This answer would add up considering that the group also flirted with the name of 'Johnny and the Beetles', as well as 'Long John and the Silver Beetles.' Their unofficial manager, Allan Williams, arranged for them to perform in clubs on the Reeperbahn in Hamburg, Germany. On August 16, 1960, McCartney invited a guy named Pete Best to become the group's permanent drummer after watching Best playing with The Blackjacks in the Casbah Club. The Casbah Club was a cellar club operated by Best's mother Mona in West Derby, Liverpool, where The Beatles had played and often visited. They started in Hamburg by playing in the Indra and Kaiserkeller bars and the Top Ten club. George, who was only seventeen years old, had lied about his age, and when this little fact was discovered, he was deported by the German authorities. Paul and Pete thought it was good to start a small fire by lighting an unused condom in their living quarters while leaving it for more luxurious rooms. Arrested and charged for arson, they too were both deported. Lennon and Sutcliffe followed suit and returned to Liverpool in December. While in Germany, they stayed in a small room with bunkbeds. George Harrison admitted in The Beatles Anthology that this made things especially awkward when he crawled under the sheets with a woman for the first time — Lennon, McCartney, and then-drummer Pete Best actually applauded for him after the deed was done. Harrison joked, "At least they kept quiet while I was doing it."   They went back a second time and played the Top Ten Club for three months (April-June 1961). Stuart Sutcliffe decided to remain in Germany to concentrate on painting and left the group during this time. Sutcliffe's departure led McCartney to switch from playing rhythm guitar to bass guitar. While they were playing at the Top Ten, they were recruited by singer Tony Sheridan to act as his "backing band" on a series of recordings for the German Polydor Records label, produced by famed bandleader Bert Kaempfert ("Strangers in the Night", "Danke Schoen"). Kaempfert signed the group to its own Polydor contract at the first session on June 22, 1961. On October 31, Polydor released the recording, My Bonnie (Mein Herz ist bei dir nur), which made it into the German charts under Tony Sheridan and The Beat Brothers. Around 1962, My Bonnie was mentioned in Cashbox as the debut of a "new rock and roll team, Tony Sheridan and the Beatles," and a few copies were also pressed for U.S. disc jockeys. Cashbox, also known as Cash Box, was a music industry trade magazine published initially weekly from July 1942 to November 1996. Ten years after its dissolution, it was revived and continues as Cashbox Magazine, an online magazine with weekly charts and occasional special print issues. The band's third stay in Hamburg was from April 13–May 31, 1962, when they opened The Star Club. However, that stay was dampened when Astrid Kirchherr informed them upon their arrival of Sutcliffe's death from a brain hemorrhage. Astrid, a German photographer, and friend of the Beatles, revealed that her fiancé (and former Beatles bass player) Stuart Sutcliffe had died. No one was more shocked than John Lennon, who reportedly broke out in a fit of hysterical laughter at the idea of losing his art school buddy.   Upon their return from Hamburg, the group was enthusiastically promoted by local promoter Sam Leach, who presented them for the next year and a half on various stages in Liverpool forty-nine times. Brian Epstein (no relation to a particular disgusting human being), took over as the group's manager in 1962 and led The Beatles' quest for a British recording contract. In one now-famous exchange, a senior Decca Records A&R executive named Dick Rowe turned Epstein down flat and informed him that "The Decca audition for guitar groups are on the way out, Mr. Epstein." Remember Decca? They were Buddy Holly's first record label that thought "rock n roll was a fad." Strike two, Decca. Strike two. Epstein eventually met with producer George Martin of EMI's Parlophone label. Martin expressed an interest in hearing the band in the studio. So he invited the band to London's Abbey Road studios to audition on June 6. Martin wasn't particularly impressed by the band's demo recordings but instantly liked them when they met. He concluded that they had raw musical talent but said (in later interviews) that what made the difference for him that fateful day was their wit and humor in the studio.   Martin privately suggested to Brian Epstein that the band use another drummer in the studio. Yikes. Pete Best had some popularity and was considered attractive by many fans. Still, the three founding members had become increasingly unhappy with his popularity and personality, and Epstein had become exasperated with his refusal to adopt the distinctive hairstyle as part of their unified look. So Epstein sacked Best on August 16, 1962. Lennon and McCartney immediately asked their friend Richard Starkey, the drummer for one of the top Merseybeat groups, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, to join the band. Unfortunately, Rory Storm didn't want to release Starkey but let Starkey out of his contract. Oh... Richard Starkey would eventually be known as "Ringo Starr." He chose Ringo because of the rings he wore, and it also had a cowboy feel to it. His drum solos were referred to as Starr Time.   The Beatles' first EMI session on June 6 did not yield any releasable recordings, but the September sessions produced the minor U.K. hit, "Love Me Do," which peaked on the charts at number 17. The single reached the top of the United States singles chart more than 18 months later in May 1964. This single was swiftly followed by their second single, "Please Please Me." They recorded their first album (also titled Please Please Me) three months later. George Martin capitalized on the wild, live energy the boys perfected in Hamburg and recorded the entire Please Please Me LP in less than 13 hours — saving "Twist and Shout" for last so the taxing vocals wouldn't ruin Lennon's voice before the other songs were done. That's fourteen songs. Luckily, the longest song on the album was only 2 minutes and 54 seconds long. The shortest was a minute and 47 seconds.   The band's first televised performance was on a program called People and Places, transmitted live from Manchester by Granada Television on October 17, 1962. The band experienced massive popularity on the record charts in the U.K. from early 1963. However, Parlophone's American counterpart, Capitol Records (owned by EMI), refused to issue their singles "Love Me Do," "Please Please Me," and "From Me to You" in the United States. Mainly because no British act had ever had a sustained commercial impact on American audiences.   Vee-Jay Records, a small Chicago label, is said by some to have been pressured into issuing these initial singles. Allegedly it was part of a deal for the rights to another performer's masters. Art Roberts, music director of Chicago powerhouse radio station WLS, placed "Please Please Me" into radio rotation in late February 1963, making it possibly the first time the American people heard a Beatles record on American radio. In August 1963, the Philadelphia-based Swan Records tried again with The Beatles' "She Loves You," which failed to receive airplay.   After The Beatles' massive success in 1964, Vee-Jay Records and Swan Records took advantage of their previously secured rights to The Beatles' early recordings and reissued the songs they had rights to, which all reached the top ten of the charts the second time around. Then, in a shifty move, Vee-Jay Records issued some weird L.P. repackaging of the Beatles' material they had and released "Introducing… The Beatles," which was basically The Beatles' debut British album with some minor alterations. Andi Lothian, a former Scottish music promoter, laid claim to the term in that he coined 'Beatlemania" while speaking to a reporter on October 7, 1963 at the Caird Hall in Dundee at a Beatles concert that took place during The Beatles' 1963 Mini-Tour of Scotland. Beatlemania was taking over the world.   In early November 1963, Brian Epstein persuaded Ed Sullivan to commit to presenting The Beatles on three editions of his show in February. He turned this guaranteed exposure into a record deal with Capitol Records. Capitol agreed to a mid-January 1964 release for "I Want to Hold Your Hand." Still, unexpected circumstances triggered premature airplay of an imported copy of the single on a Washington D.C. radio station in mid-December. Capitol brought forward the release of the record on December 26, 1963.   Bob Dylan introduced The Beatles to the cannabis drug in 1964 in a New York hotel room. He offered the "Fab Four" marijuana as a consequence of his misconception that the lyrics in their hit song "I Want to Hold Your Hand" from Meet the Beatles! were "I get high" instead of "I can't hide." This initial partaking in drugs grew into heavier experimentation with LSD and other substances whose psychedelic effects were commonly thought to have manifested themselves in the band's music. The Beatles, in turn, would influence Dylan's move into an electrified rock sound in his music.   Several New York City radio stations—first WMCA, then WINS, and finally, WABC began playing "I Want to Hold Your Hand" on its release day. The Beatlemania that had started in Washington was duplicated in New York and quickly spread to other markets. The record sold one million copies in just ten days. By January 16, Cashbox Magazine had certified The Beatle's record as number one in the edition published with the cover-date January 23, 1964.   This widespread phenomenon contributed to the near-hysterical fan reaction on February 7, 1964 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (which had been renamed in December 1963 from Idlewild Airport). A record-breaking seventy-three million viewers, approximately 40 percent of the U.S. population at the time, tuned in to the first Ed Sullivan Show appearance two days later on February 9. During the week of April 4, The Beatles held the top five places on the Billboard Hot 100, a feat that has never been repeated. They had an additional seven songs at lower positions. That's twelve songs on the Billboard charts at once. Of all the music acts on the charts, 12 percent of the entries consisted of Beatles songs. They were so unaware of their popularity in America that, on their arrival, they initially thought the crowds were there to greet someone else.   Oh, and their Concerts Often Smelled Like Urine Apparently, the masses of young girls who turned up for their concerts, movie premieres, or to wave hello as the Beatles walked off the plane in a new city were apparently too distracted by their love for the band to care about whether or not their bladders were full. DSo, they'd pee themselves.  In 1964, the band undertook their first appearances outside of Europe and North America, touring Australia and New Zealand, notably without Ringo Starr, who was ill and was temporarily replaced by session drummer Jimmy Nicol. When they arrived in Adelaide, The Beatles were greeted by what is reputed to be the largest crowd of their touring career, when over 300,000 people turned out to see them at the Adelaide Town Hall. Yeah, Adelaide's population was only right around 200,000. In September of that year, baseball owner Charles O. Finley paid the band the unheard-of sum of $150,000 to play in Kansas City, Missouri. That's $1,398,914.52 today and utterly unheard of at that time.   In 1965, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom bestowed the band the Member of the Order of the British Empire or MBE, a civil honor nominated by Prime Minister Harold Wilson.   On August 15, that year, The Beatles performed in the first stadium rock concert in the history of Rock n roll, playing at Shea Stadium in New York to a crowd of 55,600. The stadium's capacity is 57,333. The band later admitted that they had mainly been unable to hear themselves play or sing due to the volume of screaming and cheering. This concert is generally considered when they started disliking playing live shows.   In 1965, recently interested in Indian music, George Harrison purchased a sitar. He played it in the song Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown), the first instance of such an instrument being used on a rock record. He later took sitar lessons from maestro Ravi Shankar, and implemented additional elements of Eastern music and spirituality into his songs, notably Love You To and Within You Without You. These musical decisions significantly increased the influence of Indian music on popular culture in the late 1960s.   In July 1966, when The Beatles toured the Philippines, they unintentionally snubbed the nation's first lady, Imelda Marcos, who had expected the group to attend a breakfast reception at the Presidential Palace. Manager Brian Epstein was forced to give back all the money that the band had earned while there before being allowed to leave the country.   Upon returning from the Philippines, an earlier comment by John Lennon back in March of that year launched a backlash against The Beatles. In an interview with British reporter Maureen Cleave, Lennon had offered his opinion that Christianity was dying and that The Beatles were "more popular than Jesus now." Oops!   There was an immediate response, starting with an announcement by two radio stations in Alabama and Texas that they had banned Beatles' music from their playlists. WAQY DJ, Tommy Charles said: "We just felt it was so absurd and sacrilegious that something ought to be done to show them that they can't get away with this sort of thing." Around two dozen other stations followed suit with similar announcements. Some stations in the South (shocker) went further, organizing demonstrations with bonfires, drawing hordes of teenagers to burn their Beatles' records and other memorabilia publicly. Many people affiliated with churches in the American South took the suggestion seriously.   The Memphis, TN city council, aware that a Beatles' concert was scheduled at the Mid-South Coliseum during the group's upcoming U.S. tour, voted to cancel it. Rather than have "municipal facilities be used as a forum to ridicule anyone's religion" and said, "The Beatles are not welcome in Memphis." On August 13, The Ku Klux Klan nailed a Beatles' album to a wooden cross and subsequently burned it, vowing "vengeance," with conservative groups staging further public burnings of Beatles' records.   Young people across the United States and South Africa burned Beatles records in protest. Then, under tremendous pressure from the American media, John Lennon apologized for his remarks at a press conference in Chicago on August 11, the eve of the first performance of what turned out to be their final tour.   The Beatles performed their last concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco on August 29, 1966. From that point forward, they focused on recording music. They ended up pioneering more advanced, multi-layered arrangements in popular and pop music. After three months away from each other, they returned to Abbey Road Studios on November 24, 1966, to begin a 129-day recording period in making their eighth album: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, was released on June 1, 1967.   Along with studio tricks such as sound effects, unconventional microphone placements, automatic double-tracking, and vari-speed recording, The Beatles began to augment their recordings with unconventional instruments for rock music at the time. These instruments included string and brass ensembles, Indian instruments such as the sitar and the "swarmandel," tape loops, and early electronic devices, including the "Mellotron," which was used with flute voices on the intro to "Strawberry Fields Forever." McCartney once asked Martin what a guitar would sound like if played underwater and was serious about trying it. Lennon also wondered what his vocals would sound like if he was hanging upside down from the ceiling. Unfortunately, their ideas were ahead of the available technology at the time.   Beginning with the use of a string quartet (arranged by George Martin) on Yesterday in 1965, The Beatles pioneered a modern form of art-rock and art song, exemplified by the double-quartet string arrangement on "Eleanor Rigby" (1966), "Here, There and Everywhere" (1966), and "She's Leaving Home" (1967). In addition, Lennon and McCartney's interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach led them to use a piccolo trumpet on the arrangement of "Penny Lane" and a Mellotron at the start of "Strawberry Fields Forever."   On June 25, 1967, the Beatles became the first band globally transmitted on television, in front of an estimated 400 million people worldwide, in a segment within the first-ever worldwide T.V. satellite hook-up, a show entitled Our World. The Beatles were transmitted live from Abbey Road Studios, and their new song "All You Need Is Love" was recorded live during the show.   Following the triumphs of the Sgt. Pepper album and the global broadcast, The Beatles' situation seemingly got worse. First, their manager Brian Epstein died of an overdose of sleeping pills on August 27, 1967, at 32, and the band's business affairs began to unravel. Next, at the end of 1967, they received their first major negative press criticism in the U.K., with disparaging reviews of their surrealistic T.V. film Magical Mystery Tour. The public wasn't a fan, either.   The group spent the early part of 1968 in Rishikesh, Uttar Pradesh, India, studying transcendental meditation with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. Upon their return, Lennon and McCartney formed Apple Corps, initially a philanthropic business venture they described as an attempt at "western communism." The middle part of 1968 saw the guys busy recording the double album, The Beatles, popularly known as "The White Album" due to its stark white cover. These sessions saw deep divisions beginning within the band, including John Lennon's new girlfriend, Yoko Ono, being at his side through much of the sessions and the feeling that Paul McCartney was becoming too dominating. Paul McCartney gradually took more control of the group. Internal divisions within the band had been a small but growing problem during their earlier career. Most notably, this was reflected in the difficulty that George Harrison experienced in getting his songs onto Beatles' albums, and in the growing artistic and personal differences between John and Paul.   On the business side, Paul wanted Lee Eastman, the father of his wife, Linda Eastman, to manage The Beatles, but the other guys wanted New York manager Allen Klein to represent them. All of the band's decisions in the past were unanimous, but this time the four could not agree on a manager. Lennon, Harrison, and Starr felt the Eastmans would look after McCartney's well-being before the group's. Paul was quoted years later during the Anthology interviews, saying, "Looking back, I can understand why they would feel that was biased against them." Afterward, the band kicked themselves in the ass for the Klein decision, as Klein embezzled millions from their earnings.   Their final live performance was on the rooftop of the Apple building in Savile Row, London, on January 30, 1969, the next-to-last day of the problematic Get Back sessions. Mainly due to Paul McCartney's efforts, they recorded their final album, Abbey Road, in the summer of 1969.   John Lennon announced his departure to the rest of the group on September 20, 1969. The rest of the band talked him out of saying anything publicly. In March 1970, the band gave the "Get Back" session tapes to American producer Phil Spector, whose "Wall of Sound" production was in direct opposition to the record's original intent to appear as a stripped-down live studio performance. McCartney announced the breakup on April 10, 1970, a week before releasing his first solo album, McCartney. On May 8, 1970, the Spector-produced version of Get Back was released as the album Let It Be, followed by the documentary film of the same name. The Beatles' partnership was legally dissolved after McCartney filed a lawsuit on December 31, 1970. Following the group's dissolution, the BBC marketed an extensive collection of Beatles recordings, mainly of original studio sessions from 1963 to 1968. Much of this material formed the basis for a 1988 radio documentary series, The Beeb's Lost Beatles Tapes. Later, in 1994, the best of these sessions were given an official EMI, released on Live at the BBC.   On the evening of December 8 1980, John Lennon was shot and fatally wounded in the archway of the Dakota, his home in New York City. His killer was Mark David Chapman, an American Beatles fan incensed by Lennon's lavish lifestyle and his 1966 comment that the Beatles were "more popular than Jesus." Chapman said he was inspired by the fictional character Holden Caulfield from J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye, a "phony-killer" who despised hypocrisy. Chapman planned the killing over several months and waited for John at the Dakota on the morning of December 8. Early in the evening, Chapman met Lennon, who signed his copy of the album Double Fantasy and subsequently left for a recording session. Later that night, Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, returned to the Dakota. As Lennon and Ono approached the building's entrance, Chapman fired five hollow-point bullets from a .38 special revolver, four of which hit John in the back. Chapman remained at the scene reading The Catcher in the Rye until the police arrested him. John Lennon was rushed to Roosevelt Hospital in a police car, where he was pronounced dead on arrival at around 11:15 p.m.   In February 1994, the then-three surviving Beatles reunited to produce and record additional music for a few of John Lennon's old unfinished demos, almost as if reuniting the Beatles. "Free As A Bird" premiered as part of The Beatles Anthology, a series of television documentaries, and was released as a single in December 1995, with "Real Love" following in March 1996. These songs were also included in the three Anthology collections of C.D.s released in 1995 and 1996, each consisting of two C.D.s of never-before-released Beatles material.   On November 29 2001, George Harrison died at a property belonging to Paul McCartney, on Heather Road in Beverly Hills, California. He was 58 years old. As relayed in a statement by his wife Olivia and son Dhani, his final message to the world was: "Everything else can wait, but the search for God cannot wait, and love one another." The Beatles were the best-selling popular musical act of the twentieth century. EMI estimated that by 1985, the band had sold over one billion discs or tapes worldwide. In addition, the Recording Industry Association of America has certified The Beatles as the top-selling artists of all time in the United States based on U.S. sales of singles and albums.   The Beatles have spent 132 weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart – by far the most of any artist. Garth Brooks occupied the top spot for 52 weeks, the second most.   The Beatles are one of only two musical acts to have eight consecutive albums on the Billboard 200 all hit No. 1.  – the other being Eminem –   Anthology 1 sold 450,000 copies on its first day of release, reaching the highest volume of single-day sales ever for an album. In 2000, a compilation album named one was released, containing almost every number-one single released by the band from 1962 to 1970. The collection sold 3.6 million copies in its first week and more than 12 million in three weeks worldwide, becoming the fastest-selling album of all time and the biggest-selling album of 2000. The collection also reached number one in the United States and 33 other countries. In 1988, every Beatles member (including Pete Best and Stuart Sutcliffe) was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. www.iconsandoutlaws.com www.accidentaldads.com  

united states god america jesus christ american new york california live texas new york city chicago australia europe apple rock washington british san francisco sound germany washington dc christianity united kingdom philadelphia german new zealand south alabama night north america south africa bbc indian scotland wall missouri britain beatles member liverpool manchester kansas city places philippines hurricanes capitol scottish rock and roll strike tn internal hamburg billboard twist klein get back arrested pepper epstein john lennon top ten beverly hills paul mccartney lsd yikes chapman sgt anthology allegedly garth brooks rock and roll hall of fame george harrison wins real love catcher british empire marlon brando rye mccartney ringo starr crickets ringo yoko ono dundee emi blackjack mbe ku klux klan beatle queen elizabeth ii american south abbey road brando buddy holly indra phil spector johann sebastian bach fab four billboard hot beetles salinger spector capitol records our world let it be ono george martin white album leaving home uttar pradesh beatlemania starkey lonely hearts club band rishikesh ed sullivan thebeatles penny lane ed sullivan show abbey road studios ravi shankar decca magical mystery tour wild one dso reeperbahn shea stadium from me sutcliffe wabc maharishi mahesh yogi eleanor rigby polydor brian epstein wls mark david chapman all you need is love beeb pete best hold your hand imelda marcos savile row holden caulfield strawberry fields forever allen klein mellotron parlophone recording industry association candlestick park free as a bird double fantasy dhani quarrymen she loves you cashbox presidential palace love me do mini tour merseybeat star club apple corps mid south coliseum moondogs roosevelt hospital stuart sutcliffe tony sheridan eastmans wmca granada television allan williams sam leach garston jimmy nicol love you to kaempfert charles o finley
From The Perch
Who is the Atlanta Falcons No. 3 pass-catcher, a Marcus Mariota update and more

From The Perch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 18:06


It's a mailbag episode as we hit on the Atlanta Falcons receiving corps, Marcus Mariota, Matt Ryan's legacy and whether or not Rothstein is a superhero in disguise.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Triple Threat
Is it Time for Astros to Upgrade at Catcher? (Hour 2) Clint Stoerner & The Show 06-10-22

The Triple Threat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 41:08


the artisan podcast
ep28 | daniel sieberg | storyteller, entrepreneur

the artisan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 39:49


Daniel Sieberg Co-Founder, Chief Content Officer: GoodTrust Director, Innovation Marketing, Moody's Author: The Digital Diet (2011); Digital Legacy (2020, w/ Rikard Steiber) https://www.linkedin.com/in/danielsieberg/ ------------------     Katty Welcome to the artisan podcast as we welcome Daniel Seiberg as our next guest. Daniel is the Co-founder and Chief Content Officer of Good Trust and the Director of Innovation Marketing at Moody's. But above all, Daniel is a storyteller. Throughout his career he has told stories of brands and stories of people as a journalist, as an author, as an entrepreneur. He has traveled to over 70 countries and has worked in marketing, communications, product, and partnerships at many well known companies including Google as well as many news outlets. I'm so excited to have Daniel here so that we can talk about storytelling and how that impacts interviewing and how we can show up as our authentic selves, not only to an interview but any role that we start. So, with that, let's welcome Daniel.   Daniel Hi, Katty. It's wonderful to be with you and dwell in possibilities as the sign over your shoulder reads and talk about storytelling. Probably one of my favorite subjects.   Katty Yeah, thank you. I was fascinated when we had met a few weeks ago just to talk about the concept of storytelling and wanted to bring that to the audience here. Obviously, the audience who listens here are all storytellers… whether they're visual storytellers, or writers, or marketers. But this concept of storytelling is so important, and as we are recording this, the gardeners have come. So for the audience, just giving you a little warning if you're hearing noise, it's out of my control.   Daniel This is all part of our story right now.    Katty This is the story of working from home.    Daniel Yes, exactly.   Katty It is what it is.    Daniel Yep, life in 2022.    Katty Yep, we will speak loudly to overcome that. So, Daniel, how did you get started on this path? Let's go there first.   Daniel Yeah, absolutely and I will keep my origin story relatively tight. I would just say that my father spent his career as an engineering electronics technician working with oceanographers who went to the North Pole to study climate change. So I was exposed to the “how does anything work” kinds of questions from an early age. My family believes in service and my sister is a nurse practitioner. So that's a little bit of my orientation in the world.    And then coupled with that, my maternal grandmother died of complications from Alzheimer's and I can distinctly remember what it was like to see her at her 75th birthday party, and as an awkward 14-year-old walk up to her with a present and for her to say, “Oh, this is lovely, dear, thank you, and who are you?” And for the two of us to sort of die in front of each other in that moment. So what struck me is the value of our stories and how we pass them on. How we convey them. They're sort of the storytelling or how we do that. There's the tools that we use to tell those stories, there's the subject matter, that people, and everything wrapped up in what it means to tell a story and of course to listen,  to receive,  or to watch. So that, I think, is what ultimately pushed me into a career of being a journalist. In my case, it was science and technology. I did a master's degree in journalism with a focus of technology at The University of British Columbia…. a long time ago.    The arc of my career went through working at CNN, covering those subjects including space and environment, and on to CBS News, and ABC and then I pivoted away from being a practicing journalist, if you will, to focusing on technology and I would say helping others use technology to tell stories. So I spent several years at Google and helped to create a couple of teams in service of empowering newsrooms to use technology to tell stories in new ways with data through different tools, training journalists, helping to identify new markets and thinking about success metrics and a lot of stuff that newsrooms are thinking about back then integrating that into their workflow.    And then left all of that about four and a half years ago and went into entrepreneurship. I continued to stay close to the idea of storytelling and I co-founded a blockchain startup at one point. I've been an advisor to many startups, started my own company that was about an immersive kind of AR augmented reality, virtual reality kind of an experience to communicate with people and hear stories of the past. A couple of years ago, I connected with a former fellow Googler who I didn't know and we embarked on this journey of co-writing a book together. And in parallel, building a company called Good Trust, which is all about this idea of digital legacy. So now that we have the first book I wrote was called Digital Diet, which was all about living with technology. And now here we are ten years later, and we're all sort of dying with it in sort of a morbid way. But this is the way that we've evolved through technology and how it captures our stories. And so, this is where I find myself, somewhere at that intersection of technology, storytelling, and all of us mere humans.   Katty It speaks to me and it resonates with me, because I wrote a book about grief and that whole journey through loss and certainly, memories and stories of our loved ones are particularly near and dear to my heart. And making sure that we're preserving them and being able to share that legacy. But you bring up a digital legacy, and that's pretty interesting. And I think what I gathered from what I learned from that you had shared with me about your book, and correct me if I'm wrong, it's really kind of just being mindful and being aware of the digital legacy and the footprint that we're leaving behind. Right?   Daniel Exactly, and I mean, to the degree to which if we look back or up into our family tree, if you will, and the creative output that became the sum total of someone's identity. So for example, we hope, maybe we're not all of us, many of us have an Ancestry or My Heritage profile, right? Particularly as we age, we start to think about how to capture all of that with just one or two generations earlier.    Maybe the artifacts that we have with those people are a postcard or to a letter, a handful of photos. You know, if the person lives into the 60s and 70s, maybe there's some video,  but it's in a format is hard to share and hard to preserve. But now as we get into the 2000s, 2010s, 2020s, the output of each of us has grown exponentially that reflection of who we are. We create 10x of what we have on somebody's ancestry profile every day in our email, the photos that are found and you know, the accounts we have and social media posts and on and on. And if somebody had access to all of that, you know if I could see what my grandfather actually created or thought or did or said.    I would personally be fascinated by it. Now for somebody else to come across that maybe that starts to feel a little creepy, or there are privacy issues and ethics and all the rest of it. But I do think that awareness, part of it that you referenced, is something that we've thought a lot about with Good Trust, because if somebody passes away whether you're in your immediate family, or even a friend and you don't know that they have, you know, a Facebook, a LinkedIn, still have a MySpace, like all these places where they've got all this stuff, that's sort of an early challenge. And then on another level, is there some crypto somewhere that you don't know about? Is there a retirement account that somebody forgot to tell you about its password? And all of a sudden there were these pragmatic reasons to be aware of all of this too. So there's like the emotional and the pragmatic side to know all this.   Katty And for sure, and I imagine now with creatives, and NFTs, that's a whole nother piece to keep track of.   Daniel Exactly. You know, we've tried to create ways for people to do that through something we've called a digital vault, with kind of this notion that you can assign a trusted contact to help you to do this on your behalf after you pass away or to help somebody who is already a family of somebody who's already passed away to take care of all of this, because the reality is that the average person spends about, the exact number is, six hours and fifty-two minutes a day online. I think through the pandemic, that's probably gone up. Let's just say, most of your waking hours during the day are spent somehow connected to the internet.    How much of that time you actually are creating something you want to save and remember and pass on to people? Maybe it's like 10 to 20%, but still on a daily basis, that's a lot. I mean, just today, you know, if I go back to get those notifications of a memory and remember back on this day, right? And those are photos and like I do not want those photos to get lost. These are photos and it doesn't even have to be some huge occasion when anniversary or birthday. Sometimes it's those every day, I'm using air quotes for people who can't see us because “every day” moments where you know, your kids do something and you want to remember.  When you were building a tree fort, and you know, those are the kinds of photos you want to pass on to people. So how to identify those, how do you pass them on in a way that feels tangible to someone else to do something on your behalf? This is really what we're talking about with digital legacy. It's the story of you, just in a digital capacity.   Daniel And who gets to see it and who gets to access it. And these days, we have some AI ways to think about this. For example, you can animate a photo through our site where you can sort of bring it to life, if you will. So if you have a picture for let's say, you know, from 60 or 70 years ago, you can animate it in a way that the person now has some expressions and nice to feel like so you can kind of capture their essence a little bit more and share all of that.    There are other companies, there's one called HereAfter that allows you to have a conversation with somebody who has passed away. If you ask them some questions, so for example, if I asked you a series of 100 questions about your life, what Hereafter will do is take that data or you can do it on your own behalf and create a conversational AI experience so that you could learn about your history and you know, even after the person passed away, you have these memories and you can use your smartphone device. You know, be with the family and ask them questions. There's a video one called StoryFile, which you can do with video you can do as an app on your phone and it's now sort of talking to you, you know. And it could be somebody who's already passed away. They did this at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and at a certain point with Holocaust survivors, you could ask them questions. So this is the direction that we're going with the stories. They are being created in a digital way, preserved in a digital way, and now sort of passed on in this digital way.   Katty Yeah, I was talking to someone yesterday actually on another podcast about augmented reality, And how cool would it be if we could create something where a hologram of a person passed could be a conversation that we're having.   Daniel Absolutely. And, you know, today it's possible in a limited way for people who either have the money or the means to do that. So for example, Kanye West gave his wife at the time Kim Kardashian, a hologram of her deceased father, Robert Kardashian for her birthday and she could actually see it and interact with it and he was sort of speaking to her you know, if you will from the afterlife. There's an example of a mother in Korea, who her daughter had died at a young age seven or eight, horribly tragic event as tragic as anybody could imagine. And what this company offered her was a virtual reality experience to interact with her daughter. They created kind of a digital version of her daughter, and then the mom got to sort of say hi, and kind of, you know, bring her back to life if you will. The mom was so emotional and watching it is difficult, and there's some part of you that, or at least for me, that's conflicted, or you think, is this what she should be doing to deal with her grief or not. On the other hand, this is how she feels she wanted to do it. And maybe it's cathartic in some ways for her to experience all of this in that way. So,fascinating discussions about all that.   Katty Yeah, for sure. I could talk to you about this for a long time, but for this podcast lets bring it back to creatives. And actually I think mostly sharing just in terms of the story we're telling about ourselves online. That's an important piece and we always on the recruitment side of our business, we're always talking to candidates about, what does your online presence depict? Is there a through line between what you say you want to do and how you've created your LinkedIn profile, for example. And then you have all these other assets that you're creating. So what could you share with us in terms of our online story? When it comes to branding, our personal brand and how that represents online? Is there something that we can tie that back into what is my story as a candidate, what's my story as a job seeker?   Daniel Here's what I would say. First of all, for me personally, I'm going to call myself a digital immigrant insofar as you know, I didn't grow up with the Internet. And, you know, it became part of my life at a certain point. But for of course, a whole other generation that we're talking about, you know, millennials Gen Z, this is just what they know. And so their life is captured in this digital way from the beginning, if you will, right? Their parents are sharing photos of them and then they have a digital presence. So they have a digital self from day one to think about.    And I think what I wish I could tell my younger self was be authentic you in every case, whether it's something you're talking about in a broader public context, like social media, or something you're sharing a little more privately or whatever it is, just be the authentic you.  Kind of imagine that somebody could either look over your shoulder or look at your account or see what you were posting, just be the same person, accept who you are. I've gotten better at doing as I've aged, I wish I sort of figured all this out much younger,because I think what can happen is that social media of course triggers our ego, this sense of projecting, and, you know, I think pulls out a lot of our insecurities. We may not be that person in our entirety.    When I worked at Google, we used to say that social media was a reflection of of someone's ego and search was more of your id, what are you really thinking? Right? So if you could see what people search history is versus what they posted on Facebook could be quite different. Right? And I think that prospective employers can now start to sense that if not detected  you know, whether it's within your resume, does that line up with what you're saying you did or how you conduct yourself, all of those kinds of sensitivities to think about.    I think that the earlier on in your life that you can just be that one person no matter what the medium is. Just have that reflected out into the world. I just feel like the more confident you'll be, the more successful you'll be. But this is again, I wish I could tell my younger self all this in this sort of sense. It's easier to say than to do.   Katty Yeah. Why do you think storytelling is so important? Why stories?   Daniel You know, somebody told me once that there are six words that if you say that it's anybody, they will trigger a part of the brain and their words are, “let me tell you a story.” And there's something that's universal about stories and the way that it captures our attention, and our engagement and our curiosity. Some of the best sort of human traits are fired up when we know there's a story coming. What can we learn? What does this mean? What happened? Tell me more, right? And I think for anybody who has kids, when you stop reading this story, like halfway through they're like no, no, no, no…. you have to keep going. And it's kind of wonderful in a way to see that because but it does require, it asks of us to be this listener and somebody who is  paying attention, if you will. And I think that, to me, stories are the way that knowledge is passed on, yes, but perhaps more importantly, experience and wisdom.    For a time I had this idea of a product that was like a wisdom engine. These days, we think about the search for knowledge and understanding the facts and all of that, but what about all this tremendous wisdom that we all possess and how do we find that from other people? We can read about it and books and learn philosophy and all that. It used to be that we would sign up as human beings in a philosophy house that was what we sort of ascribed to a particular philosophy and that was our way of looking at the world, and we were a stoic and that's kind of what we thought and we talked about that and discussed it with people. These days of course, there's some of that with faith or with religion, but philosophically, I feel like stories contain so much of that philosophy and so much we can learn from them. And they manifest in different ways, movie, TV show, a commercial, an ad can be a little bit of a story, a website, an email.    I just think that they are universal and there's a finite number of universal truths that appear in an infinite number of stories. It's when people would say there are really only 16 original stories in the world and they're a million different ways to tell the same story throughout history, but I think it's one of the best ways for people to learn, and to capture something that feels fundamentally important as human beings.  We started by trying to tell people things through cave drawings…look, just pay attention to this thing. I don't know how to, speak your language or get you to listen to me, but I'm going to draw it here and just look at this thing, right?   And now people are scrolling through TikTok, and we start to lose people's attention spans. This is my great concern with stories. Is that they're going to be lost, because people can't pay attention for more than a few seconds. When I watch films now, I'm like, can we hold a shot for longer than two seconds before we have to go to the next thing and the next thing. Let's read the person's expression, let's sit for a second in this moment. I get that the world's moving at a faster pace, and I don't want to be the fuddy duddy who's like can we go back to fax machines and slow things down? I'm on the cutting edge, I like being out on the frontier,but there's something about a linear understanding of something that requires the story to capture people's attention and to learn. And if you weren't able to do that or don't have that opportunity, I feel like we're losing something as a species as a society. I'll get off my soapbox now.   Katty I agree because I think stories pull you in. As you said, “let me tell you a story”, and that naturally just makes people lean in and ask, ”what's coming next?”  Question for you, kind of going back to candidates and interviewing. How can one tell their story in a short way? Are there any tips in terms of how a candidate in an interview can just authentically show who they are whether it's through their resume or in the interview process that is concise? They can't start the interview with like, let me tell you a story. But you know, a traditional question is like, “tell me about yourself?” “How did you get started?” So are there any recommendations that you can leave our audience with in terms of how to be able to weave their story into the facts of what it is that they do?   Daniel I love when people can tell a story. I'm going to see if I can just wrap this in the right way but like, a humbly confident manner. So in other words, they're aware, they're self aware enough in their place in their own story, such that they can tell it in a sort of an articulate way. They can describe what they learned, maybe throughout their life and  in their career. But they're not saying it in a way that's sort of like well, “I've figured it all out and just like everybody out of my way, obviously you should hire me!”  It's more of a journey and kind of giving you a sense of how they got here. And I love being pulled into those stories and people talking about you know, I I went through this health scare, but I what I discovered about myself was this, and then I went on to create this thing, and I thought I had figured it all out but then this happened, and then I joined up with this person and we built this thing. I love hearing those stories.  I remember when I was in journalism, early journalism classes, I had a writing professor who said, anytime you write a biography about somebody, you've got to include a nose picker. Like a something about the person that isn't this lofty, they were this great, whatever, right? We all have our nose pickers about ourselves. Nobody's a perfect person.    I think when we go into an interview, the sense is to project, I'm perfect, not only am I perfect, but I'm perfect for the job, and clearly you should hire me and let's get to it. Sometimes I think younger people are unsure of where the balance is, they don't want to seem like they're not confident, on the other hand, if you're overconfident people tend to sort of lean back a little bit. They're like, alright, well, sorry the room isn't big enough for your ego. So I think there's some amount that needs to come into how you convey yourself and just admit that you have your own failings, right?  We all have our nose picker kind of things that we can highlight.   The classic kind of thing when people say “what's a negative attribute you would say about yourself?” The one that people have been told not to say it's like, I'm too much of a perfectionist. I just wanted to write “Oh, are you Oh, you're too much of a perfectionist?” Versus If someone were to ask me what is my nose picker? I would say I've done lots of different personality tests, so it's sort of a scary and exciting to kind of learn these things about yourself. But I feel like one of the things for me that can be a nose picker is that I consider myself a leader with passion, somebody who wants to move forward as solutions oriented. “Hey, everybody, like let's go this way. We'll figure it out. Like come on, like how can you do this? Great, awesome idea. Let's do it.” Right? And then the flip side of that, in terms of the optics of it is that it can be seen a little too intense. So people are like, Okay, well Daniel, slow down and let's pause for a minute and talk about all this and do more measures. So,  I can get caught up in my head overthinking that too. So I love when I can observe somebody else who's great at all of this, this kind of being humbly confident or whoever you sort of think about it, and observing them and saying like, I want to be like that. That's how I want to be getting out of my own way sometimes because I think also I can be able to be Canadian.I'm from Canada originally I feel like I'm an honorary New Yorker after 16 years, but I can be a little too Canadian and think, I need to defer to others or not be as you know, little forthright in what I think are my opinions.    And Canadian are terrible at apologizing all the time and wanting to be liked because we're just just like America's hat, up there and you know, “Gosh, darn it, I hope people will think we're all right in the world.” And, so rather than being this kind of like bold, American I know it's we can do this and, might so often they're in there like just wrestling way and I tried to smooth those waters to some degree and be a little more of like the calm like the duck, with the feet under the water paddling and I'm just the duck. I don't wanna say Swan, I don't quite put myself in that category.   Katty But they're paddling really, really fast!   Daniel  They are paddling really fast. There's definitely that side of me, beneath the surface. But I know people don't like to see that because it makes them anxious.   Katty Yeah, exactly. That's so funny. It brings it back to authenticity, right like if you're in that interview, and you can't show up as who you are then.   Daniel Yeah. And if for whatever reason, it doesn't work out and oh my gosh, we've all had those moments. Then you sort of say okay, just wasn't meant to be. And I think that this is something else I've needed to learn over the course of my career is that the more you can be your authentic self and live in the moment and whatever's going on and accept that you know, there will be an outcome from that.  It may not be exactly what you'd imagine. If it isn't, then okay, but maybe sort of no expectations, I think is another thing. I think we all sometimes put high expectations and put it on ourselves or in a situation where we want to stay and we push ourselves and that can come across too or it's like just wow, okay, whoa…iit goes back to the intensity. And so I think I've needed to regulate that and modulate that in some ways. And just, you know, a little bit the, you know, Fred Rogers, Mr. Rogers has asked children to, or ask parents to say to their children, I love you just the way you are.    And I think if you can do that with yourself in a little bit of a self affirming sort of way, which I know that this can all sound a little too out there for some people, but if you can have these kinds of conversations with yourself, and really like who you are, and when you go into a job interview, or to have a discussion with somebody, allow that authentic self to come out. Ideally, it connects with that person. And if it doesn't, then it wasn't meant to be and rather than sort of regretting it, or trying to force it, think okay, on to the next. See that there's always another adventure or opportunity out there.   Katty Yeah, good point. If we don't show up as our authentic self, and we put on airs during the interview, certainly, that's something that when we show up to the job, day after day, day after day, it has to be our authentic self.  There's no way that we would want to or even can hold up a pretense.  It's just not going to work. It's not going to be the right job.   Daniel Exactly, it's not and that's when you drift into, I don't know if people have read Catcher in the Rye recently but you start to become Holden Caufield and you just feel like a phony, and I have had jobs where I felt like phony, because I sort of got my way in the door, if you will and then by the end, then a month or two months later, you know, it started to feel awful. And then it just goes down. And it's really hard to recover from that. And so, rather than trying to come up with this fake story.    When I interviewed younger people now I would rather they told me that they don't have a ton of experience, but they really want to learn, or that they haven't done this thing yet, but they did this thing and here's what they discovered.   At Google, when we would hire people, and I was involved in a lot of different interviews and hiring people at Google. I think you could actually get a badge internally,  I think, mine got up to 75 or whatever it was six years. So anyway, enough people that I loved just that experience. And there were different quadrants to assess as people would come in: role related knowledge and, what was their experience and just all this stuff, and Googliness was one that people still probably have a hard time kind of figuring out.  The one that to me that was most important was categorized as GCA, so general cognitive ability.  The way that was expressed to me was not is the person smart or not, or what was the SAT… that doesn't matter.  It's could that person, if you brought them in under one particular job description, and let's say that product went away, for whatever reason, sunsetted, wasn't renewed or funded again..could that person be moved over to a completely different job, different team, different product and perform and excel in that environment, because they have that general cognitive ability to adapt to a whole different thing? If the answer is yes, that you think that that person scores high there, that to me was the  most valuable aspect of evaluating somebody. Because that's what we're all asked to do, is to adapt, be solutions oriented, have the growth mindset, all of these attributes we look for people. When I came across somebody who I felt possessed that, and there are people who I hired at Google who are still there, and I love seeing the arc of their career, and in my head, I'm like, I knew that they would be that person. I'm like, I told you, Google people, I don't work there anymore. You know what I mean, I'm in the background cheering them on, because I think this is exactly what companies need,are these people who can who have that neuroplasticity, and growth mindset and can adapt because companies change even big companies that think they're never going to change?   Katty Yeah, one of our core values at Artisan is agility of thought and action, because at least in the 27 years we've had Artisan our clients have changed drastically from exacto knives and paste up boards to where we are today. And they will probably continue changing and evolving like we were just talking about AR and VR and where the world is going. So, agility fits into GCA, general cognitive abilities. I'll ask you this as a final question, did you have a favorite interview question that you always asked? I always hear Google questions are pretty unique but what was your favorite question to ask?   Daniel I know some of the Google questions, I'm mean, there are even like sites dedicated to like trend questions. And for a long time they were like, the question is, like, why is a manhole cover round, you know just these kinds of random things, right. I don't know, because the equipment anyway, people would obsess over these things, right?    I gave a talk about this recently about failure, and what it means to fail and I always loved hearing people share their stories of failure. And to me, if people have that failure story, they know what that failure moment was and they can identify it and they can express it and talk about it in a way that you can see that they've clearly evolved through it and taken what they can from it.     I read recently about the concept of failure compost that even though you may have failed, the project, failed idea whatever it was, you can sort of take some of that and turn it into fertilizer for your next project.   Katty Yeah, like that.   Daniel I'm gonna give full credit to the Google X team. It was part of a moonshot email, but they were describing this whole concept of failure compost. I just think there's something wonderfully sort of like a virtuous cycle of, of life almost in a way because people can put so much of themselves into something that fails and if, if you can go through that and see how it refined you, and then come out the other side, and remember to not identify yourself as a failure, and to be able to say, Yes, I failed,but here's what I learned and I'm ready for the next thing.    I mean, you know, someone like Michael Jordan is famous for his success, of course. But one of his quotes that I think people love to follow up on is the number of times he missed shots, was was given the ball at the last second to win the game and missed and he says, you know, I failed over and over and over again, and that's why I succeeded. It's such a powerful way to think about success.    I mean, there's a tremendous book by Srikumar Rao, who is at Columbia Business School Professor has this whole framework around how to approach your life and business and really the book is called Are you ready to succeed? And to me the flip of that, of course, is in your head like, are you ready to fail? No, I don't want to fail. But so how do you kind of think about that and cope with it and, and ideally thrive out of those kinds of situations. So anyway, that was my favorite question,and I always loved hearing about it. There's never any judgment. I mean, it's not. So I just loved having those conversations with people.    Katty Well, it brings us back to being authentic. Right? You can not be authentic if you've never failed before, because we all have at some point, we've all fallen down and then gotten up, dusted ourselves off and said, Oh, right now what now? Where do I go?   Daniel I think it gets to a path of trust much faster. Especially in an interview or when you're meeting somebody for the first time, if you can acknowledge that place. Because you know that to me is what helps to build and broker trust is, and ideally when you get the job, and you go through that together, and you fail, you succeed, that brings people together. It's like connective tissue being in the trenches you're figuring it out together. But if you can kind of get that in the early moments with somebody and kind of understand it and be a bit vulnerable. I just think they're on a great path.   Katty Beautiful, beautiful words, and I think a great lesson, just the authenticity. I see it so much when we interview hundreds of candidates in a given time period and I cannot tell you how many people have told me, that when I've asked them so what happened at the previous job? Why did you leave? Like hardly anyone's ever says that I was fired. And then you do a reference check and it comes back but they were fired. We'll just say it just, just say and share why and not have these surprises in the little box that's going pop up like a little Jack in the Box.   So this goes back to what you were saying just being authentic. What's the lesson learned, what happened, what were the circumstances, what did you do, what did you not do, and what have you learned from that?   Daniel Exactly. Well, I think the gardeners must have stopped to listen in on our conversation or something.   Katty Yeah, it's nice and quite. They're done. They were buzzing away at the height of our conversation so I'll listen and see what they said but you know what.. we're being authentic here, so.    Daniel We persevered through it.   

Birds All Day
Gabriel Moreno called-up to Blue Jays: inside his skillset, expectations & is a catcher on his way out?

Birds All Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 47:25


Keegan Matheson, MLB.com's Blue Jays reporter, joins Drew and Kaitlyn to discuss the promotion of Toronto's top prospect, Gabriel Moreno. What can we expect from Moreno? How does his addition factor into the other faces behind the plate for TO? Plus, who are some trade deadline candidates for the Jays? Follow Drew on Twitter: @DrewGROF Follow Kaitlyn on Twitter: @kaitlyncmcgrath Follow Keegan on Twitter: @KeeganMatheson Subscribe to The Athletic for just $1/month for 6 months by visiting: theahtletic.com/spinrate Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Writers Bloc
Moreno, Kirk & The Jays Catcher Gold Mine

Writers Bloc

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 49:31


Ben kicks off the show with Arash Madani (7:00) who is in Detroit with the Jays and today it was announced that Gabriel Moreno. They compare him with the rise of Alejandro Kirk and the new Blue Jays gold mine. Arash tries to convince Ben to make the weekend trip to Detroit. Then we pivot to Canada Soccer and Arash weighs in on the fight for equal pay and how the management of Canada Soccer botched everything since and including the Iran controversy. Later we speak with James Sharman (32:00) about Team Canada returning to the pitch tonight in Nation's Cup still without a deal after walking away from the Panama game a week ago. He explains how coach John Herdman was able to bridge gaps and brought the team together who were very much separate and in many cliques. Then the push for the Women's National team to achieve pay equity. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate. 

OverDrive
Matheson on Jays catcher Gabriel Moreno, Kirk's early dominance, & AL East standings

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 10:37


MLB.com Blue Jays Reporter Keegan Matheson joined the show to talk about Blue Jays prospect Gabriel Moreno and his expectations. He also talked about Alejandro Kirk's early season dominance and how crucial he has been, the toughness of the AL East division & more.

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo
Steve Phillips on Moreno getting called up & anniversary of Bobby Valentine's fake moustache game

First Up with Landsberg & Colaiacovo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 17:56


Former Mets GM and TSN MLB insider Steve Phillips joins First Up to chat about top prospect Gabriel Moreno getting called up, future of Blue Jays at Catcher, Kikuchi's very bad start, Angels using Nickelback as their walk up song, will Maddon and Girardi manage again and more!

Catcher's Corner
Catcher's Corner: Claim or Lame?

Catcher's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 90:04


Sami (@Believe_Sami) and Eric (@SamskiNYC) welcome Justin Mason (@JustinMasonFWFB) to discuss recent pieces of news and then play a game of Cut or Keep followed by a game of Claim or Lame. This episode has tons of quick-hitting analysis on as many players as we could possibly fit. All music in this episode is made by Brooklyn hip-hop artist Dan Dillinger, whose new album can be found on Spotify Timestamps 4:00 - Top News Stories Joe Maddon is fired. Do managers matter for fantasy? Tylor Megill coming back this weekend. Start him right away? Ezequial Duran called up by the Rangers Travis Swaggerty called up by the Pirates Elehuris Montero called up by the Rockies 21:00 - Cut or Keep Juan Yepez Josh Naylor Connor Joe Yasmani Grandal Javier Baez Trevor Rogers Jon Gray Josiah Gray Reid Detmers 53:45 - Claim or Lame Jeffrey Springs Graham Ashcraft Zach Eflin Michael Wacha Ross Stripling Brady Singer Alex Kirilloff Oscar Gonzalez Jack Suwinski Lane Thomas Luis Garcia (Nationals) Jon Berti Jose Trevino Cal Raleigh Curt Casali Spec Save Claims --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eric-samulski/support

Doug & Wolf Show Audio
Wolf & Luke discuss DeAndre Hopkins not being ranked as a reliable pass catcher

Doug & Wolf Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 38:18


Wolf and Luke talk about DeAndre Hopkins not being ranked as a reliable pass catcher and if we finally have the answers we wanted regarding the Suns' Game 7 lost.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcasts Doug & Wolf
Wolf & Luke discuss DeAndre Hopkins not being ranked as a reliable pass catcher

Podcasts Doug & Wolf

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 38:18


Wolf and Luke talk about DeAndre Hopkins not being ranked as a reliable pass catcher and if we finally have the answers we wanted regarding the Suns' Game 7 lost.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Locked On Giants – Daily Podcast On The San Francisco Giants
SF Giants option Joey Bart, acquire catcher Austin Wynns from Phillies

Locked On Giants – Daily Podcast On The San Francisco Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 26:08


The San Francisco Giants sent struggling catcher Joey Bart back to the minor leagues. They also traded for another catcher, Austin Wynns, in exchange for left-handed pitcher Michael Plassmeyer. So who is Wynns and what does this move mean for the SF Giants and Bart's future with the team? Wynns has quite a bit of major league experience with the Orioles, and it hasn't gone particularly well. He has struggled to hit, but has very intriguing numbers in the upper levels of the minors. He will have to be added to the Giants' 40-man roster, so a corresponding move will have to be made. Wynns also does not have minor league options, so once he's activated he cannot be sent down. In Triple-A the last two seasons, Wynns has put up jaw-dropping numbers. He has almost twice as many walks as strikeouts in the minors this season. He's also known as a strong defensive catcher. Bart's struggles have been well documented. Simply put, he's struck out way too often. It's not clear when he'll get another opportunity with the Giants, but it should happen again at some point. The former No. 2 overall pick in the country has performed well in the minors, albeit with some red flags in Triple-A last season, and has been considered at times one of the game's best overall prospects. But it has been a huge struggle offensively in the majors, and this is a chance for him to clean up his swing. The Giants have added two catchers, Michael Papierski (in exchange for Mauricio Dubón) and now Wynns in the last few weeks. That doesn't necessarily bode well for what they really think of Bart. Find and follow Locked On Giants on your favorite podcast platforms:

Blue Jays Talk
Jays Talk Plus: Explain It Black + The Catcher Conundrum

Blue Jays Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 98:05


On today's edition of Jays Talk Plus, Blake Murphy debuts “Explain it Black” with Blue Jays Producer Chris Black and analyst Joe Siddall! They look back on the signs that indicated Kevin Gausman could be tipping his splitter, and weigh-in on Alejandro Kirk's red-hot bat and what to look for in tonight's game against the Royals with Alek Manoah on the mound (03:08). FanGraphs writer Ben Clemens joins Blake to break down about some nifty stats, what they mean and how they apply to the Blue Jays, before discussing his latest piece on Adam Cimber's slider usage against lefties (27:45). Later on, Blake opens up his mailbag to answer your questions, and takes a closer look at the Angels' managerial situation with Joe Maddon out the door (51:59). Next up, the Athletic's Kaitlyn McGrath chats about Danny Jansen's season, the Jays' surplus at the catcher position, and helps get us set for Game 2 against the Royals tonight (01:15:49)! The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

Circle Round
Encore: The Wind Catcher

Circle Round

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 22:46


Tony Award winner Lea Salonga (Miss Saigon, Les Misérables) headlines this Marshallese tale from our fourth season about how the first sailboat came to be.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Connor Pavalony - VFL & Orioles Org Catcher (6.6.22)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 15:23


VFL and Catcher for the Baltimore Orioles Organization Connor Pavalony joins the show to talk UT Baseball in the Regionals. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Actual Astronomy Podcast
#228 - Comet Catcher Updates and Observing Reports

The Actual Astronomy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 46:14


Chris was able to observe with his Comet Catcher and Shane observed with his newly acquired Borg 25mm achromat. Both guys share their observing reports. 

Locked On Royals - Daily Podcast On The Kansas City Royals
Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez is heating up recapping the series with the Houston Astros

Locked On Royals - Daily Podcast On The Kansas City Royals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 25:50


Rylan Stiles (@Rylan_Stiles on Twitter) dives into the Kansas City Royals series recap against the Houston Astros, as KC Royals catcher Salvador Perez is heating up, how can the Royals learn a lesson from MJ Melendez? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Did you know every week, nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn? Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONMLB. Blue Nile Make your moment sparkle with jewelry from Bluenile.com, and LOCKED ON SPORTS listeners get $50 off purchases of $500 or more using code LOCKEDON. Athletic Greens To make it easy, Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/MLBNETWORK #KCRoyals #MLB #SalvadorPerez Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On MLB Prospects
Mailbag Monday! With MLB catcher offense being so bad, will MLB teams call up catching prospects earlier?

Locked On MLB Prospects

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 33:34


On today's show, we're answering your questions! We've got a question about the Josh Smith callup by the Texas Rangers and how he fits in the middle infield with both Corey Seager and Marcus Semien in place for the immediate future. We discuss why some guys get callups from AA versus AAA, and then spend some time in the AA Southern League answering some questions about RP Andy Fisher of the Chattanooga Lookouts (Cincinnati Reds affiliate) and SP Taj Bradley of the Montgomery Biscuits (Tampa Bay Rays affiliate). We close the show with a discussion of the sorry state of big league catching and if it'll prompt teams to bring offensive-oriented catchers to the Show earlier. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Closer Mentality
Ep. 69: 'The Fort' and Catcher Psychology with Michael McKenry

Closer Mentality

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 31:45


Episode 69 highlighted the 13-year professional baseball career of catcher Michael McKenry. McKenry spoke of his journey to Major League lineups, piecing together additional opportunities, the pain and confusion of being traded, how he became "The Fort", the post-sport grieving process, and how through all of the adversity, he maintained his composure. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Get 10% off of your first month at www.betterhelp.com/closermentality Closer Mentality UNCENSORED: www.youtube.com/channel/UCJuZfwIP9ny-WIqpcUaQnWA Season 2's Playlist: www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLd…3p1aXW0xVjceLdJhG The episode is presented by MindReady Studios

Fireside Yankees - A New York Yankees Podcast
The Yankees have found their starting catcher | The legend of Jose Trevino

Fireside Yankees - A New York Yankees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 24:16


Alex and Nick dive into New York Yankees catcher Jose Trevino and how amazing he's played so far this season! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

OverDrive
Russell Martin on the Catcher's mentality, chaos of the 7th inning in Game 5 of the 2015 ALDS & who is behind plunking hitters

OverDrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 21:24


Former Blue Jays and All-Star Catcher Russell Martin joined the OverDrive guys earlier today and got into a number of things including the "catcher mentality", how crazy the 7th inning was during Game 5 of the 2015 ALDS, who is responsible for plunking hitters & why he loved playing under John Gibbons.

KNBR Podcast
5-31 Shawn Estes discusses a weird weekend of Giants baseball as well as the changing dynamic at the catcher position with Casali being the better option right now to win baseball games

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 27:46


Former San Francisco Giant and current tv broadcaster for NBC Sports Bay Area, Shawn Estes discusses a weird weekend of Giants baseball as well as the changing dynamic at the catcher position with Casali being the better option right now to win baseball games See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Murph & Mac Podcast
5-31 Mike Krukow tells Murph and Mac why Curt Casali should be the everyday catcher until Joey Bart improves

Murph & Mac Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 16:32


5-31 Mike Krukow tells Murph and Mac why Curt Casali should be the everyday catcher until Joey Bart improves. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
5-31 Mike Krukow tells Murph and Mac why Curt Casali should be the everyday catcher until Joey Bart improves

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 16:32


5-31 Mike Krukow tells Murph and Mac why Curt Casali should be the everyday catcher until Joey Bart improves. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RotoGraphs Fantasy Baseball
The Sleeper and the Bust Episode: 1055 – Rays Corner and Sunday FAAB ft. Eric Samulski

RotoGraphs Fantasy Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 84:01


Justin Mason and Jason Collette are joined by Eric Samulski of Rotoball, Tailgate Sports and the Catcher's Corner podcast to discuss this week's FAAB!