Podcasts about Figma

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Best podcasts about Figma

Latest podcast episodes about Figma

Lenny's Podcast: Product | Growth | Career
An inside look at how the New York Times builds product | Alex Hardiman (CPO at The New York Times)

Lenny's Podcast: Product | Growth | Career

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 67:20


Alex Hardiman is Chief Product Officer at the New York Times, where she oversees the company's news, cooking, games, audio and advertising products. Previously, Alex was Chief Business & Product Officer at The Atlantic, and before that she was Head of News Products at Facebook. We discuss how engineers and product people work with writers to create impactful stories, how teams build the incredible visualizations and experiences for NYTimes.com, how product teams are structured within the New York Times, and the good and bad about working at a company like the New York Times versus a FAANG tech company. We also talk about the details behind the New York Times's acquisition of Wordle and uncover what the Times is dreaming up for its product over the next 10 years.—Find the full transcript here: https://www.podpage.com/lennys-podcast/an-inside-look-at-how-the-new-york-times-builds-product-alex-hardiman-cpo-the-new-york-times/#transcript—Where to find Alex Hardiman:• Twitter: https://twitter.com/alex_hardiman• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandrahardiman/—Where to find Lenny:• Newsletter: https://www.lennysnewsletter.com• Twitter: https://twitter.com/lennysan• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lennyrachitsky/—Thank you to our wonderful sponsors for making this episode possible:• Miro: https://miro.com/lenny• Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/lenny• Vanta: https://vanta.com/lenny—Referenced:• Jodi Kantor: https://www.nytimes.com/by/jodi-kantor• Wordle: https://www.nytimes.com/games/wordle/• Wordle Is a Love Story: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/03/technology/wordle-word-game-creator.html• Josh Wardle on Twitter: https://twitter.com/powerlanguish• Eric Kim's recipes: https://cooking.nytimes.com/ourcooks/eric-kim/• Wirecutter: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/• Framing Britney Spears: https://www.nytimes.com/article/framing-britney-spears.html• Hard Fork podcast: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/04/podcasts/hard-fork-technology.html• High Growth Handbook: Scaling Startups from 10 to 10,000 People: https://www.amazon.com/High-Growth-Handbook-Elad-Gil/dp/1732265100• An Elegant Puzzle: Systems of Engineering Management: https://www.amazon.com/Elegant-Puzzle-Systems-Engineering-Management/dp/1732265186• The Revolt of the Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium: https://www.amazon.com/Revolt-Public-Crisis-Authority-Millennium/dp/1732265143• Giovanni's Room: https://www.amazon.com/Giovannis-Room-James-Baldwin/dp/0345806565/r• The Daily podcast: https://www.nytimes.com/column/the-daily• The Wire on HBO: https://www.hbo.com/the-wire• Google Workspace: https://workspace.google.com/• Slack: slack.com• Figma: figma.com• Mode: https://mode.com/• GitHub: https://github.com/• Fidji Simo on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fidjisimo/—In this episode, we cover:(04:48) Alex's background(07:37) How Alex fought disinformation on the news team at Facebook (11:11) How some product people thrive in chaos(14:13) Alex's return to the New York Times(16:22) What product means at the New York Times(20:42) How the product team at the New York Times is structured(26:20) How the New York Times makes stories come alive with balanced creative and technical teams(33:15) The acquisition of Wordle (42:00) What it was like to work at the New York Times during the onset of Covid(47:11) How to avoid burnout on a product team(49:26) How the New York Times has set itself apart with its subscription package(52:21) How the New York Times's products are rooted in helping in the real world(52:54) Lenny's tips for improving Wirecutter(53:36) The differences and similarities on product teams in a news organization(59:58) Lightning round—Production and marketing by https://penname.co/. For inquiries about sponsoring the podcast, email podcast@lennyrachitsky.com. Get full access to Lenny's Newsletter at www.lennysnewsletter.com/subscribe

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Why Figma is selling to Adobe for 20 Billion Dollars

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 69:15


Dylan Field is the co-founder and CEO of Figma, which makes a very popular design tool that allows designers and their collaborators to all work together right in a web browser. You know how multiple people can edit together in Google Docs? Figma is that for design work. We just redesigned The Verge; we used Figma extensively throughout that process. So for years, people have been waiting on the inevitable Figma vs. Adobe standoff since Figma was such a clear upstart competitor to Photoshop and Illustrator and the rest. Well, buckle up because in September, Adobe announced that it was buying Figma for $20 billion. Figma is going to remain independent inside Adobe, but you know, it's a little weird. So I wanted to talk to Dylan about the deal, why he's doing it, how he made the decision to sell, and what things he can do as part of Adobe that he couldn't do as an independent company. Dylan's also a pretty expansive thinker, so after we talked about his company getting the “fuck you” money from Adobe, we talked about making VR Figma for the metaverse and AGI, which is artificial general intelligence, or the kind of AI that can fully think for itself. This episode takes a turn. I think you're going to like it. Okay, Dylan Field, CEO of Figma. Here we go. Links: Welcome to the new Verge Adobe to acquire Figma in a deal worth $20 billion A New Collaboration with Adobe Designers worry Adobe won't let Figma flourish WebGL - Wikipedia How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell - Decoder Dylan Field on Twitter: "Our goal is to be Figma not Adobe" College Dropout Turns Thiel Fellowship Into a $2 Billion Figma Fortune Generative adversarial network (GAN) - Wikipedia       GPT-3 - Wikipedia Is VR the next frontier in fitness? - Decoder Artificial general intelligence - Wikipedia   Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23209862 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. It was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Jackson Bierfeldt. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters and our Executive Director is Eleanor Donovan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
540: Next 13, WP vs FB, Figma Thoughts, and a TypeScript Journey

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 43:11


Our thoughts on Next 13, incremental adoption, server components, WordPress vs Facebook, CodePen updates, Figma features we dig, Chris' TypeScript journey, and Dave's a hypocrite?

Grumpy Old Geeks
577: Self Driving Twitter

Grumpy Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 79:27


A two-factor pain; Jason hops on Brian's soapbox; the self-driving Twitter crash; Meta ditches human-curated newsfeed; verification has always been a joke, but this is really hilarious; Amazon pauses corporate hiring; Google buys an AI startup to compete with... TikTok?; Adobe's Pantone, Figma issues; the Peripheral; the Witcher renewed, recast; the Machine; drone swarms for Candy Crush; Playstation VR2; Instagram plans NFT minting; Captain EO, amusement parks and mixed media theater; sharing iPads.Show notes at https://gog.show/577/Sponsors:Kolide - Kolide can help you nail third-party audits and internal compliance goals with endpoint security for your entire fleet. Learn more here.Hover - Go to Hover now and grab your very own domain or a few of them at hover.com/gog and get 10% off your first purchase.FOLLOW UPFact Check-CNN did not report Trump died on Nov. 1, 2022IN THE NEWSTwitter has removed 1,500 accounts following coordinated trolling campaignMeta to ditch human-curated Facebook News stories globallyElon Musk's First Grand Plan for Twitter? Charging $8 Per Month for a Blue CheckmarkElon Musk wants to make Twitter's edit button free for everyone, report saysElon Musk reportedly wants Twitter to bring back VineAmazon Pauses Corporate Hiring on Economic UncertaintyGoogle buys an AI avatar startup to take on TikTokDOJ takes aim at Adobe's $20 billion dealMEDIA CANDYThe PeripheralNetflix renews 'The Witcher,' recasts Liam Hemsworth as Geralt of RiviaThe Machine Teaser TrailerAPPS & DOODADSA swarm of 500 drones will plague New York City with advertising tomorrow$550 PlayStation VR2 launches on Feb. 22, 2023Meta's Instagram Plans NFT Minting, Trading ToolsSECURITY HAH!The CyberWireDave BittnerHacking HumansCaveatControl LoopNational Theater LiveThe Met: Live in HDWhite Snake ProjectsOptimizing Apps for Shared iPadGordon Ramsay Fish & ChipsHoly Chicken Ship! The full-length "Captain EO" is more brilliant than you can possibly rememberStar ToursCLOSING SHOUT-OUTSBoot Up with JasonSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Content Rookie
Writing is designing and Figma ain't that great

Content Rookie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 29:52


Episode 47: Writing is designing and Figma ain't that great Tag along as guest Michael Metts and I talk about his book 'Writing is designing' as well as a bunch of other things, such as Figma for UX writers or why you sometimes just need to claim the 'content designer' title to move up the career ladder. Learning outcomes: How 'Writing is designing' came to be Workshops on content design with Michael and Andy Why Figma for writers is overrated How you sometimes just need to claim that UX writing title! *** Connect with guest, Michael Metts: "Where you can sign up for our newsletter to hear about workshops: https://www.writingisdesigning.com Where I'm writing about leadership and will announce a new workshop soon: https://leadinglikeyou.com If people want to stay in touch with me, there's LinkedIn and Twitter." Connect with host, Nicole Michaelis: nicoletells.com // Contentrookiepod.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicoletells/ hi@nicoletells.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/contentrookie/message

Big Technology Podcast
How Figma Caught Adobe By Surprise — With Carmel DeAmicis

Big Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 60:49 Very Popular


Carmel DeAmicis was the 20th employee at Figma, a startup that Adobe just acquired for $20 billion. A former journalist and editor at Figma, DeAmicis saw the company rise under the nose of Adobe — the giant in the space — and eventually grow so fast that Adobe acquired it in a defensive move. In this week's episode, DeAmicis explains how a startup caught a major, established company by surprise. And why changing design culture played a big part in it. You can find DeAmicis on Notion.

Cross-Chain Examination
DAOs vs. Internet Communities with Jon Yan from Vector DAO

Cross-Chain Examination

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 31:05


Jon is the Co-Founder of VectorDAO - a collective of designers, artists & developers contributing to web3.After working as a designer at Coinbase for several years, Jon decided to take a leap of faith, quit his job, and he began working for himself as a freelance designer. After realizing that the work he was doing was highly integral to the success of his clients, Jon began to feel that taking an hourly wage for his work was a bit old school. So, to better participate in the upside of his work and more closely align his incentives with those of his clients, he began taking a portion of his earnings in their native tokens.After connecting with a friend who was also a great freelance designer in the space, the duo decided to pool together the tokens they were earning, invite other designers to do the same, and socialize their gains and losses. Thus, Vector DAO was born. By aligning incentives, socializing risk, and giving independent freelancers a community to thrive in, Vector DAO became a perfect storm for success. The collective worked with over 40 organizations in their first year and grew to a point where they could no longer accept applications. Drilling down into the details, Vector DAO actually considers itself an internet community as opposed to a DAO. Yes - there is a decentralized component to how they make decisions about their treasury, but ultimately, Vector DAO is not fully decentralized or autonomous, and that's okay! By keeping the team relatively small (about 90 people) and creating a shallow hierarchy, Vector is extremely efficient and doesn't face many of the coordination issues that “true” DAOs face. In this episode we discuss the differences between a “true” DAO and an internet community, and we dive into the ins and outs of Vector DAO, how it works, and how they have attracted some of the best talent in the industry. We address the importance of great design in the crypto space, and Jon leaves listeners with some advice if you're thinking of starting a DAO.  

Startups For the Rest of Us
Episode 632 | Hot Take Tuesday: Figma Exit, Side Project Distraction, No Code Dogma

Startups For the Rest of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 37:32


In episode 632, join Rob Walling and Einar Vollset for Hot Take Tuesday, where they analyze and discuss some of the latest news. Some topics covered include the Figma exit, side project distractions, no-code apps, and more.Episode Sponsor: Find your perfect developer or a team at Lemon.io/startupsThe competition for incredible engineers and developers has never been more fierce.  Lemon.io helps you cut through the noise and find great talent through its network of engineers in Europe and Latin America.They take care of the vetting, interviewing, and testing of candidates to make sure that you are working with someone who can hit the ground running.When it comes to hiring, the time it takes to write your job description, list the position, review resumes, schedule interviews, and make an offer can take weeks, if not months.  With Lemon.io, you can cut down on a lot of that time by tapping into their wide network of developers who can get started in as early as a...Read more... »Click the icon below to listen.  

Inside Marketing Design
S03E05 - Sketch (with Carly Marsh and Osvaldas Poviliunas)

Inside Marketing Design

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 67:09


In this episode, Charli talks with Sketch CMO, Carly Marsh, and Digital Designer, Osvaldas Poviliunas, about Sketch's new website, how they incorporated the brand's personality into the new design, and why it's so important that product design informs every aspect of marketing design.Carly and Oz talk very openly about their take on competition, how they think through and design competitor comparison pages, and Sketch's place in the market. And, yes, they absolutely talk about the fact that their biggest competitor, Figma, has just been acquired by Adobe, and what that means for them.Sketch is a design tool launched in 2010, and was one of the first tools truly built for digital design.Links  Sketch.com Oz on LinkedIn Carly on LinkedIn Sketch's developer handoff page Connect with Charli CharliMarie.com Charli on Twitter Charli on Instagram InsideMarketingDesign.com Subscribe and stay in touch Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts YouTube WebflowThis season is brought to you by WebflowTry the no-code website builder used by designers and marketing design teams (and by this show, for the site you're on now!) – Get started for free

TechCheck
Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen on Figma Acquisition, Previewing Netflix's Q3 Earnings & Apple Unveils New iPad 10/18/22

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 44:26 Very Popular


Our anchors begin today's show with Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen offering his outlook for the broader macro environment and the company's plans to acquire design platform Figma. Then, Bank of America analyst Nat Schindler looks ahead to Netflix's earnings after the bell, and Arjuna Capital Managing Partner Natasha Lamb shares her top picks across big tech. Next, Needham analyst Charles Shi joins with his growth projections for chipmaker TSMC, and CNBC's Steve Kovach covers Apple unveiling a slate of new products. Later, CNBC's Eamon Javers shares new reporting on one of the largest alleged crypto laundering schemes of all time.

Design To Be Conversation
Noah Levin: Innovate stale practices by effectively learning from others

Design To Be Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 34:33


Noah Levin is a Senior Product Design Director at Figma. His job includes a variety of things, like attracting and retaining talented designers, setting and sharing context, providing actionable feedback, and helping facilitate a healthy environment for design in the company. Before Figma, he led design teams at ClassPass and Google, taught designers to code as an advisor at Framer, and built a cuff-mounted digital assistant for astronauts at NASA. He studied Human-Computer Interaction at Carnegie Mellon and is originally from Pittsburgh.We dive into how he and the team at Figma continue to innovate stale practices, how he goes about learning from others, who he actively learns from, and much more. 

The Product Design Podcast
Ahmad Kadhim - Will Adobe screw up the Figma acquisition?

The Product Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 54:01


In episode 38 of The Product Design Podcast, Seth Coelen interviews Ahmad Kadhim (also known as AK), Co-founder and VP of Product at 3RM, a Web3 startup. He made his way into tech over ten years ago through a Bootcamp and has worked as a developer, designer, and product manager during his career.During our chat, AK advises how to break into tech and the latest on the Figma acquisition by Adobe. We dive into what we hope to see come out of this shift that has rocked our industry and AK's inspiring closing thoughts on how this acquisition could change the future of design.During our interview with AK, you will learn:

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed
537: ShopTalk Live from An Event Apart 2022

ShopTalk » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 55:19


Chris and Dave live from An Event Apart in Denver talking awkward break points, the npm web, Scott Jehl web criminal, web components, what is the purpose of a website, Svelte, and how does Figma do it?

Go To Market Grit
COO Zscaler, Dali Rajic: If You're Not Always Learning, You'll Get Wiped Out

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 76:51


Before Zscaler's Dali Rajic arrived at his current company, he helped grow AppDynamics from $7 million in annual recurring revenue to nearly $1 billion — and for his next move, he knew he had to do something even bigger. That's why he was excited to transition to Zscaler's COO in February after more than two years as its CRO: “It was a job worth taking because it stretched me and it made me uncomfortable.”In this episode, Dali and Joubin discuss the state of tech M&A, the meaning of wealth and comfort, the value of hard work, being perceived as intense, going into business instead of science, inspiring your kids, bucketing how your spend your time, integrity and self-awareness, how to recognize your teammates' contributions, injecting tension, cutting through the noise, demanding excellence of yourself, celebrating the moment, and allowing yourself to unwind.In this episode, we cover: Adobe's $20 billion acquisition of Figma, compared to Cisco's 2017 acquisition of AppDynamics (01:18) What AppDynamics could have become if it hadn't sold (08:17) Remembering your roots when you get a life-changing amount of money (12:26) Growing up in Germany, and why Dali came to the US when he was 16 (18:56)  Living to work and finding fulfillment (23:16) The old-school sales style vs. the new generation's (26:10)  The unusual way Dali got hired at AppDynamics, and how he thinks about the arc of his career (30:15) Asking for the things you want and prioritizing your responsibilities (35:59) Hiring mistakes and what traits Dali looks for in candidates (45:36) How to turn big wins into learning moments (50:28) The benefits of making people “uncomfortable” in their jobs (55:23) Maximizing yield for individuals vs. organizations (01:01:39) Why Dali schedules his time off as strictly as his time on (01:08:35) Links: Connect with DaliLinkedIn Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: grit@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #22210: MacVoices Live! - Adobe/Figma and Elon Musk/Twitter (2)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 37:54


The MacVoices Live! panel didn't hold back when discussing the Adobe/Figma deal and what it might mean to the future of graphic and deisign collaboration. Neither were Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Mark Fuccio, Jeff Gamet, Jim Rea, Warren Sklar, Web Bixby, and Brittany Smith bashful with their thoughts on the latest in the Elon Musk-buying-Twitter saga. (Part 2)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by Kolide. Kolide is a fleet visibility solution for Mac, Windows, and Linux that can help you securely scale your business. Learn more here. Links: The Adobe-Figma deal is historic for tech startups — if it goes throughhttps://www.protocol.com/newsletters/pipeline/adobe-figma-antitrust-concerns   Guests: Web Bixby has been in the insurance business for 40 years and has been an Apple user for longer than that.You can catch up with him on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg.Brittany Smith is a trained cognitive neuroscientist who provides ADD/ADHD, technology, and productivity coaching through her business, Devise and Conquer, along with companion video courses for folks with ADHD. She's also the cofounder of The ADHD Guild, a community for nerdy folks with ADHD. She, herself, is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator and on YouTube with tech tips. Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

The eCommerce Playbook - For Magento, Shopify & BigCommerce
The Insane Growth of Figma from Startup to $20 Billion Exit

The eCommerce Playbook - For Magento, Shopify & BigCommerce

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 11:22


IWD Agency - Visit Our Website Contact Us:  hi@iwdagency.com Blog Post Marketing Services   Most people aren't that gifted in the design department. For them, Figma has been the guiding light; and well, in that process, became a $20 billion company. In this episode, we're going to take you along Dylan's journey from taking Figma from a little startup to one of the biggest names in the world.   ==============================================================   BOOKMARKS: 00:00 - The Insane Growth of Figma 00:36 - How Figma Started 01:49 - Figma Begins to Expand 02:45 - Figma Launch 03:04 - Figma Community 03:58 - Figma's Journey to Monetization 05:45 - The Pandemic's Effect on Figma's Growth 06:51 - Figma Becomes a Threat to Adobe 09:02 - Adobe Announces Deal to Buy Figma 09:41 - What This Means for Figma's Future   ============================================================== Other eCommerce Resources:   The Rise & Fall of Peloton The Rise & Fall of AllBirds Shein's INSANE Growth Email Marketing Tips for Your eCommerce Business eCommerce SEO Optimization Tutorial How to Do Digital Marketing for Agriculture? How to Do Cannabis Marketing?     ============================================================== Subscribe to our YouTube channel   IWD Agency offers online business solutions that help maximize the retailer's consumer base with a professional website, online branding, marketing, and optimizing the overall customer retail experience. Discover the true value of your brand with professional solutions offered by experts in the online retail industry. IWD Agency YouTube channel is focused on providing quality content information, news, tips, tricks, and much more. On our YouTube channel, you'll find all the necessary information that you need to maximize your eCommerce biz. So, make sure to follow our content, share these videos, give us a thumbs up, and leave a comment below.   ============================================================== Follow us on: Facebook Instagram Linkedin Pinterest Twitter  While you're at it, check out our blogs. ===========================================================

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #22209: MacVoices Live! - Why Does Adobe Think Figma Is Worth $20 Billion? (1)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 37:25


Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Mark Fuccio, Jeff Gamet, Jim Rea, Warren Sklar, and Web Bixby discuss what Figma is for those who don't know, and why Adobe decided to purchase it for $20 billion. The MacVoices Live! panel covers the basics of the service, how it competes with Adobe, and how collaboration has become such a hot feature in almost any class of software. (Part 1)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by Kolide. Kolide is a fleet visibility solution for Mac, Windows, and Linux that can help you securely scale your business. Learn more here. Show Notes: Links: The Adobe-Figma deal is historic for tech startups — if it goes throughhttps://www.protocol.com/newsletters/pipeline/adobe-figma-antitrust-concerns   Guests: Web Bixby has been in the insurance business for 40 years and has been an Apple user for longer than that.You can catch up with him on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22210: MacVoices Live! - Adobe/Figma and Elon Musk/Twitter (2)

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 37:55


The MacVoices Live! panel didn't hold back when discussing the Adobe/Figma deal and what it might mean to the future of graphic and deisign collaboration. Neither were Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Mark Fuccio, Jeff Gamet, Jim Rea, Warren Sklar, Web Bixby, and Brittany Smith bashful with their thoughts on the latest in the Elon Musk-buying-Twitter saga. (Part 2)  [embed]http://traffic.libsyn.com/maclevelten/MV22210.mp3[/embed] This edition of MacVoices is supported by Kolide. Kolide is a fleet visibility solution for Mac, Windows, and Linux that can help you securely scale your business. Learn more here. Links: The Adobe-Figma deal is historic for tech startups — if it goes throughhttps://www.protocol.com/newsletters/pipeline/adobe-figma-antitrust-concerns   Guests: Web Bixby has been in the insurance business for 40 years and has been an Apple user for longer than that.You can catch up with him on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg.Brittany Smith is a trained cognitive neuroscientist who provides ADD/ADHD, technology, and productivity coaching through her business, Devise and Conquer, along with companion video courses for folks with ADHD. She's also the cofounder of The ADHD Guild, a community for nerdy folks with ADHD. She, herself, is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator and on YouTube with tech tips. Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

SaaS District
How to Combine a Community-Led Growth & Product Led Growth Strategy with Zachary DeWitt # 192

SaaS District

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 40:18


Zach DeWitt is a Partner at Wing Venture Capital, a firm investing in Seed and Series A rounds for transformative enterprise tech companies. Prior to Wing, Zach was CEO and co-founder of Drop, which built two award-winning iPhone apps (Drop Messages and Firefly) before selling the technology and the IP intellectual property to Snapchat in 2016. Zach holds a BA in Economics from Yale University as well as an MBA from the Harvard Business School. In this episode we cover: 00:00 - Intro 01:30 - Explaining CLG & PLG When It Comes To SaaS 09:06 - Big Monolithic Brand Vs Community Led Product 10:30 - Does CLG Work For Every Kind Of SaaS 12:35 - Benefits Of Using Community-Led Growth 15:19 - Where To Start To Spread Your Word 17:43 - The Right Time & Way To Develop A Community 20:36 - How Often & How To Share Updates With The Community 27:52 - How PLG Companies Can Keep The Community Active & Engaged 31:39 - Zackary's Favorite Activity To Get Into a Flow State 32:26 - Zachary's Piece Of Advice For His 20 Years Old Self 33:51 - Zachary's Biggest Challenges at Wing Partner Capital 34:49 - Instrumental Resources For Zachary's Success 36:40 - What Does Success Means for Zachary Today 38:44 - Get In Touch With Zachary Get In Touch With Zachary: https://www.linkedin.com/in/zachary-dewitt-a5a8b816/ (Zachary's LinkedIn) Zachary's Email Mentions: https://www.copy.ai (Copy.ai) https://www.figma.com (Figma) https://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-poyar/ (Kyle Poyar) https://notoriousplg.substack.com (Notorious PLG) https://www.linkedin.com/in/gagarg/ (Gaurav Garg) https://www.linkedin.com/in/peterwagner414/ (Peter Wagner) https://www.linkedin.com/in/tom-bradytb12/ (Tom Brady) Tag Us & Follow: https://www.facebook.com/SaaSDistrictPodcast/ (Facebook) https://www.linkedin.com/company/horizen-capital (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/saasdistrict/ (Instagram) More About Akeel: https://twitter.com/AkeelJabber (Twitter) https://linkedin.com/in/akeel-jabbar (LinkedIn) https://horizencapital.com/saas-podcast (More SaaS Podcast Sessions) https://horizencapital.com/saas-consulting-services/ (SaaS Consulting Services) https://horizencapital.com/how-to-value-saas-business/ (Learn How to Value SaaS Companies)

Chit Chat Money
What Does Adobe's Next Decade Look Like? With Leandro from Best Anchor Stocks (Ticker: ADBE)

Chit Chat Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 57:50


Adobe operates through three segments: Digital Media, Digital Experience, and Publishing and Advertising. The company recently acquired Figma, a collaborative design platform, for $20 billion. Listen as Brett and Ryan ask Leandro questions about the company, its business model, and valuation. Enjoy the show! ***************************** Interested in becoming a member of 7investing? Subscribe with code “MONEY” and get $100 off your annual subscription for life: https://7investing.com/checkout/ ****************************** Access our “Not So Deep Dive” episodes by signing up for CCM+. Sign-up directly through Spotify or Apple Podcasts. If you listen on another podcast player, use this link and create a private RSS feed: https://anchor.fm/chitchatmoney/subscribe Need more information? Check-out our launch newsletter: https://chitchatmoney.substack.com/p/welcome-to-chit-chat-money-plus ****************************** Want updates on future shows and projects? Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/chitchatmoney Interested to see more of Leandro's work? Follow him on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/Invesquotes?s=20&t=ANL_r8vtQfEea5vzrh1vWg Contact us: chitchatmoneypodcast@gmail.com Timestamps Adobe | (4:20) Industry | (16:12) Disclosure: Chit Chat Money hosts and guests are not financial advisors, and nothing they say on this show is formal advice or a recommendation. Brett Schafer and Ryan Henderson are general partners and portfolio managers at Arch Capital. Arch Capital and its partners may hold securities discussed on this show.

Stock Talk with Josh & Niko
Episode 39 - "Missing Earnings"

Stock Talk with Josh & Niko

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 63:52


Hey everybody! Josh & Niko return this episode to talk about Adobe acquiring Figma, recent news going on regarding OPEC, Nike on the decline, the FED raising rates, a recession nearing and more! Music: Fitz and the Tantrums - MoneyGrabber DISCLAIMER: WE ARE NOT PROFESSIONAL FINANCIAL ADVISORS JUST A COUPLE GUYS GIVING OUR OPINIONS Follow our TikTok - @stocktalk_joshniko Follow our Twitter - https://twitter.com/StockTalk_1 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stock-talk-pod/support

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22209: MacVoices Live! - Why Does Adobe Think Figma Is Worth $20 Billion? (1)

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 37:26


Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Mark Fuccio, Jeff Gamet, Jim Rea, Warren Sklar, and Web Bixby discuss what Figma is for those who don't know, and why Adobe decided to purchase it for $20 billion. The MacVoices Live! panel covers the basics of the service, how it competes with Adobe, and how collaboration has become such a hot feature in almost any class of software. (Part 1)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by Kolide. Kolide is a fleet visibility solution for Mac, Windows, and Linux that can help you securely scale your business. Learn more here. Show Notes: Links: The Adobe-Figma deal is historic for tech startups — if it goes throughhttps://www.protocol.com/newsletters/pipeline/adobe-figma-antitrust-concerns   Guests: Web Bixby has been in the insurance business for 40 years and has been an Apple user for longer than that.You can catch up with him on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

The Bike Shed
357: Notetaking For Developers

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 30:55


Joël is joined by Amanda Beiner, a Senior Software Engineer at GitHub, who is known for her legendary well-organized notes. They talk about various types of notes: debugging, todos, mental stack, Zetelkasten/evergreen notes, notetaking apps and systems, and visual note-taking and diagramming too! @amandabeiner (https://twitter.com/amandabeiner) Mermaid.live (https://mermaid.live) Monodraw (https://monodraw.helftone.com/) Zettlekasten (https://zettelkasten.de/introduction/) Evergreen Notes (https://notes.andymatuschak.org/Evergreen_notes) Notion (https://www.notion.so/) Obsidian (https://obsidian.md/) Transcript: JOËL: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Joël Quenneville. And today, I'm joined by Amanda Beiner, a Senior Software Engineer at GitHub. AMANDA: Hey, Joël. Great to see you. JOËL: And together, we're here to share a little bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Amanda, what is new in your world? AMANDA: Well, one thing I'm really excited about is that my team at GitHub is experimenting with how we're going to incorporate learning and sharing what we've learned with each other in new ways, and I'm really excited to see where people take that. So, one of the things that we're thinking of is that we all get really busy, and we all have exciting projects that we're working on in the day-to-day, and sometimes it can be really hard to pull yourself away from them to do some learning that would be something that will probably help you in the long run. But every time we do do projects like that, people are really excited about it, and people like to collaborate. So we're just trying to figure out how we can make that a more regular thing because it's great for our whole team. JOËL: I love that. Do you have a project or something that you've been getting into recently to learn? AMANDA: Yeah. One of the things that I have been working on is that this is the first backend-focused role that I've had in my entire career. So I feel like I just kind of keep pulling back layers on how different forms of magic work. And I'm just trying to get closer to the metal of what is powering our databases. And that's something that I've been really excited to learn some more about. JOËL: So it's digging into a lot of, like, Postgres and just general database theory. AMANDA: Yeah. So for me, I've spent a lot of time at the Active Record layer as I have been settling into my role and figuring out what our domain models are that we care about. And I'm trying to get a little bit more into the questions of why did these tables end up looking the way that they do? Why are they normalized or denormalized where they are? And trying to get a better idea of the theory behind those decisions. JOËL: And this is a new team that you've joined. AMANDA: This is an existing team that I've joined a year ago now. JOËL: So it sounds like you're dealing with a somewhat unfamiliar codebase. You're looking at a bunch of existing models and database tables. That can be a lot to process and understand when you first join a team. Do you have an approach that you like to use when you're looking at unknown code for the first time? AMANDA: Yeah. I usually like to dive right in as much as I can, even if it's with a very small bug fix or something like that, something that allows me to just get my hands dirty from the beginning and poke around what models I'm dealing with, and maybe some of the adjacent ones that I don't need to know about now but might want to come back to later. JOËL: One thing that I find is really helpful for me are diagramming and note-taking. So if it's something like a database table or ActiveRecord models that I'm not familiar with, if it's more than maybe two or three, which is probably the most I can keep in my head, I have to start drawing some kind of like an entity-relationship diagram or maybe even just a bulleted list somewhere where it's like here are the things and how they connect to each other. Otherwise, I'm like, I don't know, I don't have enough RAM in my brain for that. AMANDA: That sounds like a really helpful approach. How do you approach creating these diagrams? JOËL: Occasionally, I will just draw it out by hand with pen and paper. But more recently, I've been using tools like Mermaid.js and specifically the website mermaid.live that allows you to just put in some names and arrows, and it will build out a diagram for you. And that's been really helpful to explore and understand what is going on with different entities that relate to each other. AMANDA: I've used Mermaid.js recently, and I really enjoyed it as well. I found that writing something that lets me write words or something somewhat like words and takes care of the drawing for me is probably best for everyone involved. JOËL: Yeah, that's a good point. It's kind of like Markdown, the ability to just write a little bit of text and move on and not worry about the size of boxes or the shape of the arrows or whatever. It helps you to really stay in that flow and keep moving. AMANDA: I definitely agree. I feel like I can't have been the only person that somehow ended up very deep into the Figma documentation because I didn't quite know how to do what I was supposed to do, and I forgot what I was trying to draw in the first place. JOËL: Right. It's really easy to put your designer hat on and want to make something like a beautiful diagram when this is really more of a capturing your state of mind. It's a rough note, not something you're necessarily going to publish. So, in addition to visuals, do you find yourself taking a lot of notes when you're exploring code or debugging code? AMANDA: Yeah. I feel like I tend to jot a lot of things down, maybe class names, maybe some links to PRs or issues, or anywhere that might have context about what I'm looking at and how it got in that way. At this point in the process, it feels my notes usually feel like a bit of a bullet point list that doesn't quite make sense to me yet but maybe will get some shaping later. JOËL: What kind of things do you tend to record in those notes? AMANDA: I think one of the things that I'm usually trying to get out of those notes is just a snapshot of what I'm trying to accomplish at the time that I'm creating them. What's the bug that I'm trying to solve, and how did I get into this rabbit hole? So that if it ends up being the wrong one, I can follow my breadcrumbs back out and start a different way. JOËL: Oh, that is really powerful. I love the imagery you used there of following breadcrumbs. And I feel like that's sometimes something I wish I had when I'm either exploring a particular code path or trying to find a bug. And at some point, I've gone a pretty long path, and I need to back up. And I don't remember exactly where I was or how I got to this point, especially if I've gone down a path, backtracked a little bit, gone down a different path, backtracked, gone further down a third path. And so having breadcrumbs, I think, is a really valuable thing that I wish I did more when I was debugging. AMANDA: Yeah. And one of the most helpful breadcrumbs that I found is just a list of questions. What was the question that I was trying to answer when I opened this file or looked at this method, and did it help me solve that question or answer that question? And if the answer is no, then I can refer back to what the question was and try to think about what else might help me solve that question. JOËL: I also love that. It's really easy to get sidetracked by other questions or other ideas when exploring or debugging. And sometimes I find that half hour later, I haven't answered the original question I came here to answer, and I kind of haven't even tried. And so, maybe writing down my questions before I go down a path would help me stay more focused during a debugging session rather than just trying to keep it all in my head. AMANDA: I very much relate to getting nerd sniped by something that looks interesting but ultimately doesn't solve the original problem that you were trying to. JOËL: This even happens to me when I'm pair programming. And so we'll say out loud the question we're trying to answer is this; let's open this file. And then you go into it, and you're like, oh, now that is an unusual line of code right there. AMANDA: [laughs] JOËL: I wonder why they're doing that. Let me check the git blame on this line. Oh, it's from 2015? AMANDA: [laughs] JOËL: I wonder what was happening there. Was that part of a Rails upgrade? And then, at some point, the other person has to interject and be like, "That's all fascinating, but I think the question we're actually trying to answer is..." and we get back on track. AMANDA: I feel like that's a really good opportunity, maybe for a different kind of note of just interesting curiosities in a given codebase. I find that one of the skills that I'm trying to get better at is, rather than building a repository of information or answers to questions, just building a mental map of where the information I'm trying to find lives so that when someone asks me a question or when I have to solve something I don't necessarily know the answer, but I just know the resource to find that will point me in the direction of that answer. And I feel like those kinds of explorations are really helpful for building out that mental model, even if it may be at the time seems like an unrelated rabbit hole. JOËL: So this kind of note is a bit more permanent than a bread crumb style note would be. AMANDA: Yeah, maybe. And I guess maybe it's less of a note, and it feels kind of like an index. JOËL: Hmmm. AMANDA: Like something that's connecting other pieces of information. JOËL: That's really interesting. It's got me thinking about the fact that note-taking can be very different in different situations and for different purposes. So we've talked a little bit about debugging. I think we've mixed debugging and exploration. Maybe those two are not the same, and you treat notes differently. Actually, do you treat those two as different, or do you have different approaches to note-taking when you're exploring a new codebase versus debugging a particular problem? AMANDA: I think that those kinds of notes could probably be a little bit different because I think when I'm onboarding onto a new codebase, I'm trying to cast a pretty wide net and give some overall information about what these things do that by the time I'm very deep in debugging, it might be information that I already know very well. So I feel like maybe debugging notes are a little bit more procedural. They are a little bit more I did X, and I did Y, and I did Z, and these were the questions. And the introductory notes to a new codebase might be more along the lines of this is what this model does, and stuff that will eventually become second nature and might be useful to pass off to someone else who's onboarding but which I might myself not refer back to after a certain amount of time. JOËL: I see. That's an interesting point because not only might the type of notes you take be different in different scenarios, but even their lifespan could be different. The value of a debugging note, that sort of breadcrumbs, might really only be that useful for a few hours or a couple of days. I can imagine notes you're taking while you're exploring a codebase those might be helpful for a much longer period and, as you said, maybe in passing them on to someone else when they're joining a team. AMANDA: So that makes me think of whether the debugging notes should be as short-lived as I'm making them sound because I feel like there are times where you know you've debugged something previously, but you didn't keep the notes. Maybe they were just on a scrap of paper, and now they're gone. And I feel like I'd like to do a better job of digesting those notes a little bit better and eventually turning them into something that can be a little bit longer-lived. JOËL: That's fair. I find that, especially for debugging, I like to capture a lot of what was in my notes in the eventual commit message for the fix. Of course, my random breadcrumbs probably don't make sense in the commit message, but a lot of what I have learned along the way often is helpful. AMANDA: That's a really good point. I hadn't thought of commit messages as notes, but you're right; they totally are. JOËL: One thing I've done is I've sort of taken this idea to the extreme. I was debugging some weird database table ActiveRecord model interactions, and the modeling was just a little bit unusual. There were multiple sources of truth in the relationships. And there were enough models that I struggled to really understand what was going on. And so I drew an entity-relationship diagram. And I felt that that was important to understand for people reviewing the code but also anybody looking back at the commit later on. So I used a tool called Monodraw, which allows you to draw simple diagrams as ASCII art. And so, I have a little ASCII art ERD in my commit message. AMANDA: That's incredible. I feel like if I were a developer git logging and I saw that commit message, I would be both thrilled and terrified of what exactly I was diving into in the git blame. [laughs] JOËL: Definitely both, definitely both. But I have referred back maybe a few months later. Like you said, I had to refer back to that commit because a similar bug had cropped up somewhere else. And I knew that that commit had information that I had gathered that would make the debugging experience easier. AMANDA: I guess the commit message is a really good example of having a note that's very closely tied to its context. Like, it's in the context of like a commit, which is a set of changes at a point in time, and it's really well situated in there. What do you think about the trade-offs of having that as part of a commit message versus something like some other sort of documentation where something like that could live? JOËL: I guess it depends on how you think you're going to use it in the future. Again, for debugging things, it feels like you don't often need to refer back to them, so I don't think you would want to just dump that on a wiki somewhere. It probably makes sense to have that either in just a collection of debugging notes that you have or that you could then dig into if you needed or in a commit message, something like that. But maybe some of the things that you learned along the way could be pulled out and turned into something that lives somewhere else that's maybe less of a note at that point and more of a publication. AMANDA: That sounds like a fine line between note and publication. JOËL: Perhaps it's an artificial line that I'm making. AMANDA: [laughs] JOËL: But yeah, I guess the idea is that sometimes I will look at my own debugging notes and try to turn them into something like either a wiki page for a particular codebase or potentially even a blog post on the thoughtbot blog, something that I've been able to synthesize out of the notes there. But now you've kind of gone a few steps beyond the underlying raw notes. AMANDA: I'm interested in your thoughts on that synthesis of notes into how does something go from a commit message into a blog? What does that process look like for you? JOËL: I have a personal note-taking system that's loosely inspired by a system called Zettelkasten and also another similar system called evergreen notes. The idea is that when you learn things, you capture small atomic notes, so they are an idea in your note-taking application, and then you connect them. You create links between notes. And the idea is that there's a lot of value in making connections between notes that's almost as much part of the knowledge-creating experience as capturing single notes on their own. And as you capture a bunch of these little, tiny notes over time and they become very interconnected, then you can start seeing, oh, this note from this one experience, this note from this conference talk, and this note from this book all connect together. And they maybe even make connections I hadn't seen, or I hadn't thought of individually in those moments. But now I see that they all kind of come together with a theme. And I might then combine those together to make a blog post or to use as the foundation for a conference talk. AMANDA: That's really interesting. I like the concept of being able to capture bits of information at the time that they felt relevant without having to have an entire thesis in this note. Or that idea doesn't have to be fully fleshed out; it can become fleshed out later when you connect the dots. JOËL: That's a really powerful concept. One of the big ideas that I picked up through this was that there are always byproducts of knowledge creation. So if I'm writing a blog post, there are always some things that I cut that didn't make it into the blog post because I'm trying to keep it focused. But those are still things that I learned, things that are valuable, that could be used for something else. And so anytime I'm writing a blog post, preparing for a conference talk, learning some things in a debugging session by reading a book, there are always some things that I don't use necessarily immediately. But I can capture those little chunks, and eventually, I have enough of them that I can combine them together to make some kind of other work. AMANDA: I'm really curious about your process of creating those notes. If you're reading a blog post, say, to learn a new topic and you're taking notes on that, how do you go from this concept that you're learning in the blog post to these really focused notes that can be combined in other ways? JOËL: So the Zettelkasten approach suggests that you have two forms of notes, one it calls literature notes which are just sort of ideas you jot down as you are reading some work. You're reading a book or a blog post or watching a talk, and then, later on, you go and turn those into those atomic-separated, linked notes together, what Zettelkasten calls permanent notes. And so I'll often do that is just focus on the work itself and jot down some notes and then convert those later on into these smaller atomic chunks. AMANDA: That concept of taking a larger theme and then actually spending the energy to distill that into a different kind of artifact that might be helpful later on is really interesting. And I don't do Zettelkasten note-taking, but I've also found that to be useful in other contexts as well. JOËL: One thing that I sort of hold myself to is when I am writing those atomic notes is, I don't write them as bullet points. They're always written in prose and complete sentences. The title is usually a sort of thesis statement, a thing that I think is true or at least a thing that posits that could be true, and then a short paragraph expanding on that idea which I think helps cement a lot of information in my mind but also helps to give me little chunks of things that I can more or less copy-paste into an article and already have almost a rough draft of something I want to say. Do you find that when you synthesize ideas into notes that you do something similar, or do you stick mostly to bullet points? AMANDA: I think I might do a mixture of the two. I think procedurally, I use bullet points a lot, but I think those bullet points tend to be full sentences or several sentences together. I've definitely run up against some of the drawbacks of terseness, where they're less helpful when you refer back to it later. But I do like the visual cues that come with things like bullet points, or numbered lists, or even emoji and note-taking to be a visual cue of what I was thinking of or where I can find this later on. JOËL: I love emoji; emoji is great. AMANDA: I guess actually I've started using emoji as bullet points. That's something that I've found even to be helpful just with remembering or with grouping things thematically in my mind. And when I'm going back through my notes, I find it easier to find the information that I was looking for because it had a list, or an emoji, or an image, or something like that. JOËL: Yeah, that makes it really easy to scan and pick out the things that you're looking for. It's almost like adding metadata to your notes. AMANDA: Totally. JOËL: That's a great tip. I should do that. AMANDA: You can definitely run into the Figma problem of you then spend so much time finding the right emoji to be the bullet point that you forgot what you were doing, [laughs] but that's a problem for a different day. JOËL: So this sort of Zettelkasten evergreen notes approach is a system that I use specifically to help me capture long-term thoughts about software that could eventually turn into content. So this is very much not a debugging note. It's not an exploratory note. It has a very particular purpose, which is why I write it in this particular way. I'm curious; I know you have a lot of different systems that you use for your notes, Amanda. Is there one that you'd like to share with the audience? Maybe tell us a little bit about what the system is and why it's a good fit for the type of scenario that you'd like to use it in. AMANDA: Sure. One situation that I found myself in recently is I have started taking classes on things that I'm interested in, development-related and non-development-related. And that's a formal structure that requires some note-taking that I haven't really done since I was in school. And the tools were very different back then as to what we had available to us for note-taking. It was basically Microsoft Word or bust. So I have found myself having to develop a new note system for that kind of content delivery method, basically of watching a video and taking notes and having something that then makes sense outside of the context of sitting down and watching a video. So that has been a little bit of a process journey that I've been on the last couple of months. JOËL: And what does your note-taking system look like? AMANDA: So it's been a mix of things, actually. I started out just kind of brain-dumping as I went along with the instructor talking trying to type and keep up. And I found that very not scannable to look back on. I was looking for some more visual cues, and I didn't really have time to insert those visual cues as I was trying to keep up with a lecture essentially. I then transitioned back to old school pen and paper, like, got myself a notebook and started writing in it. And obviously, that has some benefits of the free-formness, like, I'm not constrained by the offerings of any specific tool. But the trade-off for that is always that you have different notebooks for everything. And it's like, where's my X class notebook? And so I've been trying to bring those two methods together into something that makes a little bit more sense for me and also bring in some of that synthesis process that you were talking about with your note-taking method of doing the full literature notes and then synthesizing them down into something a little bit more well-scoped for the particular piece of information. JOËL: So you have like a two-step process then. AMANDA: It did end up being a two-step process because one of the things that I found was the grouping of ideas that make sense when you're first learning a concept and the grouping of ideas that make sense when I'm revisiting that concept, later on, aren't necessarily the same. And so, keeping it in the original context doesn't necessarily help me recall the information when I'm referring back to my notes. JOËL: That's really interesting. When you're writing it, it's going to be different than when you're reading it. So we've been talking a lot about the purpose of different notes along the way, and you mentioned the word recall here. Do you use these notes mostly as a way to recall things that you would look back at them and try to remember, or are they more of a way to digest the material as you're going through it? AMANDA: I think at the time that I'm writing them, they definitely served the purpose of helping me digest the information. But at some point, I probably want to be able to look back at them and remember the things that I learned and see if maybe they have new salience now that I have sat on them for a little bit. JOËL: Hmmm, that's good. So it's valuable for both in different contexts. AMANDA: Yeah, definitely. And one of the more surprising things that I've learned through that process has been that when I'm learning something, I really like a chronological kind of step-by-step through that process and building blocks of complexity that basically go one on top of the other. But then, once I've kind of made it to the end when I look back on it, I look back on those notes, and they're usually pretty thorough. They probably have a lot of details that aren't going to be top-level priority at the end. But I didn't really have that concept of priority when I was first learning it. I was kind of grasping onto each bit of information, saying, "I'm going to scroll this away in case I need it later." And then when you get a better understanding of the full picture, you realize, okay, I'm glad that I know that, but it's not necessarily something that I'd want to look back on. So I really like having systems that then allow me to regroup that information once I have built out a fuller picture of what it is I'm trying to learn. JOËL: Interesting. So the sort of digesting step that happens afterwards or the synthesis step, a lot of the value that you're adding there is by putting structure on a lot of the information you captured. AMANDA: Yeah, I think putting structure and changing the structure, and not being afraid to change that structure to fit my new understanding in how I see this concept now instead of just how this concept was explained to me. JOËL: So you mentioned that you'd initially used notebooks and paper and that that felt a little bit constraining in terms of organization. Is there any kind of software or apps that you like to use to organize your notes, and how do they fit in with your approach to note-taking? AMANDA: I've been using Notion for the last few years. I found that that application works well with my visual preferences for note-taking. I think there's a lot of opportunity for visual cues that help me recall things, such as emoji and bullet points. And I like that I can do all of that by writing Markdown without then also having to read Markdown. JOËL: Yeah, I definitely agree that a little visual change there where you can actually see the rendered Markdown is a nice quality-of-life improvement. AMANDA: Absolutely. And I also think that the way that it turns Markdown into blocks that then you can rearrange has served me really well for that synthesis process of maybe this bullet point makes sense, and I want to keep it as is. But I want to rearrange it into these new themes that I'm seeing as I'm reviewing these things that I've learned. JOËL: That's fascinating. So it has some really good tools for evolving your notes and reorganizing them, it sounds like. AMANDA: I like that I can group my notes by concept, and notes can be subsets or sub-notes of other notes. And you can kind of move the individual notes in between those blocks pretty easily, which helps me rearrange things when I see different themes evolving. JOËL: I've heard really good things about Notion, but I've not tried it myself. My app of choice so far has been Obsidian, which I really appreciate its focus on linking between notes. It doesn't have this concept of blocks where you can embed parts of notes as notes into other notes and things like that. But that has been okay for me because I keep my notes very small and atomic. But the focus on hyperlinking between notes has been really useful for me because, in my approach, it's all about the connections. AMANDA: So, what does that process look like when you are referring back to all of these notes that are hyperlinked together? JOËL: That's actually really important because the recall aspect is a big part of how you would use a note-taking system. For me, it's sort of like walking the graph. So I'll use search, or maybe I know a note that's in the general theme of what I care about, and then I'll just follow the links to other related articles or notes that talk about things that are related to it. And I might walk that graph three, four steps out in a few different directions. It's kind of like surfing Wikipedia. You find some entry point, and then you just follow the links until you have the material that you're interested in. AMANDA: It sounds like creating a Wikipedia wormhole of your own. JOËL: It kind of is. I guess, in a way, it's kind of like a little mini personal wiki where the articles are very, very condensed because I have that limitation that everything must be atomic. Wow. So this has been a really fascinating conversation. I feel like one of the big takeaways that I have is that types of notes matter. Note-taking can take very different forms in different contexts. And the way you organize them would be vastly different; how long you care about them is also going to be different. So going into a particular situation, knowing what sort of situation is this that I'm using notes and what is their purpose is going to be really helpful to think in terms of how I want to do my note-keeping. Whereas I think previously, I probably was just like, yeah, notes. You open a document, and you put in some bullet points. AMANDA: I am definitely guilty of doing that as well. And I like the idea of having a purpose for your notes. You mentioned your purpose was ultimately to build a map that would produce content. And I really like how you have found a system that works really well for that purpose. And I'm going to keep thinking about how to be more intentional in what is the purpose of the notes that I'm taking in the future. JOËL: Well, thank you so much for joining the conversation today. Where can people find you on the web? AMANDA: Thanks so much for having me, Joël. You can find me @amandabeiner on Twitter. JOËL: And we'll link to that in the show notes. And with that, let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. If you have any feedback, you can reach us at @_bikeshed, or reach me at @joelquen on Twitter, or at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. Thank you so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Exposure Ninja Digital Marketing Podcast | SEO, eCommerce, Digital PR, PPC, Web design and CRO

Figma sold to Adobe for a massive $20 Billion. But how did it get there? Find out exactly how Figma rose to be one of the most popular design platforms in today's podcast. Get the show notes @ https://exposureninja.com/podcast/259/ Get a FREE review of your website @ https://exposureninja.com/rpod/review/ Download our eBook @ https://exposureninja.com/your-google-book/

Human Insight Podcast
Solving business problems with big 'D' design

Human Insight Podcast

Play Episode Play 55 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 38:40


The digital acceleration is changing everyone's lives, especially for designers who are more and more in demand across companies, industries and geographies. The past decade has seen incredible changes to design, and who is a designer.In fact, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics this year officially recognized the job of “web and digital interface designer,” says Andrew Hogan, who leads insights and analysis at Figma and was this week's guest on the Human Insight Podcast. “And there's also this realization that design can impact things at a business level, call it Big D design,” Hogan said. “It's not just about moving pixels, it's also about solving business problems.”Podcast co-hosts Andy MacMillan and Janelle Estes talked with Andrew before Adobe's announced its intentions to acquire Figma for $20 billion.In addition to discussing how much design has changed, as well as what's ahead, they also discussed what are the best practices across the industry, especially as it pertains to big, global, and/or enterprise organizations. Follow us on LinkedIn or Twitter Co-host Janelle Estes | @janelle_estes Co-host Andy MacMillan | @apmacmillan Producer Nathan Isaacs...

JS Party
7 pounds of news in a 5 pound bag

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 66:03


Hang with Jerod, Nick & KBall while we discuss what's new & noteworthy in the web world. Cloudflare Turnstile, Linkify 4.0, TC39 updates, the Figma acquisition, Penpot, pay transparency, and more! We might even discuss TypeScript if Nick gets his way…

Five & Thrive
October 6th's Weekly Rundown

Five & Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 5:45


Introduction: Welcome to Five & Thrive: a weekly podcast highlighting the Southeast's most interesting news, entrepreneurs, and information of the week, all under 5 minutes.  My name is Jon Birdsong and I'm with Atlanta Ventures. Individual On the Move: Sometimes the 2nd, 3rd or 4th person at a company can create a transformational force needed to get the product in market. I can't tell you how many times I've seen or heard how the first go-to-market leader connects with a technical founding team and the sparks fly. Well, this past week I met with the ideal go-to-market individual who wants to be that 3rd team member right after the founding team has built out the minimum viable product in an interesting and fast growing market. After learning more about this individual's story, I can attest he would be a great addition in the early days based off his sales results, technical understanding, and extensive experience bringing products to market. If you or you and a co-founder are listening and looking for your first go-to-market team member, email me at jon.birdsong@atlantaventures.com and I'll put y'all in touch.  Event of the Week: The premiere conference on Bitcoin is next week. Now I know several folks may be down on digital currency right now, and quite candidly it is not an area we have place much focus at Atlanta Ventures, however, I would be remiss if I didn't mention it here as there is a big sentiment in the waters that digital currencies are going through the same cycle that the internet did after 2001 bubble popped. If you're looking to understand bitcoin, next week is a great opportunity in Atlanta.  Company Coming Up: This company coming up is headquartered out of Charlotte and it's called Spendly. Imagine overpaying for merchant services for years and having now simple or easy way to shop around or price compare. Millions of SMB's are doing it daily, right now. Spendly's software lets you easily compare your current financial services ranging from payroll, insurance, lines of credit, retirement plans, and much more. In three easy steps, you'll have quotes from their trusted network of providers comparing and contrasting each service you're assessing. Check out Spendly if you're wondering how competitive your current financial products are today.     Beta Product of the Week: The beta product of the week comes from Birmingham and it's called ClearMindNow. CEO, Liz Read and team are solving the cumbersome, invasive, and unaccountable process for drug testing. Their solution helps families across the country monitor and test family members in a safe, simple, and verified way through their technology. How it works is you open up the ClearMindNow App, and through facial recognition confirms the participants identity. From there, the software records you administering a test sent to you by ClearMindNow where one swabs their mouth and tongue. Upon completion, you take the swab, place it back in the holder and show the camera your test results – similar to a rapid Covid test. As the United States battles the fentanyl crisis, and more, ClearMindNow provides another way to combat the disease affecting millions upon millions Americans. ClearMindNow is an up and coming solution to put on your radar.   Concepts of the Week: Over the past few weeks in the Atlanta Ventures office, we've discussed the topic of how long it takes to accelerate from start date, to finding product market fit, to building a repeatable, scalable sales process. For example, the Figma team, which just sold to Adobe for $20B spent 5 years building their product before they made their first dollar in revenue. Figs, the high end scrub company spent 3-4 years before generating over $1M in ARR. Today they are a publicly traded company valued in the billions. One of the hardest aspects of entrepreneurship is maintaining the faith in the product or the market or the team during these years towards scale. Investor David Sacks calls this “The Wilderness Years.” We've linked to one his posts elaborating more on these intrepid years of a startups' journey, but how does an entrepreneur know they are successfully navigating the Wilderness years? The most simple answer in the early days is the rate of customer feedback which is a direct indication of the authentic demand your product is solving. For example, even though Dylan Field, the CEO of Figma spent years, years y'all, not generating revenue, there was enough natural product demand, through feedback and excitement in the market. One unique caveat with Figma is their self-signon go-to-market strategy. It takes time to build that foundation, much more so than picking up the phone or sending a cold email, introducing and urging people to try and use your product. Regardless, if you are an entrepreneur in the Wilderness years, it is vital to be extremely honest with yourself to assess not only the overall market potential, but the velocity of market feedback and product iteration, as that is the best indicator of progress in one of the toughest stages in startups.  Annnnd, that's 5 minutes. Thank you for listening to Five and Thrive. We provide 5 minutes of quality information, so you can thrive in the upcoming week. Please subscribe to the show and spread the good word!  Resources discussed in this episode: Company Coming Up: Spendly Event of the Week: Tab Conference - The Atlanta Bitcoin Conference Beta Product of the Week: ClearMindNow Concept of the Week: The Wilderness Period 

School of Motion Podcast
How to get Adobe to buy you for $20 billion in 3 easy steps...

School of Motion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 24:27 Very Popular


Adobe recently acquired Figma for $20 billion. That's 'billion' with a 'b'. This transaction was the largest purchase of a private VC-backed company in history, and left wall street and many artists scratching their heads. Why did Adobe do this historic deal? And, what does it mean for motion designers?

Tecnocast
O designer tenta, mas não consegue fugir da Adobe

Tecnocast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 56:13


Vinte bilhões de dólares. Essa é quantia que a Adobe está disposta a desembolsar para comprar o Figma, startup que vinha se estabelecendo como uma pedra em seu sapato. A aquisição torna a empresa ainda mais dominante no setor de design. Enquanto isso, profissionais da área ficam apreensivos com o destino do Figma – e ainda mais presos às soluções da Adobe. Por que foi necessário investir tanto para abocanhar o Figma? E as reações negativas da comunidade de usuários se justificam? Para entender essas questões, conversamos hoje com o Felipe Santana. Ele é designer de produtos, criador de conteúdo sobre UI/UX Design e professor num curso todo dedicado ao Figma. Dá o play e vem com a gente! ParticipantesThiago MobilonPaulo Higa Felipe Santana CréditosProdutor: Josué de OliveiraEdição e Sonorização: Ariel LiborioArte da capa: Vitor Pádua 

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News
Is The Market Healthy? | AWM Insights #130

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 16:47


Markets are crazy right now. The S&P 500 was down over 9% for September alone. Interest rates have been marching higher. What does this mean for you and your money?Everyone goes through challenging periods of time whether that's in sports or business. Investing is no different. It is perfectly normal in times like these to be unnerved by market drops and the possibility of a looming recession. Talking it through with your advisor is exactly what you should be doing. For clients, there are three zingers for you to know right now.There are many different kinds of interest rates and they are not all created equal. It is important to know which one people are talking about and whether it should even matter to your personal situation.The best place to be in times of high inflation for long-term investors is equities. Stocks have proven to outpace inflation when you invest over decades. Sitting in cash destroys purchasing power during high inflationary periods like today.Clients with resilient financial structures should feel more confident because markets are healthy and working for you. It affords you the luxury of being indifferent during these times.Have questions for an upcoming episode? Want to get free resources, book giveaways, and AWM gear? Want to hear about when we release new episodes? Text “insights” or the lightbulb emoji (

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Tech 895: Eastern Blocks

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 163:57 Very Popular


Stadia is done, Zuck's UFC appearance, General AI, OG App, Amazon event Stadia is issuing refunds - How to get yours. Red Dead Redemption 2 fan with nearly 6,000 hours on Stadia begs Rockstar for character transfer. Adobe can't Photoshop out the fact its $20bn Figma deal is a naked land grab. Penpot inks $8M as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition move. Is Mark Zuckerberg Fighting at This Weekend's UFC Show? Texts show roll call of tech figures tried to help Elon Musk in Twitter deal. The True Genius of Tech Leaders. "Buying Our Way In" was Palantir's (PLTR stock) Secret Plan to Get into the NHS. Elon Musk unveils Optimus Is general AI right around the corner? Google Fires Blake Lemoine, Engineer Who Called Its AI Sentient. James Bridle's "Ways of Being" In Delaware's Kathaleen McCormick, Elon Musk Finds A Judge Who Means Business. Klobuchar, Cruz strike deal to advance journalism antitrust bill. Inside Podcasters' Explosive Audience Growth. The OG App promises you an ad-free Instagram feed. Amazon hardware event 2022. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Kantrowitz and Cory Doctorow Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit eightsleep.com/twit podium.com/twit policygenius.com/twit

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 895: Eastern Blocks - Stadia is done, Zuck's UFC appearance, General AI, OG App, Amazon event

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 163:57 Very Popular


Stadia is done, Zuck's UFC appearance, General AI, OG App, Amazon event Stadia is issuing refunds - How to get yours. Red Dead Redemption 2 fan with nearly 6,000 hours on Stadia begs Rockstar for character transfer. Adobe can't Photoshop out the fact its $20bn Figma deal is a naked land grab. Penpot inks $8M as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition move. Is Mark Zuckerberg Fighting at This Weekend's UFC Show? Texts show roll call of tech figures tried to help Elon Musk in Twitter deal. The True Genius of Tech Leaders. "Buying Our Way In" was Palantir's (PLTR stock) Secret Plan to Get into the NHS. Elon Musk unveils Optimus Is general AI right around the corner? Google Fires Blake Lemoine, Engineer Who Called Its AI Sentient. James Bridle's "Ways of Being" In Delaware's Kathaleen McCormick, Elon Musk Finds A Judge Who Means Business. Klobuchar, Cruz strike deal to advance journalism antitrust bill. Inside Podcasters' Explosive Audience Growth. The OG App promises you an ad-free Instagram feed. Amazon hardware event 2022. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Kantrowitz and Cory Doctorow Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit eightsleep.com/twit podium.com/twit policygenius.com/twit

Design Details
448: News Desk, Vol. 5

Design Details

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 43:03


This week, we break down new Figma features, dissect the Live Activities HIG, and share our cool-takes on the Adobe + Figma acquisition.The Sidebar:The Sidebar is an exclusive weekly segment for our Patreon supporters. You can subscribe starting at $1 per month for access to bonus content going forward! Sign up at patreon.com/designdetails.Latest VIP Patrons:Catherine McConalogueWillMartin ChudobaShelaTim JohnsenNick AngiolilloChariton ShumwayOleg FrolovMark StephensonBryn JacksonNancy TranMain Topic:This week, we break down new Figma features, dissect the Live Activities HIG, and share our cool-takes on the Adobe + Figma acquisition.Component properties, select featuresSho Kuwamotoxkcd: Two Key SystemHuman Interface Guidelines for Live ActivitiesAdobe to acquire FigmaPenpotJob Board:We're curating the best product design roles from the world's most design-forward companies.

This Week in Tech (Video HI)
TWiT 895: Eastern Blocks - Stadia is done, Zuck's UFC appearance, General AI, OG App, Amazon event

This Week in Tech (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 164:43


Stadia is done, Zuck's UFC appearance, General AI, OG App, Amazon event Stadia is issuing refunds - How to get yours. Red Dead Redemption 2 fan with nearly 6,000 hours on Stadia begs Rockstar for character transfer. Adobe can't Photoshop out the fact its $20bn Figma deal is a naked land grab. Penpot inks $8M as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition move. Is Mark Zuckerberg Fighting at This Weekend's UFC Show? Texts show roll call of tech figures tried to help Elon Musk in Twitter deal. The True Genius of Tech Leaders. "Buying Our Way In" was Palantir's (PLTR stock) Secret Plan to Get into the NHS. Elon Musk unveils Optimus Is general AI right around the corner? Google Fires Blake Lemoine, Engineer Who Called Its AI Sentient. James Bridle's "Ways of Being" In Delaware's Kathaleen McCormick, Elon Musk Finds A Judge Who Means Business. Klobuchar, Cruz strike deal to advance journalism antitrust bill. Inside Podcasters' Explosive Audience Growth. The OG App promises you an ad-free Instagram feed. Amazon hardware event 2022. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Kantrowitz and Cory Doctorow Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit eightsleep.com/twit podium.com/twit policygenius.com/twit

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Tech 895: Eastern Blocks

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 163:57


Stadia is done, Zuck's UFC appearance, General AI, OG App, Amazon event Stadia is issuing refunds - How to get yours. Red Dead Redemption 2 fan with nearly 6,000 hours on Stadia begs Rockstar for character transfer. Adobe can't Photoshop out the fact its $20bn Figma deal is a naked land grab. Penpot inks $8M as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition move. Is Mark Zuckerberg Fighting at This Weekend's UFC Show? Texts show roll call of tech figures tried to help Elon Musk in Twitter deal. The True Genius of Tech Leaders. "Buying Our Way In" was Palantir's (PLTR stock) Secret Plan to Get into the NHS. Elon Musk unveils Optimus Is general AI right around the corner? Google Fires Blake Lemoine, Engineer Who Called Its AI Sentient. James Bridle's "Ways of Being" In Delaware's Kathaleen McCormick, Elon Musk Finds A Judge Who Means Business. Klobuchar, Cruz strike deal to advance journalism antitrust bill. Inside Podcasters' Explosive Audience Growth. The OG App promises you an ad-free Instagram feed. Amazon hardware event 2022. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Alex Kantrowitz and Cory Doctorow Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: nureva.com/twit eightsleep.com/twit podium.com/twit policygenius.com/twit

Emprende Aprendiendo
La Startup que Cambió el Diseño para Siempre

Emprende Aprendiendo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 16:10


Figma es una empresa de diseño colaborativo que recientemente se vendió a Adobe por $20.000 millones. Y la gran pregunta es... ¿Qué tiene de especial esta empresa? ¿Realmente era una amenaza para Adobe? En este podcast vamos a tratar la historia de Figma, la innovación que aportó al mundo del diseño en los últimos 10 años y los motivos por los que las acciones de Adobe se han desplomado tanto después de anunciar la compra. ¡Empezamos!   ACCEDE A LA SÚPER OFERTA DE HOSTINGER CON EL CUPÓN "EMPRENDE"

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 683: Finnish Foliage - Douglas Rushkoff interview, AI powered turret, Amazon hardware event, NASA DART

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 164:31 Very Popular


Interview with Douglas Rushkoff. How Rushkoff discovered the topic for his new book. Survival of the Richest: The wealthy are plotting to leave us behind. When Rushkoff decided to write the book. How billionaires define "winning" How do WE create a better future? What is Rushkoff's manifesto? What was Rushkoff's major? Team Human is a podcast striving to amplify human connection. Meta ordered to pay Voxer $175 million for violating live-streaming patents. Bitcoin Rises 6.5 Percent as a Strong Dollar Sinks Other Currencies. Meta Sued For Tap Dancing Around Apple's New App Privacy Rules. The OG App promises you an ad-free Instagram feed. Chipotle is moving its tortilla robot to a real restaurant. Israel Deploys AI Powered Turret in the West Bank. No, There's No 'Ghost In The Machine' On Board American Airlines Aircraft. Penpot inks $8M, as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition move. Darth Vader's Voice Emanated From War-Torn Ukraine. DallE is open to all! Help pick the cover of Jeff's book. Amazon hardware event 2022. What Did Axios Do? Amazon launches a Kindle you can write on. 10 biggest announcements from Google Search On 22. LinkedIn Ran Social Experiments on 20 Million Users Over Five Years. Chromecast with Google TV (HD) goes official for $29.99 with 1080p, HDR, 8GB storage. Google discontinues its last traditional Chromecast, but software support will continue. Chrome now lets you search your @history and @bookmarks from the address bar. Google lays out Manifest V3's 2023 transition timeline for Chrome extensions. Here are all of the new features and updates coming to Google Maps. Android Auto 8.2 beta begins rolling out, tweaks dock of 'Coolwalk' redesign. NASA's DART Mission Hits Asteroid in First-Ever Planetary Defense Test. Images show chunks DART took out of asteroid. Picks: Leo - Rezmason/matrix: matrix (web-based green code rain, made with love). Jeff - TikTok transparency report. Jeff - Preorder The Gutenberg Parenthesis. Ant - Osee Tech On-Camera Monitors. Ant - Register for Adobe Max for FREE (Virtual). Cool plank-bike video. Let me out of the Dynamic Island! Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Douglas Rushkoff Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 683: Finnish Foliage

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 164:31 Very Popular


Interview with Douglas Rushkoff. How Rushkoff discovered the topic for his new book. Survival of the Richest: The wealthy are plotting to leave us behind. When Rushkoff decided to write the book. How billionaires define "winning" How do WE create a better future? What is Rushkoff's manifesto? What was Rushkoff's major? Team Human is a podcast striving to amplify human connection. Meta ordered to pay Voxer $175 million for violating live-streaming patents. Bitcoin Rises 6.5 Percent as a Strong Dollar Sinks Other Currencies. Meta Sued For Tap Dancing Around Apple's New App Privacy Rules. The OG App promises you an ad-free Instagram feed. Chipotle is moving its tortilla robot to a real restaurant. Israel Deploys AI Powered Turret in the West Bank. No, There's No 'Ghost In The Machine' On Board American Airlines Aircraft. Penpot inks $8M, as signups for its open source spin on Figma jump 5600% after Adobe's $20B acquisition move. Darth Vader's Voice Emanated From War-Torn Ukraine. DallE is open to all! Help pick the cover of Jeff's book. Amazon hardware event 2022. What Did Axios Do? Amazon launches a Kindle you can write on. 10 biggest announcements from Google Search On 22. LinkedIn Ran Social Experiments on 20 Million Users Over Five Years. Chromecast with Google TV (HD) goes official for $29.99 with 1080p, HDR, 8GB storage. Google discontinues its last traditional Chromecast, but software support will continue. Chrome now lets you search your @history and @bookmarks from the address bar. Google lays out Manifest V3's 2023 transition timeline for Chrome extensions. Here are all of the new features and updates coming to Google Maps. Android Auto 8.2 beta begins rolling out, tweaks dock of 'Coolwalk' redesign. NASA's DART Mission Hits Asteroid in First-Ever Planetary Defense Test. Images show chunks DART took out of asteroid. Picks: Leo - Rezmason/matrix: matrix (web-based green code rain, made with love). Jeff - TikTok transparency report. Jeff - Preorder The Gutenberg Parenthesis. Ant - Osee Tech On-Camera Monitors. Ant - Register for Adobe Max for FREE (Virtual). Cool plank-bike video. Let me out of the Dynamic Island! Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Douglas Rushkoff Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

My First Million
How Roger Federer Became A Billionaire, Betting On Yourself, And The Figma Seed-Stage Pitch

My First Million

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 59:30 Very Popular


Episode 367: Sam Parr (@TheSamParr) and Shaan Puri (@ShaanVP) talk about how Roger Federer became a billionaire, learning to bet on yourself to make more money, the Figma seed-stage pitch, and much more. ----- Links: * More Money Than God * Grit * (YT) Dylan Field pitches Figma to Daniel Gross * (YT) Inventing on Principle - Bret Victor * Do you love MFM and want to see Sam and Shaan's smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel. * Want more insights like MFM? Check out Shaan's newsletter. ------ Show Notes: (01:20) - Figuring out employee incentives (13:35) - Idea: Pooling tech employee options (20:50) - When the main thing doesn't make the main money (26:15) - Billy of the week: Roger Federer (36:30) - JP Morgan doesn't know anything (40:45) - Figma Seed Pitch (52:40) - Floyd Mayweather and betting on yourself ----- Past guests on My First Million include Rob Dyrdek, Hasan Minhaj, Balaji Srinivasan, Jake Paul, Dr. Andrew Huberman, Gary Vee, Lance Armstrong, Sophia Amoruso, Ariel Helwani, Ramit Sethi, Stanley Druckenmiller, Peter Diamandis, Dharmesh Shah, Brian Halligan, Marc Lore, Jason Calacanis, Andrew Wilkinson, Julian Shapiro, Kat Cole, Codie Sanchez, Nader Al-Naji, Steph Smith, Trung Phan, Nick Huber, Anthony Pompliano, Ben Askren, Ramon Van Meer, Brianne Kimmel, Andrew Gazdecki, Scott Belsky, Moiz Ali, Dan Held, Elaine Zelby, Michael Saylor, Ryan Begelman, Jack Butcher, Reed Duchscher, Tai Lopez, Harley Finkelstein, Alexa von Tobel, Noah Kagan, Nick Bare, Greg Isenberg, James Altucher, Randy Hetrick and more. ----- Additional episodes you might enjoy: • #224 Rob Dyrdek - How Tracking Every Second of His Life Took Rob Drydek from 0 to $405M in Exits • #209 Gary Vaynerchuk - Why NFTS Are the Future • #178 Balaji Srinivasan - Balaji on How to Fix the Media, Cloud Cities & Crypto * #169 - How One Man Started 5, Billion Dollar Companies, Dan Gilbert's Empire, & Talking With Warren Buffett • ​​​​#218 - Why You Should Take a Think Week Like Bill Gates • Dave Portnoy vs The World, Extreme Body Monitoring, The Future of Apparel Retail, "How Much is Anthony Pompliano Worth?", and More • How Mr Beast Got 100M Views in Less Than 4 Days, The $25M Chrome Extension, and More

Emprendeduros
EP. #145 | Spotify vs Amazon - ¿quién va a a ganar?

Emprendeduros

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 32:25 Very Popular


MANDANOS TU PROYECTO fondo@emprendeduros.com DESCUENTOS PARA CONTINUAR LAS FIESTAS PATRIAS CON MEZCAL ALERÓN www.mezcalaleron.com - 20% de descuento ww.mezcalaleronusa.com - 15% de descuento ¡Emprendeduros! En el episodio de hoy Rodrigo y Alejandro hablan sobre Adobe comprando Figma por $20,000 millones de USD. También hablan de Spotify expandiendo sus ramas de negocio. Finalmente hablan de OpenDoor y cómo su negocio se esta enfrentando a problemas por la baja de bienes raíces en EEUU. ¡Clic en el enlace para encontrar el podcast en otras plataformas! https://linktr.ee/emprendeduros

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway
Prof G Markets: The Demise of Chamath's SPACs, Citrix's Debt Deal, and Adobe's Figma Acquisition

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 29:26 Very Popular


This week on Prof G Markets, Scott shares his thoughts on Chamath Palihapitiya's decision to close two of his SPACs. He then explains why Wall Street Banks are on the hook for $700 million after the leveraged buyout of Citrix, a software company. And in this week's deep dive, we take a look at why Adobe would pay $20 billion for the design software company Figma in what may be the largest acquisition of a private technology company ever.  Chamath's SPACS Citrix's LBO Adobe's Acquisition Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 894: Juking the Stats - Apple Watch Ultra, YouTube dislike button, Serial podcast, AI and Getty Images

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 160:39 Very Popular


Apple Watch Ultra, YouTube dislike button, Serial podcast, AI and Getty Images Leo talks about his new Apple Watch Ultra. How Fitbit helped me lose 15 pounds. YouTube's 'dislike' and 'not interested' buttons barely work, study finds. Adobe's Aquisition of Figma is a Land Grab. Slack's Canvas feature puts a document editor in your chat window. TwistedWave, an Audio Editor. Word Jazz by Fred Katz and Ken Nordine. Ken Nordine - Levis Ad. Adnan Syed, Subject of 'Serial,' Is Released From Prison. California woman who faked her own kidnapping sentenced to 18 months in prison. The FDA may have unintentionally made 'Nyquil Chicken' go viral on TikTok. Getty Images bans AI-generated content over fears of legal challenges. 'A.I. Should Exclude Living Artists From Its Database,' Says One Painter Whose Works Were Used to Fuel Image Generators. The AI Unbundling. OpenAI open-sources Whisper, a multilingual speech recognition system. No, There's No 'Ghost In The Machine' On Board American Airlines Aircraft. Darth Vader's Voice Emanated From War-Torn Ukraine. Mozilla reaffirms that Firefox will continue to support current content blockers. How 'Star Trek: The Motion Picture' Finally, After 43 Years, Got Completed. Enterprise Connect: Facing the Tough Issues on Hybrid Work: How Communications Technology Will Support New Ways of Working. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Lisa Schmeiser, Larry Magid, and Shelly Brisbin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: shopify.com/twit