Podcasts about CRM

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  • 3,592PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about CRM

Show all podcasts related to crm

Latest podcast episodes about CRM

Stop Talking, Take Action, Get Results. Business and Personal Growth with Jen Du Plessis
DealMachine: Real Estate Investing In The Palm Of Your Hand With Matt Kamp

Stop Talking, Take Action, Get Results. Business and Personal Growth with Jen Du Plessis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:49


Imagine driving by houses to find leads but doing it all virtually. With the power of technology, you can do just that by simply accessing the DealMachine App's free CRM and pull-up lists. To talk more about this technology is the Vice President of Partnerships at DealMachine, Matt Kamp. Join Jen Du Plessis as she sits down with Matt to discuss how to become a real estate investor quickly. Go out and start taking action, and let DealMachine handle all the information. It's up to you to fight this analysis paralysis and get started in real estate.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the Mortgage Lending Mastery Community today:kineticsparkconsulting.comBecome a MLM Gold Member!MLM Membership

Drunk On Social
Drunk On Social The Symposium- Why You Should Start A Facebook Group In 2022- EP 35

Drunk On Social

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 26:36


Why You Should Start A Facebook Group In 2022 Tristan and Jeff have a lot to share in this episode: more Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook news, information about a new December contest, and important goals and ideas for your social media game in 2022. Don't miss it!   Episode Highlights: YouTube is making a simple change that indicates they understand where the world is going on Social. What is it? Why does it matter? Are you attempting to use YouTube Shorts? Jeff explains how to make it easy. The Lab Coat Agents Podcast has also highlighted YouTube with Jesse Dau and Jackson Wilkey on episode 136-138, check them out here. Facebook announced Meta but they also announced all the new things for the Facebook community in groups. Facebook Groups is the future of Facebook and everyone should be starting their own groups. Why? Tristan goes through the things that are changing for Facebook Groups and how they will give more autonomy to the user and ways to monetize subgroups within them. Tristan and and Jeff discuss a successful Facebook Group called, “Living North Phoenix”. Do you want to know what Jeff and Tristan recommend as a priority in your 2022 goals? Jeff explains and shares ideas for Facebook Groups.  Instagram just released another new sticker. What is it going to do? Jeff doesn't understand the Instagram sticker. He shares a story he had on social Media to try to understand what to put there with it. Tristan explains the idea behind it and how it gives you more play. There is a writing prompt portion too. Tristan reminds listeners that as Facebook starts creating this Metaverse, there are going to be peripherals like the watches and other equipment. What are the things that are going to be needed to participate in the experience but are not inherently created by the company who is allowing you to jump into it? There is a whole other opportunity there. Do you know what today's “Gold Rush” is? What is the December Challenge? Jeff is leading it up with Stories on Instagram. Tune in for all of the details and get connected in it.  For the entire month of December, Drunk on Social will be discussing 2022 goals for you to set for your social media game. Where does your focus need to be? How do add to your social CRM? Get ready for the new year! Resources Mentioned: Drunk on Social Website: www.drunkonsocial.com Drunk on Social Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/136264191062786/  Drunk on Social Instagram: https://www.facebook.com/groups/136264191062786/  Jeff Pfitzer Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeffpfitzer/  Jeff Pfizer TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@jeffpfitzer?lang=en  Tristan Ahumada Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/labcoatagents  Tristan Ahumada YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJ6o6B5JPEBP57hu9VdzT4Q Lab Coat Agents Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/labcoatagents Lab Coat Agents Twitter: https://twitter.com/LabCoatAgents Lab Coat Agents Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/labcoatagents/  Facebook Announces New Groups Tools at Its 2021 Communities Summit https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/facebook-announces-new-groups-tools-at-its-2021-communities-summit/609517/ Instagram Launches 'Add Yours' Sticker to Facilitate More Engagement in Stories https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/instagram-launches-add-yours-sticker-to-facilitate-more-engagement-in-sto/609267/

Just Start Real Estate with Mike Simmons
Live Q&A - Picking the Right CRM, Locating Sellers, How to Structure Private Money, Outsourcing Work, and Finding a CPA

Just Start Real Estate with Mike Simmons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 37:30


Welcome to this version of the Just Start Real Estate Podcast! I am excited to bring you another replay of my Facebook Live Question and Answer sessions. I just started doing these live forums in April and they are going so well and I am getting such great feedback and questions, I thought I would share them here on the podcast. Especially for those people that are unable to join us live, this will provide an opportunity to hear the awesome questions I am fielding about business, taking risks, real estate, and so much more! Some of the questions have been very real estate specific, but others have been general business questions, like asking about overcoming fear in order to get started and how to successfully scale. I have also received more personal questions like how I decided real estate investing was right for me and the steps I took to get my business off the ground.   This presentation is the live Q&A that I did the week of November 17th and each Thursday we will offer you another chance to take advantage of listening to the answers to our guests' fabulous and compelling questions! Don't miss this new episode of the Just Start Real Estate Podcast! Notable Quotes:   “A hard money lender may not loan you 100% of the purchase price and renovation amount of a property, but will likely load 80-90% of those costs.”   “If you buy a property right, once you renovate it, it is worth more than the money you have into it, and you can refi out of it.”   “I always suggest finding a CPA right away, especially if you are buying rentals, because there are some significant tax advantages to having rentals.”   “I don't recommend finding a CPA and having a hundred conversations with them before you start looking for investment properties.”   “Start looking for properties immediately!”   “The best CRM is the one that you will diligently use every single day in your business.”   “Sometimes people stress out about the tools they are going to use in their business and they make them more important than the business itself.”   “When approaching a property owner, you want to find out if and why they want to sell. It is really pretty simple.” Links: Real Estate Find & Fund Blueprint Flip Hacking Live 7 Figure Flipping Return on Investments Just Start Real Estate JSRE on Facebook Mike on Facebook Mike on Instagram Mike on LinkedIn Mike on Twitter Level Jumping: How I Grew My Business to Over $1 Million in Profits in 12 Months  

Massive Agent Podcast
How To Work Less to Earn More

Massive Agent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 23:00


As busy real estate entrepreneurs it seems like our plates are always full. There's always a fire to put out, a call to return, or a showing to rush to. We're so busy doing all the things, that we never stop to take a break and get perspective. But are we actually productive?This week, host Dustin Brohm reminds us that working less while taking intentional actions can have a huge impact on our productivity and improve our business. Often, we're working hard and doing more of the wrong things. Sometimes we're so busy working in our business that we take little or no time to work on our business. If we want to pivot into profitability and growth, we'd do better to spend less time focused on tasks and more time away from our business to learn, decompress, and think.Dustin shares his advice for scaling our business in 2022. It starts by not repeating what we did in 2021. If the quality of our lives is determined by the quality of the questions we ask, then perhaps we should re-evaluate our questions. Rather than asking how we can do more, let's ask how we can scale our business by doing less.Register Now:FREE WEBINAR: The Easy Button for Facebook Ads - Wed Dec 8th @ 2pm ESTMentioned on this episode:Sean Whalen on InstagramLions Not Sheep***********************Sponsored by: Follow Up Boss, the CRM of choice for agents ready to scale quickly. Massive Agent listeners get a FREE 30 Day trial (no CC required!!) CLICK HERE***********************Recommended:Witly: the fully automated Facebook Ad management system for real estate agents and loan officers. Get a 14 day free trial HEREShop my Amazon Store: podcasting equipment, my favorite books, cool stuff for  REALTORS®, etcMassive Agent Society: Our Real Estate Lead Gen Coaching Program/online course and online courseBuzzsprout: Host your podcast with the same platform we use. Affordable, user-friendly podcast hosting for real estate agents - New users get a $20 Amazon Gift CardFollow us on Instagram*The Massive Agent Podcast is a production of the Industry Syndicate

FactSet Evening Market Recap
Evening Market Recap - Wednesday, 1-December

FactSet Evening Market Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:02


Equity markets again lower as the CDC identifies the first Omicrom case in the United States. Other points of interest include volatility in the oil markets and the possibility of heightened travel regulations. Ticker's Mentioned: BIRD, CRM, TSLA, AMBA, MRNA, PFE

The tastytrade network
Engineering The Trade - December 1, 2021 - More Bounce to the Ounce

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:16


The S&P 500 has ended three consecutive sessions with a 1% move in either direction. Will there be a fourth? Hard to say after an intraday reversal. Also, bond action appears to be tipping a hat to the Fed's future plans. Plus, Jermal looks at option flow in FXI, MU, IYR and CRM.

The tastytrade network
Engineering The Trade - December 1, 2021 - More Bounce to the Ounce

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 26:26


The S&P 500 has ended three consecutive sessions with a 1% move in either direction. Will there be a fourth? Hard to say after an intraday reversal. Also, bond action appears to be tipping a hat to the Fed's future plans. Plus, Jermal looks at option flow in FXI, MU, IYR and CRM.

Zacks Market Edge
Growth Stock Sell-Off: What Should You Do?

Zacks Market Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 32:43


New investors are facing their first big growth stock sell-off. Here are strategies to help you navigate it. (1:15) - Stock Market Dip: Is The Growth Stock Rally Slowing Down? (11:00) - How Should You Navigate The Recent Stock Market Sell Off? (18:30) - Buying Opportunities: Stocks To Keep On Your Radar (28:15) - Episode Roundup: LULU, RH, MSFT, PINS, EXAS, SHOP, DKNG, SQ, CRM, NEWR, FB, BIGC, IGV, EXSW, PYPL Podcast@Zacks.com

CPQ Podcast
Discussion with Brillio and Salesforce Leaders

CPQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:36


Brillio recently acquired Standav, in this episode we talk about what that means for Brillio and their Partnership with Salesforce. Guests are Protik Mukhopadhyay, GVP Sales Transformation and Brion Schweers, VP Salesforce Revenue Cloud. In this episode they provide more information about this acquisition, what that means for employees and customers going forward and much more. LinkedIn Protik https://www.linkedin.com/in/protikm/  LinkedIn Brion https://www.linkedin.com/in/brion-schweers-71363211/ 

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales
77: Leading with data in your sales process and why traditional sales is broken (Anthony Innarino, President @ SOLUTIONS Staffing)

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 29:58


Anthony teaches us how to win competitive deals by leading with insights to guide the prospect through the buyer journey.======================Four Actionable Takeaways: * Lead with insights to show the prospect that you know their business.* Don't assume the customer deeply understands their world, be prepared to share learnings.* Show the buyer what they should be considering during their evaluation.* Sell the model, not the features, of your business.======================Anthony's Path to President's Club:* Over 30 years of sales experience in staffing & B2B * Creator of Iannarino Sales Accelerator * Founder of B2B Sales Coach & Consultancy ======================Outreach: Efficiently and effectively engage prospects to drive more pipeline, close more deals: https://click.outreach.io/30mpc======================Gong: Improve your win rates, clone your best sellers: gong.io/30mpc======================Vidyard: Free Screen Recording and Video Creationists: https://www.vidyard.com/30mpc======================Dooly: Instantly stop your CRM suffering: https://refer.dooly.ai/30mpc-page/======================Skipio: The Sales Rep's Playbook for Texting in the Sales Process: https://www.skipio.com/30mpc======================Focus Areas: ProspectingSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Morning Fire!
Increasing Sales Through Empathy and Organization with Jeroen Corthout

Morning Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:01


On today's podcast, I have Jeroen CorthoutJeroen is co-founder and CEO of Salesflare, an intelligent CRM built for SMBs selling B2B, mostly popular with agencies and SaaS companies.Salesflare itself was founded when Jeroen and his co-founder Lieven wanted to manage the leads for their software company in an easier way. They didn't like to keep track of them manually and built Salesflare, which pulls customer data together automatically.It's now the most popular CRM on Product Hunt and top rated on review platforms like G2 for its ease of use and automation features.Where you can find Jeroen https://salesflare.com https://linkedin.com/in/jeroencorthout

Scalable Real Estate Investing
How to Generate Millions in Land Development with Nick and Eric

Scalable Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 50:14


Nick and Eric are full-time real estate investors, developers, and founders of Winterspring Capital, a private equity firm based out of Boston, MA. Since starting their company, Nick and Eric have owned ordeveloped over $56 million of multifamily assets, with an additional $40 million of currently ongoingdevelopments in the pipeline. Nick and Eric focus on several different types of multifamily investments:from value add 100+ unit complexes in the Southeast that they syndicate alongside their investor base, toaffordable housing development, to luxury multifamily condominium developments.Episode Highlights:- Affordable housing can mean a variety of things depending on what market you're in. In this episode, Nick and Eric discuss an affordable housing project in which the City of Boston requested proposals to construct homes that were specific to their requirements. To keep the homes affordable for buyers, Boston mandates a certain lower than market price for buyers, and Nick and Eric make their fee from the development fee they charge the city. Boston also has rules in place that prevent buyers from turning around and flipping the homes at higher prices. Affordable housing differs from Section 8 housing in that Section 8 housing is a rent program in which the government subsidizes a portion of the rent so that the total rent is at market rates. Conversely, the project Nick and Eric did was selling the entire home (not renting) and also selling them at below-market rates.- The key to running a successful real estate development business that operates on a sustainable business model is to have the right architect, engineer, and other team members in place. The developer also needs to be very familiar with the zoning of the local area, floor area ratios, and other particularities in each specific market.- Never underwrite for rent or capital appreciation. Dial-in rent growth of 0% so that any realized rent growth is icing on the cake. If the deal still looks good using this conservative approach, then chances are that it will turn out better than expected when executed.- Nick and Eric's returns on development deals are usually in the 20% to 30% range, which is a major differentiator compared to plain vanilla multifamily value-add syndication deals. Winterspring Capital utilizes a mix of development deals (somewhat analogous to house flipping) and buys and holds multifamily assets with indefinite hold periods.- To choose your market, you must confirm that there's been steady population growth of at least 5% or more.Helpful Links:https://winterspringcapital.com/Best Way to Contact Nick and Eric:Instagram:@winterspringcapitalLinkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-dinicola-2408897ahttps://www.linkedin.com/in/nicholas-earls

The Talking Dead - A podcast dedicated to the AMC TV series The Walking Dead
The Talking Dead #562: FTWD s7e7 “The Portrait”, TWD: World Beyond s2e9 “Death and the Dead”

The Talking Dead - A podcast dedicated to the AMC TV series The Walking Dead

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 91:33


This week on Fear The Walking Dead Morgan goes to Strand for some help, but Strand is dealing with his own issues. On World Beyond, the Bennett family continues to execute their escape plan from the CRM and come face-to-face with Jadis. Time Stamps4:34 - FTWD s07e07, "The Portrait"50:42 - TWD:WB s02e09, "Death and the Dead" --Please send us your comments, thoughts and feedback! Email us at talkingdeadpodcast@gmail.com, or post comments below. You can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/talkingdead, or leave us a voice message by clicking the "Send Voicemail" link in the header. Support the show by donating via PayPal, or by becoming a Patron.

Keeping It Real
The Magical Seller Lead Generation Email

Keeping It Real

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 56:17


 Are you looking to send lead generation emails to everyone on your database, past clients, or unconverted leads in your CRM? A great email marketing strategy is to send emails that contain details regarding how much their home is worth or if they're interested in getting an offer for their home. In this blog post, we'll guide you through the steps you need to know to set up your magical seller lead generation email.  Sending Out Leads  When you send emails, make sure that you send to warm leads rather than cold ones, and make sure to make it personal. No one wants spam in their emails and everyone knows what a templated email looks like, so don't send out one of those. If it looks like junk mail or if it doesn't look relevant, people are more likely to throw it away or unsubscribe.  Where to Get a List of Emails Before you can send out an email, you need a list of email addresses. These emails can be found from all of your contacts on Outlook, or your Gmail. Proceed to export all the people on your contacts to your email marketing program. Do the same for everyone on your cell phone and put them in a different spreadsheet. Then do the same for your existing CRM, whether you're using Real Geeks or something else. Export everything except anyone who has unsubscribed from emails in that system. Another source is a dialer — these will make calls for you and may lead to people you've spoken to. Export these into another spreadsheet.  Scrubbing Your Emails Next, we need to scrub these emails — use NeverBounce.com to ensure that you don't get bounced emails. This works by providing a ping to the email addresses to see if the actual mailbox works. A $50 subscription will be enough to scrub a couple of thousand emails, and businesses of all sizes use this tool.  Eliminating Duplicates  While you now have 4 to 5 spreadsheets of scrubbed emails, you will probably have a bunch of duplicates too. Use Myemma.com or Zoho Campaigns will help you send your marketing emails. Other tools include MailChimp and Salesforce for the big players. Upload each spreadsheet into your email marketing program so that the system automatically eliminates duplicates of the same email address. Now, you have a scrubbed, no-duplicate list of all your best contacts ready to get an email from you.  What To do When the Domain Name isn't Authenticated  Be sure to do an SPF DKIM Authentication — Google will have a help file on how to set this up. Going through this process will significantly improve the likelihood of sending this email to mailboxes where it would be tagged as spam.  Enjoy Limitless Lead Generation  With the steps above, you should be able to get a wealth of leads from emails sent to your contacts. However, this isn't meant to be done all the time and you can't send out an email every single week. Keep in mind that this method is best used about once a month or once every two months.   You can download a pdf of all the emails from this episode HERE

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher
S7 E7 | Talking Walking Dead | Fear Edition

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 34:12


Season Seven Episode Seven TITLED: The Portrait World Beyond / Season Two Episode Nine / Death and the Dead WELCOME TO IT… With myself Jeff Fisher, Jason Buttrill & Maximus Fisher EPISODE DESCRIPTION ON IMDB for Fear - When baby Mo gets sick, Morgan successfully pleads for entry into Strand's Tower; Morgan quickly learns even Strand's benevolence has its limits. EPISODE DESCRIPTION ON IMDB for World Beyond - As the plan continues to unfold, tensions between the group and the CRM come to a dramatic head; while some rush to save an ally, difficult truths are brought to light. Listen each week as we discuss the latest episodes and what the future may hold in all things Dead… Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wavebreak Podcast: Grow Your Shopify Store
Top Growth Mistakes To Avoid in 2022 For DTC Brands

Wavebreak Podcast: Grow Your Shopify Store

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:41


Our guest today is Founder and President of a conversion rate optimization agency responsible for serving massive brands, like Nike, Xerox, and Adobe.Jon MacDonald joins the Wavebreak Podcast to share everything he's learned about growth while running a conversion rate optimization agency for 12 years, and how much of that will matter during unprecedented times in 2022.In this episode you'll learn:The highest frequency conversion rate killers that Jon and his team consistently find when tearing down a new client's ecommerce website. Why tactics are more relevant than you think, but still take a backseat to core tenants and philosophies.How prioritizing user experience could lead to more unexpected growth than chasing the latest trends and tools.Jon MacDonald is Founder and President of The Good, a conversion rate optimization firm turning browsers into buyers for some of the world's largest brands.Join Our Private Email ListOur industry-leading DTC newsletter is trusted by ecommerce and marketing leaders at top brands like Goop, Skims, Cartier, Walmart, and thousands more.Click here to sign up ->Links MentionedThe GoodOpting In To OptimizationLearn more about Wavebreak: the email & CRM agency for high-growth DTC brandsSponsored by KlaviyoKlaviyo — Over 265,000 innovative brands are growing their businesses by listening and understanding to cues from their customers--easily turning that information into valuable marketing messages used to build highly segmented, automated email & SMS campaigns, such as win back campaigns or abandoned cart recovery and more.

The Flip Empire Show
EP574: Turning A Self-Storage Deal Into A Cash-Flowing Machine

The Flip Empire Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:45


If you're ready to drop your W2 job and start creating wealth, this episode is going to be a great source of inspiration. Chris Lawrence shares his journey from leaving his sales job to finding a $2M self-storage deal on his 5th cold call. Stay tuned to learn all the details of this cash-spitting transaction and the keys to overcoming self-limiting beliefs.   KEY TAKEAWAYS The challenges of leaving a full-time job to invest in real estate Resources you need in order to take your first steps into real estate What is a ''freedom number''? How can you discover yours? How the lead generation process for self-storage deals works One way to finance a $2M self-storage investment   RESOURCES/LINKS MENTIONED The miracle morning by Hal Elrod   TWEETABLES “Sometimes we have to align ourselves with people that believe more in our abilities than we believe in ourselves.” - Alex Pardo   “What's awesome about self-storage is that you can run it like a business and still get the benefits of real estate.” - Chris Lawrence     ABOUT CHRIS LAWRENCE Chris Lawrence is a residential and commercial real estate investor situated in Rochester, NY, who has reached financial freedom at the age of 32. He's the owner of Helping Homes, a company that provides real estate solutions for homeowners by helping them get out of problematic situations like foreclosures, divorce, or having to relocate quickly.  They purchase homes in any condition and work with sellers to meet their needs.     CONNECT WITH CHRIS Website: www.helpinghomesrei.com Instagram: @chrisflipsroc Facebook: @Chris.Lawrence.31     ASCEND Don't Wait To Enjoy Your Life, Tomorrow, Live It Today! How To Grow Your Business, Expand Your Impact, and Experience Your Perfect Life:

Power Producers Podcast
Throwback: The Riches are in the Niches with Bob Klinger

Power Producers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 65:31


In this throwback episode of The Power Producers Podcast, host David Carothers and co-host Kyle Houck, interviews Bob Klinger, President and CEO of Klinger Insurance Group located in Germantown, Maryland. Bob discusses his military background, what brought him into the insurance industry, marketing strategy, his staff, and giving back.  Episode Highlights:  How did Bob Klinger get into the insurance industry? (2:49) Why did Bob Klinger decide to start a dry cleaning business? (5:37) Bob explains the importance of working in various roles to understand the pieces and parts of what made their operations tick. (8:36) Why does Bob take his staff on field trips? (13:23) Bob shares how his Ranger mentality impacted his managing style and how he has evolved. (15:26) Everyone that holds a desk at Klinger Insurance Group has to hit numbers, daily/weekly goals, and incentives. (17:26) Hiring and probationary periods. (18:24)  Prioritizing your daily routines. (26:41) Using your CRM and tracking outbound calls. (28:46)  Why is it important to execute a defined process? (30:58) Marketing, advertising, and giving back to the community. (39:01) Tweetable Quotes:   “I think that if anything gives me chills, it's giving back. You know, I grew up pretty easy, I grew up pretty poor, and so being in this industry has given me a blessing and a standard of living to give back.” - Bob Klinger “No matter who you are, you have to execute the process that has been defined, that has been proven to be successful to perfection.” - David Carothers  “I just realize that not everybody's going to think like you; in some cases, that's good.” - Bob Klinger Resources Mentioned: David Carothers LinkedIn Kyle Houck LinkedIn Bob Klinger LinkedIn Klinger Insurance Group

The Law Entrepreneur
294. Education as a Differentiator with Joe DeMaria

The Law Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:04


Starting your own practice isn't something they teach in law school. Join me as I sit down with legal professionals to hear firsthand accounts of just how they did it.     In this episode, Neil and Joe discuss: The power of education in marketing and advertising.  Building your preeminence in your field.  The difference between scale and growth.  Re-architecting for the future.    Key Takeaways: You can't beat your competition by copying (or attempting to copy) them. It doesn't work.  People don't buy from you because they understand what you are doing. They buy from you because they feel understood.  Sweat equity will only get you so far - it is not scalable.  Scale is what happens when you re-architect your business to support the growth.    "Education is the thing that makes marketing and advertising campaigns." —  Joe DeMaria   Get in touch with Joe DeMaria Website: https://www.teachtoscale.com/ (https://www.teachtoscale.com/)  Office Hours: https://www.teachtoscale.com/try-office-hours/ (https://www.teachtoscale.com/try-office-hours/) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teachtoscale/ (https://www.instagram.com/teachtoscale/)  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/teachtoscale (https://www.facebook.com/teachtoscale)  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/thejoedemaria/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/thejoedemaria/)    Thank you to our sponsors! https://confirm.spotlightbranding.com/tle/ (Spotlight Branding) - A legal marketing company that works with solo and small law firms to increase referrals. Go to https://confirm.spotlightbranding.com/tle/ (https://confirm.spotlightbranding.com/tle/) for a better way to market your law practice.  http://callruby.com/lawentrepreneur (Ruby Receptionist) - Virtual receptionist & live call services that will help you grow your office (and save money), one call at a time - to learn more, go to http://callruby.com/lawentrepreneur (callruby.com/lawentrepreneur) or call 844.895.7829 https://www.marketcircle.com/ (Daylite) - The all-in-one contact relationship manager. If you feel like it's time to upgrade from spreadsheets to a CRM, visit https://www.marketcircle.com/ (https://www.marketcircle.com/) and get your first month free when you mention Law Entrepreneur. Get in touch with Neil: Website: https://thelawentrepreneur.com/ (https://thelawentrepreneur.com/) Twitter: https://twitter.com/lawentrepreneur (https://twitter.com/lawentrepreneur) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thelawentrepreneur/?ref=hl (https://www.facebook.com/thelawentrepreneur/?ref=hl) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyralawfirm/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyralawfirm/) If you've enjoyed the podcast, http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1086406592 (please head to Apple Podcasts and leave a rating & review for the show)! It only takes a moment, and really helps me to reach new listeners. You can also http://www.thelawentrepreneur.com/ (head to the website at TheLawEntrepreneur.com) for more information on the podcast and my legal services.    Show notes by Podcastologist Chelsea Taylor-Sturkie   Audio production byhttps://www.turnkeypodcast.com/ ( Turnkey Podcast Productions.) You're the expert. Your podcast will prove it. 

Marketing Online
1971. Preguntas y CRM

Marketing Online

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 26:43


Hoy lanzamos curso de CRM con Clientify y contestamos preguntas sobre Matomo, emprender sin tiempo, agencias generalistas, membership sites, el futuro del SEO y mucho más.

Data And Analytics in Business
E83 - Steven Tye - The Data in Your Water - Smart Water Metering

Data And Analytics in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 57:10


What is Smart Water Metering and what does it mean for sustainability across Australia? Is this the future of water conservation? Enter into the movement of smart cities and have a look into a brighter future - one step at a time - with Steven Tye. Meet Steven Tye Steven's Role as a Smart Water Utilities Leader at Tyeware Steven Tye has been the Owner, Director, and Solutions Consultant at Tyeware for the past 14 years and counting. He has been involved in smart metering projects since 2011 and has experience working with over 50 water utilities on smart metering pilots and rollouts. Tyeware is an internationally recognized digital water metering & IoT solutions provider leading Australia's IoT revolution in smarter water solutions for agriculture. Data Science in Smart Water Metering Solution They developed the MiWater and MyH2O systems for Mackay Regional Council and now partner with Taggles Systems for the Australian and international commercialisation of this software suite. MiWater processes, interprets and integrates data received from Automated Meter Infrastructure (AMI) to give utilities control and oversight over their water infrastructure, from the largest networks down to individual services. MiWater has assisted in identifying leaks totaling six billion litres of water, in turn, saving residents of the Mackay region hundreds of dollars every year. In addition, MiWater assisted in regulating water consumption among the town's population, allowing the Mackay Regional Council to reach its goal of reducing annual water consumption by 10%. Customer Experience and Telemex More recently, Tyeware has developed "Telemex", an industry-first integrated CRM, demand management and customer portal for water irrigation schemes. It includes the full management of water allocations, titles, transfers and changeovers, as well as meter management, scheme management and automated notifications. At the heart of Telemex is a customer portal used by water customers to lodge, manage and visualise the impact of water orders. Telemex builds on Tyeware's expertise and innovation across the Australian water industry to cultivate water sustainability through customer-centric solutions. Data Analytics and Smart Water In this exclusive analytics podcast episode, Steven shares: His entrepreneurial journey and experience in growing a software business What a smart water metering solution is and why it plays a vital role in solving climate change Real-life examples of how utilities, local governments, and agriculture businesses use the solution in their own businesses The type of data collected for these solutions How analytics is used to identify water leakages and plans for infrastructure development How he started his journey in developing smart water metering solutions The challenges and advice in applying data analytics with a digital water metering solution If you are in a C-suite position, working for a utility company or local council, and find yourself intrigued about how data science can assist you with infrastructure planning and engaging with your customers, this is the episode you do not want to miss out on. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
What to Measure to Create a Successful Lead Generation Strategy

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 20:34


What metrics should you track to create a successful lead generation strategy? Kara Brown had been working on a string of supply chain corporate jobs where she oversaw IPOs and eventually decided to create her own business and focus on lead generation. She believes filling the top of the funnel now will be the first to capture market share in the recovery. With LeadCoverage, she focuses on B2B revenue operations and acquisition strategies for scaling companies. In her conversation with Jason, they spoke about what she has seen working for lead generation, what every company should be measuring to keep a profitable business, and how you can save time on prospects that won't become customers. 3 Golden Nuggets Measure what's happening in your funnel. Many agencies don't have a really good lead generation source and are leaning on word of mouth to get new clients. You really have to find that source to keep growing. Where do most businesses fail? Kara says most companies she works with fail at truly measuring what's happening inside their funnel. At the top of her lead generation strategies are “share good news, track who's interested, and then follow up.” Another successful strategy is getting as niche as possible. “When your niche is small, you can be hyper-targeted in your approach,” she says. This will save you a lot of time with clients that don't meet your criteria. Measuring volume, velocity, and value. Kara is not running a creative agency, but she is all about making her business as profitable and valuable as possible. When it comes to how valuable her consultancy or her agency is, she thinks in terms of measuring volume, value, and velocity. Velocity is how fast are they getting in your funnel? Volume is how many deals can you handle any one time and how many deals are going to fill your pipelines? This is all about close ratios and trying not to spend too much time on deals that won't close. And value is all about what is this potential customer truly going to be worth to you? For this, try to be really honest and don't overvalue customers. Lead with pricing to save time. When you are speaking with potential customers, do you lead with the budget? Doing so could really help your closing ratio and save you a lot of time on deals that aren't going to close. Kara prefers to be really straightforward with her approach and start the conversation by stating what her company does for customers and say “this is our minimum monthly rate” to find out whether it is on that potential customer's budget or not. If they're not, then she offers to use the rest of the call to give free advice. She assures this is helpful and saves her a lot of time. Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Measure Your Way to a Successful Lead Strategy and Stop Wasting Time on the Wrong Prospects {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here, and have another amazing digital agency podcast guest for you. We're going to talk about lead generation for your digital agency. It's going to be a fun show, so let's go ahead and get into it. Hey, Kara. Welcome to the show. Kara: [00:00:22] Hey! Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:23] Yeah, I'm excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Kara: [00:00:27] Yeah, I'm Kara Brown. I'm the CEO and founder of LeadCoverage and we do B2B lead gen for supply chain, heavy industrial, and tech. Jason: [00:00:35] Awesome. And so how'd you get started in creating an agency? Kara: [00:00:40] Yeah, that's a funny story. So I was the 12th employee at a company called Echo Global Logistics. Very sexy, all the trucks. Uh, actually a super sexy, the guy that started Echo Global Logistics also started Groupon. So I got to send the first Groupon email. It's a true story. It came from my inbox. Got to watch them grow like crazy and then ended up being on the team that took the company I was working for went public. So I did an IPO at about 25. Uh, I was asked to move to Nashville to do another IPO for a private equity company, for another supply chain management company. Sort of a stream of, of supply chain, corporate jobs. And then ended up back in Chicago, popped out two kids, moved to Atlanta, moved here for a sort of a garbage brokerage jobs. So it was sort of similar to supply chain but in a different space. Instead of going public, that company raised $95 million in equity. When I exited that, the question was like, what to do next? And someone told me the statistic that less than 2% of female founders will ever break a million dollars in revenue. And I said, well, that doesn't sound that hard. So I did it with an all female team. It took us about 10 months and now we're on the path to ten million. Jason: [00:01:54] Awesome. So is Groupon still around? I haven't heard anything from them. Kara: [00:01:58] Yes. They're still around. They're a publicly-traded company. Please buy some Groupon things. Jason: [00:02:05] So you must have some stock. Kara: [00:02:08] Yeah, I think… They still exists. They're still out of 600 West Chicago and sort of a Chicago tech darling from the early two thousands. Jason: [00:02:15] Very cool. Uh, funny story, my wife got me a Groupon in a helicopter, like 10 years ago for my birthday. And I'm like, I'm not doing it. I'm scared to death of helicopters. That's right. Let's talk about lead generation. You know, I find a lot of digital agencies, they take on the wrong clients and they take on the wrong clients because they haven't been building their pipeline. They haven't been building their pipeline because they don't have a really good lead generation source in order to really kind of tap on because they're based on word of mouth. So what have you seen working for lead-generation? Kara: [00:02:55] Sure. So we have nine lead gen strategies, but I'll start sort of at the top. So at the top is share good news, track who's interested, follow up. Most companies that we interact with, either customers or people that would just help out as friends. Are doing one or two of those and almost none of them, almost none of them, of the companies we talked to are tracking any of it, right? Like really, truly measuring what's happening inside their funnel. And so one of the things that we've found successful for Lead Coverage is getting as niche as possible. So our niche is supply chain management companies over a hundred million in revenue or venture-backed. And basically, if you don't hit one or two of those criteria, we may take you on as a client, but we may not. We may say no, thank you. And that's been very successful for us. So in terms of lead gen, when your niche is small, you can be hyper-targeted in your approach. If you're wide and not very deep, it's really easy to end up talking to a lot of folks that aren't super valuable. The other thing that we like to measure, which we can definitely talk about later, we do a lot of measurement in our company, is we measure volume, velocity and value. And I think most important for agencies is value, right? So a very smart man part of the Groupon kickoff team in the very beginning of the early days said to me, hey, Kara, it is… it costs to you, just as much money to run a $250,000 account as it does a $2,500 account. So get upstream and get as big as you can. Get your, get your retainers as big as you can, as fast as you can. Because that's where the real money-making happens. Jason: [00:04:48] You mean you don't want to race to the bottom? I see a lot of people when they initially talk with us, we really kind of determined that pricing is one of their big issues. And they're like, well, my competitor is actually cheaper. We're actually more. I'm like, what does that matter? Do you want to win that race? I was like, I don't. Kara: [00:05:10] We just decided to raise our minimums. I went to a trade show last week for our very specific niche industry, right? So every single person at that show could be a customer for us, which I think is super important. We went to the show and the number that I told everyone, nobody said it was too expensive. And I came back to the office after two days in the trade show floor. And I said, we need to increase our minimum because no one told me it was too much. And when no one's telling you, you're too expensive, you're not charging enough. Jason: [00:05:40] Yeah. Yeah, totally. Yep. Totally agree. Get in a little bit more about kind of the velocity and the volume and the, the value. Let's talk a little bit more about that. Kara: [00:05:49] Yeah. We love measurement. So we are not a creative agency. We don't have a creative director. We don't do creative. We don't do color theory. We're probably very different than most of the folks that listen to your podcast. But I still listen to the two Bobs and I'm all about agency work. And I'm like all about sort of consulting and how do I make this business as profitable and valuable as possible? So when I think about how valuable my consultancy or my agency is, I think about volume, value, and velocity. So how fast are my customers finding me? And then how fast can I get them to close the deal? Velocity story is a funny one. I have a client that we have been or potential client we've been talking to for over two years. And I think I may tell him it is time to stop talking to each other. Like it's nice. But, um, I've sort of sent him enough info. I've done enough. We've had enough phone calls. I've talked to enough of his people. It's been two years. If you're not going to buy, you're not going to buy, right? So that's velocity. But we also had a few weeks ago, our first one call-close. So we were introduced to someone, they came through a LinkedIn post that I wrote, which I should definitely mention how we do LinkedIn because it's really interesting. And one call the guy was like, great. Let's do it. And our minimums, Jason, are $15,000 a month. And the guy was like, I don't want your minimum. I want to be a big fish in your pond. We were like, all right, let's do it. So those are really exciting. So velocity is how fast are they getting in your funnel? Volume is how many deals can you handle any one time and how many deals are going to fill your, fill your actual pipelines? This is all about close ratios, right? So you can have a whole bunch of conversations, but if they're only closing 5 to 10% of them, you're spending a lot of time on deals that aren't going to close. So I have a thing that I do… fair it may not be nice, but it helps me save a lot of time. I will look at who I'm talking to before I get on the phone. And if they're not in our box, I will open the call with something to this effect: It's so nice to meet you, Jason. I want to talk a little bit about what we do and who we do it for. I'm going to tell you how much. If we're not in your budget, we'll use the next 25 minutes. I'm going to give you 25 minutes of free advice. My minimum is $20,000 a month and my core market is supply chain technology and heavy industrial. Does that feel like something that you can afford? And if they're like, oh my budget's like $2,000 a month or something crazy, then I'll say, hey, no problem. Let's use the next 25 minutes and I'll give you all the free advice I can. That's really helpful. They also don't call me again. So I don't have to like go down the rigor mortise of like giving them a proposal for $20K a month. And they're like, uh, we're not on the same page. So that stops that and then value, right? What is this potential customer going to be worth to me? Like really, truly going to be worth to me. And I don't do the work you do. So I don't work with agency owners. But I would imagine that there are a lot of folks out there who overvalue potential customers, right? I think this product is going to come in at 80 grand and it comes in at 20. I think that this customer is going to stick around for two years and they stay for three months, right? So being really, truly honest with yourself on values really important. And the best way to check out value is just to have someone, probably not you, if you're the CEO. Go back and look at your, at your previous customers, right? Like take a deep dive and really be honest with yourself on how much is each customer actually truly worth to you? Jason: [00:09:21] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients? You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients using revenue growth platforms. Sharpspring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in Sharpspring. Now for a limited time, my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with Sharpspring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smartagency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smartagency. Yeah, I love it. And I love that you get right to the budget in the very beginning. There's so many people, you know, when I'm speaking to a crowd, one of the two questions I'll ask is all right, how many people get the budget every single time or almost every time? And then, you know, how many people ask for it? And by the it's about 50% of the room than ask. And then 50% of that, it's only a quarter of the percent of agencies are actually getting the budget. And that's before they put all that work in it. I would always go to them and say, I just need a range of what you're trying to stick around. Because here's the deal, especially on pricing, and I learned this the hard way when I talked to a small company, I never heard of called Berkshire Hathaway. And I pitched them like a $20,000 website. They were expecting 30,000. So like if I started out, like I would always try to lead with what's their expectation and then match them there. But I would also even have a floor. Uh, so pricing is very important. Kara: [00:11:12] So I actually disagree. I lead with our pricing. Because if they're willing to pay you $30,000 for a website, there's probably $120,000 somewhere in their budget, right? And I think as a woman, this isn't necessarily agency owner, but as a woman, knowing other women in business, we tend to undervalue ourselves. And what I've found is, as my retainers have gone from 5 to 7 to 12 to 15 to $20,000 minimums, no one's saying no, right? Like very few people say to me, I can't afford you, right? Unless they're like just out of the box, but if they're in the box and they understand the value and I've done a good job of delivering what we do and showing them what we do and how we do it and what the value is we bring. As long as I lead with my minimum… Actually, it's not even the minimum. I learned something at an EO event, the entrepreneur organization that the human brain anchors on the first number that you tell someone. So when someone says to me, Kara, how do we work with you? I say, well, our average retainer comes in between 30 and $40,000 a month, but our minimum is 20. So instead of them saying, oh, I can get this person for five grand a month because I say something like our minimum is five grand. They're already like, oh, well she's like, she's really expensive. Like, can I afford her home? Like, oh, like maybe I should find another $30,000 a month somewhere to pay this person. So I think it's really important that you set your own standards and there's always money in corporations. I have worked for enormous corporations in my corporate career. There's always money. Always. Jason: [00:12:58] Yeah. Yeah. I call it the reverse engineer effect when you're going over the range, because so many people, when they go, I just need to know a range. A thousand, fove thousand? I would literally start at a billion and then a million and then a hundred thousand and 20,000. So they echo that first number going, holy cow, no one else said that. What makes you so unique? And you can really separate yourself. And switching focus a little bit. You hinted a little bit to the LinkedIn post. Tell us how you do that. Kara: [00:13:28] Yeah, so we can attribute $480,000 to two LinkedIn posts. And that's just in 2020, not in 2021. So super proud of this whole process. I post super regularly on LinkedIn. Sometimes I post about being a woman in business. Sometimes it's about marketing. Sometimes it's just like, I don't know thoughts of the week that I've decided that I want to share. I have a ghost writer. She's on my team. Should we speak for about an hour a week. Now, because we've been working together for a while, she can get almost four LinkedIn posts out of that one hour. I also write for Forbes and Entrepreneur and other magazines. So she does those for me at the same time. And she writes the post themselves. They're my words, but she physically crafts them. They go to my team, my team adds the emojis and make sure that they're, if people are tagged and then they go into a file for me to approve. I approve. And then they get scheduled. So we have posts that are going out. We're recording this in September. We've got posts going up through the end of November and I'll be gone the entire month of October. So I'll still be posting even though I'll be in Europe, which is really nice. And so we can see attribution of almost $500,000 to LinkedIn. And this is LinkedIn thought leadership. And it cost me probably 2000 bucks a month to do this. So it's my most ROI driven piece of, of lead gen that we do for myself. And it's been a terrific way for us to meet people. You can't always track every single lead back to LinkedIn, but it was a, it was a funny story. I was at this trade show I just mentioned in our niche industry. And I ran into some guy that I had known from a million years ago. And he said Kara, I read every LinkedIn post and I was like, awesome. And he said… Jason: [00:15:11] Stalker. Kara: [00:15:12] Stalker, right? Well, that's the whole point, like, please stalk me. And he said, may I please introduce you to my CMO? I think that I'd really like to make sure that you two meet each other and now they're going to be a client. So you never know who's reading it. They may not be liking, sharing and engaging, but put it be putting yourself out there is super important. Jason: [00:15:31] Yeah. I love it. And these are just regular posts. Do you have a call to action on there or is it just helpful? Kara: [00:15:36] Yeah. So we're trying to, the LinkedIn algorithm changes pretty regularly. We do this for clients as well. So we have a human being on our team who is regularly trying to sort of like bust the LinkedIn algorithm. Not in an ugly way, just in a, how do we use it to our advantage? So one of the stats she told me that I was really surprised is that less than 2% of people that are on LinkedIn are actively posting. So just by actively engaging in LinkedIn, they're already in the top 2% of folks that are sort of voyeurs only, right? And so, as long as you just put anything out there, you're going to be sort of doing better than other folks. If you get into like exactly what, you know, doing posts, doing polls calls to action links, links back to landing pages. Links to, to form fills and video. We can, it's a whole another podcast we can do just to talk about how to like optimize LinkedIn. In my professional opinion, that this is specifically for my market, which is supply chain, heavy, industrial and tech. I don't need to put video out there. I don't need to be super complicated about it because no one's buying from LinkedIn, right? LinkedIn just keeps me front and center for the folks in my world and in my universe. That when I see them at the trade show or when I send them an email or when they see something from me that's interesting and they have a need. They're like, oh man, there's this woman who posts all the time on LinkedIn. She's really interesting. I'm going to reach out, right? So it's just about staying in the conversation. Jason: [00:17:03] Yeah. It's about consistency. You know, you mentioned you were chatting with someone for two years. Holy cow, like if I was chatting with them, but when I look at my, our stats, most people don't buy from us for about a year and a half to two years. They're digesting that content, which isn't a sweat off my back and if they never buy it and they just get helpful content, I'm perfectly fine with that as well. But, but yeah, just to go through the proposal process for two years, that is a yeah. Shit or get off the pot dude. Kara: [00:17:34] And yeah, this particular human is such a nice guy and he's so kind, and I know he does want to work with us and he is very specifically strapped by, you know, investors and sort of what these investors want to do. I get it. And it doesn't bother me to like, have a relationship with this person. He is also well connected. He's a good human, but we are going to have to at some point, be like, hey, I can't do one more deliverable for you, right? Like I can't, I can't put together another email or send you another proposal. Like they're all the same. Like, it hasn't changed. Like the same proposal you got two years ago was going to be the same one I'm going to send you now because what we do, hasn't really changed. Jason: [00:18:13] Awesome. Well, this has all been great, Kara. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience listening in? Kara: [00:18:19] You know, I think one of the things that's really important to us, Jason, is the combination of failed the market. That sales and marketing, including PR and AR analyst relations, which I know a lot of folks in digital marketing don't really touch analysts at all. Cause it's kind of boring, but really important to your senior leaders, right? So if you're going up market, and this is not small business, this is enterprise. So we're very fortunate in the, in our niche. We have sort of along the spectrum, small business, all the way up through sort of big corporate enterprise, even publicly traded companies. And so we get to touch everything from analyst relations to public relations, all the way through, but long story short, the deeper we get in the niche, the higher our prices can go and the more we get integrated with both PR AR and sales. And the stickier you get, the more you can deliver math back to your client that goes to their boss, that goes to the board. The longer you'll stay in the organization, the more valuable you are and the more sticky, just the stickier that you get in inside those orbes. And so that's my sort of best piece of advice is if you can deliver math back to your clients, specifically math that goes to the board or to some sort of senior executive, you will be very, very sticky. So find something that's meaningful to your customer that you can deliver on a regular basis. That means something to their boss. Jason: [00:19:46] Awesome. Love it. What's the agency website people can go and check you guys out? Kara: [00:19:50] Yeah. We're lead coverage.com and we'd love to hear from anyone who wants to talk more about lead gen or anything about supply chain. Jason: [00:19:58] Awesome. Well, thanks so much, Kara, for coming on the show. Make sure you guys go check out the website, connect with Kara. And if you guys want to be around the most amazing agency owners in the world, where they're sharing  what's working currently to be able to see the things you may not be able to see as well as have fun scaling your business. I'd like to invite all of you. Go to check out digitalagencyelite.com. This is our exclusive mastermind just for digital agency owners. So go to digitalagencyelite.com and until next time have a Swenk day.

Cállate y Vende
¿Qué es el Metaverso y Cómo Cambiarán las Ventas? (Ep-201)

Cállate y Vende

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 46:39


Demasiado se habla del Metaverso y ooootra vez nos salen los "gurús" con la cantaleta de "nuevas formas de vender". ¿Qué es y cómo nos va a impactar a los vendedores el famoso metaverso?CURSO GRATIS "VENTAS & CRM"https://www.detonadoresdevalor.com/cursocrm See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Scott Winter Digs Into How Business Development Can Change The World

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 64:26


Scott Winter, CRM Evangelist, shares his thoughts and hard-won experiences on business development and how his perspective changed over the years from “selling is bad” to “business development is one of the most important things you can do. Learn about Scott's three favorite GrowBIG strategies that he uses all the time to help land new clients, the mindset that allows him to sell with confidence and genuine empathy, and how business development is the key to changing the world at large.   Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your personal definition of business development? The first component is being genuine. If you're not, people will see right through what you're doing. Scott has been fortunate to work with companies that he authentically believes in, and that confidence in the product makes being genuine possible. Drinking your own champagne helps. Scott is an avid consumer of the products he sells, and that makes the conversations easy and learning more about what the prospect needs simpler. Be genuine, love what you do, and treat it as a learning exercise. When you love what you do, it will come through in your enthusiasm for the client and the results you can get them. Think of it as a partnership where their victory is your victory and you will convey your pride and energy for what you do. Think with empathy, get excited about the future and help the prospect create that future. Business development has to be flexible because this is not a one-size-fits-all world. You have to be able to take your service offering or product, listen to what the other person's needs are, and show them how it can help solve their problem.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG Training or Snowball System? Whole brain thinking is a concept that Scott always gravitates towards when he's putting together a pitch or presentation. It helps shape his storytelling and the way his message connects with the people he's talking to. The Give to Get is another tool that Scott uses all the time. It's highly valuable to the prospect, builds the relationship, and helps them out, and for a trusted advisor, that's very important. Building it Together is the third favorite technique that Scott uses all the time. Working with Index naturally lends itself to customized problem solving for clients so it makes this kind of collaboration easy. If you can find a way to do that for your prospect, it can be incredibly powerful in developing the business relationship. In terms of Give to Gets, sometimes that takes the form of simple advice but it can also take the form of creating a solution to a prospect's particular problem, which can then be leveraged later on at scale. In the course of business development, you are constantly building a repository of knowledge and the more you do, the more tools and knowledge you have to help people. Scalability comes from a project management mindset. You can build something that can be leveraged by multiple people, it just takes a little foresight during the initial build. If you love what you do, you are constantly thinking about how you can help people which makes having the A-Ha moment much easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: Tell us of a time when you were doing something with business development that you are really proud of. Scott was working with another firm years ago that used Interaction, and there was a big push to bring them on board as an expanded partner. It took many months and using a lot of the GrowBIG strategies to provide enough value and develop the relationship to the point where they said yes, and that client became one of Scott's favorites to work with. There was a tremendous growth in confidence for Scott, since he was not a natural salesperson, and that partnership revealed how important business development really is and how good he could be at creating valuable relationships. There are four big incremental yes's you need in order to build something together. You have to get agreement that the strategic fit is there, determine the practicality of what you're going to do, get the team and all the stakeholders on board, and then get the “yes” on the financial aspects. Accountability is a major component of Scott's approach to business development. When he works with a client, he makes himself available to them and gets invested in their success instead of just moving on to the next sale. Scott focuses on building trust and giving the client a personal commitment to see the project through. Everything about the GrowBIG Training and Snowball System is about building long-term relationships. Scott trusts in his team and his product, and that trust allows him to support his clients in their success. If you don't stand behind your client and service, you're never going to be able to sell to them again. It all comes down to trust.   Mo asks Scott Winter: If you could send a video back in time specifically on business development, what would it say? The first thing Scott would say to his younger self would be to buy as much Bitcoin as possible. Seriously though, he would try to help his younger self get past the limiting belief that sales is a bad thing. No matter who you are, you have to sell. Do what you have to do to learn that skill sooner in a way that brings you enjoyment, because it's going to serve you for the rest of your life. Do something you're passionate about, and embrace the idea of business development. If you only have deep expertise, no one will know you exist and nothing will get done. If you only know sales, you will never do anything really meaningful. When you have both you can change the world. Deep expertise gives you the foundation for building trust and confidence with a prospect that you can actually help solve their problem, and you can use that to inform your ability to communicate that well. Even now, Scott struggles with how to structure emails perfectly and doing the right amount of outreach. You don't need to be perfect, you just need to put in the work consistently and genuinely care about the prospect or client's outcome. Just like sports or any skill that you want to improve, business development takes practice.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition
Scott Winter Digs Into How Business Development Can Change The World

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 64:17


Scott Winter, CRM Evangelist, shares his thoughts and hard-won experiences on business development and how his perspective changed over the years from “selling is bad” to “business development is one of the most important things you can do. Learn about Scott's three favorite GrowBIG strategies that he uses all the time to help land new clients, the mindset that allows him to sell with confidence and genuine empathy, and how business development is the key to changing the world at large.   Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your personal definition of business development? The first component is being genuine. If you're not, people will see right through what you're doing. Scott has been fortunate to work with companies that he authentically believes in, and that confidence in the product makes being genuine possible. Drinking your own champagne helps. Scott is an avid consumer of the products he sells, and that makes the conversations easy and learning more about what the prospect needs simpler. Be genuine, love what you do, and treat it as a learning exercise. When you love what you do, it will come through in your enthusiasm for the client and the results you can get them. Think of it as a partnership where their victory is your victory and you will convey your pride and energy for what you do. Think with empathy, get excited about the future and help the prospect create that future. Business development has to be flexible because this is not a one-size-fits-all world. You have to be able to take your service offering or product, listen to what the other person's needs are, and show them how it can help solve their problem.   Mo asks Scott Winter: What is your favorite science, step, or story from the GrowBIG Training or Snowball System? Whole brain thinking is a concept that Scott always gravitates towards when he's putting together a pitch or presentation. It helps shape his storytelling and the way his message connects with the people he's talking to. The Give to Get is another tool that Scott uses all the time. It's highly valuable to the prospect, builds the relationship, and helps them out, and for a trusted advisor, that's very important. Building it Together is the third favorite technique that Scott uses all the time. Working with Index naturally lends itself to customized problem solving for clients so it makes this kind of collaboration easy. If you can find a way to do that for your prospect, it can be incredibly powerful in developing the business relationship. In terms of Give to Gets, sometimes that takes the form of simple advice but it can also take the form of creating a solution to a prospect's particular problem, which can then be leveraged later on at scale. In the course of business development, you are constantly building a repository of knowledge and the more you do, the more tools and knowledge you have to help people. Scalability comes from a project management mindset. You can build something that can be leveraged by multiple people, it just takes a little foresight during the initial build. If you love what you do, you are constantly thinking about how you can help people which makes having the A-Ha moment much easier.   Mo asks Scott Winter: Tell us of a time when you were doing something with business development that you are really proud of. Scott was working with another firm years ago that used Interaction, and there was a big push to bring them on board as an expanded partner. It took many months and using a lot of the GrowBIG strategies to provide enough value and develop the relationship to the point where they said yes, and that client became one of Scott's favorites to work with. There was a tremendous growth in confidence for Scott, since he was not a natural salesperson, and that partnership revealed how important business development really is and how good he could be at creating valuable relationships. There are four big incremental yes's you need in order to build something together. You have to get agreement that the strategic fit is there, determine the practicality of what you're going to do, get the team and all the stakeholders on board, and then get the “yes” on the financial aspects. Accountability is a major component of Scott's approach to business development. When he works with a client, he makes himself available to them and gets invested in their success instead of just moving on to the next sale. Scott focuses on building trust and giving the client a personal commitment to see the project through. Everything about the GrowBIG Training and Snowball System is about building long-term relationships. Scott trusts in his team and his product, and that trust allows him to support his clients in their success. If you don't stand behind your client and service, you're never going to be able to sell to them again. It all comes down to trust.   Mo asks Scott Winter: If you could send a video back in time specifically on business development, what would it say? The first thing Scott would say to his younger self would be to buy as much Bitcoin as possible. Seriously though, he would try to help his younger self get past the limiting belief that sales is a bad thing. No matter who you are, you have to sell. Do what you have to do to learn that skill sooner in a way that brings you enjoyment, because it's going to serve you for the rest of your life. Do something you're passionate about, and embrace the idea of business development. If you only have deep expertise, no one will know you exist and nothing will get done. If you only know sales, you will never do anything really meaningful. When you have both you can change the world. Deep expertise gives you the foundation for building trust and confidence with a prospect that you can actually help solve their problem, and you can use that to inform your ability to communicate that well. Even now, Scott struggles with how to structure emails perfectly and doing the right amount of outreach. You don't need to be perfect, you just need to put in the work consistently and genuinely care about the prospect or client's outcome. Just like sports or any skill that you want to improve, business development takes practice.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
Why CRM, DSP, & Automation Is Only 75-80% Effective -- Quimby Melton // Confection

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 16:53


Confection's CEO and Co-Founder, Quimby Melton looks into the effectiveness of CRM, DSPs, and automation. Companies will need to heavily rely on first-party data going forward. And this means the quality and accuracy of that data is just as important as the data itself. Quimby takes a closer look at why CRM, DSPs, and automation are only 75-80% effective. Show NotesConnect With: Quimby Melton: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Sales Evangelist
3 Things Your Company Must Do To Successfully Implement Account-Based Marketing | Lisset Sanchez-Schwartz - 1509

The Sales Evangelist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 30:22


ABM (or account-based marketing) is the latest buzzword in the sales world, but how can we integrate this strategy within an existing marketing strategy? More importantly, should you? On today's episode of The Sales Evangelist, Donald is joined by the Director of Global Account-Based Marketing at ON24, Lisset Sanchez-Schwartz, to learn her approach to implementing account-based marketing campaigns successfully. Determine what ABM really means and which type you should utilize.  ABM is a cross of a full range of communications, from events to content delivery. It's segmenting customer bases into unique groups where you can apply different and specific messages. In some cases, that could even mean a 1:1 strategy. It's not a tactic or campaign type, but it's an orchestration amongst many team members to holistically approach an account. There are three ABM approaches: one-to-one, one-to-few, and one-to-many. Of course, the personalized you get, the more expensive it is to implement.  Determine if an ABM strategy will be effective. Admittedly, this should probably be a discussion before you determine the type of ABM. But remember, not every account needs an ABM strategy attached. ABM needs to be a partnership with sales. (Many places even call it ABX, because it applies to so much more than just marketing.) Lisset's pro tip: Don't try to boil the ocean. It takes money, time, and effort over a long period to see results.  Develop the infrastructure to support your ABM approach If you don't have the infrastructure to do retargeting at scale, select a handful of accounts and research. Apply an ABM strategy where it makes sense.  To determine if an account might benefit from an ABM strategy, evaluate and research. If you have a limited budget, use information from your sales team to build the most robust plan possible. If you have a larger budget, utilize third-party data to gain more information about a potential company. This is a great way to learn if a company is interested in you (or a competitor.) The more time you spend on the model, the better the backend will be How do you aggregate this information if you don't have the software to find all these data points? Hopefully, you have a CRM. The first-party data you've built up will pay dividends. Start with what you have today. Even if your data isn't the cleanest, start a 1:1 with a company you're more confident about. Lisset's final takeaway? Have the conversation and have patience. A long-term strategy might not seem successful initially, but it will pay dividends down the line with consistency. Visit ON24.com for more company information and connect with Lisset on LinkedIn to learn more. This episode is brought to you in part by Skipio. Are you sick of crickets? As a salesperson, the pain of reaching out with phone calls or emails and not receiving a response is real. But all text messaging is not created equal. 85% of people prefer text over email and phone calls because they want to engage in a conversation, not listen to bots. Be more like people and start having conversations that end in the conversions you want. Try Skipio at www.Skipio.com. This course is brought to you in part by the TSE Sales Certified Training Program, designed to help new and struggling sellers master sales fundamentals and close more deals. Help elevate your sales game and sign up now to get the first two modules free! You can visit www.thesalesevangelist.com/closemoredeals or call (561) 570-5077 for more information. We value your opinion and always want to improve the quality of our show. Complete our two-minute survey here: thesalesevangelist.com/survey. We'd love for you to join us for our next episodes by tuning in on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, or Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings for each episode you listen to!  Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore their huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day trial. Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Power Producers Podcast
Throwback: CRM 1

Power Producers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 30:41


In this throwback episode of The Power Producers Podcast, David Carothers and co-host Kyle Houck are joined by David Lefevre, Owner of SalesPWR. They discuss what CRM is all about and why people should utilize it. Episode Highlights: David Lefevre explains what a CRM is. (3:59) David Carothers shares how CRM has changed. (5:31) David Lefevre shares why marketing is one aspect of communication. (6:38) David Lefevre mentions what they're doing at Florida Risk. (7:43) David Carothers mentions the problem with AMS and CRM. (8:54) David Carothers shares which CRM people should use. (11:27) David Lefevre shares why people should utilize CRM. (16:26) Tweetable Quotes: “The more clients you have, the more you're going to forget. We all know that customer service is king. Meaning, staying on top of your customers and knowing ahead of time what their needs are.” - David Lefevre “Marketing is one aspect of communication. Agency management systems are designed around doing business for an agency. They're not intended to be marketing communication tools.” - David Lefevre “If you don't put good information in, you can't get good information out of it. The whole reason you have this is to get good information out.” - David Lefevre Resources Mentioned: David Lefevre LinkedIn SalesPWR David Carothers LinkedIn Kyle Houck LinkedIn Florida Risk Partners The Extra 2 Minutes

The Walking Dead Talk Through
FTWDTT 089 – Reclamation (S7E6)

The Walking Dead Talk Through

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 117:11


For this episode 89 of Fear the Walking Dead Talk Through, Kyle and LT talk through Season 7 Episode 6 of Fear the Walking Dead, titled Reclamation, which was written by Alex Delyle and Calaya Michelle Stallworth directed by Bille Woodruff. We also discuss The World Beyond Season 2 Episode 8, Returning Point.

Massive Agent Podcast
Do This Quick Social Media Hack Right Now

Massive Agent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 27:55


As real estate agents we understand the importance of social media  and too often we struggle with “what to post”. We grow frustrated looking for the silver bullet that will get, and keep, the attention of potential clients. But what if we are going about this all wrong? What if we make a slight adjustment in our social media content that could yield a major return on our efforts? Today on the Massive Agent Podcast host Dustin Brohm shares a simple concept we all know but may never have considered implementing. Dustin reminds us that most of us use social media for entertainment and everyone loves a good story. With that in mind perhaps, we should approach our content the very same way. He shares a few things with us in this episode like what we're doing i wrong, what we should be doing, and how to tell better stories and share your experiences. If you want to use social media to catch the attention of your audience, then this episode is a must listen.***********************Sponsored by: Follow Up Boss, the CRM of choice for agents ready to scale quickly. Massive Agent listeners get a 30 Day FREE trial (normally only 14 days!) CLICK HERE************************Recommended:Witly: the fully automated Facebook Ad management system for real estate agents and loan officers. Get a 14 day free trial HEREShop my Amazon Store: podcasting equipment, my favorite books, cool stuff for  REALTORS®, etcMassive Agent Society: Our Real Estate Lead Gen Coaching Program/online course and online courseBuzzsprout: Host your podcast with the same platform we use. Affordable, user-friendly podcast hosting for real estate agents - New users get a $20 Amazon Gift CardFollow us on Instagram*The Massive Agent Podcast is a production of the Industry Syndicate

Génération Do It Yourself
#227 - Maÿlis Staub - Pocket Result - Entreprendre et percer dans la tech à 40 ans et avec 4 enfants

Génération Do It Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 151:24


Avec Pocket Result, Maÿlis Staub a réussi là où personne ne l'imaginait. Elle cumule ce qui est malheureusement vu par trop de monde comme une suite de handicaps pour entreprendre : avoir passé 40 ans, avoir 4 enfants, être une femme ne pas avoir fait d'école prestigieuse. Aujourd'hui, Maÿlis en est à sa troisième société et elle explose les compteurs. La data, c'est sa passion et mesurer et analyser les données pour les optimiser, c'est son kiff (il faut de tout pour faire un monde). Maÿlis revient sur des termes un peu techniques comme NPS, PLV ou encore CRM qu'elle explique d'une façon si limpide que l'on comprend toute l'importance et l'étendue de son expertise. Surtout quand elle compare la data au nouvel or noir... Son courage et sa détermination à mettre du sens dans ses actions l'ont poussée à claquer la porte d'un grand opérateur télécoms. Dire adieu à une carrière tracée et un poste à responsabilités ; une prise de risque ? Elle pense le contraire. Faire bouger les lignes, traquer les a priori, maîtriser les métaphores et défricher l'univers obscur des données, autant de sujets abordés de façon ouverte et fun avec Maÿlis dans cet épisode. TIMELINE : 00:07:03 : Son parcours dans le marketing direct chez SFR 00:37:47 : Mesurer l'impact des PLV (publicité sur le lieu de vente) 01:01:12 : Son parcours dans l'entrepreneuriat et ses 3 sociétés 01:41:45 : Famille et entrepreneuriat, comment ça se passe ? 02:01:54 : Le syndicat professionnel NUMEUM On a cité avec Maÿlis Staub plusieurs anciens épisodes de GDIY : #66 Cyril Chiche - Lydia : le futur Paypal est Français, et il s'appelle Lydia. #177 - Gaspard Koenig - Philosophe - On ne naît pas libre, on le devient Maÿlis Staub vous recommande de lire : La promesse de l'aube de Romain Gary Monsieur Romain Gary de Kerwin Spire Les Grandes oubliées, pourquoi l'Histoire a effacé les femmes de Titiou Lecoq Avec Maÿlis Staub, on a parlé de : Geoffroy Roux de Bézieux Christophe Harrer, CTO de Pocket Result Sylvain Staub, CEO de Data Legal Drive Remy Bellavoine, CEO de Pocket Result Laurent Houitte et Louise, de B2B Kite summit Jimmy Gassion Cyril Garnier Sébastien Lery Cegetel, Bouygues Telecom, SFR et Orange Sales force Les cartes heuristiques ou Mind maps Aurélie Jean Planet take care Numeum Une pensée pour ma maman. Un coucou à Juliette et merci à David pour mon entrée VIP chez Orange Un poke spécial à Virginie, Aurélie, Morgane, Sabine, Christine et Christiane. La musique du générique vous plaît ? C'est à Morgan Prudhomme que je la dois ! Contactez-le sur : https://studio-module.com. Vous souhaitez sponsoriser Génération Do It Yourself ou nous proposer un partenariat ? Contactez mon label Orso Media via ce formulaire. Vous pouvez suivre Maÿlis Staub sur LinkedIn.

Máquina de Ventas
#42: 3 mantras de mentalidad para crecer en dinero y felicidad

Máquina de Ventas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 48:25


Hay tres actitudes en particular que son ESENCIALES en un buen vendedor, que además hacen que nuestros resultados crezcan exponencialmente, no solo en la ventas sino en la vida...Si quieren probar el CRM que nosotros usamos, aquí les dejamos el link (30 días gratis y después 25% OFF): bit.ly/pipedrivemaquina

No Limits Selling
Shampa Bagchi on Entrepreneurship

No Limits Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:47


Shampa Bagchi is the Founder and CEO of ConvergeHub (https://www.convergehub.com/), a powerful Customer Relationship Management software that powers business growth and has been recognized as one of the top 10 CRMs in the world by ZDNet (https://www.zdnet.com/article/best-crm/). ConvergeHub is a unified CRM platform with Sales, Marketing, Support and Billing that manages all customer data and activities and puts your business growth on autopilot. It helps you look at your customer and prospects as a whole person by giving you a complete 360 degree view throughout every stage the customer lifecycle.     Shampa lives in that intersection between technology, business and people, and is passionate about helping businesses grow quickly by utilizing technology to solve complex challenges and take ideas from concept to reality. Recognized as a leader in the small business community, Shampa counsels businesses on how to use technology to accelerate their business growth. She is also the co-founder of Corelynx (https://www.corelynx.com/), a boutique software development and technology strategy agency providing innovative business solutions to growing organizations. Shampa is the founder of the Business Growth Community on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12112856/) to help entrepreneurs and business leaders succeed by using technology as a catalyst in their business.   Contact Shampa: Website Blog LinkedIn Twitter Business Growth Community

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
253 America's Biggest Problem: The Lack of Authentic Dialogue

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:42


In this special solo episode of Christopher Lochhead - Follow Your Different, I just want to share with you an element of conversation around the most recent Kyle Rittenhouse case. What I wanted to talk about is America's biggest problem when it comes to situations like this. That is, the lack of any authentic dialogue about the matter. Too Much Yelling, Not Enough Listening Regardless on where you come out of the issue, there are some things that wasn't properly address or we didn't hear from at all. What I hoped we'd hear more was thoughtful, nuanced dialogue and conversation. Instead, what we got is what we've been getting a lot of in the United States of late, which is yelling and hardened positions. You're only pro or anti-something. As part of that, whatever one side does, if you're on that side, everything they do is right, and everything the other side does is wrong, and vice versa. I think that's really sad. Because thinking about thinking is the most important kind of thinking. And it's only through dialogue, where human beings can achieve greater levels of understanding. There was no dialogue sparked by this horrible circumstance, horrible situation around what do we as Americans want to do about protests and riots? There wasn't a discussion about that. Nor was there a discussion about self-defense, what do we mean by self-defense? Who decides where there's a line where we can no longer defend ourselves or not? “What I do know is we're not having conversation. We're not having dialogue. There's a lot of yelling, and not a lot of listening.” – Christopher Lochhead Bring Back the Willingness to Listen If you're a long-time listener of this podcast, you know that our mission has always been to celebrate real, authentic dialogue. In our case, dialogue around what it takes to design legendary business and legendary life. In hopes that we can bring back curiosity, we can bring back a willingness to listen, a willingness to co create our lives and ultimately, our culture and country together. I got to tell you: sometimes, particularly of late, it feels like we're losing that war. We might even have lost it completely, and we might never get it back. But I do know that a conversation about authentic dialogue, and why we don't have it, and how we can have more is an important thing to do, even if very few people want to participate in that. Bio Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger. He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur. Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist. In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion. He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the founding CMO of Internet consulting firm Scient, and served as head of marketing at the CRM software firm Vantive. We hope you enjoyed this episode of Follow Your Different™! Christopher loves hearing from his listeners. Feel free to email him, connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and subscribe on iTunes!

SEO Happy Hour
What you don‘t know, you don‘t know® with Harlan Schillinger: The Man in The Trenches

SEO Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 62:55


Harlan Schillinger is widely considered the Grandfather of Legal Advertising. He was the first in the legal field to produce and market television advertisements, and in his four decades of experience Harlan has worked with more than 130 law firms in over 98 markets throughout North America. In today's episode, Harlan sits down with host Alex Valencia to discuss how his unique approach to intake and conversion yields massive results for law firms.  According to Harlan, 99% of law firms' lead intake is robotic. He explains how compassion and empathy can set your firm apart and significantly increase lead conversion. Further, implementing a solid CRM is invaluable to the success of any law firm. After identifying a gap in the market, Harlan took his obsession with intake and conversion to the next level. Along with two partners, Harlan developed Lead Docket, a CRM software that helps law firms increase their net business by up to 40%. Tune into this week's episode of The We Do Marketing Hour podcast to learn how compassion during intake and a strong CRM can increase your firm's conversion rate and save you thousands of dollars on marketing.    Quotes • “But the truth of the matter is if you think that your intake is good, you're mistaken. When I say good, it's getting calls that you can convert viable personal injury cases, but then converting that into a contract.” (08:45) • “What I discovered with intake and conversion is how big that hole is.” (10:30) • “If you can convert more calls, then you'll make more money, you'll bring more clients, and you won't spend a nickel more to do it.” (11:44) • “Brand is what people think of you when you're out of the room.” (41:47) • “I suggest people talk to the public the way they would a jury because when you're talking to a jury, you're humanizing yourself.” (42:59) • “Advertising works. Shitty advertising, good advertising, it works. It's all about the message.” (46:26) • “You must have the right software to manage your practice so it can tell you what you don't know.” (46:19) • “No matter what you do in advertising people are going to go to your website. So you better be buttoned up with your website visually, mechanically, and so on. It's the absolute foundation.” (50:19)   Links For a FREE 1:1 consultation with Alex please visit: https://calendly.com/wdwc-alex/15min?month=2021-06  Link with Alex on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/wedowebcontent/   For guest speaker and topic requests, please send all inquiries to We Do Web Content's Director of Marketing Dina Davis, at contact@thewedomarketinghour.com.

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales
76: Selling to executives, selling with them, and everything in between (Kris Rudeegraap, CEO @ Sendoso)

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:01


Aside from the wonderful imagery of Armand licking stamps and packing boxes, Kris shares really creative tactics around selling when it comes to above-the-line executives.======================Four Actionable Takeaways: * Bring your executives early to accelerate the deal instead of at the end when it's too late.* Sell the vision of your deal (as the executive) before justifying the product with logic.* Avoid asking for meetings too far above the line. Instead as for a referral to the appropriate person.* Utilize the “Sent from my iPhone” subject to give a genuine feel to emails.======================Kris' Path to President's Club:* CEO and Co-Founder @ Sendoso* Writer for Forbes Technology Council======================Outreach: Efficiently and effectively engage prospects to drive more pipeline, close more deals: https://click.outreach.io/30mpc======================Gong: Improve your win rates, clone your best sellers: gong.io/30mpc======================Vidyard: Free Screen Recording and Video Creationists: https://www.vidyard.com/30mpc======================Dooly: Instantly stop your CRM suffering: https://refer.dooly.ai/30mpc-page/======================Skipio: The Sales Rep's Playbook for Texting in the Sales Process: https://www.skipio.com/30mpc======================Focus Areas: ProspectingSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Secret Sauce
TSS469 Customer Data Platform จุดชี้ขาดการตลาดยุคหุ่นยนต์

The Secret Sauce

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:48


รับชมทาง YouTube youtu.be/UbVnyEm1BAI   CRM หรือการบริหารความสัมพันธ์กับลูกค้า คือหัวใจสำคัญของการตลาดยุคใหม่ อย่างไรก็ตาม ในวันนี้ที่พฤติกรรมผู้บริโภคเปลี่ยนแปลงอยู่ตลอดเวลา การทำ CRM แบบเดิมอาจไม่เพียงพออีกต่อไป เพราะหากไม่สามารถตามลูกค้าได้ทัน ความสัมพันธ์ที่สร้างมาก็ไร้ความหมาย   เคน นครินทร์ คุยกับ ไมค์-สิรสิทธิ์ สุริยพัฒนพงศ์ ประธานกรรมการบริหารและผู้ก่อตั้ง บริษัท ช็อคโก้ คาร์ด เอ็นเตอร์ไพรส์ จำกัด หรือ ChocoCRM ถึง ‘CDP' ขั้นต่อไปของการทำ CRM ระบบบริหารความสัมพันธ์กับลูกค้าด้วยข้อมูล เทคโนโลยีการตลาดแห่งอนาคตที่คนทำธุรกิจจะตกขบวนไม่ได้เป็นอันขาด

THE STANDARD Podcast
The Secret Sauce EP.469 Customer Data Platform จุดชี้ขาดการตลาดยุคหุ่นยนต์

THE STANDARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:48


รับชมทาง YouTube https://youtu.be/UbVnyEm1BAI CRM หรือการบริหารความสัมพันธ์กับลูกค้า คือหัวใจสำคัญของการตลาดยุคใหม่ อย่างไรก็ตาม ในวันนี้ที่พฤติกรรมผู้บริโภคเปลี่ยนแปลงอยู่ตลอดเวลา การทำ CRM แบบเดิมอาจไม่เพียงพออีกต่อไป เพราะหากไม่สามารถตามลูกค้าได้ทัน ความสัมพันธ์ที่สร้างมาก็ไร้ความหมาย เคน นครินทร์ คุยกับ ไมค์-สิรสิทธิ์ สุริยพัฒนพงศ์ ประธานกรรมการบริหารและผู้ก่อตั้ง บริษัท ช็อคโก้ คาร์ด เอ็นเตอร์ไพรส์ จำกัด หรือ ChocoCRM ถึง ‘CDP' ขั้นต่อไปของการทำ CRM ระบบบริหารความสัมพันธ์กับลูกค้าด้วยข้อมูล เทคโนโลยีการตลาดแห่งอนาคตที่คนทำธุรกิจจะตกขบวนไม่ได้เป็นอันขาด

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth
DGS 146: The 6 Core Functions of Business

#DoorGrowShow - Property Management Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 18:41


Generating revenue must outpace expenses and the gap between the two is cash flow. Where are you at and what function do you need to focus on most to grow and scale your business, right now? Property management growth expert and founder/CEO of DoorGrow, Jason Hull talks about the six core functions of a business. It's a concept he has expanded based upon what he learned from his mentors, Alex Charfen and Tim Francis. You'll Learn... [01:22] Core Functions: Jason took what he learned, applied it to property management. [02:14] Rate and Rank 1-5: Assess your business through the lens of core functions. [03:16] Function #1: Lead Generation - get contact info from potential prospects. [03:39] Function #2: Nurture - take and follow-up on lead opportunities to build trust. [04:30] Function #3: Conversion/Sales - deal w/ objections, convince others, close deal. [06:36] Function #4: Delivery/Fulfillment - do property management work promised. [10:03] Function #5: Customer Lifetime Value - increase long-term retention. [11:08] Function #6: Finances - internal cash flow, revenue, expenses, and profits. Tweetables “Finances was the additional function.” “You cannot have all of these areas be great at the same time.” “Your ability to convert and convince people during the sales process is a skill that develops over time and gets better and better and better the more you do it.” Resources DoorGrow and Scale Mastermind DoorGrow on Instagram DoorGrow on YouTube DoorGrowClub DoorGrowLive Alex Charfen Tim Francis LeadSimple Profit First by Mike Michalowicz Transcript Welcome, DoorGrow hackers, to the DoorGrowShow. If you are a property management entrepreneur that wants to add doors, make a difference, increase revenue, help others impact lives, you are interested in growing your business and life, and you are open to doing things a bit differently, then you are a DoorGrow hacker. DoorGrow hackers love the opportunities, daily variety, unique challenges, and freedom that property management brings. Many in real estate think you're crazy for doing it. You think they're crazy for not because you realize that property management is the ultimate high-trust gateway to real estate deals, relationships, and residual income. At DoorGrow, we are on a mission to transform property management business and their business owners. We want to transform the industry, eliminate the BS, build awareness, change perception, expand the market, and help the best property management entrepreneurs win. I'm your host, property management growth expert, Jason Hull, the founder and CEO of DoorGrow. Now, let's get into the show. Today, I wanted to talk about what I would call the core functions. This is a concept that I built upon that I learned from one of my mentors, Alex Scharffen, and he had what he would call the five core functions of the business. To me, it felt a little bit incomplete for myself and so eventually in working with Tim Francis, another mentor and coach and friend of mine here in Austin, I realized there was something else missing because I was focusing on those five core functions, but still, financially, I had some challenges. That's why I was working with Tim. He's a really good financial coach. He's one of the financial mentors that I've worked with. Finance was the additional function. I'm going to take you through these core functions and this is a way you can assess your business. As you're listening along, feel free to assess your business through the lens of the core functions, take notes, and identify each of these core functions of the business, and rate them on a scale of one to five. One being the worst, five being it's amazing. The most important thing I think to know about the core functions of the business and recognize is that it's impossible for all six of these core functions and the six core functions to be a level five at the same time. It's impossible. You cannot have all of these areas be great at the same time. As you grow and level up the business, you're going to notice deficiencies or you're going to want to level these areas up. There are levels to each of these six areas in which you can get better and better and better over time. That being said, when something is doing really well, other things are going to feel constrained and be a challenge. The first function that we'll chat about is lead generation. I call it lead gen for short. With lead gen, this is getting contact info and there are lots of different ways you can get contact info of potential people that might be interested in property management or potential prospects. In general, that's lead generation, so go ahead and rate that. The next function that you want to focus on is nurture. This is where you take these leads, these opportunities, and you nurture them, which means you warm them up or inject more trust. You create more of a relationship to warm up these leads to move them towards the next function, so go ahead and rate your nurture. Nurture relates to follow up, it relates to your ability to warm up these leads to build trust, to build relationships, and it could relate in your business the systems and processes related to this like whether you have a sales CRM like LeadSimple or something. Whether you've got the processes built out, you've got a good sales pipeline, you've got workflow you've got follow up, maybe having a follow up assistant, or needing one relates to the nurture category. The next category is where nurture leads them to, which is conversion or sales. This is where you're closing the deal. Number three, conversion or sales. Go ahead and rate your ability in conversion or sales. This is to deal with objections, close the deal, convince them to work with you instead of the other company they're maybe talking to or the other companies they're vetting. Your ability to convert and convince people during the sales process is a skill that develops over time and gets better and better and better the more you do it. Go ahead and rate yourself there. These first three relate basically to the front end of the business or sales. What I will hear a lot is people say, oh, my close rate, I'm like 90%. I'm a badass at sales, but then you ask them, where are you getting your leads? And they're like, they're mostly referrals, they're referrals. Cool. If you have a close rate less than 90% probably and they're warm hot referrals, you probably have a problem. That's the cool thing. If you get the right type of lead generation, nurture almost becomes unnecessary. You don't really have to warm them up. Then conversion also is largely dealt with because you're going to get the deal, you just don't screw it up. Now, when you start dealing with colder leads and colder prospects, my goal with clients is to make sure that you are a badass at conversion or sales and that you notice if that function feels weak right now because you've started maybe focusing on colder leads, or you're just not closing as many of the conversations that you've been prospecting or working with as you want. Maybe that function is weak. We can improve that significantly. One of the easiest ways to collapse time on these first three functions is to just focus on warmer lead opportunities instead of advertising or cold lead opportunities. Cold leads would be like SEO, PayPerClick, content marketing, social media marketing, pay per lead services like [...] et cetera. Those take a lot more time and I've talked about that in other trainings and other podcasts, I'm sure many times. Number four, this is more shifting into the back end of the business or behind the paywall. Once they've converted into a customer, they've signed the contract, they're now a client. The next step, item four, would be delivery or fulfillment. Delivery, fulfillment largely is connected to operations. This is everything that you said you were going to do during the sales process. This is screening tenants, working to find tenants and tenant placement. This is maintenance, coordination, everything. All the work of doing property management. That is what is included in delivery fulfillment—dealing with tenants, all that kind of stuff. Generate reports, owner payouts, all of this that's all under delivery fulfillment operations. What I'll notice a lot in the industry—for those that are struggling to grow—is they won't have operations delivery fulfillment. They'll have number four out of five or a really high level and yet then lead gen is like a one. If lead gen is one and delivery and fulfillment is like a five, you're making a big mistake in the business because what that tells me is you consistently keep focusing on the wrong things in your business. You're doing the wrong things. Any function that you're focused on of these six functions, which we'll finish and go through in a second, any function you're focused on primarily and trying to maintain it to five, that is not your weakest function. That's where your time, energy, focus, attention, cash, effort, et cetera are going, you are making a mistake. That means you are distracted. Those are distractions because what the business needs most right now is whichever of these functions is weakest, that's where your five currencies I talked about time, energy, focus, cash, and effort should be focused on. This is where all that should be going so that you can get a return and you can level that up. The goal is to level up the weakest function, and then if that's now a strength, now your other functions will appear to be weaker in relation. Now those you're going to rate at a lower level and you're going to want to level those up. This is the juggle of running a company and running a business is figuring out what do I need to focus on most right now. If you are at the helm, you are the entrepreneur, you are the leader, you are the business owner, you need to provide this leadership to the business to your team. You need to help them figure out what is our weakest function to focus on. Too often, the business owners continue to focus on the function that they're already good at, that the business already has at a five, and they try to keep it as a five. You have to be willing to let a five slip in order to get something from a one or a two, and that's okay. Get those up to a three, a four, or maybe even a five. If delivery or fulfillment, for example, operation slips to maybe a three in relation because now you're getting so much business, it's uncomfortable, you can't onboard everybody, and things are starting to slip, cool. Now it's time to shift your attention and focus to that function. If you assess this regularly on a quarterly basis and brainstorm with your team through these functions, you will be able to make really good decision-making. The next function after delivery fulfillment or operations, number five, is the customer's lifetime value. The customer lifetime value or CLV includes retention, it includes resell, it includes upsell, and it includes your pricing. You want to make sure that your fee structure is good. That you've got really good fees in place so you're getting paid really well for what you do. That you're maximizing the lifetime value of these clients in that way. Also, you're able to focus on the right types of clients in your lead generation and in closing that are going to have a lengthy retention rate. You're able to retain clients long term, or you're able to convert short term property management clients, not sure short term rentals, but accidental investors, for example, into long term buy and hold investors. You have some process maybe for that. You want to increase the customer lifetime value. If you're losing a lot of customers due to sales right now, then that's the area to focus on right now. There's a weakness maybe on your CLV, for example, or maybe you just need to increase lead generation in order to counteract that. Number six is finances. The financial area of the business means the internal finances for you as the business owner and for the business. This means cash flow, revenue, expenses, profit, reporting, financial decision making. If you do not feel like this is your strength or this is a weakness in the business, this is something that you will need to work on. One of the initial baby steps I like to recommend is usually implementing profit first. You can check out my previous episode with the author of the book Profit First, Mike Michalowicz. You can just search for Profit First DoorGrowShow on YouTube if you want to pull that up or on iTunes, podcast app, or whatever. I'm a big fan of Profit First. We operate with the Profit First system. We've taken things financially beyond that to another level in working with some of the financial coaches and financial books that I've gone through. I think that's a really fantastic starting place. It gets you out of the feast and famine of cash flow cycles getting scarce, then trying to make money, and the hunt and the chase constantly of trying to escape. The way I like to compare finances is, the analogy I like to use is Indiana Jones. Indiana Jones running from the boulder. Everybody remembers this iconic scene in Indiana Jones and I believe the Temple of Doom and he's running from the boulder. He's just taken the statue, it set some sort of booby trap off, and now this boulder is chasing after him. He's running for his life. Indiana Jones running is generating revenue, that's revenue. Revenue has to outpace that big boulder, which is expenses. The gap in between Indiana Jones running and the boulder coming after him, that gap, is cash flow. Some of that cash is already spent so there's really just free cash is the real gap. Some of that cash is already going to be spent, you know expenses are coming due, you have to have it set aside. Profit first is going to help you kind of get this in alignment a little bit more. It's going to help you get better cash flow and it's basic. Some of you are basically borderline accountants, so this isn't maybe as big of an issue. Maybe the finances are tight. A lot of entrepreneurs are more visionary-oriented, they're dreamers. Sometimes they're hiring staff too quickly. They're starting to focus on some of the other functions, building up operations maybe, and they're spending more money. All of these things go hand in hand. Finances also relate to the type of lead generation that you can do, all of these things interplay with each other. My goal for those listening to this episode is to take a look through these six lenses of your business to figure out what does the business need most right now? What does the business need most? For those that are like why does he add the six functions of finances? One of the things that's absolutely possible in some businesses is to generate enough deals, enough sales, and enough business to where you can't deliver quick enough on it to get the return or get paid on it and you can actually run out of money by doing too much sales. Just focusing on revenue all the time in a top-down just revenue focus goal is not always the most effective financial goal in a business. It's the most typical, but that's not always the most effective. You can actually go too fast and grow too quickly if you're not taking into account the financial aspect in relation to the other core functions. Take a look at your business, chat with your team, go through and assess your core functions. We have a more formal brainstorming methodology that will take clients through these functions to really assess their business. At a quick easy glance at your business, you can look through and just ask yourself, where are we at in relation to these functions. You can ask your team as well to get a perspective, and you will then have some pretty good eye feedback and a pretty good idea of which function you need to focus on most in your business. If you find that operations are a big constraint for you right now, what you'll find then is lead gen and conversion will be heavily impacted because you won't really have confidence in your product, in your service, in your offering because you lack integrity. If you are delivering fulfillment of three or less, and you're trying to go out and create new business, you probably feel like you're lying to people by saying, hey, we're really awesome. We're the best property managers. We do a great job. When deep down you're like a two in doing a great job on a scale of one to five. All of these impact each other. Let's figure out what's your weakest function that you need to focus on right now and where does your attention needs to go. If you could use some coaching or some help, we'd love to get you into our DoorGrow & Scale Mastermind. Reach out to us, you can check us out at doorgrow.com. You can also join our free Facebook group by going to doorgrowclub.com. Facebook's getting a little weird lately with censorship and craziness, so we're seriously considering exploring, shifting out of the DoorGrow Club to maybe Telegram or something else. Let me know your feedback on that if that sounds interesting because I think there's going to be more outages with Facebook, more censorship, and more challenges. I'm less and less of a fan of Facebook every day. Let us know, but currently, our internal groups are in Telegram so we're solid there because it seems to be really reliable. Anyway, reach out to us. We're happy to help you figure out how to grow your business and scale your business. We can help you with getting things in alignment on the operation side. DoorGrow OS, building these systems, building a planning cadence, helping to get operators in the business, helping to get people to take stuff off your plate and to offload. There are solutions for each of these functions that we can point you towards as we coach you and as we help you scale and level up your business, so please reach out. That's it for today. As always, my goal is for everybody to grow. To our mutual growth, everybody. Until next time, bye.

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

Sales Success Stories
Tune & See with Revenue Grid's Vlad Voskresensky

Sales Success Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:45


Vlad Voskresensky is the co-founder and CEO of Revenue Grid, a leading AI Guided Selling Platform that nudges sales teams with step-by-step guidance towards actions that bring the best results, shows deals at risk, and prioritizes tactics with the greatest impact. Vlad has been driving the product vision and leading the company's technology direction for over a decade, reinforced with more than 20 years of deep expertise in connecting enterprise (CRM systems) and personal environments.

The Building Community Podcast
Episode 5: Innovating The Future

The Building Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 29:01


Anne Young is the Director for Community Strategy and Engagement at Salesforce.org, a cloud-based software company that builds CRM technology.Their online community is the “Power of Us Hub,” and was launched in 2013. Today, their community counts 35,000 “Trailblazers or Hubbers”. In this episode, Anne speaks about why community is and will be an essential aspect of innovative organizations. And she gives insight into how Salesforce.org engages its community members with traditional and innovative approaches.Listen in to MAKE YOUR COMMUNITIES THRIVE.Want to know more?Get in touch! With Thrycon & Simone: Website: https://www.thrycon.com/connect-thrycon LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/poetscher/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvNFK7wPwGof4egGHzOp6qQ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/Thrycon/ With our guest Anne: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/annetraegeryoung/ For more, subscribe to Thrycon's newsletter: https://www.thrycon.com/signup Please leave a review on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-building-community-podcast/id1592179621

Dreams to Plans Podcast
Making Systems Less Stressful For Your Small Business with Jen Lawrence

Dreams to Plans Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:00


We all know you need to have systems in your small business, but what the heck does that even mean?! And what about hearing the word “system” makes you instantly overwhelmed and stressed out? It might be because you're trying to do it another person's way. Today, we've brought in Jen Lawrence, a systems freaking expert who LOVES to talk about this stuff. But the cool part is, she makes systems for YOU - not what everyone thinks you should be doing! If you're overwhelmed with the thought of creating a system, using a task management system, and wondering what the hell a CRM is, then tune into this episode and watch your mind be blown! Jen Lawrence is a productivity and systems expert passionate about creating ease through systems. Through highly customized consulting services, she helps entrepreneurs and ambitious leaders develop strategic operations solutions to create a way of working that works for them. Jen's instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jenerositypartners/ Jens website: https://jenerositypartners.com/ A special thank you to this month's podcast sponsor Attaliah Strubel! Attaliah teaches business owners how to leverage Instagram Reels to grow their business and created the The Reel Course For Real Growth to help you get your Instagram Reels poppin' to-day! Use code DREAMER to get $100 of your course today!! attaliahstrubel.com/the-reel-course/  Attaliah's instagram: https://www.instagram.com/attaliahstrubel/ Atttaliah's website: https://attaliahstrubel.com/   www.dreamstoplanspodcast.com

Hiring and Empowering Solutions
127: Results Driven Data Literacy with Matt Cowell

Hiring and Empowering Solutions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 41:31


This episode is not about your CRM. It's about creating a culture of data literacy within your law firm, from the C-Suite down to the receptionist. Everyone in your organization should understand the importance of getting good data. There is a transformation happening in the corporate world. We are quickly reaching the point where data literacy and skills are no longer optional. Matt Cowell, CEO of Quanthub, shares his insight on how we can up-skill our data literacy. He also takes the overwhelm out of where and how to begin if you haven't started yet. The ultimate goal of creating a data literacy transformation within your law firms is that the owner isn't the only one asking questions about data. It becomes layers deep in the organization where everyone contributes to making data-driven decisions because that's just how the organization operates. Now everyone's asking questions and answering these questions with the data that they have available. Then the organization's efficiency and operations continue to rise because everyone is starting to become interested in why things are happening. Many business owners are embarrassed when they don't know their numbers. They are often overwhelmed and don't know where to start. Data literacy begins with curiosity. Pick an area of your practice and start asking questions. Data itself is not all that valuable. The value is in the insights that come from the data. What are you going to do with the data? What changes will you make based on the data? When you get insightful and deeply curious, then you start knowing the powerful questions to ask. This will help you make better decisions. What You Will Learn How to get your team proficient in managing data Who needs to understand data literacy in your firm Why your front of house team needs to understand the importance of data quality Where to start gathering data How to create a data-driven culture How to avoid data overwhelm Connect with Matt Cowell https://quanthub.com/ Matt@quanthub.com Connect with Molly Hiring & Empowering Solutions on Facebook www.hiringandempowering.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/molly-hall

The Talking Dead - A podcast dedicated to the AMC TV series The Walking Dead
The Talking Dead #561: TWD: World Beyond s2e8 “Returning Point”, Fear The Walking Dead s7e6 “Reclamation”

The Talking Dead - A podcast dedicated to the AMC TV series The Walking Dead

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 120:44


On Fear The Walking Dead Al tries to avoid the CRM as she goes after Isabelle, while Morgan and Grace try to convince her to come back to the sub. On World Beyond, The Bennett family execute their escape plan with Jadis not far behind. Time Stamps5:21 - TWD:WB s02e08, "Returning Point"54:48 - FTWD s07e06, "Reclamation" --Please send us your comments, thoughts and feedback! Email us at talkingdeadpodcast@gmail.com, or post comments below. You can follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/talkingdead, or leave us a voice message by clicking the "Send Voicemail" link in the header. Support the show by donating via PayPal, or by becoming a Patron.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Demand Planning in VUCA Times with Ali Raza

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 42:54


Demand Planning in VUCA Times with Ali Raza Ali Raza and Joe Lynch discuss demand planning in VUCA times. Ali is the Founder and CEO of Throughput, where he and his team help companies realize greater output and free cash flow. About Ali Raza Ali Raza is the Founder and CEO of Throughput, Inc., an AI-Powered software to help companies run leaner, faster, smoother, and safer operations out of the box. Ali comes from a deep academic and real-world industrial operations in process simulations and operations management. He has managed onshore/offshore/war zone logistics as well as batch, continuous, and discrete manufacturing setups. At Schlumberger, he became one of the youngest Geomarket Production Services, pioneering 3 projects and serving 50+ industrial clients. His production teams were responsible for billions of dollars of hydrocarbon output to the global economy. Ali joined his first tech startup while still an undergraduate student at the University of Pennsylvania. Since then, he has been eliminating one global bottleneck after another, with his current focus on optimizing supply chains that extend to Mars. About ThroughPut, Inc. ThroughPut Inc. is the Artificial Intelligence (AI) Supply Chain pioneer that enables companies to optimize their Operations by leveraging their existing Data Systems to increase Output, Quality and Profitability across their entire enterprise. ThroughPut's AI software, ELI, includes the only Bottleneck Management System (BMS) that utilizes existing enterprise data systems, such as ERP, MES, IMS, TMS, WMS, PLC, EAM, POS, CRM, SCADA, Historian, and other data systems, to solve for the $25 Trillion of annual Waste across global supply chains already today. Such constraints to the $90 Trillion global Economy could otherwise be dedicated to more productive, useful and sustainable purposes for the benefit of all stakeholders and communities. ThroughPut's AI software is designed by Fortune 500 Supply Chain & Logistics leaders, Silicon Valley AI and Analytics pioneers, and top global Operations Experts in the areas of the Theory of Constraints, Lean Manufacturing, Supply Chain Automation, Total Quality Management, and over four-dozen other leading best practices now digitized as part of the ELI software, with hundreds of years of hands-on experience in the space. Key Takeaways: Demand Planning in VUCA Times Ali Raza is the Founder and CEO of Throughput, where he and his team help companies realize greater output and free cash flow. This episode is actually a webinar hosted by Joe Lynch, featuring Ali Raza discussing demand planning in VUCA times. Demand planning is a supply chain management process that enables a company to project future demand and successfully customize company output — be it toilet paper, laptops or truck capacity — according to those projections. The demand planning process typically involves: Collecting, organizing and preparing data Creating a preliminary forecast Integrating market data Reconciling bottom-up and top-down forecasts Creating a final forecast Using analytics to monitor forecast vs actual and adjust accordingly Demand planning is never easy, but in VUCA times, it becomes practically impossible because the demand and capacity signals are subject to Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity (VUCA). In the webinar, Ali Raza, Founder and CEO of ThroughPut explains how demand sensing with real-time intelligence can be used to create better demand forecasts. With demand sensing, companies can easily predict near-future demand patterns to streamline the flow of materials, processes, output, and free cash flow across your integrated supply chain. Regardless of whether you sell trucking services, or tomatoes, there is a better way to predict demand and then reorient capacity accordingly. To optimize demand planning, companies need to utilize demand sensing will: Harmonize the right product-mix to extract greater profits Optimize replenishment and distribution targets to create a perfect pull system Achieve accurate inventory availability across locations with predicted customer demand Throughput's Demand Sensing module enables Demand Planners, S&OP Professionals and Supply Chain Managers to rapidly free up existing manufacturing capacity, gain additional throughput potential, create concrete productivity gains and boost financial impact amidst ever-growing supply and demand uncertainty.   Learn More About Demand Planning in VUCA Times Ali Raza ThroughPut Inc  Throughput Economics: Making Good Management Decisions Putting Supply Chains on Autopilot with Ali Raza The New Retail Paradigm with Ali Raza Supply Chain: Cash or Trash with Seth Page The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

The Flip Empire Show
EP572: Making Profit A Habit

The Flip Empire Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 47:39


If you're looking to implement a system that can get 7 figures into your bank account, this episode is going to blow your mind. Listen in as David Richter shares everything you need to know about the Profit First system, including to whom this method is for and an exercise that will help you save up thousands of dollars in expenses.     KEY TAKEAWAYS The biggest mistakes people make with their business The right formula to calculate your profits Percentage of your income you should transfer to your profits An exercise to make your transactions and team more efficient Why you need to turn your profits into a habit in your business     RESOURCES/LINKS MENTIONED Profit first by David Richter Rich dad poor dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki The richest man in Babylon by George S. Clason     ABOUT DAVID RICHTER David Richter is an active real estate investor who has been essential in closing over 850 deals which include wholesale, turnkey, BRRRR, owner finance, rentals, lease options, and any other exit strategy you can think of. While growing and building a real estate business from 5 deals a month to over 25 deals a month, he realized that as much money was coming in, it was going right out. With the unique opportunity of being in every seat as a real estate investor, he found a calling to the company's finance seat to help them see where their money was really going. David has helped real estate companies completely turn around from going out of business to building cash reserves through his profit advising company Simple CFO Solutions, LLC. He is the author of Profit First for Real Estate Investing.      CONNECT WITH DAVID Website: www.simplecfosolutions.com Facebook: Simple CFO Solutions LinkedIn: Simple CFO Solutions     TWEETABLEW “When you implement a system into your business, it has to work for you, not the other way around.” - Alex Pardo “The ultimate goal is to have control over your money and make profit a habit.” - David Richter   ASCEND Don't Wait To Enjoy Your Life, Tomorrow, Live It Today! How To Grow Your Business, Expand Your Impact, and Experience Your Perfect Life:

The Law Entrepreneur
293. The Art of Email Marketing with Kelsey Johnson

The Law Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 50:12


Starting your own practice isn't something they teach in law school. Join me as I sit down with legal professionals to hear firsthand accounts of just how they did it.  Today, my guest is Kelsey Johnson. Kelsey is the product manager for AWeber, which is an email marketing platform that quite frankly, I use and have used for years and years. Aweber is a perfect platform and they have enough robust capabilities and complexities, and technical skills that you can grow with that platform to do just about anything little that a smaller solo or small firm practitioner would ever want of their email platform. It is a delightful conversation with Kelsey, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.   In this episode, Neil and Kelsey discuss: The value of having a platform, such as AWeber, for email marketing to small and solo law firms.  The benefits of email marketing, not just utilizing social media for your marketing.  Email marketing beyond the monthly newsletter.  Unique opportunities to build relationships with marketing.  Key Takeaways: Email marketing is like a QR code - it has been around for decades, but it isn't going to go anywhere. There is value in owning your audience.  Each person you communicate with holds enormous potential value. The communication and connection is what makes the biggest difference in your email list.  There are benefits to having landing pages that aren't just your website's homepage, in part because they can be directly built for your target audience.  You can learn from your competitors and how they market and apply those lessons (without plagiarizing) in your own marketing.  "That's really the best way that you do marketing, is by trying to reach everybody on the platform that they prefer." —  Kelsey Johnson Resources: Try AWeber today!  https://www.aweber.com/ (https://www.aweber.com/) Email: kelseyj@aweber.com  Twitter: https://twitter.com/KelseyColorado (https://twitter.com/KelseyColorado)  If you've enjoyed the podcast, http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1086406592 (please head to Apple Podcasts and leave a rating & review for the show)! It only takes a moment, and really helps me to reach new listeners. You can also http://www.thelawentrepreneur.com/ (head to the website at TheLawEntrepreneur.com) for more information on the podcast and my legal services.   --   Thank you to our sponsors! https://confirm.spotlightbranding.com/tle/ (Spotlight Branding) - A legal marketing company that works with solo and small law firms to increase referrals. Go to https://confirm.spotlightbranding.com/tle/ (spotlightbranding.com/TLE) for a better way to market your law practice. http://callruby.com/lawentrepreneur (Ruby Receptionist) - Virtual receptionist & live call services that will help you grow your office (and save money), one call at a time - to learn more, go to http://callruby.com/lawentrepreneur (callruby.com/lawentrepreneur) or call 844.895.7829 https://www.marketcircle.com/ (Daylite) - The all-in-one contact relationship manager. If you feel like it's time to upgrade from spreadsheets to a CRM, visit https://www.marketcircle.com/ (marketcircle.com) and get your first month free when you mention Law Entrepreneur.

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition
Scott Winter on Business Development – Time To Get Great At Business Development

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:12


Mo asks Scott Winter: When was the moment that you realized that business development was great? Scott started his career off in sales with LexisNexis and that developed into a role in consulting. Eventually he made the switch to a product management position with Interaction where he focused on CRM and client relationships. Interaction is the world's largest CRM system for law firms and by coming up in that environment, Scott learned a lot about the technical aspects of the software which helped him better serve his clients. Scott had the typical mindset about sales in college that most people have, but he reframed his perspective after getting some actual experience in sales positions. The one key moment when Scott realized that business development was a powerful tool for growth was after having a simple conversation with someone on a plan. Just listening carefully and remembering what he learned blew that person away when they met again many months later. Scott has a knack for having a conversation on any subject and being able to find a point of connection. He also tends to add notes in his phone of a particularly interesting detail (powerlifting, ironman training, etc.) and makes use of his CRM to keep track of everything. Remembering details about someone is an art and a science, but there are tools you can use to make it easier.     Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com scott@index.io Scott Winter on LinkedIn

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast
Day 5 - Deal Fast Track Challenge

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 79:05


Day 5 of the “Deal Fast Track Challenge”! Today we are talking about following up with old leads and partnering on deals. The week has gone by so fast and the 5-day challenge is at an end! We've been hearing massive results from our challengers and it's blowing our minds! Some of them have as much as 26 leads from doing this challenge and following through with our daily homework. They are getting excited and it's understandable because going from zero to a lot of leads in 5 days is a huge step forward. Now, what do you do with those leads? We covered that today and we talked about the fastest way to do a deal. And that is….drum roll...to follow up on old deals! Some of these leads will close to a deal while some of them will be a “No”. But, those nos doesn't mean they won't ever want to sell. That just means they're not ready right now. What do you do with those? You save them for later, you follow up and then that glorious day when these nos are ready to accept your offer will come. So many of you right now are sitting on a gold mine of old leads and you don't know what to do with them. You have two options: you either follow on those old leads or bring that someone who's already doing deals and partner with them on those leads. It's all about getting on the phone and following up. Call at least 10 of your old leads who didn't respond to your text or email and follow up with at least 10 of those deals who did respond but never closed a deal. You don't have to do everything. You can hire a VA to do the calling and texting for you. We did 58 deals in 1 year and after looking closely at our CRM, 54 of those deals are from follow-ups! Can you believe that? You can do this too. All you need to do is understand that the gold mine is in the follow-ups, get on the phone and take action!What's Inside: —The fastest way to a deal.—It's all about the follow-up. —Why partnering with someone who's already doing deals works.—Follow-ups are a gold mine for deals.