Podcasts about James Baldwin

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American writer

  • 1,257PODCASTS
  • 1,793EPISODES
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  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
James Baldwin

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Best podcasts about James Baldwin

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Latest podcast episodes about James Baldwin

New Books in African American Studies
72 Caryl Phillips Speaks with Corina Stan

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 49:59


Our second January Novel Dialogue conversation is with Caryl Phillips, professor of English at Yale and world-renowned for novels ranging from The Final Passage to 2018's A View of the Empire at Sunset. He shares his thoughts on transplantation, on performance, on race, even on sports. Joining him here are John and the wonderful comparatist Corina Stan, author of The Art of Distances: Ethical Thinking in 20th century Literature. If you enjoy this conversation, range backwards through the RtB archives for comparable talks with Jennifer Egan, Helen Garner, Orhan Pamuk, Zadie Smith, Samuel Delany and many more. It's a rangy conversation. John begins by raving about Caryl's italics–he in turn praises Faulkner's. Corina and Caryl explore his debt (cf. his The European Tribe) to American writers like Richard Wright and James Baldwin. Meeting Baldwin was scary–back in those days before there were “writers besporting themselves on every university campus.” Caryl praises the joy of being a football fan (Leeds United), reflects on his abiding loyalty to his class and geographic origins and his fondness for the moments of Sunday joy that allow people to endure. John raises Orhan Pamuk's claim (In Novel Dialogue last season) that the novel is innately middle-class; Caryl says that it's true that as a form it has always taken time and money to make–and to read. But “vicars and middle class people fall in love, too; they get betrayed and let down…a gamut of emotion that's as wide as anybody else.” He remains drawn to writers haunted by the past: Eliot, W.G. Sebald, the huge influence of Faulkner trying to stitch the past to the present. Mentioned in the Episode James Baldwin, Blues for Mister Charley, The Fire Next Time Richard Wright, Native Son Johnny Pitts, Afropean Caryl Phillips, Dancing in the Dark J. M. Coetzee, “What We like to Forget” (On Caryl Phillips) Graham Greene (e.g Brighton Rock and The Quiet American) wrote in “The Lost Childhood” (1951) that at age 14 ” I took Miss Marjorie Bowen's The Viper of Milan from the library shelf…From that moment I began to write.” Maya Angelou, Letter to My Daughter William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom Read a transcript here Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

TED Talks Daily
How moms shape the world | Anna Malaika Tubbs

TED Talks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:21


Mothers undeniably impact and shape history -- but their stories are often left out or misrepresented, says sociologist and author Anna Malaika Tubbs. This erasure limits policies to support mothers and their essential roles in society. Citing the remarkable lives of Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin (the mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin, respectively), Tubbs emphasizes the need to shift the perspective on motherhood at a cultural level -- to better reflect the presence, power and influence of moms as our first leaders, caretakers and teachers. "Would the world be different today if we had been telling their stories all along?" she asks.

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson
Dr. Joseph Evans on The Polished King

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 40:57


Dr. Joseph Evans is the Dean of the Morehouse School of Religion and author of his latest book, “The Polished King: Living Words of Martin Luther King Jr.” He joins the show to discuss that book, his motivations for writing it and the title its been given, and James Baldwin, who considered Dr. King to be a “polished preacher,” is interwoven as we come to understand the power of King's words and faith. BUY the book here: https://www.judsonpress.com/Products/J301/the-polished-king.aspx Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The California Report Magazine
Remembering the Rainbow Sign: From Baldwin to Simone, the Short But Powerful Reign of Berkeley's 1970s Black Cultural Center

The California Report Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 29:48


Today, it's an unassuming beige building on a busy Berkeley street. But in the 1970s, the Rainbow Sign was a groundbreaking center for Black culture, politics, and art. It hosted dozens of high-profile Black thought leaders and performers, including James Baldwin, Nina Simone, Maya Angelou, and Shirley Chisholm. The Rainbow Sign was open to all – as a performance venue, political organizing space, and cafe. It lasted just a few short years, from 1971-1977. But it left profound mark on the young people who attended concerts and performances there, including Vice President Kamala Harris.

The Creative Nonfiction Podcast with Brendan O'Meara
Episode 295: Wil Haygood Talks 'Colorization,' Black Films in a White World, and Meeting James Baldwin

The Creative Nonfiction Podcast with Brendan O'Meara

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 66:20


Wil Haygood is the author of nine books. His latest is Colorization: 100 Years of Black Films in a White World (Knopf, 2021). This conversation was part of a live series for Goucher College's MFA in Creative Nonfiction. Sponsor: West Virginia Wesleyan College's MFA in Creative Writing. Support: Patreon.com/cnfpod Social Media: @CNFPod Show notes and newsletter: brendanomeara.com

In The Thick
The Achilles Heel of Democracy

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 34:20


Maria and Julio are joined by Jelani Cobb, staff writer at the New Yorker and co-editor of the new book “The Matter of Black Lives: Writing from the New Yorker.” They reflect on the history and legacy of the Black Lives Matter movement. They also unpack the latest in attacks on voting rights in the lead up to the midterm elections, and the state of U.S. democracy as we approach the one year anniversary of the Jan. 6 insurrection.ITT Staff Picks:As we approach the 10-year mark since the murder of Trayvon Martin, we're sharing Jelani Cobb's first piece in The New Yorker about his death and its aftermath.In his 1962 essay printed in The New Yorker, James Baldwin writes about growing up in Harlem, his experiences with racism, Black people's struggles in the United States and the myths that white Americans cling to. “America's political system is broken, seemingly beyond its normal capacity to repair,” writes senior correspondent Zack Beauchamp in this piece for Vox.Photo credit: AP Photo/Ashley Landis, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TED Talks Daily (HD video)
How moms shape the world | Anna Malaika Tubbs

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 12:21


Mothers undeniably impact and shape history -- but their stories are often left out or misrepresented, says sociologist and author Anna Malaika Tubbs. This erasure limits policies to support mothers and their essential roles in society. Citing the remarkable lives of Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin (the mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin, respectively), Tubbs emphasizes the need to shift the perspective on motherhood at a cultural level -- to better reflect the presence, power and influence of moms as our first leaders, caretakers and teachers. "Would the world be different today if we had been telling their stories all along?" she asks.

TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How moms shape the world | Anna Malaika Tubbs

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 12:21


Mothers undeniably impact and shape history -- but their stories are often left out or misrepresented, says sociologist and author Anna Malaika Tubbs. This erasure limits policies to support mothers and their essential roles in society. Citing the remarkable lives of Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin (the mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin, respectively), Tubbs emphasizes the need to shift the perspective on motherhood at a cultural level -- to better reflect the presence, power and influence of moms as our first leaders, caretakers and teachers. "Would the world be different today if we had been telling their stories all along?" she asks.

TED Talks Kids and Family
How moms shape the world | Anna Malaika Tubbs

TED Talks Kids and Family

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 12:21


Mothers undeniably impact and shape history -- but their stories are often left out or misrepresented, says sociologist and author Anna Malaika Tubbs. This erasure limits policies to support mothers and their essential roles in society. Citing the remarkable lives of Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin (the mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin, respectively), Tubbs emphasizes the need to shift the perspective on motherhood at a cultural level -- to better reflect the presence, power and influence of moms as our first leaders, caretakers and teachers. "Would the world be different today if we had been telling their stories all along?" she asks.

The United States of Anxiety
Lynn Nottage: Unexpected Optimist

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 51:05


Two-time Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Lynn Nottage (Ruined, Sweat, Clyde's) breaks down her remarkable career and shares how, as an optimist at heart, she finds the light and resilience in unexpected stories. Plus, she tells host Kai Wright about her hopes for the future of theater and her interest in making the medium accessible and meeting people where they are. Companion listening for this episode: Can America Be Redeemed? (7/5/2021) Eddie Glaude and Imani Perry consider the question through the work of James Baldwin and Richard Wright. Plus: How our country could enter a period of “post-traumatic growth.” "The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.    We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 194:00


Listen to the Sun. Jan. 2, 2022 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. This is our second program for the year and we will provide information on the PANW for our listeners and readers. In the second hour we continue our focus on African American literary icons Langston Hughes and James Baldwin with interviews, poetry and discussion on their contributions to the struggle for liberation and social justice. Finally, we review some of the most important issues impacting the African continent today. 

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Jan. 1, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features a PANW report with dispatches on the homecoming sponsored by the Ethiopian government to build support for the country under attack by western-backed elements; Sudanese media outlets were raided by security forces in an attempt to intimidate journalists covering the mass democratic movement; eight Malian soldiers were killed in an ambush in the north of the West African state; and people are still being displaced in northern Mozambique due to the insurgency. In the second hour we look back on the literary efforts of key African American icons including Lorraine Hansberry, Langston Hughes and James Baldwin. Finally, we review some of the most important and pressing issues taking place on the African continent.

KUCI: Film School
The Sleeping Negro / Film School Radio interview with Director Skinner Myers

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


Skinner Myers' debut feature film THE SLEEPING NEGRO Confronted with a series of racially charged incidents, a young black man must overcome rage, alienation, and hopelessness in order to find his own humanity. The young black man, simply identified as “Man,” must resolve the personal meaning of his blackness when his white boss orders him to commit fraud to benefit the corporation. Struggling with an overwhelming sense of shame for going through with the illegal demand, Man seeks consolation by discussing his unease with a black former friend and his white fiancé. In the aftermath of these confusing, frustrating and maddening interactions, Man realizes he's been looking at his life through the wrong lens. Following on the footsteps of the LA Rebellion filmmakers, Charles Burnett (The Killer of Sheep) and Billy Woodberry (Bless Their Little Hearts), director Skinner Myers tells a very personal and intimate Black story in a radically non-traditional cinematic style as a means to express freely his feelings as a Black man in America. Director, co-producer, writer and lead actor Skinner Myers joins us for a conversation on the production challenges of a filming in Los Angeles on a micro-budget, juggling the responsibilities in front and behind the camera and the significance of author / provocateur James Baldwin. For news and updates go to: thesleepingnegro.com For more go to: skinnermyers.com

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp
S2E99A - REPRISE: Ed Kale - Freedom Rider in the 60s Civil Rights Movement

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 54:06


This holiday week - a SPECIAL REBROADCAST from October 2020: one of Ken's all-time favorites. Ken met this remarkable octogenarian while Kayaking on Lake Superior.  Ed Kale, M.Div., 1963  professional kayaker, was a student at Yale Divinity School in 1961 when a generous professor funded his participation in a Freedom Ride to Jackson, MS. He was arrested, put in jail along with other men and women, black and white. Because the jails were full, he and the others (including the famed William Sloan Coffin), were transferred to the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman. Ken met Ed while kayaking on Lake Superior - and then met at the historic Old Rittenhouse Inn in Bayfield, WI for an interview. They talked about their experience as seminarians, and then Ed's journey which includes his friendship with James Farmer (the civil rights champion who organized the Freedom Rides), Carol Ruth Silver (author and fellow Freedom Rider), and the incomparable author and philosopher James Baldwin. Learn more about Ed Kale in our SHOW NOTES. From SEASON 1, Episode 42: OCTOBER 2020Become a Patron www.patreon.com/beachedwhitemaleSupport the show (http://thebeachedwhitemale.com)

The Bible as Literature
The Rejection of Yahweh

The Bible as Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:34


“A mob,” James Baldwin wrote, “is not autonomous: it executes the real will of the people who rule the state. The slaughter in Birmingham, Alabama, for example, was not merely the action of a mob.” (Baldwin, Dark Days)The crowds in Matthew choose their champion because Pilate demands victory. Pilate, in turn, wants what the people want because, like his wife, he grasps desperately for what Caesar has to offer. In the end, everyone wants what Caesar wants: the Lord's execution. So Baldwin was right: the mob carries out the will of the state. In Matthew, the will of the state is expressed in the person of Pilate, who executes the Lord to secure Caesar's place on the seat of Elohim. Dumb move, Caesar. Really dumb.Richard and Fr. Marc discuss Matthew 27:19-23. Episode 412 Matthew 27:19-23; Music:Crowd Hammer by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4983-crowd-hammerLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Locust Radio
Episode 11 - Locust Phenotype Plasticity

Locust Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 63:55


Why does this extraterrestrial on a talk show say the aliens want to “help us,” and why are they so interested in our water? Seems fishy… Adam and Tish speak with artist, writer, and Locust Arts & Letters Collective member Laura Fair-Schulz about her work, and how labor, identity, gender, abstraction, dysphoria, and liberation all inform it. At the end of part one, Tish reads a poem from the Stink Ape Resurrection Primer about ghosts going on strike. Also discussed in this episode: Laura Fair-Schulz, “Candyman 2021: Art Reveals Horror,” Imagojournal.com (October 25, 2021), Laura Fair-Schulz, “Writing Marxism Out of Art History,” RedWedgeMagazine.com (May 1, 2019), Mark Fisher on Magical Voluntarism, the ArtNet series on NFTs and the art world, “Inside the NFT Rush,” by Ben Davis, part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 (November - December 2021), Frida Kahlo's house being dismantled for NFTs, Henry Giroux, “Jim Crow Politics Have Descended on Education,” Truthout (October 27, 2021), and more. Artists and writers discussed include Alice Neel, Mark Fisher, Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, James Baldwin, Richard Hamilton, and more. Works by Laura discussed in this episode can be viewed at the Locust website. Locust Radio is hosted by Tish Turl and Adam Turl, and produced by Alexander Billet and Drew Franzblau. Music by Omnia Sol.

Box of Neutrals
BONUS — Post-drive mudside aside with Lakeside Drive

Box of Neutrals

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 30:10


Michael is locked in a mud-covered trailer with James Baldwin from fellow Australian podcast Lakeside Drive with a convenient amount of podcasting equipment when they decide to record their thoughts about the controversial concussion to the 2021 F1 season.

New Books in History
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in National Security
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in National Security

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/national-security

New Books in American Studies
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Intellectual History
Jessica Hurley, "Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex" (U Minnesota Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 64:56


Since 1945, America has spent more resources on nuclear technology than any other national project. Although it requires a massive infrastructure that touches society on myriad levels, nuclear technology has typically been discussed in a limited, top-down fashion that clusters around powerful men. In Infrastructures of Apocalypse: American Literature and the Nuclear Complex (U Minnesota Press, 2020), Jessica Hurley turns this conventional wisdom on its head, offering a new approach that focuses on neglected authors and Black, queer, Indigenous, and Asian American perspectives. Exchanging the usual white, male “nuclear canon” for authors that include James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Ruth Ozeki, Infrastructures of Apocalypse delivers a fresh literary history of post-1945 America that focuses on apocalypse from below. Here Hurley critiques the racialized urban spaces of civil defense and reads nuclear waste as a colonial weapon. Uniting these diverse lines of inquiry is Hurley's belief that apocalyptic thinking is not the opposite of engagement but rather a productive way of imagining radically new forms of engagement. Infrastructures of Apocalypse offers futurelessness as a place from which we can construct a livable world. It fills a blind spot in scholarship on American literature of the nuclear age, while also offering provocative, surprising new readings of such well-known works as Atlas Shrugged, Infinite Jest, and Angels in America. Infrastructures of Apocalypse is a revelation for readers interested in nuclear issues, decolonial literature, speculative fiction, and American studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

The Audio Long Read
From the archive: Unlearning the myth of American innocence – podcast

The Audio Long Read

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 38:29


We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017:When she was 30, Suzy Hansen left the US for Istanbul – and began to realise that Americans will never understand their own country until they see it as the rest of the world does. By Suzy Hansen. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

The Yay w/Norman Gee & Reg Clay
Episode 216: CJ Strickland aka Curtis Manning

The Yay w/Norman Gee & Reg Clay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 64:38


Curtis Manning (aka CJ Strickland) is a budding actor who won last year's Plethos Fammy Awards for best actor for his portrayal of James Baldwin in my play Four Men in Paris, back in 2018. Curtis was recently cast to perform in A Chorus Line at the Pinole Community Theatre. We talk about how Curtis got into acting, his experience at Chabot College, his role as James Baldwin (and the parallels between Curtis and Baldwin), and his goals for the future. You can reach out to CJ directly via Instagram: @cjmanning17 SHOWS: Great Expectations (San Jose Stage) Nov 17 – Dec 12 Norman Gee and Li-Leng Au (Episode 189) is in the show https://www.thestage.org/season/great-expectations Check out the interview given by Li-Leng Au for BroadwayWorld: https://www.broadwayworld.com/san-francisco/article/BWW-Interview-Li-Leng-Au-of-GREAT-EXPECTATIONS-at-San-Jose-Stage-Company-Has-Been-Dying-to-Get-Back-Onstage-20211119 Shoshana in December (Z Space) December 15 – 7:30pm Eiko Yamamoto (Episode 120) is in the reading http://www.zspace.org A Not-So Silent Night (Playground SF) Part of Monday Night Playground Dec 20th – 7pm Linda Amayo-Hassan (Episode 83) has a piece – The Nativity – to be featured Norman Gee will be directing 8-2-5 Cherry https://playground-sf.org A Christmas Carol (Center REP Theatre) Dec 9 – 21 Terrance Smith (Episode 102) is in the play https://lesherartscenter.showare.com/eventperformances.asp?evt=1501 Cinderella (African American Shakespeare Company) Dec 18 & 19 at 3pm Angel Adedokun (Episode 147) is in the show https://www.cityboxoffice.com/eventperformances.asp?evt=2766 Into The Woods (Berkeley Playhouse) Nov 19 – Dec 23 Anna Joham (Episode 87) and Marah Sotelo (Episode 124) are in the show https://tickets.berkeleyplayhouse.org/online/default.asp?menu_id=F59B59D6-DB1F-4A96-8B85-A0D61066D21B The Hollow (City Lights Theatre) Jan 20 – Feb 20, 2022 Anne Yumi Kobori (Episode 192) is in the show https://cltc.org/explore-our-2021-22-season/ Awesome Orchestra's End of Year Concert 2021 December 12 Created by David Moschler (Episode 137) www.flipcause.com/secure/cause_pdetails/MTMxNzU3 Barry Graves (Episode 104) has a new podcast out! The Black Man's Heart On Spotify and all your podcast apps Our wonderful consulting producer Mallory Somera (Episode 151) is producing a podcast for KCBS Radio called Connect The Dots, a weekly news podcast, hosted by WCBS Newsradio 880's Lynda Lopez. Check out “Connect The Dots” on any podcast app. Also, Bindlestuff Studios has a podcast called the Fobcast, exploring Filipino American immigrant stories. Check out The Fobcast in any podcast app. The Yay Twitter feed: @theyay3 Reg Clay (Instagram, Twitter): @Reg_Clay Norman Gee (Twitter): @WhosYrHoosier

Zeitfragen-Feature - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Autorinnen der Harlem Renaissance - Eigensinnig und beunruhigend

Zeitfragen-Feature - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 32:01


Seit der Wiederentdeckung und Neuübersetzung des Gesamtwerks von James Baldwin ist das Interesse hierzulande an afroamerikanischer Literatur des 20. Jahrhunderts groß. Und endlich gilt es auch den Frauen dieser Bewegung.Von Katharina Teutschwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, ZeitfragenDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Black Educators Matter
Identity Talk Consulting

Black Educators Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 56:40


“Stay true to the teacher in you.” Kwame Sarfo-Mensa Math Teacher, Tutor, Mentor, Founder: Identity Talk Consulting Identitytalk4educators.com @kwam_the_identity_shaper “If we're really going to talk about anti-racism, we need to commit to proactive and continuous capacity building.” Have you ever thought of education as healing work? As an educator for the last 15 years, Mr. Kwame Sarfo-Mensa utilizes his youthful spirit and commitment to the community to actively bring joy into the lives of the children he serves. This week, we learn about his origin story, how he navigated his childhood in Connecticut and Ghana, and how he utilizes his lived experiences to support educators in developing their practice. “Read the books, but look in the notes section, that's the gateway to building your knowledge.” Kwame breaks down the state of education in Black America (and schools us on the Saving American History Act of 2020), calls out the testing companies that capitalize off of the white washing of teacher education, and asks “whose voices are being centered?” He also shares lots of resources and recommendations for educators, including James Baldwin's “A Talk to Teachers”. He's trying to dismantle the white supremacist norms which influence the way that educators teach. Once you get informed, that's when the unlearning starts to happen. His advice to educators: Rethink pedagogy. Remix teacher education. Learn your teacher identity.

Metropolitika
Metropolitika: 8 Aralık 2021

Metropolitika

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 53:14


Konuğumuz Bilkent Üniversitesi'nden Esra Almas ile İstanbul imgelerini ve oto-etnografi türünü konuşurken sisli mekânlardan geçen melankoliden, İstanbul'un Yahudi kültürü anlatılarından, Roni Margulies, James Baldwin ve Erich Auerbach'tan bahsediyoruz.

The Fighting Moose
The Birds

The Fighting Moose

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 11:24


Name two people from the American Civil War? Did you name Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee? That's okay if you didn't. Today, we have two stories, which may be one story with two parts, in which we read about Mr. Lincoln and General Lee. Today we read the stories “Saving the Birds” and “Another Bird Story” which comes to us from the book “Fifty Famous People” written by James Baldwin.   Where you from...What book(s) are you reading? Survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FM8626C   Website: http://www.thefightingmoose.com/   Blog https://thefightingmoosepodcast.blogspot.com/   iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-fighting-moose/id1324413606?mt=2/   Story (PDF): http://ww.thefightingmoose.com/episode250.pdf   Reading List: http://www.thefightingmoose.com/readinglist.pdf   YouTube: https://youtu.be/29Nql_u3MyU/   Book(s): “Fifty Famous People” http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6168   Music/Audio: Artist – Analog by Nature http://dig.ccmixter.org/people/cdk   National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA): http://www.nasa.gov   Song(s) Used: cdk - Sunday by Analog By Nature (c) copyright 2016 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/cdk/53755  

The Healthcare QualityCast
Leading for Physician Equity with Pringl Miller, MD, FACS

The Healthcare QualityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 39:51


Introducing Dr. Pringl Miller, a General Surgeon, also with a Fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, as well as Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Pringl is the Founder and Executive Director of Physician Just Equity, an organization created to help empower doctors through complex work conflicts. In this episode Dr. Pringl discusses the problem of physician inequity and maltreatment of doctors especially among healthcare leaders, highlighting the negative impacts on the healthcare industry. Top Takeaways • [06:48] Women and underrepresented people in Medicine and Surgery seem to be more vulnerable to harassment, discrimination, and retaliation. Usually, these situations are unrelated to their clinical quality or work proficiency. • [10:56] Lessons from failure: It's important to understand the culture and engage in proactive communication with colleagues to minimize misunderstanding. Also, remember that not every environment is going to be supportive of your authentic self and it's better to part ways amicably. • [14:23] When faced with such challenging situations, it is important to avoid going into conversations hot but to take time and understand what happened, and be sure that the cultural values in that workplace align with yours. • [17:13] Tools for building intimate connections: Respect for colleagues, Active Listening, and Aligning with what gives people meaning. • [21:18] Best 'Aha' moment: Moving from clinical work to focus on her foundation gave a lightness, and Dr. Pringl realized that it was because she left an environment where there was a constant expectation for her to fail. • [27:40] Ongoing changes in the healthcare industry: There is a heightened awareness of health inequity and the need for health justice as the pandemic brought to light some of the racial inequities in the healthcare system. • [33:28] Professionals need to be encouraged to move into healthcare by improving the workplace treatment of doctors, especially the underrepresented groups of doctors; this alone is a major reason for the mass exit of healthcare professionals. • [37:05] Dr. Pringl is inspired by her work to lead by example, and this passion helps her inspire workers in her organization. • [40:45] Dr. Pringl's message to herself in the past is "it's not whether you win or lose, it's how you play the game". To herself in the future, she hopes all her challenges have helped her grow productively. • [42:07] Dr. Pringl encourages listeners to reach out and offer support through the Physician Just Equity website. Key Quotes: "Not everything that is faced can be changed but nothing can be changed until it is faced" - James Baldwin "40% of women leave Medicine altogether or go to part-time within 6 years of completing their training" "We are all stories" "If you're not being allowed to shine and to thrive, there's something wrong with your workplace environment" Connect: Find | Dr. Pringl Miller LinkedIn – Dr. Pringl Miller Twitter - @equitydocs --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/healthcarequalitycast/message

The Current
Jelani Cobb on The Matter of Black Lives, and what Black Lives Matter means today

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:34


Journalist, historian and New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb has co-edited a vast collection of writing from the magazine titled The Matter of Black Lives. He talks about James Baldwin's writing, the killing of Ahmaud Arbery and what Black Lives Matter means today.

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Christian Wiman / Finding Home Through Exiles' Eyes

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 43:51


"To be a poet is to be an exile," says poet Christian Wiman. He echoes the most influential writer on his early life and work, Simone Weil, who wrote in her Gravity & Grace: "We must take the feeling of being at home into exile. We must be rooted in the absence of a place." Wiman spent most of the 2020 leg of the pandemic curating a story about home using 100 poems, seamed with prose from some of the wisest denizens of our species to narrate the tale. He joins Evan Rosa to read some of the poetry from the collection, talk about the connection between poetry and faith, and continue to examine the meaning of home through exiles' eyes. This episode was made possible in part by the generous support of the Tyndale House Foundation. For more information, visit tyndale.foundation.Show NotesHome: 100 PoemsJoseph Brodsky, exile from RussaDefining "Home"Mahmoud Darwish, "I Belong There""I have learned and dismantled all the words in order to draw from them, a single word: home."Josef Pieper on tautologyPoetry as a way of inhabiting rather than definingThe epigraph from He Held Radical Light: "The world does not need to come from a god. For better or worse, the world is here. But it does need to go to one (where is he?). And that is why the poet exists." (Juan Ramon Jimenez)Why does the poet exist?"Existence is not existence until it's more than existence."Jack Gilbert, "Singing in My Difficult Mountains""My fine house that love is.""To be a poet is to be an exile."Simone Weil: "We must be rooted in the absence of a place." (Gravity & Grace)A traveling placeModern humanity in exile, a secular notionWeil, The Need for Roots"I think all poets though, experience the feeling of displacement that comes with perception."W.B. Yeats on Maude Young, "I might have thrown poor words away and attempted to live.""Life is the thing. Words are always a kind of displacement."Wendell Berry's Sabbath: "There is a day when the road neither comes nor goes, and the way is not a way, but a place."Frantically nomadicRestlessness and the pull toward securityRooted in relationships"In my 20s, Simone Weil was the most important writer in my life. ... But now in my fifties, I feel a little differently. I still love Simone Weil, but I appreciate very much the work that someone like Wendell Berry has done to secure an existence against all the odds, secure a kind of existence in one place, and make it out of language as well."Vincent Van Gogh and Gaston BachelardStabilizing and DestabilizingVan Gogh: Life is roundBachelard: Dwelling in images and wordsSome real element of the past, brought into the present with metaphysical power: "I think there's some real element of the past of memory, that is made alive and volatile and even salvific, and it's not an image of youth. It is the actual thing being brought into the present."He Held Radical Light: seeking, through poetry, "those moments of mysterious intrusion, that feeling of collusion with eternity, of life and language riled to the one wild charge.”Poetry: the main way faith sustains Wiman"All poets are Jews." (Maria Sativa)"All poets are believers." (Christian Wiman)Something in poetry itself to further existence"If you do not believe in poetry, you cannot write it." (Wallace Stevens)Glory to God for dappled thingsThe role of mystery in poetry and faithFollowing the music of poetry in a physical, physiological, improvisational wayWendell Berry on the Kingdom of God: "We contain that which contains us."Home in painful division in Wendell BerryCarson McCullers: ImprovisationBraithwaite, "Bass"How is poetry in conversation with perplexity?James Baldwin, "Sonny's Blues" (Christian Wiman's "favorite short story in the world")"Dealing with the roar rising from the void and imposing an order on it."Deep consolation in poetryResponding to the music of poetryRead poetry out loudCan you write good poetry without suffering much?George MacKay Brown, "Old Fisherman with Guitar"What is a life worth living? Creating and lovingThe pursuit of God is wrapped up with creating art and being freed to love.The impact of Christian Wiman's "Prayer"About Christian WimanPoet Christian Wiman is Professor of the Practice of Religion and Literature at Yale Divinity School. He's the author of several books of poetry, including Every Riven Thing, Hammer is the Prayer, and his most recent, Survival Is a Style. His memoirs include the bracing and beautiful My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer and He Held Radical Light: The Art of Faith, the Faith of Art. He edited an anthology of 100 poems on Joy a few years ago, and just released Home: 100 Poems this month.Introduction (Evan Rosa)"To be a poet is to be an exile," says Christian Wiman, a poet and Professor of the Practice of Religion and Literature at Yale Divinity School. Wiman knows this personally. When he was younger than now, he moved 40 times over a 15 year period. He would come early to work as Editor of Poetry Magazine to write his own, spilling line after line onto page from the driver seat of his car (he wrote my favorite poem of his that way he tells me). And the writer that defined him then was Simone Weil, who wrote in her Gravity and Grace, "We must take the feeling of being at home into exile. We must be rooted in the absence of a place."And I wonder, if all poets are exiles, does that make us all poets? The generalized unease and anxiety that comes with being human often leaves us longing for a home. And each of us imagine a particular place, a perspective, a people, when we think of home. But it's always longing, isn't it. Especially in light of the fact that "we are home to each other"—that home is ultimately a relational reality built and maintained and indwelled with people—if that's true then no wonder we long for home all the more, because we long to be accepted, received, and loved all the more.A recent theme of the podcast has been exile and migration. War correspondent Janine Di Giovanni offered perspective on the vanishing Christian population in the middle east; biblical scholar Francisco Lozada helped us view faith through the eyes of the immigrants hopeful sojourn. Today, that continues, even as we consider the very meaning of home by way of poetry.Christian Wiman spent most of the 2020 leg of the pandemic curating a story about home using 100 poems, using with prose from some of the wisest denizens of our species to narrate the tale. The book came out this month, and you can listen to Miroslav Volf and Christian Wiman discuss the project on episode 36 of the podcast.I asked Chris to come back on the show to read more of the poems he selected, talk about the connection between poetry and faith, and continue to examine the meaning of home through exiles' eyes. You might think that's exactly the wrong way to wonder about home. But Odysseus would tell you different as he fights his way back to Ithaca. Moses would tell you different as he leads the Jews through the wilderness. Jesus would tell you different as he goes to prepare a place for you.And what other option do we have as wandering wonderers anyway—always longing for home, always praying for, in Christian Wiman's words, "those moments of mysterious intrusion, that feeling of collusion with eternity, of life and language riled to the one wild charge.”Thanks for listening, and enjoy.Production NotesThis podcast featured poet Christian WimanEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaProduction Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers, Natalie Lam, and Logan LedmanA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

EXPLORING ART
Episode 186 | The Deeper Meaning of Art

EXPLORING ART

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 25:38


James Baldwin once said “All art is a kind of confession, more or less oblique. All artists, if they are to survive, are forced, at last, to tell the whole story; to vomit the anguish up”. On this episode of we're going to be taking a deep dive in the deeper meaning of various artwork and explore what stories are being told. Who was alexander the great and did he actually slay a minotaur? What was the deal with Botticelli's birth of Venus and what are its connections to the virgin marry? This podcast will answer a bit of those questions and dive deeper into the symbolisms and connections of the Birth of Venus painting.

Gentlemen's History Hour
On Critical Race Theory. Is there a War on Critical Thinking? | GHH | S2E2

Gentlemen's History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 59:03


In this episode, GHH returns with EQuality, Rob Jay 10x, and Freddy Jones breaking down Critical Race Theory juxtaposed to the war on critical thinking in this society, abolitionist, and more.Follow on FB and IG: @gentlemenshh @podnplatformation.https://linktr.ee/gentlemenshhProduced by Savvi Hue for POD'N.

A. Idle
THE FIRE NEXT TIME: James Baldwin, the G.O.A.T.

A. Idle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 28:50


Released in 1963 James Baldwin penned a pure essay of the black consciousness in America. His unfiltered commentary on race, religion & their respective roles in the destruction of a nation will preserve the knowledge of American society for generations in the future. I encourage you to reflect, in this season of giving, on the climate of hostility that produces the fear holding us back from maintaining our sense of self. Side note: I am very thankful for those that listen. May you have a wonderful holiday season! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The United States of Anxiety
The Myth of a ‘United' States

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 50:49


History shows that our country's actually been divided from the start. If secession is in our DNA, what's keeping us together? Should we just break up already? Kai talks with author Richard Kreitner about his book, “Break It Up: Secession, Division, and the Secret History of America's Imperfect Union.” Plus, a look at how the Internet and the “Filter Bubble” contribute to our isolation today. Stick around for an exercise you can do when the divide gets real at the Thanksgiving table. Companion listening for this episode: Can America Be Redeemed? (07/05/2021) Eddie Glaude and Imani Perry consider the question through the work of James Baldwin and Richard Wright. Plus: How our country could enter a period of “post-traumatic growth.” “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.    We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

Boston Athenæum
Louis Menand and Maya Jasanoff, "The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War"

Boston Athenæum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 55:14


The Cold War was not just a contest of power. It was also about ideas, in the broadest sense―economic and political, artistic and personal. In The Free World, the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize–winning scholar and critic Louis Menand tells the story of American culture in the pivotal years from the end of World War II to Vietnam and shows how changing economic, technological, and social forces put their mark on creations of the mind. How did elitism and an anti-totalitarian skepticism of passion and ideology give way to a new sensibility defined by freewheeling experimentation and loving the Beatles? How was the ideal of “freedom” applied to causes that ranged from anti-communism and civil rights to radical acts of self-creation via art and even crime? With the wit and insight familiar to readers of The Metaphysical Club and his New Yorker essays, Menand takes us inside Hannah Arendt's Manhattan, the Paris of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, Merce Cunningham and John Cage's residencies at North Carolina's Black Mountain College, and the Memphis studio where Sam Phillips and Elvis Presley created a new music for the American teenager. He examines the post war vogue for French existentialism, structuralism and post-structuralism, the rise of abstract expressionism and pop art, Allen Ginsberg's friendship with Lionel Trilling, James Baldwin's transformation into a Civil Rights spokesman, Susan Sontag's challenges to the New York Intellectuals, the defeat of obscenity laws, and the rise of the New Hollywood. Stressing the rich flow of ideas across the Atlantic, he also shows how Europeans played a vital role in promoting and influencing American art and entertainment. By the end of the Vietnam era, the American government had lost the moral prestige it enjoyed at the end of the Second World War, but America's once-despised culture had become respected and adored. With unprecedented verve and range, this book explains how that happened.

Channel 33
Jeffrey Wright on ‘The French Dispatch,' Tweeting the News, and Playing Colin Powell

Channel 33

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 38:13


Bryan is joined by actor Jeffrey Wright to discuss his role as journalist Roebuck Wright in ‘The French Dispatch.' They touch on the details within a Wes Anderson script, finding inspiration in the late James Baldwin, the use of Twitter, and more! Host: Bryan Curtis Guest: Jeffrey Wright Associate Producer: Erika Cervantes Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Fighting Moose
Cadmus and Europa

The Fighting Moose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 23:52


When viewing Jupiter with a telescope or binoculars, you can see four dots next to it. These are the four largest moons of Jupiter, one of which is Europa. According to NASA, this is a celestial body that could possibly sustain life. As with a lot of celestial names, it seems, we get a lot of them from Greek mythology. So today, we read the story “Cadmus and Europa” which comes to us from the book “Old Greek Stories” written by James Baldwin.   Where you from...What book(s) are you reading? Survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FM8626C   Website: http://www.thefightingmoose.com/   Blog https://thefightingmoosepodcast.blogspot.com/   iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-fighting-moose/id1324413606?mt=2/   Story (PDF): http://ww.thefightingmoose.com/episode247.pdf   Reading List: http://www.thefightingmoose.com/readinglist.pdf   YouTube: https://youtu.be/c_QuaBJjwaU/   Book(s): “Old Greek Stories” http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11582   Music/Audio: Artist – Analog by Nature http://dig.ccmixter.org/people/cdk   National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA): http://www.nasa.gov   Song(s) Used: cdk - Sunday by Analog By Nature (c) copyright 2016 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/cdk/53755  

City Arts & Lectures
Jelani Cobb

City Arts & Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 71:59


Jelani Cobb is a staff writer for the New Yorker magazine, historian, and professor of journalism at Columbia, and one of today's most important public intellectuals.  He is the co-editor of  a new anthology, The Matter of Black Lives, which compiles New Yorker essays on race in America through time, by writers including James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Hilton Als, and Zadie Smith. On November 5, 2021, he came to the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco for an on-stage conversation with Jeff Chang and a live audience. They spoke about diversity in the newsroom, the controversy surrounding Dave Chappelle, and the findings of a task force created by Lyndon Johnson in the wake of racial riots in the 1960s.

Voices From The Frontlines
Voices Radio: Pacifica Radio Archives fund drive and a conversation with Meena Roman.

Voices From The Frontlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 59:07


This week on Voices from the Frontlines... THE TRIO IS BACK; Alan Minsky, Channing Martinez, and Eric Mann speak with Meena Roman from the Third-World Network, about moving forward the Black Nationalist, Third-World Alliance movement. The white-settler state that is the United States that has raped, pillaged, and created what they now call the "third-world" is afraid of being called the genocidal white-settler state that it is. Malcolm X began shifting the base of his leadership position from the Nation of Islam to one that was rooted in Black Nationalism. He understood that religion, at the base of his leadership, couldn't unify the Black nation in the United States, but a Black Nationalist platform could unify the Black Nation. The Pacifica Radio Archives is a massive collection of audio content from voices like Malcolm X, the last recording of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Angela Davis, Fannie Lou Hamer, James Baldwin, W.E.B. DeBois, Lorraine Hansberry, and thousands more. During this episode we are also raising money for the Pacifica Radio Archives to preserve these voices and so many more, which are being obliterated by this white-settler state that under no circumstances wants to be called out for its atrocities and on-going oppression. Call (800)735-0230 and donate $250 to the Pacifica Radio Archives and get the Encyclopedia of Sound; 1600 hours of audio content from the most powerful voices in the world. The archives is working to digitize the ONLY recordings of these historic and massively powerful voices.

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership
131: Paying it Forward as a Nonprofit Leader (Michael DeVaul)

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 58:00


131: Paying it Forward as a Nonprofit Leader (Michael DeVaul)SUMMARYPassion is often found in young leaders, while wisdom and experience are words associated with successful senior nonprofit leaders. Where are you on your journey of nonprofit leadership?  Do you realize the value of self-assessment? Michael DeVaul has been on both sides of that bridge for more than three decades in the nonprofit sector and reflects on leading by example through action.  In episode #131 of The Path Podcast, Michael shares his five steps to go from being a transactional leader to a transformational leader.  Patton and Michael discuss harnessing personal and professional experiences to be a more impactful nonprofit leader.  As a man of action, Michael is a role model for change, but he believes you must take action to make change.ABOUT MICHAELMichael is a seasoned veteran with 38+ years in the nonprofit sector. From Evanston, Illinois, he was a member of the Emerson Street YMCA and Ebenezer A.M.E. Church two strong black institutions which along with his extended family, helped seed his potential. In 2019, Michael was awarded the YMCA of the USA Carlos Sanvee award for his work strengthening emerging young leaders.  However, his highest honor remains the Champions of Change award given by the Obama White House for his efforts in community building and global work in Senegal and Bangladesh. Today, Michael serves as the YMCA of the USA National Director for Boys and Young Men of Color with a focus to lead reimagining policies, practices, and procedures across 100+ cities to improve the outcomes, impact, and economic mobility of all young men of color. He believes that to effect change you must first understand and develop your personal brand.  Driving culture involves reinforcing beliefs and behaviors that determine how an organization's leaders and the community they serve interact.  Only then can you address inequities for the purposes of reimagining an important concept called belonging. Michael lives in Charlotte and is most proud of being a husband, brother, father, uncle, and friend. EPISODE TOPICS & RESOURCESDavid Hawkins book Power vs. Force Learn more about building your own brand at BYOB TeamCheck out James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time“If you do not have a conscience, I cannot appeal to an absence of it” – Petra Hermans Ready for a Mastermind?  Apply Today!

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
158: Joshua Stephens on Being a Nomadic Writer: Reflections on Dislocation, World Travel, and James Baldwin

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:55


Joshua Stephens discusses his writing techniques and shares his rationale for interweaving politics into longform prose pieces that he publishes in some of the world's top journals on seemingly apolitical topics, like coffee or football. He reflects on his life as a nomadic writer, and discusses how the theme of “dislocation” has shaped his perspective and impacted his writing.  Joshua then shares some of his influences and discusses how his style of prose has evolved over the years.  He gives specific tips for honing the craft, writing more tightly wound prose, and becoming a better writer over time.  Joshua also discusses the influence of James Baldwin's work on his life, politics and writing.  He then reflects on what travel means to him, tells a story about almost getting kidnapped in the Sinai and shares how that moment profoundly impacted him.  He then recommends some of his favorite books, his favorite coffee shops around the world, and his favorite travel destinations.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com GET MATT'S FREE MAVERICK WHITE PAPER “Real Estate Investing for Digital Nomads:  How to Buy U.S. Rental Properties from Anywhere in the World and Finance an Epic International Lifestyle”   GET MATT'S FREE MAVERICK PACKING VIDEO “Stylish Minimalism:  How to Travel the World Long-Term with Carry-On Luggage Only”  

Vulgar Geniuses
Danté Stewart

Vulgar Geniuses

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 69:37


Dante Stewart's debut memoir

Longform
Episode 463: Mitchell S. Jackson

Longform

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 61:16


Mitchell S. Jackson is a journalist and author. His profile of Ahmaud Arbery, ”Twelve Minutes and a Life,” won the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing. ”What is 'great'? 'Great' isn't really sales, right? No one cares what James Baldwin sold. So: Are you doing the important work?” Show notes: @MitchSJackson mitchellsjackson.com Jackson on Longform 00:00 "Twelve Minutes and a Life" (Runner's World • Jun 2020) 01:00 Pafko at the Wall (Don DeLillo • Scribner • 2001) 03:00 "Ahmaud Arbery's Final Minutes: What Videos and 911 Calls Show" (Malachy Browne, Drew Jordan, Dmitriy Khavin and Ainara Tiefenthaler • New York Times • May 2020) 12:00 "We Went to Vegas to Wring Joy From Heartbreak" (New York Times Magazine • Sep 2021) 16:00 Survival Math (Scribner • 2020) 24:00 The Residue Years (Bloomsbury • 2014) 29:00 "Chuck Palahniuk, Tom Spanbauer Share Writing Secrets" (Jeff Baker • Oregonian • May 2014) 34:00 "When Michael B. Jordan Promises to Come Home, He Means It" (Esquire • Nov 2019) 36:00 "Chris Rock's Plan for Immortality" (Esquire • May 2021) 44:00 "Prison" (Richard Just, Editor • Washington Post • Oct 2019) 44:00 "Calendars" (Washington Post • Oct 2019) 45:00 Olio (Tyehimba Jess • Wave Books • 2016) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Black Oxygen
Nada Elmikashfi On Boundaries, Power, and Belonging

Black Oxygen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 47:18


Born in Sudan, Nada Elmikasfhi has been working to adopt Wisconsin as her home since 2002. She is deeply guided by James Baldwin's quote, “the place in which I'll fit will not exist until I make it.” As Chief of Staff for Rep Franchesa Hong and columnist for The Isthmus, Nada is not only working to create a sense of belonging for herself, but is working to uproot systemic white supremacy throughout our state so that Wisconsin can be a place where diversity can thrive and flourish. In this episode of Black Oxygen, Nada talks about boundaries, radical love, power and shared humanity. She reminds us that, “the human spirit is one that inherently trusts.” Towards the end of our conversation she tells us all, “you don't need permission to lead.” The conversation is filled will love, tenderness and maps out how we each have a role to play in creating the beloved community. #BlackOxygenPodcast #BlackInWisconsin #BlackWomenRest #BlackWomeninWisconsin #Belonging #Boundaries #Power #RacialEquity #AccountabilityandLove #AccountabilityandBoundaries

NPR's Book of the Day
In 'The Matter of Black Lives,' generations of Black thinkers probe American racism

NPR's Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 8:45


Back in June 2020, during a summer of protests for racial justice, the New Yorker republished 'Letter from a Region in my Mind," a seminal James Baldwin essay calling out the ignorance of liberal white Americans. In the following months, writer Jelani Cobb put together a collection of essays from the magazine that fit a similar theme: Black writers, including Toni Morrison and Ta-Nehisi Coates, who wrote pieces for the New Yorker about race and racism that still ring true today. In this interview, Cobb reflects on the essays and what it took for those Black writers to break into the magazine.

Sacred and Profane Love
Sacred and Profane Love Episode 41: James Baldwin is Bringing the Fire with Dr. Cornel West

Sacred and Profane Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 67:19


I am pleased to share a very special episode of Sacred and Profane, our first episode recorded in front of a live audience, and with the amazing Dr. Cornel West! The context for this episode is that the Classic Learning Test (which has sponsored several episodes this season, and on whose board of academic advisors I happily serve) held its third annual higher education summit in beautiful Annapolis, Maryland, and invited me to record an episode for the educators who had gathered for three wonderful days to discuss aspects of the summit's theme: Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire.” The result is the conversation that is episode 41, in which Cornel West and I discuss James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time and Go Tell it on the Mountain. Cornel argues that Baldwin is a “Socratic prophet” and a “love warrior”, and that if we only approach him through a political lens we will miss or misunderstand so much of what he has to say. Cornel helpfully traces out some of Baldwin's main influences: From Conrad and James to Mahalia Jackson and Ray Charles, but argues that, in the end, Go Tell it on the Mountain is a profoundly Augustinian novel. As always, I hope you enjoy our conversation.

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast
Episode 1255 - Barry Jenkins

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 87:44


Barry Jenkins is grateful that he's been able to harness the tools of filmmaking in order to tell the stories of his ancestors. Barry and Marc get into all the details of making the ten-part series The Underground Railroad and how Barry differentiates between the projects he's made with his head and the ones he's made with his gut. The also talk about Moonlight, bringing James Baldwin's words to the screen, and why it was important to have an on-set counselor for this recent undertaking. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.