Podcasts about dendrology

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Best podcasts about dendrology

Latest podcast episodes about dendrology

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 602 (11-8-21): Photosynthesis Fun, Fundamentals, and Confluence with Climate Change

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:26).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-5-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 8, 2021. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Racing the Sun,” by The Faux Paws, on that group's 2021 self-titled album, from Great Bear Records.  It opens a revised episode from November 2013, where we explore a sun-driven process that's fundamental to life on earth: photosynthesis, the process where green plants and algae make food, using the energy in sunlight to store chemical energy in the form of glucose.  Photosynthesis is also… VOICES IN SKIT - ~1 min./57 sec. REPORTER: We break into this show to bring you exclusive audio from the Virginia Tech campus, where a shadowy team of scientists are tinkering with the process underlying all life on earth.  They haven't yet revealed their possibly nefarious plans, so let's listen in... SCIENTIST 1: With this terrarium, we have a model system to test our carbon dioxide-manipulation scheme, and soon we'll be ready to control earth's fundamental food-producing process... SCIENTISTS 1 and 2: Photosynthesis! SCIENTIST 2: Are all the components of the system ready?  Green plants with chlorophyll? SCIENTIST 1: Check! SCIENTIST 2: Soil with proper nutrients? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2. Light? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Water? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Air with CO2? SCIENTIST 1.  CO2? SCIENTIST 2.  That's carbon dioxide! SCIENTIST 1.  Oh...right...I mean, check! SCIENTIST 2.  Let the photosynthesis start!  Engage monitoring device! SCIENTIST 1.  CO2 taken in from the air...water and nutrients being absorbed through roots...light falling on leaves.  All systems go!  Light energy is driving CO2 and water to combine and form glucose, the chemical-energy form, while releasing oxygen. SCIENTIST 2.  Apply the CO2 inhibitor! SCIENTIST 1.  Lid applied!  CO2 source blocked...system CO2 levels dropping rapidly...plants responding as expected, using up available CO2. SCIENTIST 2.  Reverse manipulation!  Apply the CO2 increaser! SCIENTIST 1. Lid removed!  CO2 added...plants responding.  Wait, they're responding too fast!  They're growing beyond the walls!  One has me...aieeeeeeee! SCIENTIST 2.  Now it's got me, too!  Noooooooo..... REPORTER: Well, this might be a good time for us to return to our regular show.  Back to you.... END VOICES IN SKIT Unlike this skit, with its far-fetched human-eating plants, there's nothing make-believe about Earth life's reliance on photosynthesis using sunlight, chlorophyll, nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide to make food.  Moreover, photosynthesis is a fundamental aspect of understanding and responding to climate change.  Photosynthesis millions of years ago created the hydrocarbon compounds that constitute today's fossil fuels, and photosynthesis now—absorbing and storing some of the carbon dioxide released in fossil fuel burning—has an important role in reducing Earth's carbon dioxide levels, warming, and other climate-change impacts.  For example, the capacity for photosynthesizing trees to take up atmospheric carbon dioxide was one aspect of the “Declaration on Forests and Land Use” at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, or COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland, from October 31 to November 12, 2021. Thanks to Eli Heilker and John Kidd for participating in this episode.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “Racing the Sun.”  We close with another musical selection appropriate for the climate challenges facing the COP26 meeting and all of us.  Here's about 25 seconds of “On a Ship,” by Blacksburg, Va., musician Kat Mills. MUSIC - ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship,” then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 186, 11-4-13. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 517, 3-23-20. Virginia Water Radio thanks John Kidd, formerly of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and Eli Heilker, a graduate of Virginia Tech in English who served an internship in Fall 2013 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, for their participation in this episode.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation demonstration of plant uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) during photosynthesis.  A terrarium (left) is attached via gas-transporting tubing to a CO2 monitor at right.  Photo taken in Blacksburg, Va., October 2013.  Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.Red Maple leaves in Blacksburg, Va., on October 30, 2013, in which green chlorophyll pigment was breaking down as photosynthesis and chlorophyll production in the leaves were stopping with the approach of winter.  The breakdown of chlorophyll in the fall allows pigments of other colors in the leaves to be revealed.  More information on fall leaf-color change is available in “The Miracle of Fall,” University of Illinois Extension, online at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/fallcolor/default.cfm. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Rick Groleau, “Illuminating Photosynthesis,” Public Broadcasting System (PBS) and WGBH-Boston, “NOVA” program, November 1, 2001, online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/photosynthesis.html. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, “Global Climate Change” Website, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/.  Specific pages used were the following:“A breathing planet, off balance,” by Kate Ramsayer and Carol Rasmussen, November 11, 2015, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2364/a-breathing-planet-off-balance/; and“Frequently Asked Questions,” online at https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/. John Seiler, John Groninger, and John Peterson, Forest Biology and Dendrology, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, Blacksburg, Va., 2009.Smithsonian Institution, “Ocean—Find Your Blue/What Are Fossil Fuels?”; online at https://ocean.si.edu/conservation/gulf-oil-spill/what-are-fossil-fuels. 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), October 31—November 12, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/.  [October 31-November 12, 2021]; for information on photosynthesizing forests serving as “sinks” for carbon dioxide and other “greenhouse gases,” see particularly “Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forests and Land Use,” November 2, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants,” “Science,” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes related to climate change. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Exploring Climate Change Basics, with Examples from Assateague Island National Seashore and Shenandoah National Park.Episode 312, 4-18-16 – Student's Research Digs into Streamside Soils, Rainfall Rates, and Greenhouse Gases. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.4 – There are basic sources of energy and that energy can be transformed.6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6     – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations.ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.  2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals. Virginia Studies CourseVS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at th

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Ologies
Part 2: Dendrology (TREES) with Casey Clapp -- UPDATES + NEW INTERVIEW

Ologies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 23:41


Part 2 of a very special duo! The fresh catch-up interview to learn what the world’s most charming and enthusiastic tree expert, Casey Clapp, has been up to since his 2018 episode aired. He’s been busy. Listen to hear if he’s gotten more pine cone tattoos, what other trees he hates, which ones he gives 10/10, musical blunders, winter pagan traditions, and why trees may play a huge role in his personality. Also: his new podcast for your ears and heart.  Follow Casey Clapp at Instagram.com/Clapp4Trees and his new podcast Instagram.com/arbortrarypod Sponsor links: www.alieward.com/ologies-sponsors A donation went to EcoTrust.org  Listen to Completely Arbortrary: https://linktr.ee/arbortrarypod/ Casey's tattoo artist, Shawn Hebrank at Blood Root: https://www.instagram.com/bloodroottattoo Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show: http://Patreon.com/ologies See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ologies
Part 1: Dendrology (TREES) with Casey Clapp -- Encore

Ologies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 90:11


Part 1 of a very special duo: Do trees have feelings? How do they talk? How old can they get? Are there any tree stories that will make me cry? Spoiler: YES. This episode aired in May 2018 and is worth a revisit, especially since Part 2 is a brand new 2020 interview with possibly the world's most enthusiastic tree expert, J. Casey Clapp. Learn about his many tree tattoos, new additions to those tattoos, how roots communicate to each other, "crown shyness,” social media shyness and the mental health benefits of tree proximity. Also: banana facts and Casey f*cking hates apples.  Be sure to hear the fresh catch-up interview in Part 2 to learn what Casey’s been up to since this originally aired. He’s been busy.  Follow Casey Clapp at Instagram.com/Clapp4Trees and his new podcast Instagram.com/arbortrarypod Sponsor links: www.alieward.com/ologies-sponsors A donation went to EcoTrust.org Listen to his podcast, Completely Arbortrary: https://linktr.ee/arbortrarypod/ Casey's tattoo artist, Shawn Hebrank at Blood Root: https://www.instagram.com/bloodroottattoo Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn   Support the show: http://Patreon.com/ologies See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Reformed Baptist Fellowship of Savannah

A tree is known by its fruits.

The Daily Gardener
September 6, 2019 Planting in September, Jean-Baptiste Van Mons, Thoreau leaves Walden Pond, James Veitch Jr, Joseph Hers, Kathleen Basford, Bartlett Giamatti, Montrose by Nancy Goodwin, Sowing Flowers, and Stolen Flowers

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2019 13:14


September is my favorite month for planting trees, shrubs, and perennials.  The cool air makes outdoor exercise a joy and the ground temperatures add the perfect amount of warmth for plants to get established.  Planting in the fall is preferred because it's the time of year when perennials experience less transplant shock. At the same time, there is still sufficient time for plants to establish their roots in the garden in time for winter. After their season of dormancy, when the ground warms again, fall-planted perennials grow and bloom more vigorously than if they were planted in the spring. Bottomline: Now is NOT the time to stop planting. It's the perfect time to get your dig on.     Brevities #OTD Today is the anniversary of the death of the botanist Jean-Baptiste Van Mons who died on this day in 1842.   The name of the game for Mons was selective breeding for pears. Selective breeding happens when humans breed plants to develop particular characteristic by choosing the parent plants to make the offspring.   Check out the patience and fortitude that was required as Mon's described his work:   “I have found this art to consist in regenerating in a direct line of descent, and as rapidly as possible an improving variety, taking care that there be no interval between the generations. To sow, to re-sow, to sow again, to sow perpetually, in short to do nothing but sow, is the practice to be pursued, and which cannot be departed from; and in short this is the whole secret of the art I have employed.”   Jean-Baptiste Van Mons produced a tremendous amount of new pear cultivars in his breeding program - something north of forty incredible species over the course of his lifetime. The Bosc and D'Anjou pears, we know today, are his legacy.      #OTD Today is the anniversary of the day in 1847 when Henry David Thoreau left Walden Pond and moved in with Ralph Waldo Emerson in Concord, Massachusetts. His two years of simple living at Walden Pond were over.    #OTD  Today is the anniversary of the death of James Veitch Jr. who died on this day in 1869. Veitch was born into the famous family nursery business known the world over as Veitch Nurseries. His grandfather, John, had started the business. After growing up and learning the business from his father and grandfather, Veitch went to London to train with other nurserymen.    After he quickly became a partner in the nursery, he married Harriott Gould. In addition to being a wonderful plantsman himself, James Jr. was an exceptionally bright businessman. He acquired a nursery called the Royal Exotic Nursery in London to ensure the Veitch Nursery stayed competitive and he turned Royal Exotic into the largest specialty nursery in Europe.  James Veitch Jr created the RHS Fruit and Floral Committees which still exist today. His love of the plants and the business were carried on in his three sons. The oldest, John Gould Veitch, was one of the first plant hunters to visit Japan. The second son, Harry James, oversaw the business during a period of peak growth. The third son, Arthur, worked with Harry to send Plant Explorers on missions all over the globe.    Of the brothers, it was the middle son, Harry, who outlived them both.  His older brother John Gould died young at age 31 from tuberculosis. Harry outlived his younger brother, Arthur, who died young as well - he died after a short illness when he was just 36 years old. #OTD  Today is the birthday of the Belgian botanist and dendrologist Joseph Hers who was born on this day in 1884. Dendrology is the science and study of wooded plants, like trees and shrubs, and their taxonomic classifications.   Hers made his first trip to China in 1905; he was an interpreter for the Belgium ministry. He later founded organizations to promote good relations between China and Belgium.   Later, Hers spent five years collecting in the north-central provinces of China from 1919-1924. The Arnold Arboretum had hired him to collect for them. As a dendrologist, Hers was especially focused on trees. The rapid rate of deforestation in China was especially alarming to Hers. Among Hers discoveries was the snakebark maple Acer tegmentosum.       #OTD   Today is the birthday of the British Botanist Kathleen Basford who was born on this day in 1916. As a young girl, Basford's nanny, Winny, taught her about the natural world; she learned to identify wildflower and trees. In the 1940's, Basford had three children of her own. She began gardening. When she wasn't with the children, she started breeding orchids. She became so interested in botany, she took evening classes on the subject. By the early 1950's, Basford published a paper on a fuchsia she discovered. It proved that the fuchsia had existed 20-30 million years ago - before the break-up of the continents. Her paper caught the attention of the chair of the botany department at Manchester University; a geneticist named Sydney Harland. He offered Basford a job on the spot. Later in life, Basford also wrote a book called "The Green Man." Before her book, this topic was largely unknown to the world. The Green Man, is a mythical figure - portrayed as a man with a head that sprouts leaves. It is a relic of the middle ages.      Unearthed Words "It's designed to break your heart.  The game begins in the spring, when everything is new again,  and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings,  and then as soon as the chill rains comes,  it stops, and leaves you to face the fall alone." - Bartlett Giamatti Today's book recommendation Montrose by Nancy Goodwin   This is a book that was released in 2005 and it's still one of my favorites. Nancy Goodwin and her husband, Craufurd, searched for 10 years before finding a 61-acre property in 1977. The place had been in the Graham family for three generations. They had named it Montrose in honor of their Scottish ancestry. This book is the story of how the Goodwins transformed the property; it's a beautiful biography of the many gardens of Montrose.   You can get used copies of this treasure on Amazon for $4 using the link in today's show notes.       Today's Garden Chore If you live in a cold climate, late fall is a wonderful time to sow flower seeds in your garden. Sweet Alyssum, Bee Balm, Coreopsis, Delphinium, Lady’s Mantle, Penstemon, and Sweet Pea are just a handful of the flowers you can sow in your fall garden. Additionally, many annuals, like cosmos, nigella, and cleome, will seed themselves after a summer in your garden.  If any seeds germinate in places where you don't want them, it's pretty easy to remove them in the spring or early summer.     Something Sweet  Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart I was researching a family tree on Ancestry recently, and I came across this little notice in The Mower County Transcriptout of Lansing Minnesota from this in 1893.   Here's what it said:   "The parties who recently took flowers from the garden of Mrs. M. E. Nancarrow are known and must call and pay for them or be subjected to serious trouble."     Thanks for listening to the daily gardener, and remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Bible Baptist Pods
Dendrology of Humanity - 5 May 2019

Bible Baptist Pods

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2019 44:02


Dendrology of Humanity - 5 May 2019 by BBC Potch

Talking Forests
Forestry Women Who Rock: Sarah McCoy - Episode 21

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2019 25:07


Sarah is the first woman to teach as a full time faculty member at the Maritime College of Forest Technology! She has a passion for helping others learn about many facets of forests and talks about it with us in a great episode! She has a Bachelor of Technology in Environmental Horticulture from Dalhousie University & the Nova Scotia Agricultural College, and Forest Technologist diploma from Maritime College of Forest Technology (MCFT) I have worked as a forest technician both in urban forest roles (ISA certified Arborist) and for the Canadian Forest Service working with invasive and native insects. I have worked on many research projects including brown spruce long-horned beetle and spruce budworm. Currently: Forestry Instructor at the Maritime College of Forest Technology (MCFT) in Fredericton NB. I teach 5-6 courses a year including forest entomology and pathology, Urban Forestry, Dendrology, Botany, Public Speaking and Arboriculture Sciences. Each year I have approx 100 students training to be forest technologists! Hobbies: Raising chickens! Social Media: Incorporating more into my classes. I think social media is a great tool and they should know how to use it effectively. Want to be featured? Schedule your interview with Talking Forests on this link:calendly.com/talkingforests Voice by Gordon Collier www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

Ologies
Dendrology (TREES) with J. Casey Clapp

Ologies

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2018 88:41


Do trees have feelings? How do they talk? How old can they get? Are there any tree stories that will make me cry? Spoiler: YES. Possibly the world's most enthusiastic tree expert, J. Casey Clapp, shows Alie his many tree tattoos, explains how roots communicate to each other, addresses "crown shyness" and schools Alie on the mental health benefits of tree proximity. Also: banana facts and Casey f*cking hates apples. Follow Casey Clapp on Instagram @Clapp4Trees Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes! Follow @Ologies on Twitter or Instagram Follow @AlieWard on Twitter or Instagram More links at www.alieward.com Support the show.

WikiWheel with Max & Shea
Episode 4-Dimebag Dendrology

WikiWheel with Max & Shea

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2018 56:40


Max and Shea address their ever-growing rouges gallery, debate the sexiness of 19th vrs 21st century gardeners, and sell out to Subaru in hopes of getting a free Crosstrek. Today's Subjects: The Lange-Taylor Prize, Wilhelm Lauche ( 19th century German dendrologist/pomologist) and 1917 In Japan. Email any questions, comments, corrections or concerns to Wikiwheelpod@gmail.com Follow the show on Twitter @wikiwheel

Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - white oak

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2013 2:09


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - white mulberry

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2013 2:06


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - shingle oak

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2013 1:31


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - shagbark hickory

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2013 2:14


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - sassafras

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2013 2:15


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - serviceberry

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2013 1:26


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - silver maple

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2013 2:27


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - green ash

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2013 1:40


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - eastern redbud

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2013 1:30


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - eastern hophornbeam

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2013 1:22


NC Envirothon
Dendrology

NC Envirothon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2011


Diane Steltz of the Jordan Lake Educational State Forest shows ways of identifying trees.

Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - gray birch

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:28


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - callery pear

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:52


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - eastern redcedar

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:42


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - yellowwood

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:50


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - red alder

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:27


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - sycamore maple

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:16


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - black ash

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 3:00


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - American chestnut

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:43


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - English oak

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:50


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - Chinese elm

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:27


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - American sycamore

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:21


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - black locust

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:54


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - European mountain-ash

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:48


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - eastern larch or tamarack

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:32


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - ginkgo

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 2:16


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - black spruce

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 2:16


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - American hornbeam

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:18


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - white fir

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:31


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - tree-of-heaven

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 2:01


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - northern white-cedar

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 1:31


Trees with Don Leopold
Trees with Don Leopold - Kentucky coffeetree

Trees with Don Leopold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2011 2:15