Podcasts about Land use

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Best podcasts about Land use

Latest podcast episodes about Land use

Accelerate Your Performance
Running Plays to Achieve Success

Accelerate Your Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 17:11


How can you appeal to both logic and emotion to properly communicate and cascade the right information to the right people at the right times? This week on our Accelerate Your Performance podcast, Dr. Janet Pilcher invites back Dale Shaver, Director of Waukesha County Department of Parks and Land Use, and Laura Catherman, Director of the Waukesha-Ozaukee-Washington Workforce Development Board, to continue their discussion on how they implement their Playbook for Success to continuously build trust and enable success between boards and leaders. They explain the importance of leading with the why, not the what, when defining your organization's story, and how to define that why in simple terms. Listen as Dale and Laura describe how to run your strategies, identify the key decision-makers, and look for potential roadblocks. This episode addresses questions, such as:Why is it important to define your story?What can you do to start implementing the Playbook for Success and build trust between your board and leaders?How can you "arm yourself" with your best team and work on building that team? Recommended Resources: Building Trust to Enable Success for Boards and Leaders, Trust: Consistency of Leadership, Working With The School Board, & The Power of Collaboration

Charlottesville Community Engagement
September 28, 2022: Greene County administrator resigns to take school job; Rivanna River conference to focus on solar land use practices, environmental justice

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 17:05


On today's installment of the program: Greene County Administrator Mark Taylor resigns to take a school superintendent position in Spotsylvania CountyA detour of two major roadways in Albemarle finishes earlier than anticipatedSolar policy takes center stage at the Rivanna River Basin Commission conference tomorrowA restaurant staple on Maury Avenue will close later this year after 46 yearsUVa's director of hospital epidemiology reflects on where we are in the COVID pandemic and whether it is over This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

What is The Future for Cities?
082R_Beyond defining the smart city – Meeting top-down and bottom-up approaches in the middle (research summary)

What is The Future for Cities?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 12:17


Summary of the article titled Beyond defining the smart city – Meeting top-down and bottom-up approaches in the middle from 2014 by Jonas Breuer, Nils Walravens, and Pieter Ballon, presented at the Eight International Conference INPUT 2014 titled Smart City – Planning for Energy, Transportation and Sustainability, and published in the Journal of Land Use, Mobility and Environment. Since we are investigating the future of cities, I thought it would be interesting to see an investigation into the bottom-up and top-down smart city approaches and where they can meet. This article introduces what smart city can mean for the different stakeholders and the consequences of its interpretation. You can find the article through this link. Abstract: This paper aims to better frame the discussion and the various, divergent operationalisations and interpretations of the Smart City concept. We start by explicating top-down approaches to the Smart City, followed by what purely bottom-up initiatives can look like. We provide a clear overview of stakeholders' different viewpoints on the city of tomorrow. Particularly the consequences and potential impacts of these differing interpretations and approaches should be of specific interest to researchers, policy makers, city administrations, private actors and anyone involved and concerned with life in cities. Therefore the goal of this article is not so much answering the question of what the Smart City is, but rather what the concept can mean for different stakeholders as well as the consequences of their interpretation. We do this by assembling an eclectic overview, bringing together definitions, examples and operationalisations from academia, policy and industry as well as identifying major trends and approaches to realizing the Smart City. We add to the debate by proposing a different approach that starts from the collective, collaboration and context when researching Smart City initiatives. You can find the transcript through this link. Connecting episodes you might be interested in: No.046 - Analysis and comparison of Smart City initiatives, talking about Living Labs What wast the most interesting part for you? What questions did arise for you? Let me know on Twitter @WTF4Cities or on the wtf4cities.com website where the shownotes are also available. I hope this was an interesting episode for you and thanks for tuning in. Music by Lesfm from Pixabay

Accelerate Your Performance
Building Trust to Enable Success for Boards and Leaders

Accelerate Your Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 24:19


The health of a school district is a leading indicator of the health of a community. That's what our guests in this episode of the Accelerate Your Performance podcast share. Today, Dr. Janet Pilcher invites Dale Shaver, Director of Waukesha County Department of Parks and Land Use, and Laura Catherman, Director of the Waukesha-Ozaukee-Washington Workforce Development Board, to discuss how to build trust between the leaderships within schools, such as superintendents and principals, and their school boards. It involves great intentionality. During the conversation, they discuss the playbook for success they implemented to help get all players on the same page and moving in the right direction. Listen as they share how they go about selecting strategic playing cards from their playbook and when they say it's time to run the play.This episode addresses questions, such as:How can leaders help get everyone on the same page and moving forward when there are strong and opposing opinions?How do you clearly identify your what, and how can that be aligned with other leaders and/or the school board?How can organizations use data to tell a compelling story?Recommended Resources: Essentials for Developing Leaders, The Power of Collaboration, Working With The School Board, & Trust: Consistency of Leadership

Heart of the Matter
Removing parks for homes: Is land use in Singapore a case of conflicting needs?

Heart of the Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 30:04 Transcription Available


When news broke that ORTO leisure park in Yishun will make way for housing, residents expressed sadness and disappointment. They asked: Why are we building so many flats? Why can't we keep spaces that matter to a community? Steven Chia puts these questions to Dr Woo Jun Jie, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Policy Studies and Dr Liu Thai Ker, former chief planner.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Lynda Steele Show
Doug McCallum strikes again - pushing 50 Land Use Applications forward

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 7:59


 Linda Annis, Surrey First Councillor describes Surrey Mayor Dough McCallum's latest act as mayor, attempting to push 50 Land Use Applications forward

The Lynda Steele Show
The Full Show: BC Schools K-12 and Post-Secondary institutions to close for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral, what's next for Pierre Poilievre? Doug McCallum attempts to push 50 land use applications ahead

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 44:52


Queen Elizabeth II's funeral becomes a Canadian federal holiday. What would this mean for BC? Shachi Kurl, President of the Angus Reid Institute discusses Canada's feeling on the Royal Family. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a national holiday for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's funeral, for all federal government workers. Should B.C. give their residents the day off? What's next for new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre? Ken Boesenkool, President of Sidicus Consulting Ltd. and Professor at the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University discusses the next steps for Pierre Poilievre after having been named leader of the federal Conservatives School closures in BC and all federal workers get the day off for the Queen's funeral, what about local businesses?  Kathleen Cook, Director of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business discusses business closures for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral. Doug McCallum strikes again - pushing 50 Land Use Applications forward  Linda Annis, Surrey First Councillor describes Surrey Mayor Dough McCallum's latest act as mayor, attempting to push 50 Land Use Applications forward Mourning Queen Elizabeth II - Why September 19th should be a National Holiday Brian Dijkema , Vice President of External Affairs at Cardus discusses why it is important to give Canadians some time off to reflect on the reign of Queen Elizabeth II

Mises Media
The False Benefit of Less Land Use for Agriculture

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Even as population has grown, increasing the intensive margin for agriculture has led to increased food production. This may not necessarily be a good thing. Original Article: "The False Benefit of Less Land Use for Agriculture" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

City and County of Denver: All Programming Audio Podcast
Land Use, Transportation & Infrastructure Committee on 2022-09-13 10:30 AM - Sep 13, 2022

City and County of Denver: All Programming Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Audio Mises Wire
The False Benefit of Less Land Use for Agriculture

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Even as population has grown, increasing the intensive margin for agriculture has led to increased food production. This may not necessarily be a good thing. Original Article: "The False Benefit of Less Land Use for Agriculture" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

John Notarianni's Feed
Remembering influential Oregon land use advocate Bob Stacey

John Notarianni's Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 6:09


You might not know the name Bob Stacey, but if you live in Oregon, you probably feel the impact of his work every day.When he died this week at age 72, U.S. Rep. Earl Blumeauer said “Oregon just lost the most important person that most people have never heard of.”He had a major impact on how dense our neighborhoods are, how we get from place to place -- and he even battled a notorious religious cult.Full story here

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

UC San Diego (Audio)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

Science (Video)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

Science (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

Humanities (Audio)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

Humanities (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

Science (Audio)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

Science (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

Evolution (Video)
CARTA: Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes with Walter Willett Jessica Thompson David Tilman

Evolution (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:30


As humans have evolved, so has our ability to drastically alter the planet we call home. In this collection of talks from the CARTA symposium, "Humans: The Planet-Altering Apes" you will learn about specific examples on how humans have changed Earth and what can be done to prevent its cataclysmic demise. Walter Willett will discuss how climate change is having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world's growing population. Jessica Thompson talks about humans transformed the environment and the damage it has done to our ecosystem. Finally, David Tilman addresses the global alteration of Earth's nitrogen cycle, and what it means for u as a species moving forward. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 38205]

The Planning Commission
Sticks and Stones...Can REALLY Hurt!

The Planning Commission

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 44:40


Being a planner can sometimes hurt. Your image and reputation can be challenged. But how do you respond and what do you do when that happens? Your favorite Planning Commission podcasters explore this issue among themselves and with their wonderful guest, Land Use attorney and former Sonoma, CA mayor, Rachel Hundley. 

The National Land Podcast
Episode 16: OnX for Private Land Use, with Todd Williams of OnX

The National Land Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 48:33


In this episode, we will be talking with Todd Williams of OnX Maps. Todd is leading the effort for OnX to get the word out on the application's possibilities for private land use. Most outdoorsmen are familiar with OnX and its use for public land hunts West of the Mississippi, but many don't know how valuable this app is for private land. We will be discussing that today.   For more on OnX: https://www.onxmaps.com/ For more on the buying and selling of land: https://nationalland.com/

Plant Based Briefing
354: How Does Following a Vegan Diet Help the Environment? By Dana Hudepohl at ForksOverKnives.com.

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 12:12


How does following a vegan diet help the environment? By Dana Hudepohl at ForksOverKnives.com. Original post: https://www.forksoverknives.com/wellness/vegan-diet-helps-environmental-sustainability/    Related Episodes:  Episode 171: Technical Outrage - Innovating to Reduce Animal Use Episode 32: 5 Takeaways from Seaspiracy   The End of Medicine Documentary: https://lockwoodfilm.com/unbound  Cowspiracy Documentary: https://www.cowspiracy.com/  Forks Over Knives Documentary: https://www.forksoverknives.com/the-film/  Forks Over Knives was founded following the release of the world-famous documentary Forks Over Knives in 2011, showing people how to regain control of their health and their lives with a plant-based diet. Since then Forks Over Knives released bestselling books, launched a mobile recipe app and maintains a website filled with the latest research, success stories, recipes, and tools to help people at every phase of their plant-based journeys. They also have a cooking course, a meal planner, a line of food products, and a magazine. Please visit www.ForksOverKnives.com for a wealth of resources.    How to support the podcast: Share with others. Recommend the podcast on your social media. Follow/subscribe to the show wherever you listen. Buy some vegan/plant based merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop      Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing #vegan #plantbased #plantbasedpodcast #veganpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #forksoverknives #wfpb #wholefoodplantbased #animalagriculture #landuse #deforestation #environment #climatechange #ghg #methane #wateruse #waterpollution #sustainability #ecofriendly  

Think Out Loud
Oregon's land use agency recommends ways to mitigate wildfire risk

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 23:53


Wildfires in Oregon and the West routinely force evacuations, threatening human life and homes. Now, the Department of Land Conservation and Development has made new draft recommendations for how communities can respond to these increasing threats, including mitigation measures for new developments. The DLCD has also released new draft recommendations for how to address housing needs. The public comment period for the wildfire recommendations is now open. The housing comment period opens Wednesday. The agency will be presenting final recommendations to Oregon lawmakers in the fall. Brenda Ortigoza Bateman directs the Department of Land Conservation and Development. We talk with her about responding to wildfire risks, the housing crisis and the department's priorities more broadly as the 50th anniversary of the state's land use system approaches.

Plant Based Briefing
353: Huge New Study Finds Healthy Foods Are Better for the Environment. By Michelle McCarthy at ForksOverKnives.com.

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 5:37


Huge new study finds healthy foods are better for the environment. By Michelle McCarthy at ForksOverKnives.com. Original post: https://www.forksoverknives.com/wellness/new-study-healthy-food-better-for-environment/  Cowspiracy Documentary: https://www.cowspiracy.com/  Forks Over Knives Documentary: https://www.forksoverknives.com/the-film/  Forks Over Knives was founded following the release of the world-famous documentary Forks Over Knives in 2011, showing people how to regain control of their health and their lives with a plant-based diet. Since then Forks Over Knives released bestselling books, launched a mobile recipe app and maintains a website filled with the latest research, success stories, recipes, and tools to help people at every phase of their plant-based journeys. They also have a cooking course, a meal planner, a line of food products, and a magazine. Please visit www.ForksOverKnives.com for a wealth of resources.  How to support the podcast: Share with others. Recommend the podcast on your social media. Follow/subscribe to the show wherever you listen. Buy some vegan/plant based merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop    Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing #vegan #plantbased #plantbasedpodcast #veganpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #forksoverknives #wfpb #wholefoodplantbased #animalagriculture #landuse #environment #healthyfood #plantbasedfood  

City and County of Denver: All Programming Audio Podcast
Land Use, Transportation & Infrastructure Committee on 2022-08-30 10:30 AM - Aug 30, 2022

City and County of Denver: All Programming Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Farming Today
Farming Today This Week 27/08/22: Cost of Food; Grain Trade; Land Use

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 25:10


Today we take a closer look at the causes and consequences of increasing food prices - from farm to fork. Latest calculations point to an inflation rate for grocery of just under 12 per cent. We speak to farmers, growers and supermarkets who say a 'perfect storm' of Brexit, war in Ukraine and the effects of Covid have led to a drastic shortage of labour and increasing production costs. We also hear calls for more transparency in the grain trade, as the world's largest grain trading companies report huge profits. How sustainable is the meat you eat? Some people pay more for organic and grass-fed beef and lamb with the belief that it will have less of an impact on the environment, however conservation writer George Monbiot says they are wrong, as it is some of the most damaging. Anna Hill speaks to George Monbiot and Cambridge University professor Donald Broom who says there needs to be a wider assessment of what is meant by sustainable. Plus find out who are our three finalists for the 2022 BBC Food and Farming Awards. Charlotte is judging this year's Farming for the Future Award which will be presented at a ceremony in Cardiff later this year. Presented by Charlotte Smith Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Natalie Donovan

Free Thoughts
The Statrix: How Government Warps Our Perception of the World (Rerun)

Free Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 56:10 Very Popular


We're taking a break this week, but in the meantime, enjoy this treasure from the Free Thoughts vault where Trevor explains the “Statrix”, how government warps our perception of the world around us, and how it disproportionately affects the poor.Trevor mentions the recent spate of track problems and fires that have been plaguing Washington D.C.‘s metro system, which led to the creation of this website, ismetroonfire.com. He also explains this song by the Kingston Trio, which was meant to a protest fare increases on Boston's public subway system.Here's a series of articles by Megan McArdle on Washington D.C.‘s streetcar project, written in 2009, 2014, and 2015 (the project was originally slated to be completed in 2006 and is still not fully rolled out today, in 2016). Trevor also mentions our podcast episode with Randal O'Toole, “Transportation, Land Use, and Freedom,” James Tooley's book “The Beautiful Tree: A Personal Journey Into How the World's Poorest People are Educating Themselves,” and NeuCare, a new way to think about medical care. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Let's Talk Housing
Peter Coyle: The Policy Landscape of Land Use and Housing | Ep #14

Let's Talk Housing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 18:29


Let's Talk Housing chats with Peter Coyle, a land use attorney and shareholder at Larking Hoffman. Peter shares insight into his background in land use law and the changes he's seen in housing development over his extensive career. Peter also shares how the legal environment around housing is changing and what that means for the future of housing policy. Please click the button to subscribe so you don't miss any episodes and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you! For more information go to https://housingfirstmn.org/ © 2022 Housing First Minnesota

Think Out Loud
Oregon land-use board ruling removes limit on short term rentals in Lincoln County

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 12:36


Last November, Lincoln County voters approved a ballot measure limiting the number of short-term rentals in unincorporated areas. Their hope was to control the growing number of short-term rental homes in the county. Now, the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals issues a ruling early this month finding this decision to go against state laws. Quinton Smith is the founder of Yachats News. He joins us to share what this ruling means for Lincoln County.

Palisade Radio
Brian Gitt: Energy Shortages will be Catastrophic

Palisade Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 68:22


Tom welcomes Brian Gitt to the show. Brian has a varied background as an Energy Entrepreneur, Investor, Podcaster, and Writer. Brian discusses the mistakes he made early in trying to build a business. This caused him to study how to think clearly and question one's beliefs. Many people believe that fossil fuels are running out, but they overlook the innovation and technology that drives the industry. We're constantly bombarded by the media that we are running out of these resources. We don't have scarcity, it's more about price and technology to obtain these resources. This narrative of energy scarcity has been part of the drive towards wind and solar. The energy return on energy invested with these are incredibly poor. However, alternatives like nuclear are far better. When people are given the flexibility to innovate, they can come up with some remarkable ideas. Commodities move in boom, bust cycles. As an investor, you need to know where you are at in the cycle. The biggest hurdle today for Nuclear is government over regulation. We need safety, but we've gone too far and made things incredibly hard to build. The nuclear regulatory agency has not licensed any new power plants since their founding. How can you improve safety if you don't work with new designs? He believes we've largely solved the problems of nuclear waste storage and transportation. Newer reactor designs are reusing these waste fuel products and thus reducing their radioactivity. Solar and wind power can't replace large scale power plants because they are intermittent sources. We have yet to solve the storage problems for energy. He contrasts the amount of land needed for nuclear with that of wind and solar. There is a convergence of factors impacting carbon output in Europe and globally. We are continuing to rely on coal. The recent events in Europe have already wiped out all the gains from wind and solar. America doesn't have an energy plan, we just have corporate welfare and special interests feeding at the trough of special interests. Talking Points From This Episode The importance of questioning ones beliefs.Why the energy scarcity narrative is flawed.The importance of nuclear energy and why it's safe.Why solar and wind can only supplement existing grid solutions. Time Stamp References:0:00 - Introduction4:13 - Fossil Fuels7:07 - Incentivizing Production10:00 - Shale Oil & Credit11:30 - Nuclear Hurdles18:08 - Waste Remediation22:18 - Nuclear Innovation27:32 - Energy Densities32:44 - Land Use & Environment40:53 - Waste Production44:32 - First Principals47:57 - Electric Vehicle Concerns52:00 - Global Carbon Levels56:37 - Marketing Terms57:50 - Fracking Thoughts1:00:14 - Optimal Countries?1:07:13 - Wrap Up Guest Links:Website: https://briangitt.com/Books: https://briangitt.com/books/Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrianGitt Brian Gitt is an Energy Entrepreneur, Investor, Podcaster, and Writer. He led business development at Reach Labs to deliver long-range wireless power in industrial, asset management, and supply chain applications. He also founded UtilityScore a software company which provided homebuyers with estimates for their utility costs. Their product brought a new level of transparency to the process of buying, renting, and renovating housing. He was the CEO of a consulting firm later acquired by Frontier Energy specializing in clean energy to commercialize new technology in buildings, vehicles, and power plants. He was the Executive Director of Build It Green, where he built up a network of 2,500 building industry stakeholders. Brian loves the outdoors and has led mountaineering expeditions in Alaska, spent months backpacking in the Rockies and climbed in various national parks across the U.S.

Farming Today
17/08/33 - A prototype land use framework, seasonal farm safety, rare breed sheep

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 13:38


The Food, Farming and Countryside Commission, an independent charity, has spent the last three years working with local and national stakeholders, seeking a practical way to develop a Land Use Framework for England. They've just published their latest report, and Caz Graham speaks to Tom Burston, the Commission's director of policy and research, to find out more. A viral video on social media has sparked discussions around on-farm safety during harvest season. Off the back of the incident where a man apparently stood in front of a combine harvester, Caz speaks to Stephanie Berkeley from the Farm Safety Foundation. And Castlemilk Moorits are one of our native sheep breeds, they have a fascinating history and their fleece is highly prized by hand spinners. But with only just over a thousand in the whole of the UK, they're officially at risk. Mariclare Carey-Jones meets the Welsh Representative of the Castlemilk Moorit's Society, Vicky Phillips, and her flock. Presented by Caz Graham; produced in Bristol by Lucy Taylor.

The Strong Towns Podcast
Land Use and Transit Are a Pair—But Rarely Do We See Them That Way

The Strong Towns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 56:57 Very Popular


Jason Slaughter, producer of the YouTube channel Not Just Bikes, is a pretty cool and talented guy. He's created multiple excellent videos on Strong Towns ideas, taking our written words and translating them through his own voice into visual representations. A lot of our dedicated members have discovered us through Not Just Bikes' compelling videos.  In this episode, Chuck welcomes Jason back onto the Strong Towns Podcast, where they discuss one of his recent videos, “America Always Gets This Wrong (when building transit).”  U.S. and Canadian transit systems disrespect the people who use them. Most of the time, public transit is a hassle, it's impractical, and it doesn't make sense to use when transit routes take much longer than a car ride. The millions of dollars that are spent on our transit systems seem to go to waste when land use is not considered during the construction process.  In this podcast, Jason and Chuck go more in depth about some of the absurdities of our modern transit system and the urban deserts they tend to drop riders off at—bringing to light some reasons why people don't want to use public transit. They debunk the reasons some DOTs use for why we can't have better transit, and what the process for building efficient public transportation systems should look like. Bonus: Jason describes a time he and his kids used the transit system where he lives in Europe.  ADDITIONAL SHOW NOTES Not Just Bikes (YouTube). Check out Not Just Bikes' livestreams on YouTube and Twitch! Support Jason through his Patreon. Jason (Twitter / Reddit). Charles Marohn (Twitter).

S/GWI's Innovation Station
22. Innovations in Land Use

S/GWI's Innovation Station

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 35:10


Rachel Stroer (The Land Institute) and Barbara Decré (Savanna Institute) share their community-based strategies for improving soil health using perennial grain crops and agroforestry systems. This discussion was recorded during the “Innovations in Land Use” session of S/GWI's virtual event, The Innovation Station: Lone Star, on June 16, 2022, and is moderated by Dr. Aubrey Paris, S/GWI Policy Advisor. (The views expressed in this episode are those of the featured innovators and do not necessarily reflect the views of S/GWI, the Department of State, or the U.S. Government.)

Today with Claire Byrne
The Friday Gathering

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 30:02


Pippa Hackett, Green Party Senator & Minister of State for Biodiversity and Land Use; Duncan Smith, Labour Party TD for Dublin Fingal and Spokesperson on Health, Communications and Transport; Aoife Moore, Political Correspondent for The Sunday Times; Mick Clifford, Special Correspondent with the Irish Examiner

The DeMaio Report
What Are Democrats Doing With Land Use Laws In California?

The DeMaio Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 31:19


What Are Democrats Doing With Land Use Laws In California?

Conversations with Big Rich
Land Use Advocate, John Stewart, on Episode 123

Conversations with Big Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 75:54 Transcription Available


John Stewart devoted his career to the Navy, and his extra time to Land Use. A lifetime advocate for using public lands, John continues to use his time to keep the government and others from closing off our recreational access to public lands. Listen up to find out where the fight is now, and what you can do to help.9:05 – I joined the Navy and visited the world13:08 – I got out of the Navy and then two months later went back to work for the Navy17:30 – Hey, wait a minute, you close these areas off and we got a lot of problems23:55 – getting local businesses to really stress what the economic impact would be helps28:17 – lawsuits are a last resort34:31 – it's an easy sell in downtown NYC40:16 – the difficult part is to get them to understand what we are losing51:55 – why do you want them to have the permit?  Why not?1:07:02 – the Hot Topics right now are in UtahWe want to thank our sponsors Maxxis Tires and 4Low Magazine.Support the show

Secrest Wardle Podcast
Recreational Land Use Act - 2022 Premises Liability Webinar Series

Secrest Wardle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 14:35


This webinar provides an overview, updated for 2022, of what the Recreational Land Use Act (RLUA) states, what it means to landowners, and offer an interpretation of the Act as demonstrated through case law, including Michigan Supreme Court and Michigan Court of Appeals interpretations. Hosted by: Daniel S. Schrode, II Partner Secrest Wardle, Troy If you are not already on our distribution list, to receive invitations to register for the Premises Liability webinars correlating to our podcasts, please email Marketing Assistant Sandie Vertel, at svertel@secrestwardle.com. The updated 2022 Secrest Wardle Premises Liability Handbook is now available. The Handbook provides a comprehensive review of each topic discussed in our 2022 Premises Liability series. If you are interested in obtaining an electronic copy, please contact Marketing Assistant Sandie Vertel at svertel@secrestwardle.com.

This Week in Virology
TWiV 923: If a bat pees in a forest, does anyone care?

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 65:11 Very Popular


From The Third International Symposium on Infectious Diseases of Bats in Ft. Collins, Colorado, TWiV speaks with Vincent Munster and Raina Plowright about their careers and their research on bats, bat viruses, bat ecology and spillover events. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Brianne Barker Guests: Vincent Munster and Raina Plowright Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Novel Hendra virus variant in Australia (Emerg Inf Dis) Nipah virus detection after spillover events (Emerg Inf Dis) Want to prevent pandemics? Stop spillovers (Nature) Ecological countermeasures to prevent zoonoses (Restor Ecol) Land-use induced spillovers (Lancet Planet Health) Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Pippa Hackett On The Climate Agreement

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 7:32


Pippa Hackett, Minister of State at the Department of Agriculture for Land Use and Biodiversity, discusses the agreement to set ceilings for maximum limits on greenhouse gas emissions for each sector of the Irish economy, including a 25% cut for agriculture

Earth Wise
Bumblebees And Climate Change | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 2:00


Pollinators, such as bees and bats, are vital for global food production.  They provide an ecological service that's necessary for the reproduction of nearly 75% of the world's flowering plants, including more than two-thirds of global food crops. Bumblebees are among the most important plant pollinators.  They pollinate many food crops, including apples, tomatoes, blueberries […]

Charlottesville Community Engagement
July 22, 2022: Temporary four-member Council defers two land use votes, holds first reading on plastic bag tax

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 15:39


Welcome to Spational Noonerism Day, which doesn’t exactly toll off the rung. But if words seem to be a crittle bit lazy today, we can always mely on the rajesty of numbers as it is either 7/22/22 or 22/7/22, depending on what side of the Atlantic you’re on. This is Communville Charlotteminity Engagement and I’m Tawn Shubbs. Now, on to the information. On today’s program:Charlottesville City Council holds first reading on a five-cent tax on plastic bagsA contract has been awarded for a streambank restoration in McIntire ParkAnd Charlottesville City Council defers two land use votes due to a missing member but approve a plan to convert a single family house into a mixed-use apartment buildingFirst shout out: Soul of Cville to mark Fifth Anniversary of A12In today’s first subscriber-supported shout-out: Three groups are preparing to hold the second annual Soul of Cville festival to celebrate Black excellence in Central Virginia. Chic & Classy Image Consulting, 101.3 JAMZ, and the Ix Art Park Foundation will host the event which will be held on August 12, August 13, and August 14 and will feature: Live music and performancesA fashion showA Black artisan market featuring local vendorsFood from local Black-owned restaurantsA pop-up skate event with De La RollAn art show called There Are Black People in the Future with The Bridge PAI. On Friday there will be a screening of the 1989 film Do the Right Thing, with an afterparty in the Looking Glass hosted by 9 Pillars Hip Hop. For details, visit www.ixartpark.org/soul-of-cville.City Council holds first reading on plastic bag taxCharlottesville City Council has taken a first step on implementing a five cent tax on most plastic bags at retail stores. A first reading was held on Monday but the public hearing will be held on August 1. “It’s still a work in process at this point and we’re not ready for a final version of it,” said Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook. Deputy City Manager Sam Sanders explained that the General Assembly adopted legislation in 2020 to allow localities to levy the tax. He said there are only four ways the revenue can be used. “We can provide reusable bags to [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program] and [Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children] recipients, we can produce education to reduce environmental waste, work on mitigation on pollution and litter, and work on environmental clean-up.” Sanders said some bags are exempt, such as durable plastic one with handles intended to be used for multiple uses, and plastics for some types of groceries such as ice cream and meat. “The retailer does the work of collecting the tax,” Sanders said. “They are permitted to retain one cent of every five cents collected to offset their collection and remittance expenses. It’s very much a similar process to how they collect retail sales and use collections. They will send those in to the Virginia Department of Taxation each month.”If approved, Charlottesville would begin collecting the tax on January 1, the same day the tax will go into effect in Albemarle County. Sanders said the city has met with county officials to coordinate efforts and communication. He said the city will need to distribute reusable bags in advance to people who will really need them. “That additional five cents each visit for all the items they would be acquiring adds up over time so we want to make sure that we’re making an equity investment in the roll-out of this particular tax,” Sanders said. One of the details to be worked out is the type of reusable bag. Linen, canvas, or another kind of plastic? “That will be one of the program details that we will definitely be looking for additional feedback,” Sanders said City Councilor Brian Pinkston said that he looks forward to hearing from the public.“To me this seems pretty non-controversial,” Pinkston said. “It seems like a win-win type thing but maybe I’m missing something.” While the public hearing will be held on August 1, Council may not take a vote until August 15 in case something there’s a logistical challenge brought up by the public. City awards Schenks’s Branch contractThe city of Charlottesville will hire a North Carolina based company to restore the streambank of a waterway that runs through McIntire Park. KBS Earthworks won the contract through a competitive bidding process. “The Schenks’ Branch Tributary Project consists of a construction of a priority II and priority III stream restoration to stabilize 818 linear feet of existing impaired stream,” reads the project description in the construction documents that KBS Earthworks will implement. KBS Earthworks will be paid $762,277.27 for the work, according to the notice of award issued yesterday. Funding for the project comes from the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund administered by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. “The stream is experiencing active severe erosion of its banks and bed, sending excessive amounts of sediment downstream to waterways listed as impaired by DEQ,” reads a StoryMap on the project that was published in February. “As a result, the stream offers poor habitat for aquatic organisms and is largely inaccessible to the public.” When completed, the restored stream will run through the Botanical Garden of the Piedmont.  Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign Since the very beginning of this newsletter, one long-time Patreon supporter has used his shout-out to draw your attention to the work of the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign. The campaign is a coalition of grassroots partners including motivated citizens and volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. Summer is in high gear and pollinators are active! Want to learn more? Visit plantvirginianatives.org to download Piedmont Native Plants: A Guide for Landscapes and Gardens. Four member Council delays action on two land use items, approves a thirdCharlottesville City Council has existed as a five member body since 1928 when an amendment to the charter added two more Councilors. In 1981, voters approved a referendum to expand the number to seven, but Council ordered a revote and the idea was defeated the second time around.This past Monday’s Council meeting illustrates what can happen when one member is not present. Vice Mayor Juandiego is on a sabbatical in Ethiopia with his church. There were three land use items on the agenda and two of them were deferred, both for slightly different reasons. For background, read my June 30, 2022 story Charlottesville Council briefed on city-owned property. In the first item, Council opted to wait on a vote to vacate a paper alley in the Fifeville neighborhood. “The owners of 323 6th Street SW have asked the city to close this 20 foot platted right of way,” said City Attorney Lisa Robertson. “City Council back in 2010 previously closed a different section of the platted street.” City Councilor Sena Magill repeated her concerns about doing this without a policy in place that explains to the public what paper streets are and how they can be vacated. “Having been a homeowner who has easements who looked to try to get easements closed around 2010, I was told it couldn’t be done,” Magill said. Robertson said each case is different given the age of the plat, size of property, presence of other easements, and so on. She said Magill was right that the city has taken many approaches. “A few years ago, a previous City Council determined that you should use a scoring rubric to determine whether or not to close certain platted alleys,” Robertson said. Robertson said the city’s new Office of Community Solutions is looking into the topic as part of their efforts to get handle on what property the city owns. Mayor Snook said he shared Magill’s concern of a lack of policy.  So did City Councilor Michael Payne, but he said he would support this particular vacation. Pinkston asked if there would be a downside to waiting. That’s when Mayor Snook brought up the fact Council was down one member. “As least one concern for right now is that I don’t know if we would be 3-1 or 2-2, but if Vice Mayor Wade was here, he would presumably be able to break a tie,” Snook said. Council opted to defer a vote to the August 15 vote. 1000 Monticello Road decision deferredAfter that, Council took up a special use permit to allow 11 units at 1000 Monticello Road. An existing apartment complex is on the property and the permit is required for additional density in a structure that would be built on what is now a driveway. Council denied a similar request last year on a 3-2 vote after several speakers had argued that the developer should be held accountable for a decision to raise rents that many long-term residents could not afford.  Since then, a second application was submitted that increased the number of units that would be guaranteed to be rented out below market. “The Planning Commission reviewed this at their June meeting and recommended that the application be approved,” said city planner Brian Haluska. (See also: Planning Commission recommends approval of 11 units at 1000 Monticello Road, June 15, 2022)Haluska said the application did not trigger the city’s existing affordability requirements but seven out of the eleven units would have some income restrictions. According to the resolution, five of the apartments would be classified as “For-Rent Affordable Dwelling Units” and would be reserved for ten years to households making less than 65 percent of the area median income at a total cost (rent plus utilities) that cannot exceed the fair market rent as established by the U.S. Department Housing and Urban Development.Two of the units would be “For-rent Workforce Affordable Dwelling Unit” at rent (plus utilities) that could not exceed 125 percent of the fair market value. To qualify, households must be at 80 percent of the area median income. (look up Virginia’s fair market rent rates)Earlier in the meeting, several employees of the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority urged Council to vote the project down because they said the affordability terms were not long enough or deep enough. “The city really needs to take a look at what units are being constructed not only through the [special use permit] process but what units you are incentivizing when you all fund projects as well,” said John Sales, executive director of the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. Sales said Council should follow the recommendations by the Office of Community Solutions to lengthen the affordability term to thirty years rather than the ten proffered by the developer. In April 2021, a group that calls itself the Charlottesville Low-Income Housing Coalition published a study called “Why Building More Market-Rate Housing Will Not Solve Charlottesville’s Housing Crisis.” (read the report)Kelsey Schlein of Shimp Engineering was on hand to explain what the rents would be for the five affordable units. “The 2022 HUD [Fair Market Rent] for a one bedroom is $1,063,” Schlein said. “The Charlottesville [Metropolitan Statistical Area] median family income is $111,200.” The rents for the other two would be at 125 percent of the fair market rate, which would be under $1,300 a month. Councilor Magill indicated she would vote no.“I don’t see how this project has significantly altered from when it came before us,” Magill said. Councilor Michael Payne said he would also repeat his no vote. “Just to note for the historical record at this site that the lease terminations and evictions happened and there will be a net loss of affordable housing even if this is approved or not,” Payne said. Pinkston made a motion to approve the special use permit, and Snook seconded. Snook had voted in favor last year. “I guess the question is do we want to wait until Vice Mayor Wade is back to break the tie,” Snook said. “I would,” Pinkston said.At this point, another representative of the applicant requested a deferral. Pinkston withdrew his motion, and the matter will come back on August 15. Councilor Payne voted against the motion to allow the item to be deferred. In the final matter, Shimp Engineering also sought an increase for a density increase at 923 Harris Street to replace a single-family house for a multi-use building with seven apartments. The land is zoned industrial and Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook said he was concerned about taking away developable land for businesses. However, there were enough votes to proceed and Council approved it on a 3-1 vote. More from City Council, including a report on the Planning Commission votes in the next installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement. End of the newsletter business notesWhat’s the 411? This edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement! Thank you to all of the supports who help make this possible and have allowed me to improve this product over the past two years. This is a service of Town Crier Productions.You can join in and help make sure I make it to 822 by signing up for a paid subscription through Substack. If you do, Ting will match your initial payment. Go visit their website and see what they may be able to do for your Internet needs. Ting supports this brand of community engagement with a match! Paid subscriptions are fuel and each new payment makes me work that much harder for the community. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Booked on Planning
Land Use Law in a Nutshell

Booked on Planning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 40:29


Planning theory and laws are constantly evolving and changing. We need to continue to learn, think, and have conversations and dialogue. It is not enough to understand the core concepts, but we should go further to push the boundaries to get our communities to the next level and evolve the way we live. No longer is the status quo sufficient as we have begun to re-examination of the foundations of land use law and the questionable groundwork it stands on. Additionally, states gave local governments the power to decide what gets built on the land. As a result, land use law is primarily local and comes out of the respect for local knowledge and processes. How we choose to apply zoning codes and what to regulate has immense power. These codes impact everything from cradle to grave which is why working in the field of land use law is such an interesting and dynamic career.

Talk Back
Friday, Jul 15 - City Talk

Talk Back

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 49:22


Jordan Hess is vice president of the Missoula City Council, a veteran Ward 2 representative, and also chair of the Council

Charlottesville Community Engagement
July 13, 2022: Updates on land use master planning in Albemarle, Charlottesville, and the University of Virginia

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 17:27


Does Wednesday the 13th make you tremble in fear? What about the fact that we’re now 110 days away from Halloween? Or perhaps the fast-paced motion of a rapidly revolving world has you dizzy? Either way, we are still supposed to be in the middle of the days of haziness and laziness, but somehow craziness abides each and every day. Charlottesville Community Engagement intends to bring some focus on an ever-changing landscape. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. In today’s edition:A new health partnership is sponsoring an event this Saturday to promote better health outcomes in vulnerable communitiesSeveral area organizations receive funding from Sentara Healthcare Inflation is up as measured in the latest update of the Consumer Price IndexAn update on the Cville Plans Together initiative as well as a status report on the development of the University of Virginia’s next master plan Time is running out to fill out the latest survey in Albemarle County’s Comprehensive Plan review First shout-out is for LEAP’s new Thermalize Virginia program In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: Have you been thinking of converting your fossil-fuel appliances and furnaces into something that will help the community reduce its greenhouse gas emissions? Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP,  has launched a new program to guide you through the steps toward electrifying your home. Thermalize Virginia will help you understand electrification and connect you with vetted contractors to get the work done and help you find any rebates or discounts. Visit thermalizeva.org to learn more and to sign up!  UVA continues to develop next master planThe University of Virginia is in the midst of updating its master plan, which is to be known as the 2030 Grounds Plan. These meetings are not open to the public, but the documents and presentations are available for your review. According to a presentation at the June 15, 2022 meeting of the Master Planning Council, the next plan will integrate several recent plans such as the 2030 Great and Good Strategic Plan as well as sustainability goals. The first phase of the plan’s update began last summer and the second phase took a look at Big Ideas, System Plans, and Redevelopment Zones. One identified opportunity is to:“Improve the Grounds-City interface through ongoing collaboration and cooperation on sustainability, equity, and community well-being,” reads a bullet point on slide 11 of the presentation. Big ideas include the goal of requiring second year students to live on Grounds, creation of mixed-use nodes including one at Fontaine Research Park, and creation of transit priority corridors. The presentation also includes maps for where future parking structures might be. In June, the Buildings and Grounds Committee recommended approval of an update to the UVA capital plan to include a $54 million 1,000 space garage. Potential locations could include Fontaine Research Park and North Grounds, as well as two other locations. (slide 28 for details). The third phase will begin to draft the actual plan. Both the Master Planning Council and the Land Use and Environmental Planning Committee (LUEPC) were asked what they thought of the Big Ideas and what was missing. The LUEPC committee is a closed-door body of Albemarle, Charlottesville and UVA staff that replaced what has been a public body in late 2019. Development of the 2030 Grounds Plan will continue throughout the rest of the year. The Charlottesville Planning Commission got an update on what’s happening at one of those nodes from Bill Palmer, their non-voting representative from the University of Virginia’s Office of the Architect. “At the Ivy corridor, the big construction site down there continues,” Palmer said. “The School of Data Science is the building you see coming out of the ground. A lot of steel in that one that, as well as the landscaping and the stormwater pond, which I heard held up well in the rain last weekend.” How does this compare with how the University markets the Charlottesville area to its students? Take a look at a video from May 2018. A series of speakers extol the virtues of this place. “The University feels like a major part of this community and town,” one unidentified voice can be heard. “There is this separation but also togetherness.” “You want to be part of a community that is constantly evolving, not in a rush, but gradually so you can make the place work for you,” says another unidentified speaker whose voice may sound familiar. You’ll have to hear the podcast to make your guess. Deadline for Comprehensive Plan survey in Albemarle fast approaching Albemarle County is in the first phase of a review of its Comprehensive Plan with an eye on a growth management policy. A second questionnaire on the policy closes on July 17, and Albemarle’s Communications and Public Engagement office produced an explanatory video. “The growth management policy is one of the tools that we use to implement the county’s vision by helping us to make intentional decisions about how and where we grow and what areas are protected,” states the narrator of the video.The video states that one purpose of a growth management policy is to ensure that there are services for a growing population, including the provision of water and sewer services. “The majority of new residential, commercial, retail, office, industrial, and mixed-use development is intended to be within the county’s development areas,” the video continues. “The rural area is intended to have limited residential development.” Different community groups are also encouraging community members to fill out the survey.The Forest Lakes Community Association reminded its members of the basic gist of the growth management policy. “Designated Development Areas currently comprise only five percent of Albemarle County while Rural Areas currently comprise 95 percent of the County,” reads the newsletter. “Yet we in Forest Lakes are seeing the developmental impacts more directly, since the limited Development Area includes the 29-Corridor to the west of Forest Lakes.” The Forest Lakes Community Association had argued against the nearby Brookhill and RST Residents developments, and points out there’s currently no public transportation in the area. “Roads are planned that will eventually connect both developments directly to Ashwood Boulevard, with estimates of up to a 50 percent increase in daily traffic utilizing the Forest Lakes South exit,” the newsletter continues. Former members of the Village of Rivanna Community Advisory Committee also want people to fill out the survey. The group quit en masse in April which you can read about on Information Charlottesville or on their Substack newsletter.This spring, the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors were presented with a build-out analysis to determine if there’s enough room in the existing development area to meet the needs of a growing population. Albemarle Planning Commission briefed on build-out analysis, Information Charlottesville, May 25, 2022New report shows potential for Albemarle's growth if the county wants it, Daily Progress, May 24, 2022Supervisors got an update on June 1, 2022 that I’ve yet to write about, but will before the end of the summer. You can watch the video of that meeting here, and let us know what happened!NDS Director gives an update on Charlottesville’s Comprehensive PlanIt’s a hot summer for big land use plans. Charlottesville is in the third phase of its Cville Plans Together initiative which has already seen adoption of an Affordable Housing Plan as well as an updated Comprehensive Plan that gives more development rights to mostly every residential lot in the City.How those development rights will turn into future buildings will depend on the update of the city’s zoning code that is now underway. In June, the city released a Zoning Diagnostics and Approach report.“Basically, a slate of ideas for how we can modify our zoning to implement the Comprehensive Plan that you all and Council adopted last November,” said Neighborhood Development Services Director James Freas to the Charlottesville Planning Commission last night. The next step will be the development of a new Frequently Asked Questions list based on input taken at a public forum in June. “Our public feedback period lasts until all the way through until the end of August,” Freas said.In early August, Freas said the city will release the inclusionary zoning and market analysis report.“The market analysis piece of that is the piece looking at how might our real estate development marketplace here in Charlottesville react to this new zoning?” Freas said. “What we can expect in terms of the timing for new development, the types of new development that might happen, and where it might happen based on our existing market conditions and what we can not to that.” If you’re interested in what’s happening with the property market in Charlottesville, I track that and will have a piece that paid Substack subscribers will get a first look at tomorrow. In the meantime, visit Information Charlottesville to catch up on monthly anecdotal reviews. Sign up for a paid subscription to get the June report tomorrow!Happy 2nd birthday to Charlottesville Community EngagementToday is the second anniversary of Charlottesville Community Engagement. I posted the first episode to what’s now become Information Charlottesville. This first version is about five minutes long, but I decided to commit to putting together something on a regular basis. I had produced the Charlottesville Quarantine Report since March 2020, and was quickly wanting to branch out.I’ve been able to do this work thanks to a great number of people who have been supporting the work through Patreon. I’m grateful to those who thought my return to local journalism would be worth funding, and so I got to work as soon as I could. A few days after July 13, 2020, I launched this Substack because the delivery platform is so easy to use. This has also brought in more revenue, with many generous supporters who want me to produce as much information as I can about the items I’ve been covering for many years. This shout-out is a thank you, but it’s also a hope that if you’ve not opted to support the work yet, you might consider doing so at some point in the near future. I depend on subscriptions and Patreon contributions, as well as a couple of sponsorships. I’m looking to sustain the information and to continue serving the community. And with that, it’s back to the work! Inflation increases by largest amount since November 1981Real quick segment here. You’ll hear about inflation from lots of sources today, but I wanted to direct you to the original press release. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics today released the latest Consumer Price Index (CPI), which indicates that the average cost of all tracked items has increased by 9.2 percent from June 2021 to June 2022. For the month, the CPI increased 1.3 percent over May. Energy costs increased 7.5 percent since May with gasoline increasing 11.2 percent. When you exclude food and energy, the index rose 0.7 percent in June. Several organizations get funding from Sentara HealthcareEarlier this month, Sentara Healthcare announced nearly $5 million in funds for organizations across North Carolina in Virginia. Distributions from the Sentara Healthier Communities Fund include several in the greater Charlottesville area. “These investments will directly support programs and initiatives that address social determinants of health and promote health equity by eliminating traditional barriers to health and human services,” reads a release that went out on July 6. The local groups that received funds are:Brave Souls on FireCharlottesville Redevelopment & Housing Authority Common Ground Healing ArtsHabitat for Humanity of Greater CharlottesvilleLoaves & Fishes Food Pantry, Inc.Meals on Wheels of Charlottesville/AlbemarleThe Women’s InitiativeThomas Jefferson EMS Council Tour of Faith Mobile Community event to be held to promote health benefits of walkabilityA relatively new public health program to improve health for vulnerable community members will hold an event this Saturday morning to spread awareness of their work Betsy Peyton is the director of WellAWARE, a partnership program between UVA Health, the Charlottesville Free Clinic, and Central Virginia Health Services that seeks to serve medically underserved communities. “We are an innovative, new community health program that sends community health workers into people’s homes to help connect them to better health care,” Peyton said. Peyton said this includes neighborhoods such as Rose Hill and the 10th and Page neighborhood as well as the Esmont area in southern Albemarle. “We chose these neighborhoods related to health data,” Peyton said. “Highest rates of obesity, stroke, highest rates of low acuity emergency room visits, so people going to the emergency room for things like a headache.” WellAWARE is intended to connect people to primary care physicians. “We’ve signed a lot of people up for Medicaid who are scared to go the doctor because they weren’t sure how they would pay,” Peyton said. “We drive people to the doctor or provide free cabs to the doctor.” Peyton said the organization also holds events to promote awareness of healthy lifestyles, and this Saturday there’s one coming up in central Charlottesville.“So this event, we’re partnering with Move 2 Health Equity and it’s going to be a big event in Washington Park called Healthy Streets and Healthy People,” Peyton said. Peyton said the event will draw importance to the need for environmentally healthy streets. “If you’ve looked at maps of Charlottesville and the region, the areas that have the least shade also have the worst health outcomes, are also the poorest, and traditionally African-American neighborhoods,” Peyton said. “And so part of the mission of this event is to talk about more bikeability, more tree canopy, usable parks.” The event will take place between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. There will be a “gentle” walk/run with prizes, a field day event for kids, and gardening sessions where people can take home containers of potted herbs and vegetables. There will also be some general medical training. Learn more in this link to a press release.Housekeeping notes for the conclusion of this installment:Now that this newsletter is two, I am going to begin to add this end section with wrap-ups and acknowledgements. This is in part to curb on the rambling that occurs at the end of the podcast. Beginning today, I will acknowledge that most of the music in the podcast is composed by an entity currently going by the name Wraki. You can purchase the latest tracks on Bandcamp in an album called regret everything. If you’re interested in a shout-out, consider becoming a Patreon Subscriber, or drop me a line and we can find another way. The shout-outs may be changing soon in the near future. I am certain that does not mean they will be translated into Esperanto. Sed ili povus esti.Charlottesville Community Engagement is free to receive, but supported by paid subscriptions. If you subscribe, Ting will match your initial contribution! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Total Information AM
Fairview Heights City Council meets to discuss controversial drug treatment facility

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 5:06


Dallas Alley, Fairview Heights Director of Land Use and Development joins Carol Daniel and Tom Ackerman talking about the meeting to discuss the drug treatment center. 

The Sustainable City
Episode 6: Achieving Our Climate Goals: The Land Use-Transportation Nexus

The Sustainable City

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 69:09


Rushad Nanavatty, Managing Director and lead of the Rocky Mountain Institute'sUrban Transformation program, and Ben Holland, Senior Associate and PolicyLiaison at RMI, join us to explore the connection between transportation and land use,and how each affects our ability to achieve our climate goals, from commuting to streetdesign to electric vehicles.

Conduit Street Podcast
Election Anxiety, and the Gas Tax Debate Returns

Conduit Street Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 38:57


On the latest episode of the Conduit Street Podcast, Kevin Kinnally and Michael Sanderson explain why some local boards of elections may struggle to report timely results for the upcoming primary election. Plus, a breakdown of why President Biden's call to temporarily suspend federal and state gas taxes faces severe headwinds on both Capitol Hill and State Circle in Annapolis.The Conduit Street Podcast is available on major platforms like Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and more. Episodes are also available on MACo's Conduit Street blog.Listen to previous episodes of the Conduit Street Podcast on our website.Related Conduit Street CoverageHogan Veto Jeopardizes Timely Election ResultsSenator Kagan Calls for State of Emergency to Address Election VetoesVoting in the 2022 Primary Election? Here's What You Need to Know(What's the Deal With) Maryland's Quirky Gas TaxPresiding Officers Reject Calls for Special SessionComptroller Calls for Special Session to Halt Automatic Gas Tax HikeIRS Boosting Mileage Deduction Rates as Gas Prices Soar

Yakety Yak
Wilf Sommerkorn: Kaysville Land Use - Growth, Density, Water

Yakety Yak

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 49:03


Wilf serves on the Board of Directors for APA Utah “APA Utah provides vision and leadership for the future development and re-development of Utah communities.” -www.apautah.org As co-chair of the APA Utah Legislative Committee, Wilf advises the Utah League of Cities and Towns and provides critical updates to municipal leaders across the state.  Wilf blogs about Land Use and Legislation in the Utah Land Use Politics Blog: https://utahlanduse.org/blog/ In this episode we discuss Kaysville City-specific land use trends, policies, and the impact and effectiveness of public engagement.  Wilf is currently serving as a Planning Commissioner for Kaysville City and has been instrumental in guiding the commission through the most recent draft update of Kaysville City's General Plan    

We Measure The World
Episode 15: How Land Use Impacts Hydrology in Texas Shrink-Swell Clays

We Measure The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 31:10


Leo Rivera operates as a research scientist and director of Client Success at METER Group. He earned his undergraduate degree in Agriculture Systems Management at Texas A&M University, where he also got his Master's degree in Soil Science. There he helped develop an infiltration system for measuring hydraulic conductivity used by the NRCS in Texas. Currently, Leo is the force behind application development in METER's hydrology instrumentation including the SATURO, HYPROP and WP4C. He also works in R&D to explore new instrumentation for water and nutrient movement in soil.Discover the SATURO field infiltrometerSubscribe:https://go.meter.group/l/304411/2021-12-08/21lz3bFollow us:https://twitter.com/meter_envhttps://www.linkedin.com/showcase/meterenvironment/Questions?Our scientists have decades of experience helping researchers and growers measure the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Talk to an expert—> Request a quote—>DisclaimerThe views and opinions expressed in the podcast and on this posting are those of the individual speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by METER.

Farming Today
10/06/22 - Rural housing, hay meadows, land use

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 13:33


The government has confirmed that it plans to extend the ‘right to buy' policy to people living in properties owned by housing associations. In rural areas, housing associations often play an important role in providing affordable rental accommodation. We look at the impact this change in policy could have on rural communities. Hay meadows were once a common sight in the countryside, but there are very few of them left now. Not only are they beautiful and a valuable habitat, but farmers can also get grants to manage, restore or even create them from scratch. All this week on Farming Today we're discussing land use and today we hear how the Welsh government has bought up a farm near Brecon for it to be run by the organisers of the Green Man Festival. Local people are concerned about what that means for the future of the farm. Presented by Caz Graham and produced for BBC Audio by Caitlin Hobbs

Conduit Street Podcast
Playing it Safe: The Latest on Infectious Threats

Conduit Street Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 25:52


On the latest episode of the Conduit Street Podcast, D'Paul Nibber joins Kevin Kinnally to provide a roundup of the latest public health threats, including (still) COVID-19, Monkeypox, and tick-borne diseases. Plus, learn how local health departments prevent and control communicable diseases using surveillance, outbreak response, education, preparedness, et cetera.The Conduit Street Podcast is available on major platforms like Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and more. Episodes are also available on MACo's Conduit Street blog.Listen to previous episodes of the Conduit Street Podcast on our website.Useful LinksMonkeypox – A Maryland Primer