Podcasts about Anthropology

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Scientific study of humans, human behavior and societies

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Anthropology

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Best podcasts about Anthropology

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Latest podcast episodes about Anthropology

LongDays with Yannis Pappas
Digging up Dogs with David Ian Howe - LongDays with Yannis Pappas - Ep 52

LongDays with Yannis Pappas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 91:17


David Ian Howe is an Anthropologist, Archaeologist and Cynologist. The kid loves digging up the earth for historical artifacts and dog bones. He studies the historical relationship between man and dog and how we evolved together. Originally from Long Island, he's now based out of Nashville. He's got a popular fun TiKTok account and Instagram where he does educational videos and skits about historical humans and

Sounding History
Soundtracks of Imperial Power in Europe and Africa

Sounding History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:06


Comparing cultural expressions is a risky enterprise:  especially, in our case, because too many  still perceive Western “classical” art music to be somehow superior to other  musics because of its alleged and “universal” values. But we think the challenge can be worthwhile, especially at a deeper level, because it can help us  tease out complementary ways rulers use sound to literally underscore their political power. In today's episode we investigate music and power in the Black Atlantic, where European and African musics collided in history.Our first example is that of the Italo-French composer Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687), who often features as the father of French opera. We focus on his role as composer of lavish multimedia productions known more formally as tragédies en musique, tragedies set to music and celebrating his patron Louis XIV. These fusions of music, drama, and dance were pure political spectacle, and in Louis's younger years even involved the king himself as a dancer. The king was dancing because the purpose of a tragédie en musique was to place the king's body (which itself represented France, to contemporary ways of thinking) at the center of a complex piece of theatre. The point was not so much to entertain the audience, which often consisted of France's political elite, but to remind them of the king's absolute power. Lully made a career of creating works like these. Tom unpacks Lully's work, his dismissal by Louis after a sexual scandal (with a digression to the composer's subsequent death of gangrene as the result of a self-inflicted wound sustained while directing music) and turns, finally, to Louis's global political ambitions. Had those ambitions  been fully realized, the cultural world of the Black Atlantic (and thus our music history) would have been much more French.Chris's postcard takes us to the soundworlds of the great empires of sub-Saharan West Africa in the pre-colonial era. He starts with the Empire of Mali, whose first emperor, Sundiata Keita (ruling  in the thirteenth century CE) is memorialized in magnificent musical-epic poetry that has been passed down by oral and aural tradition. The bearers of this memory are called jeliat in the languages of West Africa (in French: griot). Chris explains how rulers of empires such as Mali depended on the jeliat, whose memorized epics were key sources of historical, genealogical, and legal knowledge, to tell their stories and legitimize their power.We then attempt one of those challenging cross-cultural comparisons. Did Lully serve as a kind of praise-singerto Louis XIV? On the face of it certainly. Yet  historical comparisons are never simple or neutral. Just look at where we would be likely to encounter Lully's music today: in “classical” opera houses or in other formats popular with elites in the “global north,” who are often culturally conditioned to value “timeless classics,” not political messages. In contrast the musical aesthetics and outputs  of the oral-aural epics of West Africa, which are still performed by musicians who claim direct lineage to their predecessors at the court of Sundiata, are more likely to pop up on playlists of “traditional” or “world” music. Both are “old” music, so why is one “classical” and the other “traditional”?The answer is the Western colonization of Africa, the flows of labor, energy, and data that made it possible, and--in turn--the influence of the jelat tradition on the vernacular musics of the Black Atlantic, which underpin nearly so many pop music genres today, from the Delta Blues to hip-hop. Music, it seems to us, is never unmoored from political and economic realities.Key PointsIn different ways around the world, political power and music mix.The prestigious genre of French “tragedy in music” formed in the late seventeenth century in lavish spectacles that told stories about the political power of Louis XIV, the “Sun King”The great poetic epics of the West African Empires, such as the Sundiata Epic from the court of the Empire of Mali, functioned similarly.Lully's operas live on, often stripped of their political meaning, in Western “classical” music. The West African epics live on too, as African “traditional music.” Some of their ethos informs the popular genres today that stem from the collision of European and African cultures in the era of the Black Atlantic, with its trade in goods and enslaved people.ResourcesWe are fans of Gérard Corbiau's 2000 film costume drama Le roi danse (even if it's somewhat over the top!). Excerpts are available widely on YouTube and other platforms. The soundtrack is available on CD or download from Deutsche Grammophon, and the streaming services Apple Music and Spotify.Timothy Blanning's book The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture: Old Regime Europe 1660-1789 is an excellent introduction to the use of cultural spectacle to underpin political power.Eric Charry's Mande Music: Traditional and Modern Music of the Maninka and Mandinka of Western Africa is a masterful situation of “traditional” music as part of contemporary West Africa aesthetics and politics.Christopher Waterman's Juju: A Social History and Ethnography of an African Popular Music places the proverb-rich Yoruba contemporary vocal/instrumental music juju in contemporary West African context.All of the books mentioned in the episode can be found in our Sounding History Goodreads discussion group. Join the conversation!

Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast
Episode 60: Will Smith, Alfred Deakin Institute for Globalization and Citizenship, Deakin University

Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 32:19


In this week's episode, Michael chats with Will Smith, from Deakin University in Melbourne, about his recent book project, Mountains of Blame (link), which explores the impact of environmental governance and climate change on the Philippine island of Palawan.  Research and lecture summary: 01:50 Advice for researchers and recommendations: 18:00 Will Smith's Top Recommendations: Mao's Bestiary by Liz Chee (link) The Sovereign Trickster by Vincent Rafael (link)

Sausage of Science
SoS 146- Racial taxonomy...just don't do it with Dr. Charles Roseman

Sausage of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 67:53


On today's episode Chris and Cara talk to Dr. Charles Roseman about his recent paper “Lewontin did not commit Lewontins fallacy, his critics do: Why racial taxonomy is not useful for the scientific study of human variation” https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/bies.202100204. Dr. Roseman is an Associate Professor in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior and Anthropology in the School of Integrative Biology at the University of Illinois. His work broadly focuses on genotype phenotype map structure, and the evolution of complex traits. You can view his website here: https://sib.illinois.edu/profile/croseman and follow him on Twitter @EvoRoseman. Contact the Sausage of Science Podcast and Human Biology Association: Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/humanbiologyassociation Website:humbio.org/, Twitter: @HumBioAssoc Cara Ocobock, Website: sites.nd.edu/cara-ocobock/, Email:cocobock@nd.edu, Twitter:@CaraOcobock Chris Lynn, HBA Public Relations Committee Chair, Website: cdlynn.people.ua.edu/, Email: cdlynn@ua.edu, Twitter:@Chris_Ly Delaney Glass, Website: dglass.netlify.app/, Email: dglass1@uw.edu, Twitter: @GlassDelaney Alexandra Niclou, Email: aniclou@nd.edu, Twitter: @fiat_Luxandra

New Books Network
Eva von Redecker, "Praxis and Revolution: A Theory of Social Transformation" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 64:55


The concept of revolution marks the ultimate horizon of modern politics. It is instantiated by sites of both hope and horror. Within progressive thought, “revolution” often perpetuates entrenched philosophical problems: a teleological philosophy of history, economic reductionism, and normative paternalism. At a time of resurgent uprisings, how can revolution be re-conceptualized to grasp the dynamics of social transformation and disentangle revolutionary practice from authoritarian usurpation? Eva von Redecker reconsiders critical theory's understanding of radical change in order to offer a bold new account of how revolution occurs. She argues that revolutions are not singular events but extended processes: beginning from the interstices of society, they succeed by gradually re-articulating social structures toward a new paradigm. Developing a theoretical account of social transformation, Praxis and Revolution incorporates a wide range of insights, from the Frankfurt School to queer theory and intersectionality. Its revised materialism furnishes prefigurative politics with their social conditions and performative critique with its collective force. Von Redecker revisits the French Revolution to show how change arises from struggle in everyday social practice. She illustrates the argument through rich literary examples—a ménage à trois inside a prison, a radical knitting circle, a queer affinity group, and petitioners pleading with the executioner—that forge a feminist, open-ended model of revolution. Praxis and Revolution: A Theory of Social Transformation (Columbia UP, 2021) urges readers not only to understand revolutions differently but also to situate them elsewhere: in collective contexts that aim to storm manifold Bastilles—but from within. Eva von Redecker is a German critical theorist and public philosopher, currently based at the University of Verona as the recipient of a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship. She was previously a research associate at Humboldt University of Berlin and she has also taught at Goethe University Frankfurt and the New School. Lucy Duggan is a writer and translator. She is the author of the novel Tendrils (2014). Fulya Pinar is a PhD candidate in the department of Anthropology at Rutgers University. Her work focuses on alternative economies, refugee care, and migration in Turkey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Eva von Redecker, "Praxis and Revolution: A Theory of Social Transformation" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 64:55


The concept of revolution marks the ultimate horizon of modern politics. It is instantiated by sites of both hope and horror. Within progressive thought, “revolution” often perpetuates entrenched philosophical problems: a teleological philosophy of history, economic reductionism, and normative paternalism. At a time of resurgent uprisings, how can revolution be re-conceptualized to grasp the dynamics of social transformation and disentangle revolutionary practice from authoritarian usurpation? Eva von Redecker reconsiders critical theory's understanding of radical change in order to offer a bold new account of how revolution occurs. She argues that revolutions are not singular events but extended processes: beginning from the interstices of society, they succeed by gradually re-articulating social structures toward a new paradigm. Developing a theoretical account of social transformation, Praxis and Revolution incorporates a wide range of insights, from the Frankfurt School to queer theory and intersectionality. Its revised materialism furnishes prefigurative politics with their social conditions and performative critique with its collective force. Von Redecker revisits the French Revolution to show how change arises from struggle in everyday social practice. She illustrates the argument through rich literary examples—a ménage à trois inside a prison, a radical knitting circle, a queer affinity group, and petitioners pleading with the executioner—that forge a feminist, open-ended model of revolution. Praxis and Revolution: A Theory of Social Transformation (Columbia UP, 2021) urges readers not only to understand revolutions differently but also to situate them elsewhere: in collective contexts that aim to storm manifold Bastilles—but from within. Eva von Redecker is a German critical theorist and public philosopher, currently based at the University of Verona as the recipient of a Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship. She was previously a research associate at Humboldt University of Berlin and she has also taught at Goethe University Frankfurt and the New School. Lucy Duggan is a writer and translator. She is the author of the novel Tendrils (2014). Fulya Pinar is a PhD candidate in the department of Anthropology at Rutgers University. Her work focuses on alternative economies, refugee care, and migration in Turkey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
The Anthropology of Castration with Dr. Kathryn Reusch - Ruins 84

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 59:51


In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Kathryn Reusch, who is a Conservation Technician in the Museum Conservation Department at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. We talk about her experiences in school in the UK, her graduate research, and then we take a deep dive into the painful topic of castration (and yes we mean human castration). Connor and Carlton pepper Dr. Reusch with questions about castration and learn more than they ever needed to know. Literature Recommendations 1999 Eunuchs and Castrati: A Cultural History by Piotr O. Scholz 2005 The Human Bone Manual by Tim D. White and Pieter Arend Folkens 2007 The Archaeology of Disease by Charlotte Roberts and Keith Manchester 2008 The Eunuch in Byzantine History and Society by Shaun Together 2013 "That which was missing": The Archaeology of Castration by Dr. Kathryn Reusch Guest Contact Dr. Reusch's Twitter: @klreusch Denver Museum of Nature and Science Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Ruins on APN: https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/ruins Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 49: Designing Decolonization | Dori Tunstall

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:39


Dr. Dori Tunstall joined Ontario College of Art & Design University in 2016, as Dean of Design. As part of the senior management team, she plays a vital role in steering aspects of the academic and administrative agendas within the Faculty of Design, as well as related research, outreach, fundraising and operational activities. As the university has initiated the challenge of decolonizing its institution, Dori advocates and communicates how Respectful Design serves the appropriate design ethos for this process. Dori is a design anthropologist, public intellectual, and design advocate who works at the intersections of critical theory, culture, and design. She leads the Cultures-Based Innovation Initiative focused on using old ways of knowing to drive innovation processes that directly benefit communities. With a global career, Dori served as Associate Professor of Design Anthropology and Associate Dean at Swinburne University in Australia. She wrote the biweekly column Un-Design for The Conversation Australia. In the U.S., she taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She organized the U.S. National Design Policy Initiative and served as a director of Design for Democracy. Industry positions included UX strategists for Sapient Corporation and Arc Worldwide. Dori holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Stanford University and a BA in Anthropology from Bryn Mawr College. Bon talks with Dori about her journey from anthropology to design, role of design in new technologies and how we can decolonize design.

Sounding History
Sounding Stone and Cetacean Energy

Sounding History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 35:57


This episode is about what happens when sounds and people meet and mix. A lot of what we talk about takes place away from North America and Europe, but we end up circling back to a primary question in this season of the podcast: how did Westerners use the sounds of others to perceive the world, “The West,” and themselves?Our first example is one of those historical stories that is so, well, weird you have to wonder if it is actually fiction. In the early years of the seventeenth century Chinese officials discovered a thousand year-old stone pillar (or “steele”) near the city of Xi'an in Western China, along the old east-west trade route known as “the Silk Road.” It was inscribed both in Chinese and Syriac, a form of Aramiac in which many early Christian texts are transmitted. Recently arrived Jesuit missionaries were quick to pick up on this find, because it supported their claim that Christianity had a long history in China. They also transmitted the news back to Rome. Then the fun starts. The great Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher, famous among other things for his collection of interesting objects and texts from around the world, used what he read about the stone to speculate about the intonation of the Chinese language (and China's relationship to ancient Egypt!). A few decades later a minor German clergyman in then very provincial Berlin read Kircher's account and proposed the idea that in China people sang all the time (as if they were in an opera) instead of speaking. Our point is that conclusions about far-away places don't have to be true to be interesting.Our second postcard was inspired by a TikTok meme. At the time we recorded the show, sea shanties were everywhere on the internet, thanks mainly to the music-video sharing app ability to amplify strange (we would say interesting!) sound objects: the app can act as a kind of digital version of Kircher's collection of curiosities. This got us thinking about where sea shanties, and other seafaring songs come from.And so we found ourselves talking about whaling ships. As Chris points out, whalers, which were really floating factories, were a kind of Silk Road on the water, thanks to their global routes and diverse crews. They also remind us that music history, economic history, exploration, and extraction often run along the same tracks. The sea shanty meme was good fun (for most listeners!). But sea shanties, and other songs from the riches of maritime history, are more than just curiosities. They offer vital sonic clues about big processes, fascinating moments, and human experience in global history.Key TakeawaysHistorical misunderstandings can be interesting in their own right: take the story of how the discovery of an ancient monument in China led one European to speculate that Chinese people sang all the time as if they were in an opera. Behind this odd idea is a story of someone struggling to make sense of new historical evidence.Whaling ships and other workhorses of the maritime trade were both “floating factories” and fascinating soundscapes. The music passed down from them (including the recent TikTok sea shanty craze) offer clues about these soundscapes, and the ways that music history and the histories of economics (especially the history of working people) travel on the same tracks.ResourcesDaniel Chua and Alexander Rehding's Alien Listening: Voyager's Golden Record and Music from Earth got us thinking about how it can be illuminating to speculate about how other people--OK, they're talking about space aliens--make sense of sound.Bathsheba Demuth's Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait is a must read on the entanglements of ecology and economy. The author is a former dog-sled musher.We're very inspired by Peter Linbaugh and Markus Rediker's The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic, which profoundly shapes our thinking about labor and maritime trade.Check out the podcast Time to Eat the Dogs for thought-provoking stories about science, exploration, and “life at the extreme” presented by the historian Michael Robinson.All of the books mentioned in the episode can be found in our Sounding History Goodreads discussion group. Join the conversation!

Future Christian
Gabriel Gordon describes a Participatory Theology of Biblical Inspiration

Future Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:39


Gabriel Gordon joins the pod to talk about his book God Speaks: A Participatory Theology of Biblical Inspiration. In our conversation, Gabriel talks about what he means by the term "Bible idolatry," why we need to stop equating God's Word with the Bible, and how the jelly donut is perfect analogy for understanding Jesus. Gabriel graduated with a double major in Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Ministry from Oklahoma Baptist University. He is currently working on his Masters of Theological Studies with a specialization in Biblical Studies from Portland Seminary. He has authored two books and is featured in an edited volume of essays on Christian leadership. In addition, he is a confirmed member of the Episcopal church part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, a self-identified Anglo-Orthodox; and one of the co-founders of The Misfits Theology Club, a blog, podcast, and annual conference dedicated to providing a place of dialogue and working to build unity amongst diverse Christians. He currently lives in Grand Junction, Colorado, with his wife Hannah, and his dog Karl Barth. The Future Christian Podcast is a production of Torn Curtain Arts and Resonate Media.

New Books Network
Joshua Sbicca, "Food Justice Now!: Deepening the Roots of Social Struggle" (U Minnesota Press, 2018)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:55


Food Justice Now: Deepening the Roots of Social Struggle (University of Minnesota Press, 2018) charts a path from food activism to social justice activism that integrates the two. In an engrossing, historically grounded, and ethnographically rich narrative, Joshua Sbicca argues that food justice is more than a myopic focus on food, allowing scholars and activists alike to investigate the causes behind inequities and evaluate and implement political strategies to overcome them. Joshua Sbicca is associate professor of sociology at Colorado State University. His research focuses on food as a site of economic, political, and social struggle. His recent work studies food systems and cultures and social movements at intersections of carcerality, gentrification, and racial capitalism. Underlying these interests is an ongoing engagement with how activists and scholars articulate and practice food justice and what this means for building broad based social movements. Website: http://joshuasbicca.com/ Twitter: @joshsbicca Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books Network
Rose Wellman, "Feeding Iran: Shi`i Families and the Making of the Islamic Republic" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 43:56


Since Iran's 1979 Revolution, the imperative to create and protect the inner purity of family and nation in the face of outside spiritual corruption has been a driving force in national politics. Through extensive fieldwork, Rose Wellman examines how Basiji families, as members of Iran's voluntary paramilitary organization, are encountering, enacting, and challenging this imperative. Her ethnography reveals how families and state elites are employing blood, food, and prayer in commemorations for martyrs in Islamic national rituals to create citizens who embody familial piety, purity, and closeness to God. Feeding Iran: Shi'i Families and the Making of the Islamic Republic (U California Press, 2021) provides a rare and humanistic account of religion and family life in the post-revolutionary Islamic Republic that examines how home life and everyday piety are linked to state power. Rose Wellman is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She specializes in Iran and the Middle East. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Islamic Studies
Rose Wellman, "Feeding Iran: Shi`i Families and the Making of the Islamic Republic" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 43:56


Since Iran's 1979 Revolution, the imperative to create and protect the inner purity of family and nation in the face of outside spiritual corruption has been a driving force in national politics. Through extensive fieldwork, Rose Wellman examines how Basiji families, as members of Iran's voluntary paramilitary organization, are encountering, enacting, and challenging this imperative. Her ethnography reveals how families and state elites are employing blood, food, and prayer in commemorations for martyrs in Islamic national rituals to create citizens who embody familial piety, purity, and closeness to God. Feeding Iran: Shi'i Families and the Making of the Islamic Republic (U California Press, 2021) provides a rare and humanistic account of religion and family life in the post-revolutionary Islamic Republic that examines how home life and everyday piety are linked to state power. Rose Wellman is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She specializes in Iran and the Middle East. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Rose Wellman, "Feeding Iran: Shi`i Families and the Making of the Islamic Republic" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 43:56


Since Iran's 1979 Revolution, the imperative to create and protect the inner purity of family and nation in the face of outside spiritual corruption has been a driving force in national politics. Through extensive fieldwork, Rose Wellman examines how Basiji families, as members of Iran's voluntary paramilitary organization, are encountering, enacting, and challenging this imperative. Her ethnography reveals how families and state elites are employing blood, food, and prayer in commemorations for martyrs in Islamic national rituals to create citizens who embody familial piety, purity, and closeness to God. Feeding Iran: Shi'i Families and the Making of the Islamic Republic (U California Press, 2021) provides a rare and humanistic account of religion and family life in the post-revolutionary Islamic Republic that examines how home life and everyday piety are linked to state power. Rose Wellman is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She specializes in Iran and the Middle East. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Microfauna, Langmahdhalde, and being a Military Spouse with Dr. Gillian Wong - Ruins 83

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 63:04


In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Gillian Wong, who is an Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at Metropolitan Community College in Kansas City, Missouri, and a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Tuebingen. Dr. Wong chats with us about her early outdoor days, experiences at UC Davis, and how learning French has been useful for her in archaeology. We then delve into her thesis/dissertation work at the University of Utah and then in Germany. She pronounces the name of the site she worked on and Connor/Carlton fails to replicate her pronunciation. Dr. Wong then talks about her experiences being a military spouse and also some advice for those who are military spouses. Literature Recommendations 2008 The Archaeology of Animal Bones by Terry O'Connor 2017 Human Subsistence and Environment during the Magdalenian at Langmahdhalde: Evidence from a new Rock Shelter in the Lone Valley, Southwest Germany by Wong, Gillian L., Starkovich, B. M., Conard, N. J. 2018 An Introduction to Zooarchaeology by Diane Gifford-Gonzalez 2016 Taphonomy for Taxonomists: Implications of predation in small mammal studies by Fernández-Jalvo, Y., Andrews, P., Denys, C., Sesé, C., Stoetzel, E., Marin-Monfort, D., Pesquero, D. 2019 Mothering from the Field: The Impact of Motherhood on Site-Based Research edited by Bahiyyah M. Muhammad and Melanie-Angela Neuilly 2020 New perspectives on human subsistence during the Magdalenian in the Swabian Jura, Germany by Wong, Gillian L., Starkovich, B. M., Drucker, D. G., Conard 2020 Latest Pleistocene paleoenvironmental reconstructions from the Swabian Jura, southwestern Germany: evidence from stable isotope analysis and micromammal remains by Wong, Gillian L., Drucker, D. G., Starkovich, B. M., Conard, N. J. Dr. Wong's Recorded lecture on her work at Langmahdhalde Holding down the Fort Podcast Guest Contact Twitter @GillianLWong Email: gillian.wong368@gmail.com Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Ruins on APN: https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/ruins Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve
34) Who Mourns for Adonais?

Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 133:19


While exploring the planet Pollux IV, the Enterprise is held captive by an alien super-being who claims to be the Greek god Apollo. His demands are that the crew abandon ship, settle on his planet and worship him like their human ancestors did 5,000 years before. Since they are no match for Apollo's mythological powers, Captain Kirk's only hope lies in reasoning with Lt. Carolyn Palamas, the ship's Archaeology and Anthropology officer, who becomes smitten with Apollo after he chooses her to be his mate. In what is perhaps one of "Star Trek'" deepest and most thought-provoking episodes, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" takes the "ancient astronaut" theory and runs with it. The writing and direction are both superb, and the production design, wardrobe and original score are all fantastic. But the key to the success of this episode lies with the magnificent, fiercely-committed and heartbreaking performance of Michael Forest, who portrays Apollo as a charismatic and empathetic, yet ultimately tragic, figure. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents/support

New Books Network
Ross Kane, "Syncretism and Christian Tradition" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:36


Syncretism, even though, is an unavoidable phenomenon of religion, has a range of connotations. In Christian theology, the use of syncretism shifted from a compliment during the Reformation to an outright insult in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The term has a history of being used as a neutral descriptor, a pejorative marker, and even a celebration of indigenous agency. Its differing uses indicate the challenges of interpreting religious mixture, which today relate primarily to race and revelation. Despite its pervasiveness across religious traditions, syncretism is poorly understood and often misconceived. Ross Kane argues that the history of syncretism's use accentuates broader interpretive problems, drawing attention to attempts by Christian theologians to protect the category of divine revelation from perceived human interference. Kane shows how the fields of religious studies, anthropology, and theology have approached syncretism with a racialized imagination still suffering the legacies of European colonialism. Kane's Syncretism and Christian Tradition (Oxford UP, 2020) examines how the concept of race figures into dominant religious traditions associated with imperialism and reveals how syncretism can act as a vital means of the Holy Spirit's continuing revelation of Jesus. Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Ross Kane, "Syncretism and Christian Tradition" (Oxford UP, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:36


Syncretism, even though, is an unavoidable phenomenon of religion, has a range of connotations. In Christian theology, the use of syncretism shifted from a compliment during the Reformation to an outright insult in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The term has a history of being used as a neutral descriptor, a pejorative marker, and even a celebration of indigenous agency. Its differing uses indicate the challenges of interpreting religious mixture, which today relate primarily to race and revelation. Despite its pervasiveness across religious traditions, syncretism is poorly understood and often misconceived. Ross Kane argues that the history of syncretism's use accentuates broader interpretive problems, drawing attention to attempts by Christian theologians to protect the category of divine revelation from perceived human interference. Kane shows how the fields of religious studies, anthropology, and theology have approached syncretism with a racialized imagination still suffering the legacies of European colonialism. Kane's Syncretism and Christian Tradition (Oxford UP, 2020) examines how the concept of race figures into dominant religious traditions associated with imperialism and reveals how syncretism can act as a vital means of the Holy Spirit's continuing revelation of Jesus. Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong: India. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Women in Customer Success Podcast
54 - How can Anthropology Guide Your Customer Success Behaviours? - Marieke Smits

Women in Customer Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:49


' Our lives are all about data.'- Marieke How can anthropology guide your customer success behaviours and decisions? I'm talking to Marieke Smits - Sr Enterprise Customer Success Manager at Pluralsight, and the recipient of 'Lean on Me' Pluralsight's award. She's an aspiring anthropologist and we are exploring what are the lessons and applications of anthropology in customer success. She's also very passionate about social impact of the global organisations. Tune in to hear Marieke's very interesting career story and anthropological insights into behaviours, data and culture within customer success. Lessons from anthropology: - how to understand and meet people where they are - use observations - provide context on data - what people say they do is not always what is happening - how to ask for customers' experiences Connect with Marieke: https://www.linkedin.com/in/smitsmarieke/ About Women in Customer Success Podcast: Women in Customer Success Podcast is the first women-only podcast for Customer Success professionals, where remarkable ladies of Customer Success connect, inspire and champion each other. In each episode, podcast creator and host Marija Skobe-Pilley is bringing a conversation with a role model from across the industries to share her inspirational story and practical tools to help you succeed and make an impact. Follow: - womenincspodcast.com - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/womenincspodcast - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mspilley/ - Instagram: @womenincspodcast Join the Women in Customer Success Network: https://join.slack.com/t/womenincs2020/shared_invite/zt-m3q3pkio-fgk0ssR6gHzoOEEdwa2f3g If you like this episode, you will also like: 06 - How to Get Your First Customer Success Job - Irit Eizips 24 - How to Narrow the Gender pay Gap During the Hiring Process - Kristi Faltorusso 34 - How to Be a Boss of Your Career - Emilia D'Anzica 35 - Career Lessons for Young Professionals - Karolina Adamus 36 - How to Become an Expert on Yourself - Ronni Gaun 47 - How to Benefit from a Return on Relationship (ROR) - Allison Skidmore 48 - How to Propel Your Career - Kellie Capote 52 - How to Land Your Dream Customer Success Job - Kat Fisher

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker
Islamophobia, the Surveillance State & U.S. Wars of Aggression w/ Dr. Nazia Kazi

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 53:16


How does the relentless U.S. war machine sell its operations to the public? Dr. Nazia Kazi, an activist and professor of Anthropology at Stockton University, explains how the managers of the U.S. empire foment Islamophobia and other racist ideas at home as an integral part of waging war abroad. Dr. Kazi challenges theories of racism that ignore U.S. foreign policy, and discusses how Islamophobia has played a central role in justifying U.S. acts of aggression, in excusing military atrocities, and in creating a massive new surveillance apparatus at home. That surveillance has been turned on Muslim and Arab Americans, along with social movements from Occupy Wall Street to Standing Rock to Black Lives Matter. Watch the NEW video edition of “The Real Story” on BreakThrough News! Dr. Nazia Kazi is author of the book “Islamophobia, Race, and Global Politics,” which has just been republished in a second edition. Please make an urgently-needed contribution to The Socialist Program by joining our Patreon community at patreon.com/thesocialistprogram. We rely on the generous support of our listeners to keep bringing you consistent, high-quality shows. All Patreon donors of $5 a month or more are invited to join the monthly Q&A seminar with Brian.

New Books in Psychology
Aaron J. Jackson, "Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:14


Vulnerable narratives of fatherhood are few and far between; rarer still is an ethnography that delves into the practical and emotional realities of intensive caregiving. Grounded in the intimate everyday lives of men caring for children with major physical and intellectual disabilities, Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities (U California Press, 2021) undertakes an exploration of how men shape their identities in the context of caregiving. Anthropologist Aaron J. Jackson fuses ethnographic research and creative nonfiction to offer an evocative account of what is required for men to create habitable worlds and find some kind of “normal” when their circumstances are anything but. Combining stories from his fieldwork in North America with reflections on his own experience caring for his severely disabled son, Jackson argues that care has the potential to transform our understanding of who we are and how we relate to others. Aaron J. Jackson is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University. His research focuses on fatherhood, care, and disability. Alize Arıcan is a Postdoctoral Associate at Rutgers University's Center for Cultural Analysis. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements: experiments in multimodal ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books in History
68 Martin Puchner: Writing and Reading from Gilgamesh to Amazon

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:08


Book Industry Month continues with a memory-lane voyage back to a beloved early RtB episode. This conversation with Martin Puchner about the very origins of writing struck us as perfect companion to Mark McGurl's wonderful insights (in RtB 67, published earlier this month) about the publishing industry's in 2021, or as Mark tells it, the era of "adult diaper baby love." Aside from being a fabulous conversation about Martin's wonderful history of book production through the ages (The Written World) this episode brings back happy memories of Elizabeth and John piling their guests into a cozy sound booth at Brandeis, the kind of place that's utterly taboo in Pandemic America.So travel with us back to 2019 for a close encounter with the epic of Gilgamesh. The three friends discuss the different stages of world writing--from the time of the scribes to the time of great teachers like Confucius, Socrates and Jesus Christ, who had a very complicated relationship to writing. In Recallable Books, Martin recommends the fan fiction website Wattpad; Elizabeth recommends "No Reservations: Narnia," in which Anthony Bourdain goes through the wardrobe. John feints at recommending Dennis Tenen's book on the writing within coding before recommending the Brautigan Library. Come for the discussion of writing, stay for the impressions of Gollum! Discussed in this episode: The Written World: The Power of Stories to Shape People, History and Civilization, Martin Puchner Gilgamesh: A New Rendering in English Verse, David Ferry Wattpad "No Reservations: Narnia," Edonohana Plain Text: The Poetics of Computation, David Tenen The Brautigan Library Episode transcript available here: Episode 6 Puchner 3.28.19 Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
68 Martin Puchner: Writing and Reading from Gilgamesh to Amazon

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:08


Book Industry Month continues with a memory-lane voyage back to a beloved early RtB episode. This conversation with Martin Puchner about the very origins of writing struck us as perfect companion to Mark McGurl's wonderful insights (in RtB 67, published earlier this month) about the publishing industry's in 2021, or as Mark tells it, the era of "adult diaper baby love." Aside from being a fabulous conversation about Martin's wonderful history of book production through the ages (The Written World) this episode brings back happy memories of Elizabeth and John piling their guests into a cozy sound booth at Brandeis, the kind of place that's utterly taboo in Pandemic America.So travel with us back to 2019 for a close encounter with the epic of Gilgamesh. The three friends discuss the different stages of world writing--from the time of the scribes to the time of great teachers like Confucius, Socrates and Jesus Christ, who had a very complicated relationship to writing. In Recallable Books, Martin recommends the fan fiction website Wattpad; Elizabeth recommends "No Reservations: Narnia," in which Anthony Bourdain goes through the wardrobe. John feints at recommending Dennis Tenen's book on the writing within coding before recommending the Brautigan Library. Come for the discussion of writing, stay for the impressions of Gollum! Discussed in this episode: The Written World: The Power of Stories to Shape People, History and Civilization, Martin Puchner Gilgamesh: A New Rendering in English Verse, David Ferry Wattpad "No Reservations: Narnia," Edonohana Plain Text: The Poetics of Computation, David Tenen The Brautigan Library Episode transcript available here: Episode 6 Puchner 3.28.19 Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
68 Martin Puchner: Writing and Reading from Gilgamesh to Amazon

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:08


Book Industry Month continues with a memory-lane voyage back to a beloved early RtB episode. This conversation with Martin Puchner about the very origins of writing struck us as perfect companion to Mark McGurl's wonderful insights (in RtB 67, published earlier this month) about the publishing industry's in 2021, or as Mark tells it, the era of "adult diaper baby love." Aside from being a fabulous conversation about Martin's wonderful history of book production through the ages (The Written World) this episode brings back happy memories of Elizabeth and John piling their guests into a cozy sound booth at Brandeis, the kind of place that's utterly taboo in Pandemic America.So travel with us back to 2019 for a close encounter with the epic of Gilgamesh. The three friends discuss the different stages of world writing--from the time of the scribes to the time of great teachers like Confucius, Socrates and Jesus Christ, who had a very complicated relationship to writing. In Recallable Books, Martin recommends the fan fiction website Wattpad; Elizabeth recommends "No Reservations: Narnia," in which Anthony Bourdain goes through the wardrobe. John feints at recommending Dennis Tenen's book on the writing within coding before recommending the Brautigan Library. Come for the discussion of writing, stay for the impressions of Gollum! Discussed in this episode: The Written World: The Power of Stories to Shape People, History and Civilization, Martin Puchner Gilgamesh: A New Rendering in English Verse, David Ferry Wattpad "No Reservations: Narnia," Edonohana Plain Text: The Poetics of Computation, David Tenen The Brautigan Library Episode transcript available here: Episode 6 Puchner 3.28.19 Elizabeth Ferry is Professor of Anthropology at Brandeis University. Email: ferry@brandeis.edu. John Plotz is Barbara Mandel Professor of the Humanities at Brandeis University and co-founder of the Brandeis Educational Justice Initiative. Email: plotz@brandeis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Aaron J. Jackson, "Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:14


Vulnerable narratives of fatherhood are few and far between; rarer still is an ethnography that delves into the practical and emotional realities of intensive caregiving. Grounded in the intimate everyday lives of men caring for children with major physical and intellectual disabilities, Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities (U California Press, 2021) undertakes an exploration of how men shape their identities in the context of caregiving. Anthropologist Aaron J. Jackson fuses ethnographic research and creative nonfiction to offer an evocative account of what is required for men to create habitable worlds and find some kind of “normal” when their circumstances are anything but. Combining stories from his fieldwork in North America with reflections on his own experience caring for his severely disabled son, Jackson argues that care has the potential to transform our understanding of who we are and how we relate to others. Aaron J. Jackson is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University. His research focuses on fatherhood, care, and disability. Alize Arıcan is a Postdoctoral Associate at Rutgers University's Center for Cultural Analysis. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements: experiments in multimodal ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in History
Jeff Miller, "Avocado: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:56


The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn't sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich and delicious fruit is also healthy despite being fatty and energy-dense gives it unicorn status among modern eaters, especially millennials. Through lively anecdotes, colourful pictures and delicious recipes, Jeff Miller's book Avocado: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020) explores the meteoric rise of the avocado, from its co-evolution with the megaherbivores of the Pleistocene to its acceptance by the Spanish conquistadores in Mexico and its current dominance of food consumers' imagination. Jeff Miller is an Associate Professor of Hospitality Management at Colorado State University. He is the co-author of Food Studies: An Introduction to Research Methods (2009) and was named Culinary Educator of the Year in 2017.  Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Aaron J. Jackson, "Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:14


Vulnerable narratives of fatherhood are few and far between; rarer still is an ethnography that delves into the practical and emotional realities of intensive caregiving. Grounded in the intimate everyday lives of men caring for children with major physical and intellectual disabilities, Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities (U California Press, 2021) undertakes an exploration of how men shape their identities in the context of caregiving. Anthropologist Aaron J. Jackson fuses ethnographic research and creative nonfiction to offer an evocative account of what is required for men to create habitable worlds and find some kind of “normal” when their circumstances are anything but. Combining stories from his fieldwork in North America with reflections on his own experience caring for his severely disabled son, Jackson argues that care has the potential to transform our understanding of who we are and how we relate to others. Aaron J. Jackson is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University. His research focuses on fatherhood, care, and disability. Alize Arıcan is a Postdoctoral Associate at Rutgers University's Center for Cultural Analysis. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements: experiments in multimodal ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Latin American Studies
Jeff Miller, "Avocado: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:56


The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn't sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich and delicious fruit is also healthy despite being fatty and energy-dense gives it unicorn status among modern eaters, especially millennials. Through lively anecdotes, colourful pictures and delicious recipes, Jeff Miller's book Avocado: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020) explores the meteoric rise of the avocado, from its co-evolution with the megaherbivores of the Pleistocene to its acceptance by the Spanish conquistadores in Mexico and its current dominance of food consumers' imagination. Jeff Miller is an Associate Professor of Hospitality Management at Colorado State University. He is the co-author of Food Studies: An Introduction to Research Methods (2009) and was named Culinary Educator of the Year in 2017.  Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books Network
Jeff Miller, "Avocado: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:56


The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn't sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich and delicious fruit is also healthy despite being fatty and energy-dense gives it unicorn status among modern eaters, especially millennials. Through lively anecdotes, colourful pictures and delicious recipes, Jeff Miller's book Avocado: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020) explores the meteoric rise of the avocado, from its co-evolution with the megaherbivores of the Pleistocene to its acceptance by the Spanish conquistadores in Mexico and its current dominance of food consumers' imagination. Jeff Miller is an Associate Professor of Hospitality Management at Colorado State University. He is the co-author of Food Studies: An Introduction to Research Methods (2009) and was named Culinary Educator of the Year in 2017.  Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Jeff Miller, "Avocado: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:56


The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn't sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich and delicious fruit is also healthy despite being fatty and energy-dense gives it unicorn status among modern eaters, especially millennials. Through lively anecdotes, colourful pictures and delicious recipes, Jeff Miller's book Avocado: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020) explores the meteoric rise of the avocado, from its co-evolution with the megaherbivores of the Pleistocene to its acceptance by the Spanish conquistadores in Mexico and its current dominance of food consumers' imagination. Jeff Miller is an Associate Professor of Hospitality Management at Colorado State University. He is the co-author of Food Studies: An Introduction to Research Methods (2009) and was named Culinary Educator of the Year in 2017.  Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Gender Studies
Aaron J. Jackson, "Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:14


Vulnerable narratives of fatherhood are few and far between; rarer still is an ethnography that delves into the practical and emotional realities of intensive caregiving. Grounded in the intimate everyday lives of men caring for children with major physical and intellectual disabilities, Worlds of Care: The Emotional Lives of Fathers Caring for Children with Disabilities (U California Press, 2021) undertakes an exploration of how men shape their identities in the context of caregiving. Anthropologist Aaron J. Jackson fuses ethnographic research and creative nonfiction to offer an evocative account of what is required for men to create habitable worlds and find some kind of “normal” when their circumstances are anything but. Combining stories from his fieldwork in North America with reflections on his own experience caring for his severely disabled son, Jackson argues that care has the potential to transform our understanding of who we are and how we relate to others. Aaron J. Jackson is a Lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University. His research focuses on fatherhood, care, and disability. Alize Arıcan is a Postdoctoral Associate at Rutgers University's Center for Cultural Analysis. She is an anthropologist whose research focuses on urban renewal, futurity, care, and migration in Istanbul, Turkey. Her work has been featured in Current Anthropology, City & Society, Radical Housing Journal, and entanglements: experiments in multimodal ethnography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

Dare to Dream with Debbi Dachinger
DR. GREGORY TARAN #Healing Chronic Physical & Emotional Issues When Others Cannot #arthritis #somatic

Dare to Dream with Debbi Dachinger

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:57


WATCH THIS NOW:Highlights ~•Trauma, Resilience, and Healing•Unlocking the body for huge, seismic shifts•Treating the source of chronic disease, rather than the symptom•Utilizing holistic & psychological diagnostic methods to determine the strategy of healing for a clientThis episode is about a doctor who heals chronic physical and emotional issues where others cannot. My guest is Dr. Gregory Taran, who is a social scientist and holistic doctor, trained in psychology, behaviorism, sociology, anthropology, ethology, and human behavior. His 2nd degree is in osteo-kinesio-therapy and applied kinesiology with treatment methods such as: osteopractice soft techniques, cranio-sacral therapy, kinesiology, and functional neurology. Gregory worked in the field of neurophysiology with elite athletes, as the physician-healer for Olympic swimmers, judo, and sambo wrestlers. Dr. Taran is well versed in psychotherapy, gestalt therapy, hypnotherapy, psychosomatics, Somatic Experience, New German Medicine, Satori healing, and psycho-kinesiology. He integrates his methods to diagnose and treat patients with chronic diseases, auto-immune illness, medical conditions with unknown etiology, cancer remission and other before-untreatable conditions. His methods have resolved conditions such as: Lupus, IBS, arthritis, colitis, allergies, kidney disease, lymphoma, migraines, and infertility problems. Dr. Taran has eradicated patient's chronic problems with back pain, neck pain, joint, foot, knee, hip, and jaw pain. He has also eliminated the stress related conditions of anxiety, depression, fear, low self-esteem, abandonment, resentment, frustration, disappointment, and suppressed sexuality. To learn more: www.DrTaran.comSubscribe! Leave a review; we read and appreciate them all! Join me on Instagram: @daretodreampodcast and @debbidachingerDebbi Dachinger is a certified coach whose expertise is Visibility in Media. She coaches people to write a page turner book, takes their book to a guaranteed international bestseller, AND pulls back the curtain, so clients have the system to be interviewed on media and podcast and get massive results. Debbi shows people how to find and use media exposure to locate their tribe, fill workshops, sell books, and gain exposure. Connect with Debbi: https://DebbiDachinger.com Get your free Template to learn what YOUR unique message is for your business: https://debbidachinger.com/gift#GregoryTaran #kinesiology #holisticmedicine #Somatic #arthritis #resentment #abandonment #LowSelfEsteem #depression #OsteoPath #Athlete #Cancer #Arthritis #neurophysiology #psychosomatic #Satori #Migraine #AutoImmune #Lupus #Colitis #IBS #pain #Anxiety #TMJ #Infertility #Sexuality #DrGriegoreTaran #DebbiDachinger #DareToDream #interview #podcast #Instagood #instalove #instawork #instapeople #instatime #health #quantum #Book #spiritual #consciousness #metaphysical #et #transformation #meditate #medicine #ceremony #alien #love #beautiful #happy #tbt #followme #nofilter #life #yoga #amazing #FBF #media #podcaster #apple #paranormal #listeningThe show is sponsored by DrDainHeer.com and Access Consciousness

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"The Oppressed Have a Way of Addressing Their Own Conditions" - On Joshua Myers' Cedric Robinson: The Time of the Black Radical Tradition

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 126:54


In this episode we host Joshua Myers, to talk about his recently published book Cedric Robinson: The Time of the Black Radical Tradition. Folks will recall that last year we had a conversation with Josh Myers about Cedric Robinson much of which centered around the content and concepts within Black Marxism.  While there is a slight overlap between this conversation and that one, the two are quite distinct and mutually inform each other. So we invite folks to revisit that alongside this conversation, or to listen to both for the first time to get a more complete picture of Myers' extensive knowledge and analysis of Robinson's life and work. Beyond that of course we encourage folks to pick up this book as it really does a great job of grounding Robinson's intellectual work within the context of his life, organizing and relationships. In this conversation we talk more about young Cedric's developing anti-imperialist and anti-colonial consciousness. His disenchantment with the aims, strategies and tactics of the Civil Rights Movement. His critiques of leadership, and analysis of charisma, which set the ground for his first book The Terms of Order. And we discuss how Robinson's work has always aimed to assault the foundations of academic disciplines. We discuss the relationship between Robinson and CLR James, and the practices of study and development of undercommons spaces for colleagues and students. We also talk about the relationship between Cedric and Immanuel Wallerstein and Modern World Systems Theory.  We talk briefly about the arguments Robinson takes up in An Anthropology of Marxism and Forgeries of Memory and Meaning and of course we can't resist a couple of questions on recent readings, mis-readings, and non-readings of Robinson's most well-known work Black Marxism. We are only six patrons away from returning to 1,000 patrons, so if you have been waiting for that moment to become a patron of Millennials Are Killing Capitalism, it's a great time to join up and help sustain the work that we do here, bringing you conversations like this.

3 minute lesson
The Rosetta Stone | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 3:00


Episode 390. Topic: The Rosetta Stone. Theme: Archaeology. How old are Egyptian hieroglyphs? How were they used as a writing system? How did  hieroglyphic scrimp become indecipherable over time? How are we able to read them today?!Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Storytellers of STEMM
#141 - Clay Tucker: Tree Rings and Hurricanes

Storytellers of STEMM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 62:45


Today's storyteller is Dr Clay Tucker! Clay is a tree ring scientist, also known as a dendrochronologist, and his specialty is related to hurricanes and climate change. I could have called this episode "Dendrochronology" but probably most people have no idea what that would mean and I didn't want to detract from this fabulous episode!! So trees grow and add rings every year, so by taking a small core of the tree you get a visual representation of that tree's life, essentially. And you can see the impact of droughts, hurricanes, and disease on the growth of that tree over time. In Clay's research, he's used tree rings from pine trees across the southeastern US to understand the impacts of hurricanes. It's fascinating research and why I asked Clay to be on the podcast! Clay and I are both in Baton Rouge, and know a lot of the same people, and so we talk about that and relationships within science, about how technology in this era allows for collaboration across continents and time zones, about what I call the "Louisiana Quicksand Conundrum", about learning to read the landscape, and of course about trees and wetlands and research. This is such a fun conversation and Clay is great and I hope everyone enjoys it! --- You can find Rachel Villani on Twitter @flyingcypress and Storytellers of STEMM on Facebook and Twitter @storytellers42. You can find Clay Tucker on Twitter @climateclay and his website https://coastalab.wixsite.com/claytucker. LSU School of Renewable Natural Resources: https://www.lsu.edu/rnr/ LSU Department of Geography & Anthropology: https://lsu.edu/ga/index.php The documentary about Richard Proenneke that Clay describes as his favorite documentary ever is called "Alone in the Wilderness". Episodes referenced in this episode: #61 - Ashley Booth Book List: Rising by Elizabeth Rush, One Man's Wilderness by Sam Keith & Richard Proenneke, Voyage of the Turtle by Carl Safina Recorded on 20 September 2021.

Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy
146: Margo Kelly, Course Leader/Therapist at True North

Stories from the Field: Demystifying Wilderness Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 44:35


Margo Kelly, MSW, MEd (they/them/theirs) is a course leader/therapist at True North in Vermont. Their journey to wilderness therapy began on a backpacking trip on the Long Trail when they came upon three different people who pointed them in the direction of True North. Margo was intrigued with an offer to be a therapist for the all-gender team and took the job. Margo shares their gender journey, their recommendations for treatment with trans and non-binary youth, and why wilderness therapy works so well.   Margo's bio from the True North Website: Margo (they/them/theirs) was born and raised in Chicago. They spent their childhood swimming in Lake Michigan, road tripping with their family, and camping throughout the Midwest. They received a bachelor's degree from University of Washington in Seattle, studying Early Education and Anthropology. Margo then traveled to Romania to work with children living in group homes, gaining insight in how environments influence children's resiliency and practicing a strength-based approach within a different worldview. Margo returned to Seattle and spent 8 years working in public schools to build students' social emotional skills and provide wrap-around services for families. Margo went on to work with clients in crisis who were experiencing sexual assault or domestic violence. This work propelled Margo to earn their Master of Social Work and Master of Education in Human Sexuality from Widener University in Philadelphia, PA. In graduate school, Margo gained valuable experience at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia within the Gender and Sexuality Clinic and Adolescent Health fellowship. They have experience supporting adolescents and young adults with anxiety, depression, disordered eating, gender variance, relationship health, and neurodiversity. Margo specializes in gender and sexuality development, identity formation, and sexual and relationship health. Margo approaches therapy from a relational, trauma-sensitive, and strengths-based perspective and believes the wilderness offers experiential learning that cultivates growth within the mind, body, and spirit. Throughout all their work, Margo maintained a strong connection to the outdoors in their personal life, backpacking throughout the pacific northwest, west coast, and now the northeast. Margo continues to enjoy the outdoors through hiking, camping, biking, or snowshoeing. They can also be found puzzling, dancing, rollerblading, cooking, or stooping on their front porch. For more information about Margo and their group at True North, please take a moment to watch this brief video.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Perishable Artifacts and Tribally Driven Archaeology - HeVo 57

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 68:28


On today's podcast Jessica interviews Dr. Edward Jolie (Oglala Lakota and Hodulgee Muscogee), the new Clara Lee Tanner Associate Curator of Ethnology at the Arizona State Museum and Associate Professor at School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. We talk about perishable materials, such as textiles, baskets, nets, and footwear, and why they are understudied, how they offer unique insights into the past, and what they can teach us about diversity and continuity both within and across regions. Throughout the podcast we continually return to the human element of perishable artifacts and associated research, including the movement to tribally driven archaeology. Links Heritage Voices on the APN Arizona State Museum University of Arizona School of Anthropology Heritage Voices Tejon Episode (Nation-Building After Federal Recognition) Cedar Mesa Perishables Project Dr. Jolie: ejolie@arizona.edu Contact Jessica Jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org @livingheritageA @LivingHeritageResearchCouncil ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Department:  a podcast about trends.
Episode 60: Crime Curious (part 2): The True Crime Female Paradigm, Paranoia and Amateur Hour

The Department: a podcast about trends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 71:19


Neil Blakemore joins Amanda + Kim for the second half of our conversation about the true crime trend. See the full episode notes at thedepartment.world.

This Anthro Life
Podcasting and the Other Side of Storytelling - Reflecting on TAL's 8th Birthday

This Anthro Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 7:39


This Anthro Life turned 8 years old in October 2021. That's a long time for a podcast. When recently invited to share what I've been working on for a newsletter, TAL's 8th birthday got me thinking about what I've learned working between anthropology and podcasting for almost a decade. I've fancied myself a public anthropologist for a while, but it has been podcasting, and working in an unusual medium (for anthropology) that has taught me some of the most important lessons for what public anthropology actually is.Music - Epidemic SoundsLenzer - A Fork FightYomoti - Fansi Pan

New Books Network
Rosa Abreu-Runkel, "Vanilla: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:26


Today I talked to Rosa Abreu-Runkel about her new book Vanilla: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020). Intoxicating and evocative, vanilla is so much more than a spice rack staple. It is a flavor that has defined the entire world—and its roots reach deep into the past. With its earliest origins dating back seventy million years, the history of vanilla begins in ancient Mesoamerica and continues to define and enhance today's traditions and customs. It has been used by nearly every culture as a spice, a perfume, and even a potent aphrodisiac, while renowned figures from Louis XIV to Casanova and Thomas Jefferson have been captivated by its aroma and taste. Featuring recipes, facts, and fables, Vanilla unravels the delightfully rich history, mystery, and essence of a flavor that reconnects us to our own heritage Rosa Abreu-Runkel is assistant professor at New York City College of Technology, Hospitality Department. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Rosa Abreu-Runkel, "Vanilla: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:26


Today I talked to Rosa Abreu-Runkel about her new book Vanilla: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020). Intoxicating and evocative, vanilla is so much more than a spice rack staple. It is a flavor that has defined the entire world—and its roots reach deep into the past. With its earliest origins dating back seventy million years, the history of vanilla begins in ancient Mesoamerica and continues to define and enhance today's traditions and customs. It has been used by nearly every culture as a spice, a perfume, and even a potent aphrodisiac, while renowned figures from Louis XIV to Casanova and Thomas Jefferson have been captivated by its aroma and taste. Featuring recipes, facts, and fables, Vanilla unravels the delightfully rich history, mystery, and essence of a flavor that reconnects us to our own heritage Rosa Abreu-Runkel is assistant professor at New York City College of Technology, Hospitality Department. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in History
Rosa Abreu-Runkel, "Vanilla: A Global History" (Reaktion Books, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:26


Today I talked to Rosa Abreu-Runkel about her new book Vanilla: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020). Intoxicating and evocative, vanilla is so much more than a spice rack staple. It is a flavor that has defined the entire world—and its roots reach deep into the past. With its earliest origins dating back seventy million years, the history of vanilla begins in ancient Mesoamerica and continues to define and enhance today's traditions and customs. It has been used by nearly every culture as a spice, a perfume, and even a potent aphrodisiac, while renowned figures from Louis XIV to Casanova and Thomas Jefferson have been captivated by its aroma and taste. Featuring recipes, facts, and fables, Vanilla unravels the delightfully rich history, mystery, and essence of a flavor that reconnects us to our own heritage Rosa Abreu-Runkel is assistant professor at New York City College of Technology, Hospitality Department. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

3 minute lesson
Tutankhamun's Tomb | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 3:00


Episode 389. Topic: Tutankhamun's Tomb. Theme: Archaeology. Who was Tutankhamun? When was he the pharaoh of Egypt and how long did he rule? Why is he now so famous? What does his tomb and his DNA reveal about his life and health? Who were the other two infant mummies in his tomb? Where is his mummy today?Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

The Monster Island Film Vault
Episode 52 - Kaiju Kim vs. ‘Gamera 3: Revenge of Iris'

The Monster Island Film Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 126:18


Hello, kaiju lovers! After nearly a year of surviving inane MST3K fodder and watching the first two entries of a fantastic trilogy, Nate reaches one of kaiju eiga's zeniths with Gamera 3: Revenge of Iris. He's joined by YouTuber and (ironically) Godzilla enthusiast Kaiju Kim to discuss this masterpiece. As Nate puts it, this is one of the rare trilogies where each entry gets better—in fact, everything gets cranked to 12 in this. They discuss the amazing story, incredible characters, impressive special effects, absolute badassery, and the many, many cultural elements that may go over western fans' heads as crazy fantasy. Speaking of which, choosing a Toku Topic was difficult, but Nate landed on the Four Symbols and mana, because they play the big roles in this film and the rest of the trilogy. Check out Kim's video on Gamera 3 here. Listen to Nathan Marchand and Travis Alexander's spinoff podcast, The Henshin Men, on Redcircle. We'd like to give a shout-out to our MIFV MAX patrons Travis Alexander and Michael Hamilton (co-hosts of Kaiju Weekly); Danny DiManna (author/creator of the Godzilla Novelization Project); Eli Harris (elizilla13); Chris Cooke (host of One Cross Radio); Bex from Redeemed Otaku; Damon Noyes, The Cel Cast, TofuFury, and Elijah Thomas! Thanks for your support! You, too, can join MIFV MAX on Patreon to get this and other perks starting at only $3 a month! Buy official MIFV merch on TeePublic! This episode is approved by the Monster Island Board of Directors…maybe. Timestamps: Intro: 0:00-9:09 Entertaining Info Dump: 9:09-18:11 Toku Talk: 18:11-1:25:42 Ad: 1:25:42-1:26:34 Toku Topic: 1:26:34-1:54:13 Listener Feedback, Housekeeping, & Outro: 1:54:13-end Podcast Social Media: Twitter Facebook Instagram Follow Jimmy on Twitter: @NasaJimmy Follow the Monster Island Board of Directors on Twitter: @MonsterIslaBOD Follow the Raymund Martin and the MIFV Legal Team on Twitter: @MIFV_LegalTeam Follow Crystal Lady Jessica on Twitter: @CystalLadyJes1 Follow The Henshin Men Podcast on Twitter: @HenshinMenPod Follow Dr. Dourif on Twitter: @DrDorif www.MonsterIslandFilmVault.com #JimmyFromNASALives       #MonsterIslandFilmVault © 2021 Moonlighting Ninjas Media Bibliography/Further Reading: “Azure Dragon.” (Wikipedia). “Black Tortoise.” (Wikipedia). England, Norman. “Inside the Heisei Trilogy: The Turtle Scoop on Gamera 3.” (Arrow Video Gamera: The Complete Collection; originally published in Fangoria #185, August 1999). Flower, James. “A Guide to English Language Gamera.” (Arrow Video Gamera: The Complete Collection). “Four Guardians of the Four Compass Directions: Celestial Emblems of the Chinese Emperor.” (On Mark Productions). “Four Symbols.” (Wikipedia). Gamera: The Complete Collection, Disc Seven Special Features. Gamera 3: Revenge of Iris Commentary by Steve Ryfle and Ed Godziszewski (Arrow Video's Gamera: The Complete Collection). LeMay, John. The Big Book of Japanese Giant Monster Movies Volume 2: 1982-2017. LeMay, John. The Big Book of Japanese Giant Monster Movies: The Lost Films (Mutated Edition). LeMay, John. Writing Giant Monsters. “Lü Dongbin.” (Wikipedia). Macias, Patrick. “A History of Gamera: Gamera 3: Revenge of Iris” (Arrow Video's Gamera: The Complete Collection). “Mana.” (Anthropology.com). “Mana.” (Wikipedia). “Miko.” (Wikipedia). Renshaw, Steve and Saori Ihara. “Star Charts and Moon Stations.” (Internet Archive). “Vermillion Bird.” (Wikipedia). “White Tiger (mythology).” (Wikipedia). “Why the Heisei Gamera Trilogy Ended That Way” by Omni Viewer. (YouTube). “Yellow Dragon.” (Wikipedia). Wiki Articles on Gamera 3: Revenge of Iris Gamera Wiki Gojipedia IMDB Toho Kingdom Wikipedia Wikizilla

Mommy Brain Revisited
29. Fatherhood and the Brain

Mommy Brain Revisited

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 42:06


In this episode of Mommy Brain Revisited I talk with Dr. James Rilling a Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University in the USA. We talk about his research on brain changes in human fathers. So cool! We also talk the interplay between oxytocin, testosterone, dad brain changes as well as tradeoffs between parenting and mating and more! Don't miss this episode and share it with a dad near you. For more information about Dr. Rilling's research see: http://anthropology.emory.edu/home/people/faculty/rilling.html For more about me see www.jodipawluski.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mommybrainrevisited/support

3 minute lesson
The Terracotta Army | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 3:16


Episode 388. Topic: The Terracotta Army. Theme: Archaeology. How did some farmers uncover an untouched collection of funeral art in China? What is The Terracotta Army and why was it made? How did they go for millennia without discovery or looting? Can you visit them today?Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Little Left of Center Podcast
EP108-Social Identities w/ Jay Van Bavel

Little Left of Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 44:10


Allison continues her series on belonging, talking to Dr. Jay Van Bavel about social identities. How do we identify with others? What groups do feel safe with and which ones are considered threats?  These are all questions that are important to our lives, our views on the world around us and our own views about our ourselves. EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:Social identitiesPolitical identitiesThe impact of feeling excludedAre our thoughts really autonomous?The "7 Days Adventists" experimentStereotypes: a double-edged sword GUESTS LINKS:Dr. Jay's websiteFollow Dr. Jay on TwitterALLISON'S LINKS:Visit Allison's websiteFollow Allison on InstagramCheck out Allison's blogListen to The Podcasters' Journey PodcastAllison's Favorites - And some great deals for you!

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New Books in African American Studies
Rachel Afi Quinn, "Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo" (U Illinois Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:48


Dominican women being seen--and seeing themselves--in the media Rachel Afi Quinn investigates how visual media portray Dominican women and how women represent themselves in their own creative endeavors in response to existing stereotypes. Delving into the dynamic realities and uniquely racialized gendered experiences of women in Santo Domingo, Quinn reveals the way racial ambiguity and color hierarchy work to shape experiences of identity and subjectivity in the Dominican Republic. She merges analyses of context and interviews with young Dominican women to offer rare insights into a Caribbean society in which the tourist industry and popular media rewards, and rely upon, the ability of Dominican women to transform themselves to perform gender, race, and class. Engaging and astute, Being La Dominicana: Race and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo (University of Illinois Press, 2021) reveals the little-studied world of today's young Dominican women and what their personal stories and transnational experiences can tell us about the larger neoliberal world. Rachel Afi Quinn is an associate professor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Culture Studies at the University of Houston.  Reighan Gillam is an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Psychedelics Today
PT271 – Jeremy Narby, Ph.D. – Anthropology, Ayahuasca, and Plant Teachers

Psychedelics Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 71:00


In this episode, Joe and Kyle interview famed anthropologist and author (most notably of The Cosmic Serpent), Jeremy Narby. He discusses anthropology in the Amazon and ayahuasca: the entourage effect, vine-only, DMT, and more.  www.psychedelicstoday.com

The Department:  a podcast about trends.
Crime Curious (part 1): The Trend of True Crime + The Staircase Exposed

The Department: a podcast about trends.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 73:35


Amanda, Kim, and special guest Neil untangle the trendy rise of True Crime.  Find the full show notes at thedepartment.world.