Podcasts about Blacksburg

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Best podcasts about Blacksburg

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Latest podcast episodes about Blacksburg

Foul Ball Area
Big Things in Blacksburg

Foul Ball Area

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 23:39


This past weekend was a big one in Blacksburg as both the Hokies softball and baseball teams continue their historic seasons. Virginia Tech softball is advancing to the NCAA Super Regionals after winning their regional, defeating Kentucky twice on Sunday to come out victorious.  Meanwhile the baseball team is fresh off a sweep of Duke and has clinched their first ever ACC Coastal division title, and the top seed in the ACC Tournament.    Plus, a few things happened in Major League Baseball this week as well. We break it all down on today's episode of Foul Ball Area.

Purple Project Podcast
PPPD: Va Tech 8, K-State 2 (BSB) 5/18/22

Purple Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 9:16


BLACKSBURG, VA: K-State (27-24) loses to the Hokies on the road with the last series of the campaign looming.

HokiePod
Hokie Sports Insider | May 18, 2022

HokiePod

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:38


Join Evan Hughes and Virginia Tech softball head coach Pete D'Amour on this special installment of the Hokie Sports Insider podcast. The two recap the regular season, discuss how strong the ACC has gotten, the fan support for softball and a look ahead to the first ever Blacksburg regional this weekend.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Foul Ball Area
Weird Things Happening

Foul Ball Area

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 23:00


It's been a wild week in baseball and we really mean that. Anthony Rendon is hitting home runs left-handed, the Pirates won a game without getting a hit, and Albert Pujols made his pitching debut at 42 years old. Quite the strange week in baseball.   Plus, Virginia Tech wins a series against No. 7 Louisville, vaulting the Hokies up to No. 3 in the D1Baseball.com rankings. How far can the Hokies go in the postseason? Will they be hosting a regional in Blacksburg? All that and more on today's episode. 

Larry Dowdy Mic Side
In this episode, we chat with Hokies network analyst Mike Burnop as he moves into his 40th year.

Larry Dowdy Mic Side

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 28:09


In episode 48, Mike Burnop is about to move into his 40th year as network analyst with the Hokies. We'll talk about his football years, plus covering both football and basketball, as well as the year Bear Bryant came to Blacksburg and plenty more.

The Andy Staples Show & Friends: A show about college football
Hendon Hooker's journey to QB1 at Tennessee

The Andy Staples Show & Friends: A show about college football

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 30:48


Andy catches up with Tennessee quarterback Hendon Hooker, whose journey to the starting job in Knoxville started at Virginia Tech. When it became clear his time in Blacksburg was done, Hooker decided to move to Tennessee as a graduate transfer. Eleven days later, Tennessee fired its head coach. The new staff initially made Hooker the backup, but he took control of the job in week two and sparked more joy than Neyland Stadium has seen in years for the remainder of the season. QB1 discusses how he kept the faith and how explosive Tennessee's offense could be in 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 625 (4-18-22): Ash Trees, Insect Impacts, and Water Consequences

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:38).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-15-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 18, 2022.  This update of an episode from July 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec That's part of “The Ash Grove,” a traditional Welsh tune performed by Madeline MacNeil, on her 2002 album, “Songs of Earth & Sea.”  Born in Norfolk and raised in Richmond, Ms. MacNeil was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley until her passing in 2020. The music opens an episode where we revisit the status of North American ash trees and explore the water impacts of pest damage to trees generally. As noted in the July 2017 episode on ashes, North America is home to 16 native ash species, with six of those occurring naturally in Virginia.  The two most common ash species in Virginia are White Ash, which tends toward upland habitats, and Green Ash, which is often found along streams and rivers.  In those areas, Green Ash can be a significant portion of the vegetation and help create habitats, improve water quality, and stabilize flows.  Both species provide food for a variety of animals and both have been widely planted in cities and towns. Since the early 2000s, ash tree populations have been devastated by the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer, a beetle native to Asia.  As of April 2022, the insect had been found in at least 35 states and the District of Columbia, and in nearly all of Virginia.  In an affected tree, the insect's larvae create a network of tunnels that impair the tree's transport of water and nutrients, eventually killing the tree.  Once an area's invaded, ashes are unlikely to survive for more than a few years without expensive chemical treatment of individual trees.  At the scale of whole forests, researchers and managers are exploring the use of parasitoid wasps as a biological control method. The Emerald Ash Borer is only one of many pest species threatening different trees in Virginia and elsewhere.  Several of these pests have been the subject of research on their water-related, or hydrologic, impacts.  Researchers are interested in how loss of tree leaves or death of trees can affect evaporation, soil moisture, water-table levels, streamflows, water chemistry, and snowpack.  Those water-cycle processes are in turn connected to ecosystem pathways of carbon, nutrients, and energy, all being affected by climate changes.  From all of these connections, little ash-boring beetles become part of a biosphere-sized story. Thanks to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music,” and we close with about 25 more seconds of “The Ash Grove.” MUSIC – ~24 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode builds upon and updates information in Episode 376, 7-10-17. “The Ash Grove/O Spirit Sweet of Summertime” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. Virginia Water Radio thanks Daniel McLaughlin, of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation and the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, for his help with this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Emerald Ash Borer-infected White Ash tree that cracked and fell in a Blacksburg, Va., neighborhood in 2021.  Photo taken April 19, 2022.Nationwide range maps for ash tree species and the Emerald Ash Borer, as of January 2021.  Map from the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, “Emerald Ash Borer,” online at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/plant-pest-and-disease-programs/pests-and-diseases/emerald-ash-borer/emerald-ash-borer.Adult Emerald Ash Borer.  Photo from the the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, “Emerald Ash Borer,” online at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/plant-pest-and-disease-programs/pests-and-diseases/emerald-ash-borer/emerald-ash-borer. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE EMERALD ASH BORER The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Forestry, “Emerald Ash Borer in Virginia—An Introduction,” online at https://vdof.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=e2660c30d9cd46cc988cc72415101590. From Background Tab: “After only 1-5 years of infestation, the larvae create extensive tunnels under the bark that disrupt the tree's ability to transport water and nutrients, which eventually girdles and kills the tree. The length of this process depends on tree age, health, and EAB density in the area but no ash tree is safe - 99% of infested ash will die.” From Distribution Tab: “In the U.S., EAB targets 16 species of native ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) and white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus).  In Virginia, white ash (Fraxinus americana) and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) are the most commonly found, though there are four other species that have limited ranges (pumpkin, black, blue, and Carolina ash). In the wild, ash often prefers wetter environments and are dominant species along rivers and streambanks.  Ash decline and death may have a negative impact on streambank stabilization and waterways in these rural areas.  Though only a small percentage of Virginia's forests are composed of ash (2-3%), urban areas can have tree inventories tallying up to 13% ash.  This is where dead ash poses the most risk!” From Biological Control Tab: “Biological control (or “biocontrol”) is a management strategy that involves releasing natural enemies from the pest's native range to control the pest at a given location.  Researchers identified wasps in the early 2000s from Eastern Asia that had co-evolved with emerald ash borers as a parasite to control its populations.  They then conducted extensive research in quarantined U.S. labs to study their life cycle, environmental parameters, and host species.  After nearly a decade of trials, only four wasp species passed the strict requirements set by the USDA-APHIS (Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service) and were approved for release.  APHIS now rears these wasps in large quantities then collaborates with federal, state, and local governments, as well as land owners to release them at approved sites.  These tiny stingless wasps lay eggs in EAB eggs or larvae, effectively killing the EAB host, and are commonly called “parasitoids.” ...These wasps do not harm humans in any way, they only target emerald ash borer as a host. The use of these biocontrol agents in suppressing EAB has shown promising results, but it will take years of controlled releases and research before we see successful parasitism and a reduction of the EAB population.” SOURCES Used for Audio Samuel H. Austin, Riparian Forest Handbook 1: Appreciating and Evaluating Stream Side Forests, Virginia Department of Forestry, Charlottesville, 2000. J. A. Biederman et al., “Multiscale observations of snow accumulation and peak snowpack following widespread, insect-induced lodgepole pine mortality,” Ecohydrology, Vol. 7 (2014), pages 150-162. J. A. Biederman et al., Increased evaporation following widespread tree mortality limits streamflow response,” Water Resources Research, Vol. 50 (2014), pages 5295-5409. S. T. Brantley et al., “Changes to southern Appalachian water yield and stormflow after loss of a foundation species,” Ecohydrology, Vol. 8 (2015), pages 518-528. T. R. Cianciolo et al., “Hydrologic variability in black ash wetlands: Implications for vulnerability to emerald ash borer,” Hydrological Processes, Vol. 35 (2021), e14014. D. W. Clow et al., “Responses of soil and water chemistry to mountain pine beetle induced tree mortality in Grand County, Colorado, USA,” Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 26 (2011), pages 174-178. Anthony D'Amato et al., “Ecological and hydrological impacts of the emerald ash borer on black ash forests,” Northeast Climate Science Center, online at https://necsc.umass.edu/projects/ecological-and-hydrological-impacts-emerald-ash-borer-black-ash-forests. M. J. Daley et al., “Water use by eastern hemlock (Tsuga Canadensis) and black birch (Betula lenta): implications of effects of the hemlock wooly adelgid,” Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 37 (2007), pages 2031-2040. J. S. Diamond et al., “Forested versus herbaceous wetlands: Can management mitigate ecohydrologic regime shifts from invasive emerald ash borer?”  Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 222 (2018), pages 436-446. Emerald Ash Borer Information Network, online at http://www.emeraldashborer.info/index.php.  Virginia information is online at http://www.emeraldashborer.info/state/virginia.php.  Information by county for each state is available in the table online at http://www.emeraldashborer.info/state-dectection-table.php. Gary M. Lovett et al., “Forest Ecosystem Responses to Exotic Pests and Pathogens in Eastern North America,” Bioscience Vol. 56, No. 5 (May 2006), pages 395-405. Steven G. Pallardy, Physiology of Woody Plants, Third Edition, Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass., 2008. D. E. Reed et al., “Bark beetle-induced tree mortality alters stand energy budgets due to water budget changes,” “Theoretical and Applied Climatology, Vol., 131 (2018), pages 153-165. W. M. Robertson et al., “Soil moisture response to white ash mortality following emerald ash borer invasion,” Environmental Earth Sciences, Vol. 77 (2018). Anita K. Rose and James S. Meadows, “Status and Trends of Bottomland Hardwood Forests in the Mid‑Atlantic Region,” USDA/Forest Service Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., November 2016; available online at https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53238. Scott Salom and Eric Day and Scott Salomn, “Hemlock Wooly Adelgid,” Virginia Cooperative Extension (Publication 3006-1451/ENTO-228NP), Blacksburg, Va., 2016, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/75419. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station [Newtown Square, Penn.], “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “Plants Data Base,” online at https://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS):“Asian Longhorned Beetle,” online at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/resources/pests-diseases/asian-longhorned-beetle;“Emerald Ash Borer,” online at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/plant-pest-and-disease-programs/pests-and-diseases/emerald-ash-borer;“Gypsy Moth,” online at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/plant-pest-and-disease-programs/pests-and-diseases/gypsy-moth. Virginia Departme

united states music relationships university texas earth education college water state change zoom land living tech research colorado ms government foundation search public national songs north america environment dark normal web natural journal tree va rain humans sea disease climate change ocean snow mass consequences citizens status columbia trees agency stream wings diamond priority researchers impacts richmond plants biology vol north american guitar environmental bay images implications ash dynamic grade soil bio conservation copyright welsh increased summertime index charlottesville responses map processes penn mid robertson pond arial signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech biological asheville gothic nationwide norfolk physiology appreciating appalachian accent atlantic ocean life sciences bark townsend govt burlington forests maple natural resources adaptations msonormal compatibility colorful forestry insect ecological times new roman populations ls sections daley poison ivy civics watershed organisms theoretical pathogens freshwater bioscience wg chesapeake policymakers forest service earth sciences photosynthesis shenandoah shrubs blacksburg acknowledgment cosgrove cambria math style definitions environmental management worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent shenandoah valley punctuationkerning third edition breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves macneil trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount brkbin brkbinsub mathfont smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim allowpng virginia department defunhidewhenused defpriority defsemihidden defqformat lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal sols bmp name title canadian journal name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference in virginia name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading forest management environmental conservation clow emerald ash borer living systems grades k name e biotic light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date rhododendrons name plain text eab name outline list name grid table name signature name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d cumberland gap name table contemporary name body text first indent name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map name table web name normal indent name balloon text name normal web name table theme name list bullet name normal table name plain table name list number name no list name grid table light name closing eastern asia multiscale eastern north america aphis relyonvml white ash grand county betula atlantic region forest resources ben cosgrove audio notes msobodytext eric day tmdl 20image stormwater runoff ecohydrology water center donotshowrevisions virginia standards
Sons of Saturday: The Podcast for Hokies, by Hokies.

Bill, Pat, and Grayson sit down to recap the events of the 2022 Spring game weekend in Blacksburg. 

Hokie Hangover
Spring Game Preview and Basketball Roster Discussion

Hokie Hangover

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 55:32


Ricky and Andrew dive into a full spring game preview, including what they'd like to see on Saturday in Blacksburg and some key elements to watch coming out of the game. In addition, the guys dive into a men's basketball roster discussion following the latest transfers of Nahiem Alleyne and Jon Ojiako, as well as draft decisions for Keve Aluma and Justyn Mutts. We're presented by Main Street Pharmacy in Downtown Blacksburg.

Mat Talk Podcast Network
James Green says farewell to Blacksburg, SERTC – VT113

Mat Talk Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 44:54


After representing the United States on six World teams and coming away with a bronze medal in 2015 and a silver medal in 2017, James Green is calling it a career. On Episode 113 of Inside Virginia Tech Wrestling, Green talks about his career, why he's leaving his shoes on the mat, what's next with USA Wrestling and he also reflects on his time in Lincoln and Blacksburg, where he closed out his competitive career.  Green represented Team USA at six straight World Championships, starting in Las Vegas in 2015 before closing out his run in Oslo in 2021. In 2017, Green's second-place finish was crucial in the United States' first men's freestyle world championship since 1995.  Photo by Tony Rotundo. SUBSCRIBE TO THE SHOW Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spreaker | iHeartRadio | Spotify | Google Podcasts  | RSS SUPPORT THE NETWORK And if you're a fan of the extensive and broad-based reach of the shows on the Mat Talk Podcast Network, become a TEAM MEMBER today. There are various levels of perks for the different levels of team membership. If you like wrestling content — scratch that — if you LOVE great wrestling content, consider becoming a team member. You'll get some cool stuff too. Looking to start a podcast of your own? Get a free month with Libsyn by using the promo code MTO when you sign up. You'll get the remainder of the month from when you sign up as well as the next month free. It'll be enough time to kick the tires and lights some fires. Direct Link for the Visually Impaired

Inside Virginia Tech Wrestling
James Green says farewell to Blacksburg, SERTC - VT113

Inside Virginia Tech Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 44:05


After representing the United States on six World teams and coming away with a bronze medal in 2015 and a silver medal in 2017, James Green is calling it a career. On Episode 113 of Inside Virginia Tech Wrestling, Green talks about his career, why he's leaving his shoes on the mat, what's next with USA Wrestling and he also reflects on his time in Lincoln and Blacksburg, where he closed out his competitive career.    Green represented Team USA at six straight World Championships, starting in Las Vegas in 2015 before closing out his run in Oslo in 2021. In 2017, Green's second-place finish was crucial in the United States' first men's freestyle world championship since 1995.    SUBSCRIBE TO THE SHOW Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spreaker | iHeartRadio | Spotify | Google Podcasts  | RSS   SUPPORT THE NETWORKAnd if you're a fan of the extensive and broad-based reach of the shows on the Mat Talk Podcast Network, become a TEAM MEMBER today. There are various levels of perks for the different levels of team membership. If you like wrestling content — scratch that — if you LOVE great wrestling content, consider becoming a team member. You'll get some cool stuff too.   Looking to start a podcast of your own? Get a free month with Libsyn by using the promo code MTO when you sign up. You'll get the remainder of the month from when you sign up as well as the next month free. It'll be enough time to kick the tires and lights some fires.

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast
Sawyer & Ciencin: Chris Villaman, Wild Week for Pack9, BC Preview

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 38:25


Coming off a wild week of baseball in which the Pack9 went 2-2 with a walk-off win on Tuesday night, Alec and Andrew discuss everything that took place in Blacksburg and against UNCW. The guys highlight what went wrong vs. Virginia Tech, how the Pack has bounced back, top players for the week and preview the BC series. Cory Smith also sits down with NC State closer Chris Villaman to break down his season, how he's adapted to the closer role, his time with USA Baseball and much more! Listen to the full interview starting at the 29:13 mark.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 624 (4-11-22): Sycamores are Sizable and Scenic at Streamsides

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:57).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-8-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 11, 2022.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, we feature a musical selection inspired in part by one of Virginia's largest and most distinctive riverside plants.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 34 sec – instrumental.You've been listening to part of “Sycamore Rapids,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va., on a 2002 album also called “Sycamore Rapids.”  The album was inspired by the trees of Virginia's state parks and forests, and the “Sycamore Rapids' tune honors particularly James River and Shenandoah River state parks.  According to the composer, the tune's progressions are meant to signify changes a paddler might experience from small riffles to larger rapids to smooth water. At any of those water features throughout the eastern United States, part of a paddler's scenery is often the American Sycamore tree.  Of the three sycamore species native to North America, the American Sycamore is the most familiar and by far the most widespread, ranging from New England to the Midwest and down to Texas, including all of Virginia.  Common in floodplain areas along rivers and streams, the sycamore's distinctive features are large, often hollow trunks; peeling, patterned bark; crooked limbs; large root masses visible along stream banks; and spherical fruits persisting on leafless twigs long into winter. Virginia riversides are of course commonly home to other tree species, too, such as Black Willow, Silver Maple, and Eastern Cottonwood.  But with its large size and distinctive bark, the American Sycamore is perhaps the Commonwealth's most noticeable waterway marker. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Sycamore Rapids.” MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 176, 8-26-13. “Sycamore Rapids,” from the 2002 album of the same name, is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Fruit on an American Sycamore beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), March 19, 2022.American Sycamore beside Sinking Creek in Newport, Va., (Giles County), April 10, 2022.American Sycamore roots along the James River near Wingina, Va., along the Nelson-Buckingham county line, July 12, 2009.Hollow trunk of American Sycamore beside the New River in Radford, Va., October 4, 2009.American Sycamores beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va., November 5, 2016.SOURCES Used for Audio eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1.  The American Sycamore entry is online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200010589. William C. Grimm, The Book of Trees, Hawthorn Books, New York, N.Y., 1962. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. University of Texas at Austin/Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, ‘Plant Database: Platanus occidentalis,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ploc. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home.  The American Sycamore entry is online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=PLOC. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia State Parks,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/.  The James River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/james-river; the Shenandoah River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/shenandoah-river. Virginia Department of Forestry, Common Native Trees of Virginia, Charlottesville, 2016. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/.) Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree buds – Episode 622, 3-28-22. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 407, 2-12-18

united states music new york university texas education college water state zoom land living tech research government foundation search north america environment dark press normal web natural tree va rain ocean fruit snow new england midwest citizens trees agency stream priority richmond plants biology environmental bay images ash dynamic grade bio conservation copyright recreation index charlottesville commonwealth processes pond signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech hollow asheville newport scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful forestry times new roman populations ls sections aquatic poison ivy watershed organisms montgomery county chesapeake radford policymakers scenic forest service photosynthesis shrubs new standard blacksburg acknowledgment cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim defunhidewhenused virginia department defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal sols james river bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis new river cripple creek virginia press living systems sizable grades k name e biotic light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name plain text name date rhododendrons name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle cumberland gap sycamores name mention name hashtag forest resources name unresolved mention giles county audio notes tmdl 20image platanus water center virginia standards
Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast
Pack Pride Weekly Podcast: Ben Broussard, Spring Game Recap

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 49:44


On this week's episode of the Weekly Podcast, Wolfpack Club Executive Director Ben Broussard joins James and Cory from Amedeo's. Broussard discusses the season for the Wolfpack, how it's impacted the Wolfpack Club, the excitement of the fan base and much more. In the second portion of the show, Cory and James break down their thoughts from the NC State Spring Game, look back on the series in Blacksburg for the Pack9 and discuss the big weekend for NC State cheerleading.

Killer Queens: A True Crime Podcast
212: The Virginia Tech Massacre

Killer Queens: A True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 78:57


In 2007, the United States, and the world watched in horror as a massacre unfolded at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, VA.  Carried out by a lone gunman, the attack left 32 people dead (plus the gunman) and 23 more injured, plus countless students and faculty suffering from mental health issues going forward. 

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast
Sawyer & Ciencin: Pack9 creative Joe Williams, Clemson recap and more

Pack Pride - The NC State Wolfpack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 38:48


Week in and week out, NC State baseball is releasing some of the best creative videos in the country from its weekend series. The man behind those videos is Joe Williams, a former starting pitcher at JMU and Assistant Director of Creative Video for the Pack9. Alec Sawyer and Andrew Ciencin discuss Williams' role with the Pack, his journey to Raleigh and more. They close out the show with a look back on the series win at Clemson, the upcoming trip to Blacksburg and what's led to the recent success for the program.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 622 (3-28-22): Tree Buds and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:59).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 3-25-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 28, 2022.  This revised episode from December 2018 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~ 10 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Hiking in the Highland Firs,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens an episode on a woody plant structure that's closed during wintertime and whose opening is a mark of spring.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds to some of the weather that trees and shrubs endure during a Virginia winter, and see if you can guess this structure.  And here's a hint: if you don't know this, you might ask a buddy. SOUNDS  - ~15 sec – March wind in previous year's oak leaves.If you guessed tree and shrub buds, you're right!  Buds are one of woody plants' adaptations for surviving winter's cold temperatures, drying conditions, and damaging winds.  Buds contain meristematic tissue, the tissue that will be future growing stems or flowers.  Sometimes woody plant buds include only the meristematic tissue, but more typically that tissue is covered by small, folded leaves and modified leaf structures called bud scales.  Just like tree and shrub leaves, buds have distinctive shapes and colors, often allowing identification when leaves are gone. Flowering trees and shrubs form both vegetative and flower buds.  The vegetative buds can be at the end of twigs or along the length of twigs in the axils where leaves attach.  Flower buds may look very different from vegetative buds, for example, as in the Flowering Dogwood.  Non-flowering trees and shrubs—that is, conifers, the cone-bearing woody plants, such as pines, spruces, and firs—also have vegetative buds that can develop into stems or into cones. In temperate climates, buds typically form at some point during the growing season and then become dormant—that is, stop actively growing—during the winter.  In spring, in response to hormones and environmental conditions, bud dormancy ends as the buds open and the enclosed tissues begin developing and growing.  But there's much variation among species, and even among individuals within a species, in patterns and timing of bud formation, dormancy, and activity. Now, what makes woody plant buds particularly a water story?  Here are three answers to that question. First, the availability of water during bud formation in one year can affect how much tissue is stored in the bud for growth and development the following spring.  Second, the meristematic tissue in a bud is protected from drying out by the covering bud scales and undeveloped leaves.  And third, while buds don't protect plant cells from freezing, their role in preventing dehydration contributes to the plant's ability to withstand injury from freezing temperatures. As spring unfolds in Virginia, some do the buds on the Commonwealth's woody plants, revealing some of the history—and water—of last summer, along with the future of this year's growing season. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Hiking in the Highland Firs.” MUSIC – ~ 22 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 449, 12-3-18. “Hiking in the Highland Firs,” from the 2001 album “Common Wealth,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.   “Hiking in the Highland Firs,” written in honor of Virginia's Grayson Highlands State Park, was previously featured in Virginia Water Radio Episode 320, 6-13-16, on Virginia's state parks. The sound of wind in oak leaves was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on March 15, 2013. Virginia Water Radio thanks Jen Gagnon, John Peterson, and John Seiler, all of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, for their help with this episode in 2018 and 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Yellow Buckeye bud opening and leaves emerging in Blacksburg, Va., April 1, 2010.Sawtooth Oak buds and previous year's leaves in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.White Pine bud among needles in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.Tulip Poplar bud opening and leaf emerging in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.Spruce bud among needles in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.Elm buds opening and leaves emerging in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.SOURCES Paul J. Kramer and Theodore T. Kozlowski, Physiology of Woody Plants, Academic Press, New York, 1979.  Steven G. Pallardy, Physiology of Woody Plants, Third Edition, Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass., 2008.  (This book is a revision of the 1979 work by Kramer and Koslowski listed above.) John R. Seiler, John W. Groninger, and W. Michael Aust, Forest Biology Textbook, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va., 2021.  Access requires permission of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, online at https://frec.vt.edu/; phone (540) 231-5483.Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. For More Information about Trees in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018,  Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service Plants Database, online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  This is the first comprehensive manual of Virginia plants published since the 1700s.  The Flora of Virginia Project is online at http://www.floraofvirginia.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs [good as of Episode 621] Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 176, 8-26-13.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forestry as work and as an industry in Virginia – Episode 160, 5-6-13.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree colors and changes in fall, including to water movement – Episode 285, 10-9-15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 –

music new york university texas earth education college water state change zoom living tech research government benefits foundation search modern environment dark normal web natural tree va rain ocean snow mass weather citizens trees agency stream priority richmond plants biology environmental bay images ash grade bio conservation copyright flower index charlottesville hiking commonwealth processes pond signature fort worth kramer ludwig virginia tech asheville physiology scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend burlington forests maple natural resources adaptations williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful forestry buds times new roman ls elm sections aquatic poison ivy watershed organisms chesapeake policymakers spruce photosynthesis shrubs new standard blacksburg acknowledgment flowering cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent third edition punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules snaptogridincell mathpr lidthemeasian x none latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater undovr donotpromoteqf subsup latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent narylim intlim defunhidewhenused virginia department defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal sols bmp name title name emphasis name normal name strong name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading environmental conservation john peterson cripple creek virginia press living systems grades k white pine name e msohyperlink academic press space systems light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date rhododendrons name plain text name list number name normal table name plain table cumberland gap name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name mention name hashtag forest resources name unresolved mention audio notes msobodytext tmdl 20image stormwater runoff water center virginia standards
HelloHealth Today
Second Brain with HelloHealth CTO John Dudley

HelloHealth Today

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 46:23


Action Steps: To be a good “second brain,” ensure the “primary brain” knows that there will be no judgment no matter what they bring to you. Open conversation breeds a level of comfort that leads to increased trust and efficiency. To be a good “primary brain,” be willing to throw any idea you have to your collaboration partner. Trust that they will hear you and help you find the solutions you are seeking. Identify your second brain. Don't worry if you need more than one.  Be willing to be a second brain for someone else. Offer your expertise to those you think can use it. John Dudley has worked extensively on the development and deployment of highly effective information technology solutions in resource-limited settings. Living for a decade in Lesotho, a small landlocked country with a high disease burden in an underdeveloped health-care system, John's work took him to the countries of Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, eSwatini, Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. He has also provided remote infrastructure for health facilities in Argentina, Colombia, Romania, and Papua New Guinea. Currently, John leads the development of GlobalHealthEMR, a patient-centered clinician-extensible electronic medical record system being developed in “majority world” countries in sub-Sharan Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia-Pacific, and South America.Having recently returned to the United States, he remains acquainted with the unique infrastructure challenges posed in similar locales by serving as technology advisor for the global health initiatives of Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. John founded Industrial Imagination in 1995 while attending Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, Virginia, home to an early testbed of internet access to the general public. He assumed the role of HelloHealth's CTO in 2022. For more information on Dr. Carmen Mohan and/or HelloHealth's services or to browse our free downloads, visit hellohealthtoday.com.  If you're searching for us on a podcasting app, please remember to smoosh the words “Hello” and “Health” together—leave out the space.Sign up for our newsletter to receive wellness tips, resources, and event information delivered directly to your inbox.If you haven't already, leave a review. Tell us how listening in has changed you in some way. The review doesn't have to be long, maybe even just one word. How about, “Transformative”? Or, if you have time for two words, “Listen now!”Please feel free to reach out directly for more information about HelloHealth's services by contacting pr@hellohealthclinic.com.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
March 23, 2022: Interim City Manager Rogers recommends two cent property tax increase related to Buford Middle School project

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 18:04


One website I frequently pursue claims that March 23 is National Puppy Day, Melba Toast Day, Near Miss Day, World Maths Day, and World Meteorological Day. Whether or not these are bona fide or bananas, there certainly are a lot of interesting things to pay attention on this ever-changing planet of ours. Charlottesville Community Engagement seeks to document as much as possible in this corner of the world, and I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. This newsletter and podcast are free, but your financial support ensures regular updates! On today’s program:Interim City Manager Michael C. Rogers recommends a two-cent increase in Charlottesville’s property tax rate to begin saving up money for school reconfigurationMembers of the public weigh in on the FY23 budget and that tax rateA new schedule has been set for a federal lawsuit seeking to force a House of Delegates race in 2022 Charlottesville seeks input on a traffic safety study on Fifth Street ExtendedFirst shout-out goes to the Piedmont Master GardenersThe first subscriber-supported shout-out today goes to the Piedmont Master Gardeners to announce their 2022 Spring Lecture Series featuring leading experts on sustainable landscaping, indigenous gardening wisdom and small fruit production at home. For two more Thursdays in March, you can buy a virtual ticket for these informative events. On March 24 at 7 p.m., Jayesh Samtani will discuss “Home Garden Berries—Selection, Cultivation, and Growing Alongside Ornamental Plants.” On March 31 at 7 p.m., Barbara Ryan will discuss “The New Sustainable Garden - Designing with Native Plants.”To purchase a ticket or to learn more, visit piedmontmastergardeners.org/events.2022 House suit proceedsNow that a federal lawsuit seeking to force a House of Delegates race in 2022 has been sent back to the Eastern District of Virginia, Judge David Novak has provided a path forward for how the suit will proceed. Plaintiff Paul Goldman has until Friday to file arguments for why he feels he has the legal standing to bring forward a case against the Board of Elections that challenges the constitutionality of allowing Delegates elected in 2021 to continue to serve until the end of 2023. The Virginia Attorney General’s office has until April 1 to file a motion as to why Goldman lacks jurisdiction and to express an opinion on whether Novak or a three-judge panel on the Fourth Circuit should rule on the question of standing. Goldman would then have until April 15 to respond. “Because the Fourth Circuit remanded this case to the District Court to address only the issue of standing, the parties shall not file any motions or other pleadings beside those listed above,” Novak wrote in his ruling. (read the March 21 order)For more information, read Graham Moomaw’s report on Monday’s hearing in the Virginia Mercury. City seeking input on Fifth Street safetyCharlottesville is pursuing Smart Scale funding for improvements to Fifth Street Extended as part of an overall effort to prevent future fatalities on the roadway. The city is looking at the area between Old Ridge Street and Harris Road. “This study focuses on improvement concepts that target known needs, reduce community impacts, and address all modes in a cost-effective manner,” reads the introduction. “Projects and solutions may be considered for future funding through local, regional, state and/or federal transportation programs — but not without first getting YOUR INPUT!”According to an information sheet on the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission’s Smart Scale page, there is no scope or cost estimate for the project. “Charlottesville identified the need for a project between Cherry/Elliott and Harris Roads in the 5th Ridge McIntire Multimodal Corridor Study, in Streets That Work, and in the Bike and Pedestrian Master Plan,” reads that page. “Considerations for the application include redesigning the intersection, enhancing multimodal facilities along the corridor, improving access, and enhancing transit access, lighting, and landscape of the area.The city has already been awarded Smart Scale funds to address the intersection of Elliott Avenue, Ridge Street, Cherry Avenue, and Fifth Street Extended. (read the application)The Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Board will discuss the Smart Scale projects at their virtual meeting on 2 p.m. Thursday. (meeting info)Rogers recommends two cent property tax increase for CY22Charlottesville City Council held a public hearing Monday on the real estate tax rate and personal property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins on July 1. Before then and before the general public comment period, Interim City Manager Michael C. Rogers presented Council with several ways forward on raising funds in the next five years for paying up to $75 million for the renovation of Buford Middle School. (review the presentation)“Several of you asked that we dig a little deeper and come back with several scenarios as we try to get to some resolution on how to deal with this issue,” Rogers said. The presentation featured another lesson from Senior Budget Management Analyst Krisy Hammill about the city’s looming debt crisis. “We have approximately $85 million that’s currently outstanding,” Hammill said. Hamill said the city currently pays about $11 million each year for debt service and that amount would drop if no further debt was issued. “Of this outstanding debt, about 28 percent of that is for school-related projects that have already been completed,” Hammill said. Hammill presented multiple scenarios, all which assume an annual growth rate of 1.5 percent over the next from the real estate property tax as well as two percent in revenues from meals tax rate. Hammill said it is the size of the project that is presenting an accounting problem. Without it, the city would expect to have a total five-year CIP of $82.4 million, requiring the sale of $46.9 million in bonds. “With the other projects that are on the Capital Improvement Plan list, they are of such amounts that we can manage our CIP within our affordability,” Hammill said. But adding a $75 million project will increase the total CIP to $157.4 million, requiring the sale of $121.9 million. VMDO, the architectural firm hired by the school system for reconfiguration, has suggested splitting those bonds sales over the period with $2.5 million this year, $20 million in FY24, $32.5 million in FY25, and $20 million in FY26. “Our annual debt service payment is moving from the $11.4 million that we’ve been talking about up to about $22 million in 2032,” Hammill said. “This is roughly equivalent to about a two cent tax increase over the next four years if we were going to that incrementally.” Other scenarios include a seven cent tax increase in FY23 in order to build up a larger reserve to pay off debt service. Another would be to reduce the city’s cost for reconfiguration to $50 million. Kevin Rotty, a financial consultant who advises the city on long-term debt, said other options would be to reduce city spending as well as to continue exploring state funding in advance of a special session to resolve the state budget that has not yet been called. “There’s a couple bills in the General Assembly right now which are talking about school construction,” Rotty said. “Certainly the city is not unique in having some school needs here.”The exact funding scenario depends on multiple variables, but the main lever Council gets to control is the tax rate. Rogers weighs in with his recommendationRogers reminded Council that the city will have to pick up the tab for paying 15 firefighters after a federal SAFER grant runs out. Collective bargaining will also have a cost as well. “There are some big opportunities in transit and opportunities to make progress on our climate plan but we’ve got to add money to match the funds that are available from the [federal government and the state,” Rogers said. Rogers had this recommendation for Council.“The proposed school reconfiguration has not been integrated into the city’s capital improvements program in a manner that will allow City Council to make a coordinated funding plan,” Rogers said. Nevertheless, he said there was a need to ensure that the city could cover its obligations for past needs as well as future ones. “For the FY23 budget I recommend that Council should enact a two cent real estate tax and set the money aside within the capital projects fund earmarked as the beginning of an annual funding program to generate funds for school reconfiguration,” Rogers said. Rogers recommended delaying a bond issue for reconfiguration for the school in FY23 until after a long-term plan could be developed. He also suggested a rehaul of the entire capital improvement program to be ready for next year’s budget. “Let’s move forward but not too fast,” Rogers said. “Let’s take a pause and start putting away some money for this project.”Rogers said that would give more time to see how the statewide conversation on school construction funding plays out. Similar stories:Council’s emphasis on housing issues reflected in proposed capital budget, December 16, 2018Council wants more info before giving direction on capital spending, November 18, 2020Charlottesville's Draft Capital Budget includes $50 million for Middle School reconfiguration, January 28, 2021Charlottesville Budget staff continues to warn Council of approaching debt limit, April 1, 2021Council discusses tax increases to help cover $60 million Buford upgrades, August 2, 2021Charlottesville Planning Commission gets first look at FY23-FY27 Capital Budget, November 29, 2021Prepping for Charlottesville's FY23 Capital Improvement Program, January 29, 2022Second shout-out goes to Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society Today’s first subscriber-fueled shout-out is for an upcoming panel discussion on local history. The Centennial anniversary of the Jefferson Madison Regional Library is coming to an end, and staff at the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society will talk Thursday at 7 p.m. about an upcoming article on “JMRL at 100” in the Magazine of Albemarle Charlottesville History. ACHS Program Coordinator Sterling Howell will speak with JMRL’s Historical Collection Librarian Miranda Burnett and UVA Law Library Coordinator Addison Patrick. It’s another Unregulated Historical Meandering on the Last Word on the Library Centennial. Register on Zoom or join the program on Facebook Live.  Public weighs in on real estate tax rate, personal property tax rate, and the FY23 budgetEarlier this year, Council met its legal obligations to advertise in a newspaper of record a potential tax rate for the current calendar year.“You authorized us to go up to ten cents which would present $9.2 million in revenue,” Rogers said. Rogers’ recommended budget did not anticipate spending any of that funding, but left it unallocated pending Council’s discussion about whether they want to entertain a property tax rate. Rogers is recommending a two cent increase this year for the school project. Council also advertised keeping the personal property tax rate at $4.20 per $100 of assessed value, though Commissioner of Revenue Todd Divers said a sharp increase in the value of used vehicles will increase bills. He told Council what the equalized rate would be. “You’re looking at a rate of probably around $3.22,” Divers said. “If don’t do anything, you’re probably going to see an additional $2 million.” Elizabeth Stark, the co-chair of the Charlottesville Democratic Socialists of America, called for the full increase of ten cents to support collective bargaining, $10 million a year for affordable housing, and other priorities. “I ask that the city use all levers in their power to generate income,” Stark said. “Though all tax options are regressive, an increase to the property tax coupled with tax relief for low-wealth neighbors and an increase to the lodging tax seems to be the solution to me.”However, Jamie Fitzgerald said a full increase of ten cents will hurt his ability to remain as a renter in Charlottesville.“I rent from an owner that does not live in Charlottesville,” Fitzgerald said. “The owner performs zero maintenance on this house and the house is rapidly deteriorating.”Fitzgerald predicted his rent would be increased to cover the cost, which would force him to vacate. “I’m sure I’m not the only renter in Charlottesville facing this issue,” Fitzgerald said. Chris Meyer encouraged Council to raise the property tax rate because he said Charlottesville is undertaxed. “We need to get moving,” Meyer said. “I appreciate the city manager’s suggestion on at least a two cent raise,” Meyer said. “I would look at potentially more.” After the tax rate public hearing, the public comment period was opened on the budget. No one spoke directly about what to do with the personal property tax rate. Brad Slocum no longer lives in Charlottesville and now commutes in from Staunton. He urged Council to increase funding for Charlottesville Area Transit in order to help the city meet its climate goals.“One of the best ways to do this is to ensure director of transit, Garland Williams, has the budget he and his staff need to expand the city’s bus fleet to achieve 15-minute fixed route service,” Williams said. Brian Campbell of the Charlottesville Democratic Socialists of America called on Council to make further cuts to the police budget and to require transparency.“Charlottesville spends $19 million annually on police,” Campbell said. “Lynchburg, a city nearly twice as big and with more officers also spends $19 million on police. On a per capita basis, Charlottesville spends more on police than Albemarle, Waynesboro, Staunton, Roanoke, Harrisonburg, Blacksburg, and Lynchburg as previously noted. Why do Charlottesville police spend so much more than their peers? No one knows.” Katie Yared, a fourth year student at the University of Virginia, called on Council to enact a plastic bag tax for FY23. “As I’m sure you know, the Albemarle County budget proposes that they will implement a tax on plastic bags by January 1, 2023, with a projected revenue of $20,000,” Yared  said. “Following the lead of Albemarle County, the city of Charlottesville has an opportunity to significantly reduce plastic waste and to incentivize the use of reusable bags.” Members of the Tree Commission sought additional funding in two areas.“First, we proposed planting 200 trees per year so that we can plant more trees than are being removed,” said Mark Rylander. That would take an allocation of $100,000 but the City Manager’s budget only includes $75,000. Rylander said the Tree Commission would like another $105,000 a year to address the destruction of ash trees by the Emerald Ash Borer. Several speakers asked for additional funding for the Public Housing Association of Residents including its executive director, Shelby Edwards. The current level of funding for FY22 is $41,000 but the Vibrant Community process for determining funding for outside agencies only recommended $21,035 for FY23. “Please fund PHAR especially our PHAR internship problem, and also our development-led redevelopment efforts,” Edwards said. The capital budget anticipates spending $3 million in bond-raised funds on public  housing redevelopment for each of the next four years. There’s a Community Budget Forum scheduled for tonight night at 6 p.m. The meals tax rate will be on the agenda for Council’s next regularly scheduled meeting on April 4. Support the program!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe