Podcasts about earth sciences

All fields of natural science related to Earth.

  • 451PODCASTS
  • 831EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST
earth sciences

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022





Latest podcast episodes about earth sciences

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
206 | Simon Conway Morris on Evolution, Convergence, and Theism

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 76:59 Very Popular


Evolution by natural selection is one of the rare scientific theories that resonates within the wider culture as much as it does within science. But as much as people know about evolution, we also find the growth of corresponding myths. Simon Conway Morris is a paleontologist and evolutionary biologist who's new book is From Extraterrestrials to Animal Minds: Six Myths of Evolution. He is known as a defender of evolutionary convergence and adaptationism — even when there is a mass extinction, he argues, the resulting shake-up simply accelerates the developments evolution would have made anyway. We talk about this, and also about the possible role of God in an evolutionary worldview.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Simon Conway Morris received his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Cambridge. He is currently an emeritus professor of evolutionary paleobiology in the Department of Earth Sciences at Cambridge. Among his awards are the Walcott Medal of the National Academy of Sciences and the Lyell Medal of the Geological Society of London. Cambridge web pageGoogle scholar publicationsWikipediaAmazon author pageSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Keep Off The Grass Podcast
Product Spotlight: Earth Science

Keep Off The Grass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:20


In this episode we had a chance to grab a glass with Kelsey from Earth Science, who's philosophy is "good stuff in, good stuff out".  They manufacture a variety of natural products for lawn and garden fertilization and soil health.  Listen and learn more by checking them out at www.earthsciencegrowing.com and follow them on IG @earthscienceco Keep Off The Grass Lawn of the Week is proudly Sponsored by ProPEAT Fertilizers www.Propeat.com IG:@propeat1We gave away some Simple Lawn Solutions fertilizer!!www.Simplelawnsolutions.comIG: @simplelawnsolutions Code "KOTG" for 5% off Join us LIVE every Tuesday night on YouTube-jump in the chat, weigh in, and try to win a giveaway!  SUBSCRIBE!!!www.youtube.com/keepoffthegrasslivecast Follow us on Instagram! www.Instagram.com/keep.off.the.grass Check out our website for more info and merchwww.KOTG.live The Keep Off The Grass Livecast is a collaborative effort of DIY lawncare enthusiasts seeking to pool our knowledge and learn from each other.  As always, be sure to research what is right for your lawn, as well as what products and application rates are acceptable and appropriate for your area, and don't forget to add .edu to ANY lawncare search for professional turf grass publications!

TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer (Part 1) on The Malcolm Roberts Show - 06 August 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 55:48


GUEST OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer (Part 2) on The Malcolm Roberts Show - 06 August 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 55:43


GUEST OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

Philosophy for our times
Is nature the new god? | Peter Sjöstedt-Hughes, Tim Palmer and Melanie Challenger

Philosophy for our times

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 42:41 Very Popular


Should we see nature as a divine source, or will doing so lead to self-annihilation? Looking for a link we mentioned? It's here: https://linktr.ee/philosophyforourtimesFrom Greece's Gaia to the Hindu Prithvi, many cultures have seen the Earth as a divine being. Christianity and Western culture however removed god from nature deriding such outlooks as 'pagan'. The earth was recast as a resource for humans, to be conquered, settled and tamed. Now it seems the tides may be changing again. Rivers and rainforests are being given legal rights and some philosophers go further arguing that the planets of the solar system should too. Nature it would seem is the new god.Might re-embracing Mother Earth be just what we need to prevent environmental catastrophe and destruction of society? Or is the return to the gods of nature a dangerous step that undermines human goals and values and threatens a return to superstition and fate?Psychedelic philosopher Peter Sjöstedt-Hughes, internationally-renowned climate scientist Tim Palmer, and author-broadcaster-podcaster Melanie Challenger test each other's beliefs about nature and god. Hosted by philosopher Hilary LawsonThere are thousands of big ideas to discover at IAI.tv – videos, articles, and courses waiting for you to explore. Find out more: https://iai.tv/podcast-offers?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=shownotes&utm_campaign=the-oldest-godsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tracking the Tropics with Bryan Norcross
Hurricane Specialist Bryan Norcross chats with Professor Ben Kirtman from the University of Miami

Tracking the Tropics with Bryan Norcross

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 65:08


Join FOX Weather's Hurricane Specialist Bryan Norcross and Professor Ben Kirtman from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Atmospheric, Marine, and Earth Science. They discuss the cutting-edge research Dr. Kirtman is doing in understanding how the oceans and the atmosphere interact as one system, how El Nino and La Niña conditions affect the global circulation, how far in advance big weather events can be predicted, and much more.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TNT Radio
Tony Wakeham & Professor Ian Plimer on The Mike Ryan Show - 01 August 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 55:55


GUEST 1 OVERVIEW: Tony Wakeham became an 'active' Julian Assange Supporter after Julian's incarceration in Her Majesty's Prison Belmarsh, in 2019. He and a small group of other supporters decided to 'gather' on Sydney's Town Hall steps after work EVERY Friday evening until Julian is free. GUEST 2 OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
Michael Benton and Hateg Island

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 104:17 Very Popular


For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Hateg Island, links from Michael Benton, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Hateg Island-Episode-400/Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more.Dinosaur of the day Hateg Island, a Late Cretaceous island that included some tiny dinosaurs and at least one enormous pterosaur.Interview with Michael Benton, paleontologist and professor of vertebrate paleontology in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol. He has written over 400 scientific papers and more than 50 books, about a wide range of topics, including animals in the Triassic, extinction events, and the Hateg Basin. His most recent books are “The Dinosaurs Rediscovered" and "Dinosaurs, New visions of a lost world"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2269: James David Forbes

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 3:50


TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer on The Malcolm Roberts Show - 23 July 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 55:48


GUEST OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer & Suzi Smeed on The Malcolm Roberts Show - 23 July 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 55:47


GUEST OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

Kan English
Understanding Europe's heat wave

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 6:30


Much of Europe has been blanketed with extreme heat. France, Spain and Portugal are now battling wildfires in addition to the scorching temperatures. Prof. Danny Rosenfeld, professor in the Institute of Earth Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, spoke with KAN reporter Naomi Segal about the developments. (Photo: Portugal. Associated Press)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 632 (7-18-22): Checking on the Chesapeake's Condition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-15-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 18 and July 25, 2022. SOUNDS – ~6 sec Those sounds of shorebirds and Chesapeake Bay waves open an episode on the condition of that bay, which we last explored in an August 2020 episode.  We set the stage with the instrumental opening of a song whose title calls to mind some colors of the Chesapeake region's waters, lands, sky, and creatures.  Here's about 30 seconds of “The Deep Blue Green,” by Andrew VanNorstrand. MUSIC – ~31 sec – instrumental In June 2022, the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science issued its latest annual Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Report Card, for conditions in 2021.  For the report's first part, to assess Bay waters, the report compares the status of several physical, chemical, and biological indicators to established goals, in order to generate condition scores ranging from zero to 100%.  Combining the indicator scores, the overall score for 2021 was 50, an increase from the 45 score for 2020 data; the report characterized the 50 score as “moderate health” and gave it a letter grade of C.  The score when the Report Card started in 1986 was 48; the highest score since then was 55 in 2002, and the lowest was 36 in 2003. For the report's second part, the overall watershed assessment, the report for 2021 looked at three categories of indicators: ecological, societal, and economic.  These resulted in a score of 56, characterized as “moderate health” and given a letter grade of C+.  This was the first year that three categories of indicators were used for the watershed assessment, so the results aren't directly comparable to previous years. Besides the Maryland center's annual report, several other Bay condition reports are regularly available.  These include the Chesapeake Bay Program's annual “Bay Barometer” report; the Bay Program's “Chesapeake Progress” Web site, with updates on progress toward the goals of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Agreement; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's biennial “State of the Bay” report; and reports by various groups on specific Bay areas, such as the James River Association's “State of the James” reports.  All depend on data gathered by various sources, including universities; governmental agencies at the federal, state, and local levels; and non-governmental organizations. The Chesapeake Bay is the United States' largest estuary.  Monitoring its condition is a large part of decades-old efforts to improve and sustain this irreplaceable water body. Thanks to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use “The Deep Blue Green.”  We close with about 50 seconds of another musical selection, created for our previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC – ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The waves sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Chesapeake Bay on Kent Island, Maryland, June 22, 2010. The shorebirds sound was taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific audio file was “Shore birds close,” online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/66/rec/8. “The Deep Blue Green,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://greatbearrecords.bandcamp.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 504, 12-23-19. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 604, 11-22-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) View of the Chesapeake Bay looking downstream from the Bay Bridge-Tunnel (between Virginia Beach and Northampton County), October 7, 2007.View of the Chesapeake Bay looking upstream from Sandy Point State Park in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, March 21, 2010.Summary charts for Chesapeake Bay waters (upper) and watershed (lower) from the “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed 2021 Report Card” (covering data through 2021; published in June 2022), University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.  Images accessed from the report PDF, online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf, as of 7-18-22. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Foundation, “State of the Bay,” online at https://www.cbf.org/about-the-bay/state-of-the-bay-report/. Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/.  Specific pages used were the following:“Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release by Caroline Grass;“Bay Barometer,” April 2021 (for 2019-20 data), online (as a PDF) at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/documents/Bay_Barometer_2019-2020_Web.pdf;“Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement” (signed June 16, 2014), online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/what/what_guides_us/watershed_agreement;“Chesapeake Progress,” online at https://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/;“The Estuary,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/the_estuary_system.Jeremy Cox and Timothy Wheeler, “Maryland, Virginia clamp down on crab harvests; cuts imposed as crab population hits record-low,” Bay Journal, June 30, 2022. Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “2022 Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey,” online at https://dnr.maryland.gov/fisheries/Pages/blue-crab/dredge.aspx.Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “Eyes on the Bay,” online at http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/.See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/whatsitmean.cfmfor “Data Available for Viewing” (dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, turbidity, algal blooms, and temperature).See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/links.cfmfor links to other Bay water-quality data and information sources.University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, online at https://www.umces.edu/.The “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed Report Card” is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/report-cards/chesapeake-bay/; note links for “Bay Health,” “Watershed Health,” and “Indicators.”A June 6, 2022, news release on the report of 2021 data is online https://www.umces.edu/news/chesapeake-bay-health-score-held-steady-in-2021.A PDF of the report of 2021 data is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, “How big is the [Chesapeake] bay?”  Online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/faqs/estuary_size.php. For More Information about the Chesapeake Bay and its ConditionChesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, “Chesapeake Bay Map,” online at https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/products/vmrc-chesapeake-bay-map/.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Chesapeake Bay,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/chesapeake-bay. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS):“Bay Info,” online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/index.php;“SAV Program: Monitoring and Restoration,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/programs/sav/index.php;“Virginia Coastal and Estuarine Observing System,” online at http://vecos.vims.edu/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/links.shtm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category.  The previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions was Episode 537, 8-10-20, Following are links to some other episodes on the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Barometer and other reports – Episode 305, 2-29-16.Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 115, 6-18-12.Bay TMDL, Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 475, 6-3-19.Chesapeake Bay Commission – Episode 496, 10-28-19.Estuaries introduction – Episode 326, 7-25-16.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 1) – Episode 279, 8-24-15.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 2) – Episode 280, 9-7-15.“Smart” buoys – Episode 538, 8-17-20.Submerged aquatic vegetation (“Bay grasses”) – Episode 325, 7-18-16.Winter birds of the Chesapeake Bay area – EP565 – 2/22/21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween; and Episode 601, 10-31-21, connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in 615, 2-7-22, on Brant.“Ice Dance” – “Ice Dance” – used most recently in Episode 606, 12-6-21, on freezing of water.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used most recently in Episode 610, 1-3-22, on water thermodynamics and a New Year's Day New River wade-in.“Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.“Wade in the Water” (arrangement) – used most recently in Episode 616, 2-14-22.  FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment.Grades K-5: Earth Resources 1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity.LS.11 – Populations of organisms can change over time. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.7 – Populations change through time.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

Einstein A Go-Go
Meteorites, Quantum Chemistry, James Webb Telescope

Einstein A Go-Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 52:55


Dr Shane and co-hosts Dr Lauren, Dr. Linden & Chris KP chat about tardigrade proteins, glacial ice, dog training, and the James Webb telescope; Rachel Kirby, PhD student at the Research School of Earth Sciences at ANU, talks about knitting and meteorites; and Professor Ekaterina Pas from the School of Chemistry at Monash University, talks about quantum chemistry. Program page: Einstein-A-Go-Go Facebook page: Einstein-A-Go-GoTwitter: Einstein-A-Go-Go and live every Sunday at 11:00a.m AEST on RRR 102.7mHz FM.

In Focus by The Hindu
Will climate change affect India's solar and wind energy production? | In Focus podcast

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 24:55


A recent study by scientists at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Pune, and Center for Prototype Climate Modeling, New York University, Abu Dhabi showed that climate change will likely impact efficiencies of solar and wind energy production – that is, the very tools we might depend on to combat climate change, may be affected by climate change in the interim!   The study came to the conclusion that some parts of India, especially the West and Northwest where large pools of wind energy farms are currently located, may see diminishing wind speeds. Also, solar radiation, which aids solar energy output, may diminish across almost all of India, save for some pockets. This means that the industry has to look at increasing efficiencies of wind and solar power technologies for better energy capture. Fortunately, we do have time on hand, for, the study has looked at data models for the next 50 years. If we do not act, though, our promise to the world of going net zero emissions by 2070 may be under threat. 

Encyclopedia Womannica
Dynamos: Inge Lehmann

Encyclopedia Womannica

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 5:58


Inge Lehmann (1888-1993) performed research that upended the way scientists thought of the center of the planet.Special thanks to Mercedes-Benz, our exclusive sponsor this month! From their early days, Mercedes-Benz has built a legacy championing women to achieve the unexpected. Join us all month long as we celebrate women who have led dynamic lives that have shifted, evolved and bloomed, often later in life, eventually achieving the success for which they were destined from the start. History classes can get a bad rap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn't help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Womanica. On this Wonder Media Network podcast we explore the lives of inspiring women in history you may not know about, but definitely should.Every weekday, listeners explore the trials, tragedies, and triumphs of groundbreaking women throughout history who have dramatically shaped the world around us. In each 5 minute episode, we'll dive into the story behind one woman listeners may or may not know–but definitely should. These diverse women from across space and time are grouped into easily accessible and engaging monthly themes like Educators, Villains, Indigenous Storytellers, Activists, and many more.  Womanica is hosted by WMN co-founder and award-winning journalist Jenny Kaplan. The bite-sized episodes pack painstakingly researched content into fun, entertaining, and addictive daily adventures. Womanica was created by Liz Kaplan and Jenny Kaplan, executive produced by Jenny Kaplan, and produced by Liz Smith, Grace Lynch, Maddy Foley, Brittany Martinez, Edie Allard, Lindsey Kratochwill, Adesuwa Agbonile, Carmen Borca-Carrillo, Taylor Williamson, Ale Tejeda, Sara Schleede, and Alex Jhamb Burns. Special thanks to Shira Atkins. Original theme music composed by Miles Moran.We are offering free ad space on Wonder Media Network shows to organizations working towards social justice. For more information, please email Jenny at pod@wondermedianetwork.com.Follow Wonder Media Network:WebsiteInstagramTwitter

Science History Podcast
Episode 56. Marine Pollution: David Valentine

Science History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 45:06 Very Popular


The oceans have been used as the dumping grounds for all manner of toxic waste. Outrage over such dumping led to the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 in the United States and the London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter in 1975. Today I discuss the dumping of DDT and other wastes off the coast of Southern California with Dave Valentine. Dave completed a BS in chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California San Diego in 1995, followed by an MS in chemistry also at UCSD the following year. He then completed MS and PhD degrees in earth system science at the University of California Irvine in 1998 and 2000. Dave is now the Norris Presidential Chair in Earth Science at UC Santa Barbara. He has participated in 25 oceanographic expeditions, including 13 as chief scientist.

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
664: Out of This World Research on Extrasolar Planets - Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 50:35


Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman is a Research Space Scientist with NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Shawn spends his days looking for ways to detect signs of alien life. He uses a wide variety of techniques, including mass spectrometers to measure the ratios of isotopes on the surface of Mars or spectrographs to measure the abundance of planetary gases. He spends a lot of his free time being a parent to his 16 month old daughter. When he's not spending quality time with his family, Shawn also likes to play basketball, water polo, and video games, as well as blog. Shawn received his Masters Degree in Earth Sciences from the University of Rochester and his PhD in Astrobiology and Geosciences from the Pennsylvania State University. Shawn previously worked as a Research Associate at Penn State, a Research Associate in the Virtual Planetary Laboratory at the University of Washington, and also served as the NASA Astrobiology Management Postdoctoral Fellow before accepting his current position. In this interview, Shawn shares more about his life and science.

TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer (Part 2) on Sky Dragon Slaying - 10 July 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 55:20


GUEST OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer (Part 1) on Sky Dragon Slaying - 10 July 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 55:50


GUEST OVERVIEW: Ian Plimer is Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopedia of Geology. Ian Plimer has won many awards including 1995 Australian Humanist of the Year, the Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize (twice) and the Michael Daley Prize for science broadcasting. Ian Plimer spent much of his life in Broken Hill where he retains strong links. Ian Plimer has a new book out called Green Murder. In this book he charges the greens with murder; the murder of humans who are kept in eternal poverty without coal-fired electricity; of forests and their wildlife by clear felling for mining, wind turbines and their bushfire policies; of economies producing unemployment and hopelessness; of free speech and freedoms and the intellectual and economic future of young people.

Science Modeling Talks
Episode 34 – Gloria Kreischer Gajewicz – “Improving Student Outcomes Through Modeling Instruction”

Science Modeling Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 40:42


In this episode, Mark talks with Dr. Gloria Kreischer Gajewicz about her experience finding modeling instruction as a veteran teacher, about shifting to standards-based grading, and about her Ph.D. research into improving student outcomes through modeling instruction. Guests Dr. Gloria Kreischer Gajewicz Dr. Gloria Kreischer Gajewicz has been a high school science educator for more than 23 years, teaching various science courses in Ohio including Biology, Anatomy and Physiology, Physics, Earth Science, and Chemistry. Currently, she teaches Chemistry and AP Chemistry at Ottawa Hills High School in Toledo Ohio. She began using Modeling Instruction in 2011 after taking a workshop at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. She earned her doctorate in education in 2019 from Bowling Green State University. https://www.facebook.com/ggajewicz (Facebook) | https://www.instagram.com/gkreischergajewicz (Instagram) | https://www.twitter.com/ggajewicz (Twitter) Highlights [25:50] Dr. Gloria Kreischer Gajewicz: "a lot of our content knowledge as science teachers really comes from our training at the university level as an undergrad. The trick is then how do we take that content knowledge and turn that into something that's understandable for our students." Resources Download Transcript https://sciencemodelingtalks.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/SMT-Ep34-GloriaKreischer-Transcript.pdf (Ep 34 Transcript)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 631 (7-4-22): Frogs and Fireworks

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-30-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 4 and July 11, 2022.  This is a repeat of a 2016 episode celebrating the July 4th holiday.  The episode features Virginia Tech master's degree graduate Kriddie Whitmore as a guest voice. SOUNDS - ~ 4 sec – Gray Treefrogs and fireworks. This week, for Independence Day episode, we drop in on a most unusual July 4th conversation: two Gray Treefrogs, surrounded by fireworks, are debating U.S. water history.  Sound unimaginable?  Well, just have a listen. SOUNDS - ~2 sec – Frogs and fireworks. Frog 1 – There those humans go again, shootin' off their fireworks and makin' it hard for us frogs to hear each other's calls!  What's all the ruckus about, anyway? Frog 2 - Why, it's July 4th!  They're celebrating this country's Declaration of Independence in 1776 from Great Britain.  I think it's cool—at least it's a break from hearing YOU guys calling every evening. Frog 1 – And just why are YOU so excited about the birthday of this big, bustling, human country?  Seems to me that it's been nothing but trouble for aquatic habitats and creatures like us since those first ships came over here from that Europe place.  Everywhere we try to hop, there's polluted rivers and lakes, lost wetlands and other habitats, and hot, dry pavement. Frog 2 – Well, yeah, you're right, partly.  This country's waters have had a pretty hard history.  And we amphibians have had the worst of it in some cases and places, with this permeable skin we have.  But you're forgetting about some positive things.  The humans' Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972, and a bunch other important acts, too.  And right here in this state, Virginia, the constitution says it's the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction. Frog 1 - Have all those things done any good? Frog 2 – Well, not always or everywhere.  Just in Virginia, hundreds of water bodies are impaired and need expensive clean-up programs.  For instance, I've got cousins living near that Chesapeake Bay, and they tell me every year it's some things good, other things fair, and still others needing a ton of work.  But many rivers and lakes certainly are in better shape than they were 40 or 50 years ago; the Potomac River's one example.  Those humans have many competing interests, so sometimes what they do isn't so good for water, or lands, or creatures like us. But other times, it is.  People have learned a lot over the years about using and managing natural resources more sustainably, and all kinds of people work hard trying to do that. Frog 1 - Yeah, I guess you're right.  You know, it's not easy being a frog, but I guess it's pretty tough being a person, too. Frog 2 – Now that's a pretty realistic call! SOUNDS - ~3 sec – fireworks.Frog 2  – Hey, there's the fireworks finale.  And that sounds like the Air Force Concert Band playing one of my favorites, “The Washington Post,” by John Philip Sousa.  Let's have a quick listen, then we better get back under cover.  All the humans will be coming back from the fireworks soon. Both frogs – Happy July 4th!MUSIC - ~ 14 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 323, 7-4-16, and Episode 427, 7-2-18. Virginia Water Radio thanks Kriddie Whitmore, a 2016 master's degree graduate in Forestry from Virginia Tech, for participating as the guest voice in this episode. Thanks also to Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, for reviewing a draft of the episode. This episode's frog and fireworks sounds were recorded Blacksburg, Va., around 9:30 p.m. on July 4, 2015. This episode's music was an excerpt of “The Washington Post,” written by John Philip Sousa in 1889, and performed here by the United States Air Force Concert Band on their 2001 album “I Am An American,” accessed online at http://www.allmusic.com/album/i-am-an-american-mw0002256231, as of 6-29-22.  Information about “The Washington Post” is available from the United States Marine Band, “Sousa-The Washington Post” (3:30 video), online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxrh1CrMmTY; and “The President's Own/John Philip Sousa,” online at http://www.marineband.marines.mil/About/Our-History/John-Philip-Sousa/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., Sep. 23, 2009. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CONSERVATION IN THE VIRGINIA CONSTITUTION Following are the four sections of Article XI, “Conservation,” of the Virginia Constitution, as accessed at the Virginia Legislative Information System, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/, on June 30, 2022.Section 1. Natural resources and historical sites of the Commonwealth.To the end that the people have clean air, pure water, and the use and enjoyment for recreation of adequate public lands, waters, and other natural resources, it shall be the policy of the Commonwealth to conserve, develop, and utilize its natural resources, its public lands, and its historical sites and buildings.  Further, it shall be the Commonwealth's policy to protect its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, for the benefit, enjoyment, and general welfare of the people of the Commonwealth. Section 2. Conservation and development of natural resources and historical sites. In the furtherance of such policy, the General Assembly may undertake the conservation, development, or utilization of lands or natural resources of the Commonwealth, the acquisition and protection of historical sites and buildings, and the protection of its atmosphere, lands, and waters from pollution, impairment, or destruction, by agencies of the Commonwealth or by the creation of public authorities, or by leases or other contracts with agencies of the United States, with other states, with units of government in the Commonwealth, or with private persons or corporations.  Notwithstanding the time limitations of the provisions of Article X, Section 7, of this Constitution, the Commonwealth may participate for any period of years in the cost of projects which shall be the subject of a joint undertaking between the Commonwealth and any agency of the United States or of other states. Section 3. Natural oyster beds. The natural oyster beds, rocks, and shoals in the waters of the Commonwealth shall not be leased, rented, or sold but shall be held in trust for the benefit of the people of the Commonwealth, subject to such regulations and restriction as the General Assembly may prescribe, but the General Assembly may, from time to time, define and determine such natural beds, rocks, or shoals by surveys or otherwise. Section 4. Right of the people to hunt, fish, and harvest game. The people have a right to hunt, fish, and harvest game, subject to such regulations and restrictions as the General Assembly may prescribe by general law.SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/; and “Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/news/blog/slight_improvements_in_bay_health_and_new_economic_data_added_in_2021_chesa.Commonwealth of Virginia, Constitution of Virginia, “Article XI Conservation,” accessed online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/constitution/article11/. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now Department of Wildlife Resources), Richmond, Va., 2011. Bernard S. Martof, et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, “Water Quality Monitoring in the Potomac Estuary,” online at http://www.mwcog.org/environment/water/potomacestuary.asp.Thomas V. Cech, Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y., 2003.U.S. Environmental Protection Agency:“National Aquatic Resources Surveys,” online at https://www.epa.gov/national-aquatic-resource-surveys;“Summary of the Clean Water Act,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Water Quality Assessments/Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.Zygmunt J. B. Plater et al., Environmental Law and Policy: Nature, Law, and Society, West Publishing Co., St. Paul, Minn., 1998. For More Information about Amphibians in Virginia and Elsewhere AmphibiaWeb, https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society.  (Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles.) Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“A Guide to Virginia's Frogs and Toads,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogs-and-toads/;“A Guide to the Salamanders of Virginia,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/salamanders/;“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/(the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19173);“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf;“Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/;“Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/. Virginia Herpetological Society, “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm. For More Information about Federal Environmental and Natural Resources LawsCornell University Law School/Legal Information Institute:“Environmental Law,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/environmental_law; “Natural Resources,” online at https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/natural_resources. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “Laws and Regulations,” online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations.  The section for the Clean Water Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-clean-water-act; the section for the Endangered Species Act is online at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/summary-endangered-species-act; the section for the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is online at https://www.epa.gov/nepa. For More Information about Virginia Natural Resources Laws Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Web site, online at http://naturalresources.virginia.gov/.  See the “Agencies” link to access the various Virginia state agencies involved with resources regulation and management. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” and “History” subject categories. Following is the link to another episode on Gray Treefrogs.Episode 528, 6-8-20. Following are links to other episodes done for July 4th. Episode 168, 7-1-13 – Water and the Revolutionary War.Episode 220, 6-30-14 – Water origins of Virginia Declaration signers.Episode 273, 7-6-15 – The Great Road on the Virginia Peninsula.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. Biology&

united states music new york relationships university game history president europe earth education college guide water law state zoom land sound living research tech society government management development public national congress environment political fish normal dark natural web va rain humans ocean animals laws policy principles sons snow washington post citizens agency stream independence day constitution priority richmond plants frogs biology native environmental bay dynamic grade bio conservation domestic fireworks resource great britain index commonwealth regulations menu processes pond signature arial virginia tech chapel hill agencies accent toad atlantic ocean life sciences govt natural resources general assembly carolinas revolutionary war slight compatibility colorful msonormal forestry declaration of independence ls times new roman sections environmental protection agency aquatic civics watershed organisms zoology freshwater reptiles chesapeake salamanders minn taxonomy policymakers chesapeake bay earth sciences toads shenandoah blacksburg amphibians acknowledgment cosgrove endangered species act environmental law cambria math clean water act style definitions worddocument north carolina press john wiley saveifxmlinvalid environmental quality ignoremixedcontent stormwater punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules virginia department lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub sols smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim potomac river environmental protection agency epa defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp united states history name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis herpetology reay john philip sousa vus living systems plater grades k united states marine band wildlife resources name e hyla space systems cumberland gap light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date name plain text name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d name table contemporary name body text first indent name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map name table web name normal indent name balloon text name normal web name table theme name list bullet name normal table name plain table name list number name no list name grid table light name closing name outline list name grid table name signature name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue national environmental policy act nepa inland fisheries forest resources ben cosgrove michigan museum audio notes virginia constitution msobodytext virginia secretary water center tmdl 20image donotshowrevisions virginia standards
American Conservative University
Geology and the Design of Our Planet for Life

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 42:59


The Good Earth: Insights from Geology on the Design of Our Planet for Life. Geologist Casey Luskin explains how Earth contains many intricate geological processes that are required for life and suggest intelligent design. Dr. Luskin holds a PhD in Geology from the University of Johannesburg where he specialized in paleomagnetism and the early plate tectonic history of South Africa. His B.S. and M.S. degrees in Earth Sciences are from the University of California, San Diego, where he studied evolution extensively at the graduate and undergraduate levels, and conducted geological research at Scripps Institution for Oceanography. Luskin is Associate Director of the Center for Science and Culture at Discovery Institute. This talk was presented at the 2022 Dallas Conference on Science and Faith in January 2022. Watch this presentation at- https://youtu.be/gKRXO8Xwc1U 8,148 views May 24, 2022 Discovery Science 165K subscribers   ============================ The Discovery Science News Channel is the official Youtube channel of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. The CSC is the institutional hub for scientists, educators, and inquiring minds who think that nature supplies compelling evidence of intelligent design. The CSC supports research, sponsors educational programs, defends free speech, and produce articles, books, and multimedia content. For more information visit https://www.discovery.org/id/ http://www.evolutionnews.org/ http://www.intelligentdesign.org/ Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter: Twitter: https://twitter.com/discoverycsc/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/discoverycsc/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/discoverycsc/ Visit other Youtube channels connected to the Center for Science & Culture Discovery Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/Discover... Dr. Stephen C. Meyer: https://www.youtube.com/user/DrStephe...   HELP ACU SPREAD THE WORD!  Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks. Forward this show to friends. Ways to subscribe to the American Conservative University Podcast Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via RSS You can also subscribe via Stitcher FM Player Podcast Addict Tune-in Podcasts Pandora Look us up on Amazon Prime …And Many Other Podcast Aggregators and sites   Please help ACU by submitting your Show ideas. Email us at americanconservativeuniversity@americanconservativeuniversity.com Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks.

TNT Radio
Professor Ian Plimer on Politically Incorrect - 25 June 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 55:32


GUEST OVERVIEW: Professor Ian Plimer is an Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, where he was Professor and Head of Earth Sciences, after serving at the University of Newcastle as Professor and Head of Geology. He was Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide and has published more than 140 scientific papers & was one of the editors for the five-volume Encyclopaedia of Geology. Prof. Plimer's new book Green Murder was published in 2021.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Power for the People: 6/22/22: A Proposed Consumer Owned Utility for Maine

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 57:21


Producer/Host: Steve Kahl Program Topic: A proposed Consumer Owned Utility for Maine Key Discussion Points: a) CMP and Versant rankings among national utilities b) Pros and cons of consumer-owned Pine Tree Power c) role of OurPowerMaine.org in getting Pine Tree Power on the Nov 2023 ballot Guest: Seth Berry, former chair of the legislature's energy committee About the host: Steve Kahl is Professor of Science at Thomas College where he teaches environmental and energy courses and advises the student sustainability club. He writes the monthly ‘Sustainability Minute' email which is distributed to over 1,200 readers. He is a member of the Quarry Road Recreational Area board of directors where he is advocating for a net-zero energy new welcome center. He has advised the board of WERU on the current plan for the station to become 100% solar powered in 2020. Steve is a member of the Green Campus Coalition of Maine, the working group of sustainability directors at Maine college campuses. Steve's past positions include Sustainability Director at Unity College where he developed a plan for the college to become 100% solar powered and earned the college the prestigious STARS Gold ranking with the American Association of Sustainability in Higher Education. Before that, he was Director of Environmental and Energy Strategies for the James Sewall Company of Old Town where he led a Maine Technology Institute research project that found that Maine could be 79% solar powered if all suitably-oriented rooftops had solar PV panels. Prior to moving home to Maine, he was a member of the Energy Commission in Plymouth NH where he was obtained funding for the renovation of a town office building to net-zero energy and the installation of 160 KW of solar PV panels on town properties included a major PV array at the sewage treatment plant that offsets 40% of its electrical costs. In his own home, he has installed two air-source heat pumps to completely eliminate heating oil, a hybrid hot water heater to reduce his water heating costs by 70%, and insulated the basement and attic to further reduce energy consumption and increase comfort. He would like to install rooftop solar panels but so far his shade trees that also produce maple syrup each year have convinced him otherwise. However, he has solar panels on his summer place at the lake and hasn’t paid for any electricity there since 2011. Steve has a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the University of Maine. The post Power for the People: 6/22/22: A Proposed Consumer Owned Utility for Maine first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Exploring Washington State
[REPLAY] #5 Conversation With Nick Zentner Geology Professor at CWU. Nick Makes Rocks FUN!

Exploring Washington State

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 54:48


This episode is a conversation with Nick Zentner a Geology Professor at Central Washington University in Ellensburg.  Nick is the host of Nick From Home and Nick On The Rocks.  Additionally Nick is a well known lecturer on geology and a winner of the James Shea Award, a national award recognizing exceptional delivery of Earth Science to the general public.  Nick shares multiple pieces of information in this episode about geology in Central Washington as well as the Cascades. I found my conversation with Nick to be very engaging and I know that you will as well.  If you have not heard of Nick Zentner please listen to this episode and you will be very entertained. If you have heard Nick speak before you know what to expect and this will not disappoint.Here are links to some other shows that Nick has appeared on.Nick On The Rocks Produced for PBS Television.Nick From Home.  Livestreams on YouTube from his home during the 2020 PandemicCentral Rocks Roadside Geology Produced by Central Washington UniversityIf you want other great ideas of places to visit, or to find out more about people who are making amazing things in Washington State you can visit Explore Washington State.Support the show

The Magic Mountie Podcast
STUDENTS ASK THE QUESTIONS: Geology ADT With Student Host Sierra Ruiz & Professor of Geology & Earth Sciences Dr. Tania Anders Episode 155

The Magic Mountie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 35:10


Today's episode is hosted by former Mt. SAC student Sierra Ruiz, who is a former student of her interviewee, Dr. Tania Anders, Professor of Geology and earth sciences. Our guest host Sierra graduated with her associate's in English in January of 2021, and transferred to Cal State Fullerton, with one year left to finish her Bachelor in English degree.  You'll hear Sierra talk about her experience as the lead facilitator of the Girls in STEM club for the Columbia Memorial Space Center. Also in this episode, Dr. Anders will help you grasp how to choose a path you're passionate about, how cross disciplines can benefit each other and the classes you might take while at Mt. SAC and beyond if you're thinking of exploring Geology.  Learn more about the Geology Degree  Visit the Mt. SAC Counseling Department Visit the Mt. SAC Transfer Center Run Time: 34 min, 25 sec To find the full transcript for this episode, click HERE

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 629 (6-6-22): The 2022 Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Season Begins with a Re-formed Pacific Storm

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:52).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-3-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks June 6 and June 13, 2022. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Driving Rain,” by the Charlottesville- and Nelson County-based band, Chamomile and Whiskey.  The storm-themed music sets the stage for our annual preview of a potential bunch of rainy, windy, and storm-surge-causing summer and fall visitors.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds to some more of the music accompanying 21 names that we hope will NOT become infamous this year. MUSIC and VOICES ~36 sec – Music lyrics: “In the driving rain”; then instrumental.  Voices: “Alex.  Bonnie.  Colin.  Danielle.  Earl.  Fiona.  Gaston.  Hermine.  Ian.  Julia.  Karl.  Lisa.  Martin.  Nicole.  Owen.  Paula.  Richard.  Shary.  Tobias.  Virginie.  Walter.” Those were the names planned for storms that may occur during this year's Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season.  The Atlantic basin includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic tropical cyclone season runs officially from June 1 through November 30.  Most Atlantic tropical cyclones occur within this period, but not all of them do.  In fact, 2022 is the first year since 2014 in which there was NOT a named Atlantic basin storm before June 1, although it was close: as of June 3, the remnants of Pacific basin Hurricane Agatha, which formed in late May and made landfall in southern Mexico, were predicted to re-form in the Gulf of Mexico as the Atlantic basin's first named storm. [Editor's note, not in the audio: Pre-June named Atlantic storms in the previous seven years were Ana in 2015, Alex in January 2016 and Bonnie in May 2016, Arlene in April 2017, Alberto in May 2018, Andrea in May 2019, Arthur and Bertha in May 2020, and Ana in May 2021.  The first named storm in 2014 was in July.  The National Hurricane Center upgraded Potential Tropical Cyclone One to Tropical Storm Alex around 2 a.m. EDT on June 5, 2022.]Tropical storms and hurricanes are two categories of tropical cyclones, which are rotating storm systems that start in tropical or sub-tropical latitudes.  A tropical cyclone is called a tropical storm—and gets a name—when sustained wind speeds reach 39 miles per hour; at 74 miles per hour, a tropical cyclone is considered a hurricane.  Tropical depressions—with wind speeds below 39 miles per hour—don't get named if they never reach tropical storm wind speed,* but they can still bring damaging rainfall and flooding.  Hurricane-force storms are called typhoonsin northwestern areas of the Pacific Ocean. [Editor's note, not in the audio: A tropical system that never gets above the tropical depression wind-speed level won't be given a name, but a lingering tropical depression that previously was at the wind speed of a tropical storm or hurricane will have a name associated with it.]Before a tropical system of any speed or name barges into the Old Dominion, here are five important preparedness steps recommended by the National Weather Service.1.  Know your zone – that is, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by checking the Virginia Department of Emergency Management's “Hurricane Zone Evacuation Tool,” available online at  vaemergency.gov/prepare, or by contacting your local emergency management office. 2.  Assemble an emergency kit of food, water, flashlights, first aid materials, a battery-powered radio, and other items that would be useful in a power outage.3.  Have a family emergency plan, including plans for evacuating and for getting in touch with one another in an emergency. 4.  Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property. And 5.  Establish ways to stay informed, especially if the power goes out. Detailed safety tips for hurricanes and other severe weather are available from the “Safety” link at the National Weather Service Web site, www.weather.gov; from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, online as noted earlier at vaemergency.gov/prepare; and from various other sources. Thanks to eight Blacksburg, Va., friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Chamomile and Whiskey for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Driving Rain.” MUSIC – ~21 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 579, 5-31-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Satellite photo of Tropical Storm Alex off the southeastern Atlantic Coast of the United States at 2:51 p.m. EDT (18:51 Z), on June 5, 2022.  Photo from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “GOES Image Viewer: GOES-East/U.S. Atlantic Coast/Band 1 (Blue Visible)”, online at https://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/goes/sector.php?sat=G16§or=eus; specific URL for the photo was https://cdn.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/GOES16/ABI/SECTOR/eus/01/20221561851_GOES16-ABI-eus-01-500x500.jpg, as of June 6, 2022.Predictions for the 2022 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “NOAA predicts above-normal 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season; Ongoing La Niña, above-average Atlantic temperatures set the stage for busy season ahead,” May 24, 2022, online at https://www.noaa.gov/news-release/noaa-predicts-above-normal-2022-atlantic-hurricane-season.Map showing the names, dates, and tracks of named Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (tropical storms and hurricanes) in 2021. Map from the National Hurricane Center, “2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season,” online at https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/index.php?season=2021&basin=atl.“5 Things to Know About Having and Evacuation Plan” poster from the National Weather Service, “What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan.  The site also has posters with “5 Things to Know About…” hurricane hazard risks, strengthening one's home, getting information, and insurance. EXTRA INFORMATION ON TROPICAL CYCLONE PREPAREDNESS The following information is quoted from the National Weather Service, ‘Hurricane Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane, as of June 6, 2022. Plan for a Hurricane: What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan) “The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1.  It is vital to understand your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding, and wind.  Here is your checklist of things to do BEFORE hurricane seasons begins.Know your zone: Do you live near the Gulf or Atlantic Coasts?  Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by contacting your local government/emergency management office or, in Virginia, by visiting https://www.vaemergency.gov/hurricane-evacuation-zone-lookup/. Put Together an Emergency Kit: Put together a basic emergency kit; information to do so is online at https://www.ready.gov/kit.  Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators, and storm shutters.Write or review your Family Emergency Plan: Before an emergency happens, sit down with your family or close friends and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you will go, and what you will do in an emergency.  Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency supplies kit or another safe place where you can access it in the event of a disaster.  Information to help with emergency plan preparation is online at https://www.ready.gov/plan. Review Your Insurance Policies: Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property.Understand NWS forecast products, especially the meaning of NWS watches and warnings.Preparation tips for your home are available from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, online at https://www.flash.org/. Preparation tips for those with chronic illnesses are available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, online at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/emergency.htm. Actions to Take When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Threatens(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-action) “When a hurricane threatens your community, be prepared to evacuate if you live in a storm surge risk area.  Allow enough time to pack and inform friends and family if you need to leave your home. Secure your home: Cover all of your home's windows.  Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows.  A second option is to board up windows with 5/8 inch exterior grade or marine plywood, built to fit, and ready to install.  Buy supplies before the hurricane season rather than waiting for the pre-storm rush. Stayed tuned in: Check the websites of your local National Weather Service office (online at https://www.weather.gov/) and local government/emergency management office.  Find out what type of emergencies could occur and how you should respond. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or other radio or TV stations for the latest storm news. Follow instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if ordered! If NOT ordered to evacuate: *Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level during the storm.  Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can. *Stay away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. *If the eye of the storm passes over your area, there will be a short period of calm, but at the other side of the eye, the wind speed rapidly increases to hurricane force winds coming from the opposite direction.” After a Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after) Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates. If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe. Once home, drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.  If you must go out, watch for fallen objects in the road, downed electrical wires, and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks that might collapse. Walk carefully around the outside of your home to check for loose power lines, gas leaks, and structural damage. Stay out of any building if you smell gas, if floodwaters remain around the building, if the building or home was damaged by fire, or if the authorities have not declared it safe. Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the leading causes of death after storms in areas dealing with power outages.  Never use a portable generator inside your home or garage. Use battery-powered flashlights.  Do NOT use candles.  Turn on your flashlight before entering a vacated building.  The battery could produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.”