Podcasts about earth sciences

All fields of natural science related to Earth.

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Latest podcast episodes about earth sciences

In Our Time
The Evolution of Crocodiles

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 53:07


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the remarkable diversity of the animals that dominated life on land in the Triassic, before the rise of the dinosaurs in the Jurassic, and whose descendants are often described wrongly as 'living fossils'. For tens of millions of years, the ancestors of alligators and Nile crocodiles included some as large as a bus, some running on two legs like a T Rex and some that lived like whales. They survived and rebounded from a series of extinction events but, while the range of habitats of the dinosaur descendants such as birds covers much of the globe, those of the crocodiles have contracted, even if the animals themselves continue to evolve today as quickly as they ever have. With Anjali Goswami Research Leader in Life Sciences and Dean of Postgraduate Education at the Natural History Museum Philip Mannion Lecturer in the Department of Earth Sciences at University College London And Steve Brusatte Professor of Palaeontology and Evolution at the University of Edinburgh Producer Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Science
The Evolution of Crocodiles

In Our Time: Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 53:07


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the remarkable diversity of the animals that dominated life on land in the Triassic, before the rise of the dinosaurs in the Jurassic, and whose descendants are often described wrongly as 'living fossils'. For tens of millions of years, the ancestors of alligators and Nile crocodiles included some as large as a bus, some running on two legs like a T Rex and some that lived like whales. They survived and rebounded from a series of extinction events but, while the range of habitats of the dinosaur descendants such as birds covers much of the globe, those of the crocodiles have contracted, even if the animals themselves continue to evolve today as quickly as they ever have. With Anjali Goswami Research Leader in Life Sciences and Dean of Postgraduate Education at the Natural History Museum Philip Mannion Lecturer in the Department of Earth Sciences at University College London And Steve Brusatte Professor of Palaeontology and Evolution at the University of Edinburgh Producer Simon Tillotson

Capital Daily
What A Past Japanese Earthquake Could Mean For B.C.'s Tsunami Risk

Capital Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 20:37


New research led by Jessica Pilarczyk, an earth scientist at Simon Fraser University, has uncovered evidence of a major earthquake near Japan's Boso Peninsula that took place about 1000 years ago. Now her team is planning to head to Vancouver Island, to scour the Port Alberni area for any evidence of a corresponding tsunami. We'll hear what this past natural disaster could mean for the tsunami risk on B.C.'s coast. Get more stories like this in your inbox every morning by subscribing to our daily newsletter at CapitalDaily.ca Check our membership opportunity at CapitalDaily.ca/MemberAnd subscribe to us on our socials! Twitter @CapitalDailyVic  Instagram @CapitalDaily  Facebook @CapitalDailyVic

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 590 (8-16-21): Osprey Rescue Reinforces Role of Fishing-line Recycling

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (4:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This is a revised version of an episode from August 2013. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental That's part of “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” an adaptation of a traditional tune called “Fisher's Hornpipe,” by Williamsburg musician Timothy Seaman on his 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The music sets the stage for a “reel” story about fishing equipment and a summer bird of prey.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can guess how the first two sounds add up to the third. And here's a hint: misplaced line makes for a tangled, feathered fisher.SOUNDS - ~19 secIf you guessed, an Osprey running afoul of some fishing line, you're right!  You heard he call of an Osprey, or “Fish Hawk,”; the sound of fishing line, being reeled in; and part of a rescue of an Osprey chick stuck in fishing line.  The latter sound was taken from the “Osprey Cam,” the Chesapeake Conservancy's real-time video transmission from an Osprey nest on Kent Island, Maryland.  On July 29, 2013, the camera showed that one of that year's three chicks had gotten its legs caught in fishing line.  Some viewers of the bird's predicament went to the site, waded out to the nest with a ladder, and climbed up and disentangled the chick. Unwittingly, this lucky Osprey chick had starred in a documentary about the value of fishing-line recycling stations.  Birds, sea turtles, and other animals can get stuck in, or eat, improperly discarded fishing line, nets, or other plastic items.  Such material can also get caught in boat propellers or intakes.  Recycling programs for fishing line are one way to help reduce these threats.  Virginia began a statewide fishing-line recycling program in 2009, run jointly by the Department of Wildlife Resources—formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries—and the Marine Resources Commission.  Recycling is now available at many boat ramps, parks, and marinas, as well as at some outdoor-equipment businesses.  At those locations, anglers can look for the distinctive plastic tubes with a curved top, and help put plastic back to use, instead of on a beak or fin. Thanks to Lang Elliot and the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, to Timothy Seaman, and to the Chesapeake Conservancy, respectively, for permission to use this week's sounds of an Osprey, fishing line, and the Osprey chick rescue.  Thanks also to Mr. Seaman for this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Bass Fisherman's Reel.” MUSIC – ~20 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 175, 8-19-13.The Osprey call sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The fishing line sound and musical excerpt from “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” on the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.The sounds of the rescue of an Osprey chick caught in fishing line were taken from a video recorded by the Chesapeake Conservancy's “Osprey Cam,” available online at http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/Osprey-Cam, used with permission.  For more information about the camera or the Conservancy, contact the Conservancy at 716 Giddings Avenue, Suite 42, Annapolis, Maryland 21401; phone (443) 321-3610; e-mail: info@chesapeakeconservancy.org. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Young Osprey in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.  Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), made available for public use by the USFWS' National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12049/rec/9, as of 8-16-21.Osprey in flight, 2016 (location not identified).  Photo by Alvin Freund, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17870/rec/11, as of 8-16-21.Fishing-line recycling container at South Holston Lake, Washington County, Virginia, April 15, 2013. SOURCES Used for Audio Boat US Foundation, online at https://www.boatus.org/clean-boating/recycling/fishing-line-recycling/. Chesapeake Conservancy, “Webcams/Osprey,” online at https://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/ospreycam. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Commission, “Reel. Remove. Recycle – Don't Leave Your Line Behind,”online at https://mrrp.myfwc.com/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Osprey entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/.  Video from an Osprey camera at Savannah, Georgia, is available online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/savannah-ospreys/. Outdoor News, “State Agencies Initiate Fishing Line Recycling Program,” 2/10/09. [Easton, Md.] Star Democrat, Osprey cam chick Ozzie is rescued, 8/7/13. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Osprey entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18845; “Recycle Your Fishing Line” is online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/recycle-your-line/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, “Introducing the Virginia Fishing Line Recycling Program,” online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/rec_assessment/VFLRP_AD.shtm. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds,” ‘Overall Importance of Water,” and “Recreation” subject categories. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Civics and Economics CourseCE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. Government CourseGOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.

society bay humans university agency music recycling photo natural relationships state video audio living game college world rescue accent cd dark tech water xeno web index rain pond research ocean government education public recreation birds foundation maryland native fish chesapeake snow environment suite organisms images reel msonormal commonwealth stream menu normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions fishing williamsburg arial environmental dynamic citizen times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading remove commission biology civics grade citizenship colorful resource md signature bio ozzie scales washington county govt watershed transcript earth sciences conservancy unwittingly ornithology freshwater hornpipe virginia tech ls annapolis atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service usfws grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes acknowledgments ar sa seaman zoology national audubon society taxonomy msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater lang elliott policymakers bmp reinforces new standard virginia department michigan museum cripple creek cumberland gap sols outdoor news florida fish kent island tmdl virginia society wildlife conservation inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
In Our Time
The Evolution of Teeth (Summer Repeat)

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 49:31


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss theories about the origins of teeth in vertebrates, and what we can learn from sharks in particular and their ancestors. Great white sharks can produce up to 100,000 teeth in their lifetimes. For humans, it is closer to a mere 50 and most of those have to last from childhood. Looking back half a billion years, though, the ancestors of sharks and humans had no teeth in their mouths at all, nor jaws. They were armoured fish, sucking in their food. The theory is that either their tooth-like scales began to appear in mouths as teeth, or some of their taste buds became harder. If we knew more about that, and why sharks can regenerate their teeth, then we might learn how humans could grow new teeth in later lives. With Gareth Fraser Assistant Professor in Biology at the University of Florida Zerina Johanson Merit Researcher in the Department of Earth Sciences at the Natural History Museum and Philip Donoghue Professor of Palaeobiology at the University of Bristol Producer: Simon Tillotson

SpiceRadioVan
UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report released and what this means

SpiceRadioVan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 12:53


John Clague, professor emeritus in the department of Earth Sciences

UW PM Podcast
Helen Huang: Co-Founder of Co.Lab and Former PM at Microsoft

UW PM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 38:19


Meet Helen, the co-founder of Co.Lab - a program providing aspiring technical folks with real-world experience launching products. Today, Gogilan sits down with Helen to discuss her unique and untraditional pathway into PM as a Earth Sciences major, her lessons and advice from on the job at Microsoft, and her new life building a business and its relationship to building products. Check out the program at Co.Lab: https://www.joincolab.io/

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 589 (8-9-21): A Musical Tour of Rivers and Watersheds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image and Extra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 9, 2021.  This revised episode from February 2015 is the last in a series of eight episodes this summer related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 sec – Lyrics: “Take me down to the riverside.” This week, that excerpt of “Riverside,” by the Rockingham County- and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, opens an episode giving musical tour of some of Virginia's major river watersheds.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to parts of six other songs, and see if you can guess the six Virginia watersheds being represented.  Three may be obvious, but the other three may challenge your musical and hydrological knowledge. MUSIC – ~ 94 sec “Shenandoah” by Timothy Seaman – ~18 sec – instrumental. “Sandy Boys” by Sara Grey – ~11 sec – Lyrics: “Do come along, Sandy boys, waitin' for the bug-eye-boo.” “Banks of New River” by Whitetop Mt. Band – ~13 sec – Lyrics: “I'm sitting here on the banks of New River.” “Clinch Mountain Quickstep” by Timothy Seaman – ~14 sec – instrumental. “Rappahannock Running Free” by Bob Gramann – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “I love the Rappahannock and its waters running free; the rapids of this river, that's where I want to be.” “James River Blues” by Old Crow Medicine Show – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “James River blues.” “All Quiet on the Potomac” – ~18 sec – instrumental. You heard parts of “Shenandoah,” performed by Timothy Seaman; “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, referring to the Big Sandy River; “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band; “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” also by Timothy Seaman, selected here for its connection to the Clinch River; “Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann; “James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show; and “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales. The watersheds of these rivers are part of 14 major watersheds in Virginia, as identified by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.  Wherever you are in the Commonwealth, you're in one of the those watersheds, as well as being—in turn—in one of the larger watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico.  They all deserve to have songs written about them, because they're part of Virginia's varied, complex, and historic system of waterways and landscapes.Thanks to all of the artists mentioned for permission to use this week's music. We close this episode, and Water Radio's summer 2021 series on watersheds and rivers, with about 30 more seconds of The Steel Wheels' “Riverside.” MUSIC – ~29 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 251, 2-2-15. “Riverside,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 10, 2014, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Productions; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. More information about Goose Creek Productions is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 295, 12-21-15.The “Shenandoah” version in this episode's musical tour is by Timothy Seaman and Paulette Murphy, from the start of “Shenandoah/Hazel River” on the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 447, 11-19-18. “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, is from the 2009 album “Sandy Boys,” copyright by Sara Grey and Fellside Records, used with permission.  More information about Sara Grey is available online at http://www.saragrey.net/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 436, 9-3-18. “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band, is from the 2008 album, “Bull Plus 10%,” copyright Whitetop Mountain Band and Arhoolie Records, used with permission.  More information about Whitetop Mountain Band is available online at http://whitetopmountainband.tripod.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 546, 10-12-20. “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” from the 2002 album “Sycamore Rapids,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 435, 8-27-18.“Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann, is from the 2008 album, “Mostly Live,” copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 304, 2-22-16.“James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show, is from the 2006 album “Big Iron World,” copyright Nettwork Records, used with permission.  More information about Old Crow Medicine Show is available online at http://www.crowmedicine.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 373, 6-19-17. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard here was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 318, 5-30-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE AND EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT VIRGINIA'S MAJOR WATERSHEDS Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Four large watersheds containing, collectively, all of Virginia's lands are the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.  The watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Sound are also contained within the Atlantic Ocean watershed.The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds.  (This table was also included in the show notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21.)  WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River

time bay university agency mexico music natural earth state audio college live north america map accent dark steel wheels tech water web status index land band rain musical pond research ocean government education gulf recreation conservation banks maine north carolina chesapeake bay tour chesapeake snow environment types va yarmouth msonormal commonwealth figures stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence arial environmental citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide riverside shenandoah water resources rivers grade colorful madison county signature geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech back bay atlantic ocean potomac natural resources grades k roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table clinch rappahannock harrisonburg acknowledgments james river all quiet cosgrove msohyperlink sara grey smith river sections bluffs potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater old crow medicine show headwater new river policymakers msobodytext bmp environmental protection agency epa rockingham county powell river virginia department goose creek cumberland gap sols tennessee river big sandy tmdl geological survey little river yadkin dan river purcellville virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes dismal swamp
Big Adventures with Brian Dierker

Brian Dierker joins his own podcast to try and answer the question "Who is Brian Dierker?" He and producer Gavin Boughner sit down and try their best to find answers. Enjoy Brian Dierker!

The Shift with Shane Hewitt
John J Clague, an expert in all things earthquakes explains how tsunamis from Alaska impact Canada and the world. Also, air travel is slowly coming back, we talk with Porter Airlines CEO Michael Deluce

The Shift with Shane Hewitt

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 52:25


RUOK with gas stations? or getting catfished? As Covid19 restrictions lift and Canadians being to travel, there is a new option for travellers. Porter airlines CEO Michael Dulce joins The Shif to tell us why they are expanding their fleet and prepping to fly across the world.  A massive earthquake struck off the coast of Alaska this week. John J. Clague, the Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at SFU, and An expert in all things earthquakes explains how tsunamis from Alaska impact Canada and the world.   HEY, DO YOU LIKE PODCASTS? Why not subscribe to ours? find it on Apple, Google, Spotify & Curiouscast.ca See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 588 (8-2-21): A Singing Paddler's Take on Time and Changes in the Upper Rappahannock River

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 2, 2021.  This revised episode from September 2018 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental This week, we feature a Virginia singer/songwriter's music about time and changes along one of the Commonwealth's major rivers.  Have a listen for about 30 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 30 sec – Lyrics: “Roads and boards, mills and mines used to line this stream--all reclaimed by floods and vines, foundations sprouting gums and pines. River flows on, so does time.  Canoe splits Rappahannock water; dip my paddle, let it glide.” You've been listening to part of “Solitude,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, on the 2000 album, “That Squirrel Song.”  This and other river-themed songs by Mr. Gramann come in large part from his years of paddling the upper Rappahannock River and its tributaries, in the area between the Blue Ridge and the Fall Line at Fredericksburg.  The part of “Solitude” you heard describes some of the changes along the Rappahannock wrought by time and the effects of water, weather, humans, and other organisms.  Observers of other Virginia rivers and their watersheds might tell similar stories of change. Some riverside changes—such as flood impacts—happen relatively quickly.  Others move at a slower pace, as with trees growing in an abandoned building foundation.  Whatever the pace, changes seen in and along a river reflect events happening not only in the river channel but also upstream in the river's watershed.  Flooding, for example, is affected by upstream land uses and tributary patterns.  In turn, water flows affect stream and river shapes and materials, determining what habitats are available for living things.  And throughout a watershed, humans have land and water uses that affect downstream water quantity and quality.Virginia's rivers are continually being changed by unrelenting time and unceasing forces, and those rivers continue to provide services like water supply, irrigation, power generation, and others.  With all that going on, it's challenging and worthwhile to ensure that the Commonwealth's rivers retain places offering solitude and fostering creativity, such as in this week's music.  Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use the music, and we close with about 35 more seconds of “Solitude.” MUSIC – ~ 33 sec – Lyrics: “Rain and sleet, wind or heat, it's all the same to me.  Weather—you can never choose; each day that's mine, that day I'll use, to flee from time in my canoe, its bow splits Rappahannock water.  Dip my paddle, let it fly.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 437, 9-10-18. “Solitude,” from the 2000 album “That Squirrel Song,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES The following photos along the Rappahannock River in Virginia were taken by Bob Gramann (except as noted) and used with his permission. Rappahannock River at the confluence with the Rapidan River (at the juncture of the Virginia counties of Culpeper, Spotsylvania, and Stafford), April 2004.Rappahannock River at low water (view toward Stafford County, Va.), August 2011.Rappahannock River in winter (view toward Stafford County, Va.), February 2006.Bob Gramann, composer of the music heard in the Virginia Water Radio episode, canoeing in the Rappahannock River's “First Drop” at Fredericksburg, Va., April 1, 2018.  Photo by Lou Gramann.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE UPPER RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER AND ITS WATERSHED The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Rappahannock River-Upper," online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-upper/. “The Rappahannock River flows from its origin at Chester Gap in Rappahannock County approximately 184 miles to the Chesapeake Bay.  The first 62 miles, from the headwaters to Mayfield Bridge (Fredericksburg), are designated State Scenic River.  The river has a watershed of approximately 2,715 mi2, and average annual discharge near Fredericksburg is typically about 1,639 cubic feet per second (cfs). “During Colonial days, the Rappahannock River was a major shipping artery for transporting tobacco, salted fish, iron ore, and grains.  The watershed supports a variety of land uses; largely agricultural in the upper watershed, with manufacturing, light industrial, and retail applications throughout.  Soil erosion is a problem in the upper watershed.  Runoff from the major tributaries (Rapidan and Hazel Rivers) leaves the Rappahannock muddy after even minor storm events. “Access to the Rappahannock system (defined here as the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers) is fairly limited and primitive. Established access points on the Rappahannock (traveling downstream) are at Kelly's Ford (Route 672 off Route 651) in Culpeper County and Motts Landing (Route 618) in Spotsylvania County.  About 25 miles separates these canoe/Jon boat slides, and an overnight camp stop is nearly mandatory for those that float fish this reach. Another access point is located on the Rapidan River at Elys Ford (Route 610) in Spotsylvania County about 14 miles upstream of Motts Landing. Access may also be gained via several non-established points.  These consist of VDOT right-of-ways along bridges (e.g., Route 522 on the Rapidan). … “The Rappahannock River's character changes abruptly in Fredericksburg at the fall line (the limit of tidal influence).  Above the fall line, the river is usually clear, swift, and dominant substrates are bedrock, boulder and cobble providing perfect habitat for smallmouth bass and related species.  However, below Route 1 the river is tidal, and the substrate is finer, dominated by sand; and the water is frequently murky.  Species composition shifts with habitat, and largemouth bass, catfish and anadromous species are more common in and below Fredericksburg.  Boaters and anglers can now navigate from upstream access points such as Motts Landing across the old Embrey Dam site and into the tidal waters adjacent to Fredericksburg.” SOURCES Used for Audio U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Use in the United States,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/mission-areas/water-resources/science/water-use-united-states?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Final 2020 305(b)/303(d) Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources:“Rappahannock River-Upper," online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-upper/; “Rappahannock River-Tidal,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-tidal/.For More Information about the Rappahannock River City of Fredericksburg, Va., “Rappahannock River,” online at https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/210/Rappahannock-River. Friends of the Rappahannock (non-profit organization), online at http://www.riverfriends.org/. Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission, “Local TMDLs,” online at https://www.rrregion.org/program_areas/environmental/local_tmdls.php.  Located at this site are Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) reports on the Upper Rappahannock River, the Hazel River, and other Rappahannock River basin waterways. RappFLOW (Rappahannock Friends and Lovers of Our Watersheds; non-profit organization), online at https://rappflow.org/.For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11); available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on the Rappahannock River or its watershed.Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16.Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15.Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11.Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18.Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18.Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21.Bluffs on rivers and other waters – Episode 587, 7-26-21.Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19.Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21.Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19.Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15.New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12.Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18.Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18.Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16.Shenandoah River introduction –

bay humans university agency music photo natural relationships earth state audio friends college change accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical united states pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol chesapeake bay route chesapeake snow environment journal types images va singing significance msonormal commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence arial species environmental soil dynamic established citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide canoe located water resources biology upper rivers lovers grade dip colorful resource solitude madison county signature flooding bio continental stafford scales blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources observers stafford county grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table fredericksburg rappahannock acknowledgments james river msohyperlink wildlife resources runoff smith river sections bluffs richard b life sciences stormwater headwater radford university new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa water use new standard virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap sols tennessee river tmdl spotsylvania boaters geological survey shenandoah national park culpeper county culpeper vdot biotic virginia standards water center first drop fall line total maximum daily load tmdl space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 587 (7-26-21): On the Bluffs of Rivers and Other Waters

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:00). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 26, 2021.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC - ~16 sec – instrumental This week, an instrumental selection by a Williamsburg, Virginia, musician sets the stage for exploring a kind of river feature that can be especially prominent geographically and historically.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds.MUSIC - ~32 sec – instrumentalYou've been listening to part of “James and York Bluffs,” by Timothy Seaman on his 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries.”  This tune honors York River State Park, located a few miles north of Williamsburg in James City County, and having—according to the album's liner notes—“a paradise of bluffs.”  River bluffs—also called cliffs, palisades, and other terms—are high, steep, broad banks overlooking a river.    They're found along many Virginia waterways, from Cedar Bluff on the Clinch River in Tazewell County, to Ball's Bluff on the Potomac River in Loudoun County, to Drewry's Bluff on the James River in Chesterfield County.  Bluffs can also form in coastal beach areas, such as along the Chesapeake Bay at Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Wherever they're found, bluffs are products of complicated land and water factors acting at the point of the bluff as well as upstream in a watershed.  In addition, bluffs are history treasures.  They reveal geologic history in layers of ancient sediments; they've been important in the humanhistory of many Virginia settlements and events; and they offer dramatic views of the natural history and heritage of the Commonwealth's waters. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “James and York Bluffs.” MUSIC - ~ 16 sec – instrumentalSHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 173, 8-5-13. “James and York Bluffs,” from the 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries,” copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 320, 6-13-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES View of a bluff at York River State Park, March 29, 2011.  Photo courtesy of Timothy Seaman.View from a bluff at York River State Park, November 19, 2010.  Photo courtesy of Timothy Seaman.EXTRA INFORMATION ON RIVER BLUFF-RELATED LOCATIONS IN VIRGINIA Following are some Virginia locations with names related to river bluffs. Ball's Bluff, Potomac River, Loudoun County.Bluff City, New River, Giles County.Bluff Point (part of Colonial Beach), Potomac River, Westmoreland County.Bremo Bluff, James River, Fluvanna County.Cedar Bluff, Clinch River, Tazewell County.Colonial Heights, Appomattox River, Chesterfield County.Drewry's Bluff, James River, Chesterfield County.Madison Heights, James River, Amherst County. SOURCES Used for Audio College of William and Mary, “Geology of Virginia/Cliffs of Westmoreland,” by Chuck Bailey, Aug. 1, 2016, online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/2016/08/01/cliffs-of-westmoreland/. County of Northampton, Virginia, “Beaches/Kiptopeke State Park,” online at http://northampton.hosted.civiclive.com/visitors/tourism/free_things_to_see_and_do/free_recreation/water_recreation/beaches. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000.  National Geographic, “Bluff,” online at https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/bluff/. National Park Service/Richmond National Battlefield Park, “Drewry's Bluff,” online at https://www.nps.gov/rich/learn/historyculture/drewrys-bluff.htm. Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority, “Ball's Bluff Battlefield Regional Park,” online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/balls-bluff-battlefield-regional-park. OntoRichmond.com, “Civil War in Richmond—Drewry's Bluff,” video (1 min./8 sec.) online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IMITTR_wC8. Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus-American Edition, Oxford University Press, 1996.U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resource Conservation Service, “Glossary of Landform and Geologic Terms,” online (as a PDF) at https://directives.sc.egov.usda.gov/OpenNonWebContent.aspx?content=41992.wba. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):“How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway;“NPDES Stormwater Program,” online at https://www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-stormwater-program. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation:“Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu;“Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places:“The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html;“Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11); available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21 Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 586, 7-19-21. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Water cycle introduction – Episode 191, 12-9-13; and water cycle diagrams reconsidered – Episode 480, 7-8-19. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 585, 7-12-21. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.5.8 – Earth constantly changes. Grades K-5: Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth ScienceES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.

oxford dictionary bay university agency music photo natural earth state audio college north america civil war impact accent dark tech water web status index land rain pond research ocean government education recreation conservation maine chesapeake bay chesapeake snow environment images yarmouth msonormal commonwealth celebration stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence williamsburg arial environmental dynamic national geographic citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide waters shenandoah water resources biology northampton rivers grade colorful madison county signature bio drewry geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech bluff city atlantic ocean westmoreland bluff glossary natural resources grades k oxford university press environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table acknowledgments centuries james river cosgrove msohyperlink loudoun county smith river usi sections bluffs potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater radford university new river policymakers msobodytext bmp madison heights environmental protection agency epa virginia department cumberland gap sols tennessee river giles county northampton county tmdl westmoreland county geological survey united states history chesterfield county virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
UCL Minds
Hypot-enthuse: Seb Groh on paeleontology and extinct crocodile relatives

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 43:35


In the latest episode of Hypot-enthuse, Malcolm and Maymana speak with Dr Sebastian Groh, Research Fellow in the Department of Earth Sciences. They discuss Seb's work looking at historic crocodylomorpha, as well as concepts such as macro-evolution, and his work as LGBTQ+ rep for the department, as well as the experiences of being a trans academic. Hypot-enthuse is a podcast from the Faculty of Mathematical & Physical Sciences at UCL. Each episode features a light-hearted chat with a notable academic, and will examine exciting science topics making news around the world. Find out more: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/mathematical-physical-sciences/news/2019/sep/hypot-enthuse-maps-faculty-podcast

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 586 (7-19-21): A Virginia Rivers and Watersheds Quiz Game

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:41). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 19, 2021.  This revised episode from September 2016 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. SOUND – ~ 7 sec This week, that sound of the Roanoke River, recorded along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Roanoke, Va., sets the stage for a Virginia rivers quiz game to highlight some key facts about the Commonwealth major rivers and their watersheds. I'll ask you six questions about Virginia's rivers.  Then I'll give you the answer after a few seconds of some appropriate music: “Exploring the Rivers,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va. Let the game begin!Question 1: What river that is very much associated with Virginia's past and present is not actually IN Virginia.MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumentalThat's the Potomac River, whose main stem along Virginia's northern border is owned by the State of Maryland.Question 2: Of the James, Rappahannock, and York rivers, which two have their entire watersheds in Virginia? MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumental The answer is the Rappahannock and the York.  A small part of the headwaters of the James is in West Virginia.Question 3: What is the largest river watershed in Virginia?MUSIC - ~ 5 sec – instrumental This time the answer IS the James River, whose watershed covers over 10,000 square miles in Virginia.Question 5: What's the longest river in Virginia, counting only each river's main stem, not all of the tributaries? MUSIC - ~ 4 sec – instrumental Once again, it's the James, whose main stem travels about 340 miles. Question 5: What two large Virginia rivers flow generally north? MUSIC - ~ 6 sec – instrumental Virginia's major northerly-flowing rivers are the New and the Shenandoah. And last, question 6: What major river flows southwesterly into Tennessee? MUSIC - ~ 6 sec – instrumental That's the Clinch River, one of several rivers in southwestern Virginia flowing toward the Volunteer State in the Tennessee River watershed, which in turn is part of the watersheds of the Ohio River, Mississippi River, and Gulf of Mexico. If you're thinking that this game left out some major Virginia rivers and river basins, you're right!  Other main rivers in the Commonwealth include the Dan, Holston, Powell, and Roanoke.  And other major watersheds with areas in Virginia include those of the Big Sandy River, which forms the border between Kentucky and West Virginia; the Chowan and Yadkin rivers, whose main stems are in North Carolina; Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay coastal rivers; and Albemarle Sound on North Carolina's coast. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close about 25 more seconds of “Exploring the Rivers.” MUSIC – ~ 27 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 344, 9-19-16. The sounds of the Roanoke River were recorded by Virginia Water Radio from the Blue Ridge Parkway near Roanoke, Va., on June 15, 2017. “Exploring the Rivers,” on the 2006 album “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Records, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  This music used previously Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 475, 6-3-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Roanoke River as seen from the Blue Ridge Parkway near the City of Roanoke, Va., June 15, 2017 (the is the location of the recording heard at the beginning of this episode).James River at Robius boat landing in Chesterfield County, Va., June 21, 2007.New River near Eggleston, Va. (Giles County), August 13, 2016.White's Ferry on the Potomac River, viewed from Loudoun County, Va., March 23, 2008.Rappahannock River near Remington, Va., (Fauquier County), December 27, 2009.North Fork Shenandoah River at U.S. Highway 55 on the county line between Shenandoah and Warren counties, Va., October 13, 2012.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT MAJOR VIRGINIA WATERSHEDS The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  This information was also included in the Show Notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21, an introduction to watersheds. WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River Roanoke 6,274 Roanoke River, Dan River, Banister River, Kerr Reservoir Yadkin 118 Ararat River York 2,669 York River, Pamunkey River, Mattaponi River Holston 1,322 N. Fork Holston River, Middle Fork Holston River, S. Fork Holston River Clinch - Powell 1,811 Clinch River, Powell River, Guest River Big Sandy 999 Levisa Fork, Russel Fork, Tug Fork SOURCES Used for Audio Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers,” online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. Frits van der Leeden:The Environmental Almanac of Virginia, Tennyson Press, Lexington, Va., 1998;Virginia Water Atlas, Tennyson Press, Lexington, Va., 1993. Kathryn P. Sevebeck, Jacob H. Kahn, and Nancy L. Chapman, Virginia's Waters, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, Va., 1986 (out of print).Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Final 2020 305(b)/303(d) Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report.  Chapter 2, “State Background Information,” states that Virginia has an estimated 100,923 miles of rivers and streams. Virginia Museum of Natural History, “Virginia's Water Resources,” special issue of Virginia Explorer, Winter 2000, Martinsville, Va. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “West Virginia Watersheds,” online at http://www.dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Watersheds.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places:“Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html;“Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, pages 8-11, available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21 Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Water cycle introduction – Episode 191, 12-9-13; and water cycle diagrams reconsidered – Episode 480, 7-8-19. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 585, 7-12-21. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth Resources4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth ScienceES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.2 – Physical geography and native peoples of Virginia past and present.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. World Geography CourseWG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 585 (7-12-21): Middle Schoolers Make the Call on the Water Cycle, Watersheds, and Stormwater

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:46). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-9-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of July 12, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. SOUND – ~4 sec This week, we drop in on a group of Virginia middle-school students giving citizens a vocabulary lesson on watersheds, the water cycle, and a challenging nationwide water issue.  Sound unbelievable?  Well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds. GUEST VOICES - ~36 sec – “Water cycle; watersheds; evaporation; transpiration; condensation; precipitation; rainfall intensity; infiltration; runoff; groundwater; surface water; impervious surface; divides; drainage areas; tributaries; river basins; the ocean. You've been listening to Christiansburg Middle School students who attended Stormwater Education Day on April 12, 2017.  The vocabulary list you heard included processes of the water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle; along with geographic features of watersheds, a term that people often interchange with drainage areas, drainage basins, or river basins.  Water cycle processes and watershed features are key elements in stormwater, affecting when, where, and how much of it occurs.  Stormwater results when rainfall or other precipitation can't seep—or infiltrate—into the ground, particularly when the precipitation lands on pavement or other impervious surfaces.  Stormwater runs off over the land surface into water bodies or into drains and pipes that eventually lead to water bodies.  During that runoff, stormwater can pick up various water pollutants, and high-volume stormwater can cause flooding and erosion.  Such impacts, and the laws and regulations implemented in response, have made stormwater-management a far-reaching water issue, affecting local governments, homeowners, and businesses all over Virginia and the nation. Back in Christiansburg, students learning now about the water cycle, watersheds, potential contaminants, and the filtering potential of different materials will be the future idea-generators and decision-makers who'll deal with this widespread and complicated issue. Thanks to Christiansburg Middle School students, teachers, and volunteers for lending their voices to this episode.  We close with some appropriate sounds and music for stormwater.  Here's some rain and thunder, followed by about 30 seconds of “Runoff,” composed for Virginia Water Radio by Torrin Hallett, a 2021 graduate of Lamont School of Music in Denver.SOUND - ~8 sec – rain and thunder MUSIC - ~ 28 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 365, 4-24-17. The voices of sixth-grade students (and some adults) from Christiansburg Middle School in Christiansburg, Va., were recorded April 12, 2017, during Stormwater Education Day, held on the grounds of the Christiansburg/Montgomery County, Va., chapter of the Izaak Walton League.  Thanks to Patricia Colatosti of the Town of Christiansburg and to Patricia Gaudreau of the Montgomery County School Division for organizing the event and for allowing Virginia Water Radio to participate. Learning stations at the April 2017 Stormwater Education Day were the following:Montgomery County – groundwater model;Skyline Soil and Water Conservation District, Christiansburg, Va. – runoff boxes;Town of Christiansburg/Town of Blacksburg/Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering – stream table;Virginia Cooperative Extension/Montgomery County Unit – pet waste and streams;Virginia Cooperative Extension/Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering – groundwater models;Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Karst Program – karst, springs, and groundwater;Virginia Tech Facilities – watershed model;Virginia Tech Forestry Graduate Student Association – sand filters and stormwater;Virginia Tech Learning Enhanced Watershed Assessment System (LEWAS) lab – runoff boxes;Virginia Tech Museum of Geosciences Outreach – watershed model;Virginia Water Resources Research Center/Virginia Water Radio – recording terms related to stormwater.The thunderstorm sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 28, 2016. “Runoff” is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio, a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York, and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  To hear the complete piece (50 seconds), please click here. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Some of the learning stations on April 12, 2017, for Christiansburg Middle School's Stormwater Education Day, at the grounds of the Christiansburg/Montgomery County, Va., chapter of the Izaak Walton League.Diagram of the water (or hydrologic) cycle. Diagram from the U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Water Cycle,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html.Virginia's major watersheds (river basins). Map by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, accessed online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil_and_water/wsheds.shtml. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT STORMWATER MANAGEMENT IN VIRGINIA The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), “Stormwater,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/stormwater.“DEQ is the lead agency for developing and implementing the Commonwealth's statewide program to protect water quality and quantity from stormwater runoff.  Under the Virginia Stormwater Management Program (VSMP), the agency issues permits, certifies land disturbers and offers compliance assistance.  “Stormwater occurs after precipitation and consists of runoff from streets, lawns, parking lots, construction sites, industrial facilities and other impervious surfaces.  Stormwater may enter surface waters directly or through natural and constructed channel systems.  Pollution, such as automobile oil, grease, metals, sediment, bacteria from animal waste, fertilizers and pesticides, even deposits from airborne pollutants can contaminate the runoff.“Unmanaged stormwater can cause erosion and flooding.  It can also carry excess nutrients, sediment, and other contaminants into rivers and streams.  Properly managed stormwater can recharge groundwater and protect land and streams from erosion, flooding, and pollutants. “DEQ regulates stormwater as a ‘point source' of pollution, which means its source can be located.  This includes stormwater discharges from [the following]: Municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s);Construction activities;Industrial discharges. “MS4s are publicly owned systems, such as storm drains, pipes, ditches or swales that collect or move water to surface waters.  They must obtain permit coverage and develop a stormwater-management program. “Coverage under a state permit may be required to discharge stormwater from construction activities.  In addition, local governments may manage their own stormwater-management permit programs, which are separate from the state permit program and from local land-disturbance permits. “During construction, a separate permit may be required for erosion and sediment control.  These land-disturbance permits are issued by localities as part of their erosion and sediment control programs, which DEQ periodically reviews.  The agency offers training for both erosion control and stormwater plan reviewers and land disturbers.  “Industrial discharges are covered under industrial stormwater permits and require management practices and monitoring to protect the quality of the waters receiving the stormwater discharges.“ Stormwater runoff that is not confined to a single point source is considered nonpoint source pollution, which is mainly controlled through erosion and sediment control.“Local governments are key partners in the VSMP program, administrating erosion and sediment control programs as well as some stormwater discharges.” SOURCES Used for Audio Code of Virginia, “Virginia Stormwater Management Act,” online via the Virginia Legislative Information System at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacodefull/title62.1/chapter3.1/article2.3/. King County, Washington, “Stormwater glossary of terms and abbreviations,” online at http://www.kingcounty.gov/services/environment/water-and-land/stormwater/glossary.aspx. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “NPDES Stormwater Program,” online at https://www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-stormwater-program; and “National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System General Permit Remand Rule,” published in The Federal Register on Dec. 9, 2016, online (as a PDF) at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-12-09/pdf/2016-28426.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “Water Science School/The Water Cycle,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html; and “The Water Cycle for Schools and Kids,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle-kids.html. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Stormwater,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/stormwater. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “An Introduction to Urban Stormwater,” by Rich Wagner (pages 1-7), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, August 2010, “Wherever You Are, Stormwater's On Your Street” and “Stormwater Information Sources,” by Danielle Guerin (pages 3-7), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49363. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).

kids new york bay humans learning university agency music local national natural halloween relationships earth state audio college sound map properly accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean washington government education construction public recreation conservation chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow environment code images oberlin college montgomery county schools va msonormal new year commonwealth atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence arial environmental dynamic citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide shenandoah water resources water conservation district biology municipal pollution conservatory civics rivers grade industrial diagram oberlin colorful resource madison county signature bio continental wild turkey manhattan school coverage scales blue ridge guest voices govt watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table acknowledgments blacksburg james river msohyperlink wherever you are runoff smith river sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater rainfall headwater radford university new river policymakers msobodytext federal register king county bmp environmental protection agency epa new standard virginia department middle schoolers cripple creek cumberland gap sols deq rich wagner tennessee river tmdl geological survey torrin water cycle unmanaged christiansburg virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
The Brian Lehrer Show
Summer Friday: Climate Change Round-Up

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 107:55


On this Summer Friday, we've put together many of our recent conversations about climate change and where individual actions can be effective: Earth Day science panel: Laura Helmuth, editor-in-chief of Scientific American, Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, professor and chair in Earth Sciences, Life & Environmental Sciences Department at the University of California-Merced, and Sir David King, founder and chair of the Centre for Climate Repair, talk about the climate emergency we're living in, and where we go from here. Steven Mufson, business of climate change reporter at The Washington Post, talks about the role of electric vehicles in meeting the U.S. climate goals, President Biden's proposed boost to the industry in his infrastructure plan, and the practicalities of shifting from gas-powered vehicles to electric ones. Plus, Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish and his newest, The Climate Diet: 50 Simple Ways to Trim Your Carbon Footprint (Penguin Books, 2021), shares his experience with an electric vehicle in Manhattan. Seth Blumsack, professor of Energy and Environmental Economics and International Affairs and director of the Center for Energy Law and Policy at Penn State University, talks about the status of rooftop solar panels and the power grid. Marielle Anzelone, botanist and founder of NYC Wildflower Week, talks about biodiversity and why it matters to the health and future of the planet, even in urban areas. As parents and kids emerge from the pandemic, the climate crisis has come into focus for many, causing anxiety especially among kids. Mary DeMocker, author of The Parents' Guide to Climate Revolution: 100 Ways to Build a Fossil-Free Future, Raise Empowered Kids, and Still Get a Good Night's Sleep (New World Library, 2018), talks about how to help kids deal with their climate anxiety and empower them along the way. Judith Enck, founder of Beyond Plastics, visiting professor at Bennington College, and former EPA Region 2 administrator, talks about which plastics are actually recyclable, and answers callers' questions on the topic. These interviews were edited slightly for time, the original versions are available here: The Climate Emergency (Earth Day, April 22, 2021) Covering Climate Now: Electric Vehicles (April 19, 2021) Covering Climate Now: Rooftop Solar (April 20, 2021) Remote Learning: Urban Biodiversity (May 24, 2021) Talking to Kids About Climate Anxiety (May 19, 2021) All About Plastics and Recycling (April 23, 2021)

Arroe Collins
Bob Poole From Life At The Waterhole On PBS

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 8:03


Waterholes are vital to the African ecosystem as bustling oases where elephants, lions, leopards and hundreds of other species meet and compete for water. Life at the Waterhole is a new three-part series from PBS, in partnership with BBC Studios Natural History Unit, that explores the daily drama of African wildlife at a unique waterhole rigged with partially submerged and weather-proofed cameras in Tanzania. The series was created by working with local Hadzabe and Maasai communities and hosted by renowned conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan alongside award-winning wildlife cinematographer Bob Poole. The competition for existing resources at African waterholes has even led to human-animal conflict. Despite the growing fight for resources, little is known about how these waterholes support so much life. The production worked with local communities and the BBC to build an artificial waterhole and outfit it with cameras. Within hours of construction, thirsty animals flock to drink, and the team uncovers the waterhole's complex dynamics for the first time. Filmed over three periods—the middle of the dry season, the hottest time of year and the height of the first rains—the series reveals dramatic interactions and unlikely rivalries, as well as some unexpected moments of humor. As elephants, warthogs, giraffes, monkeys and big cats jostle for position, scientists gain a greater understanding of the important role of water in Africa as its wildlife faces the growing impact of climate change. Wildlife cameraman Bob Poole grew up in Kenya, where his family spent much of their time with the abundant wildlife that thrived there during the 1960s and 1970s. His career began as a teenager while working on a film about elephants for National Geographic. With a university degree in Earth Science, he became a cinematographer, working around the world on natural history programs. An Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, his extensive credit list includes landmark shows for PBS, BBC and National Geographic. Working on the other side of the camera, Poole fronts shows and live TV for PBS, BBC and National Geographic. He tours with National Geographic LIVE, speaking in cities across the world, and is a Fellow with the Explorers Club. He currently calls Ketchum, Idaho, home.

PBE Podcast
PBE Fort Worth Live: AAPG Teacher of the Year, Sabrina Ewald

PBE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021


How do we start making an impact on the school system? Let's start by getting Earth Science taught to the teachers! Ms. Ewald is a real-life superhero and she is bringing Earth Science to the forefront of academia in kids from K-12. This is going to have one of the largest positive impacts in our society in the next 20-30 years. This is a huge task, a very serious one and we are honored to know and support Ms. Ewald with everything she does!!

The Smart 7
Ep 384. The Sunday 7 - Fool's Gold, the Billionaire Space Race, 3D printed fake steak and 375 puppies in a room...

The Smart 7

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 19:52


Today's episode includes the following guestsDr Denis Fougerouse, Curtin University, School of Earth and Planetary SciencesProfessor L Jay Guo, University of MichiganProfessor Gillian Foulger, Department of Earth Sciences, University of DurhamElon Musk at the World Mobile CongressGiuseppe Scionti, Founder and CEO of NovameatDr Emily Bray, Arizona Canine Cognition Centre, University of ArizonaNick Pope, UFO Consultant The Smart 7 is a daily podcast that puts your brain into gear by telling you everything you need to know for the day in less than 7 minutes. It's a snapshot of the world, covering everything from politics to entertainment, via sport and current affairs.Please follow and spread the word!In Ireland? Why not try our Ireland Edition?You need the Smarts? We've got the Smarts.Contact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.comPresented by Jamie East, written by Liam Thompson and produced by Daft Doris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 583 (6-28-21): One Blue Ridge Helps Start Many Virginia Rivers

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:41). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-25-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2014 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~ 10 sec – instrumental - “Big Run Thrives.” This week, musical selections highlight the connections between one famous Virginia ridge and the watersheds of six rivers.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds.MUSIC – ~46 sec – instrumentals – “Big Run Thrives,” ~18 sec; then “Hazel River,” ~28 sec.You've been listening, first, to part of “Big Run Thrives,” and second, to part of “Hazel River,” both by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., from the 1997 album “Here on This Ridge,” a celebration of Virginia's Shenandoah National Park.  Both tunes were inspired by streams flowing off of Virginia's Blue Ridge.  The part of the Blue Ridge that runs through the middle of the national park from Front Royal south to Waynesboro divides the watersheds of three Virginia rivers.  Throughout the park, mountain streams on the ridge's western slopes—like Big Run in Rockingham County—lead to the Shenandoah River watershed.  On the Blue Ridge's eastern side, streams in the northern part of the park—like Hazel River in Rappahannock County—flow to the Rappahannock River; in the southern part of the park, east-flowing streams are in the James River watershed. Outside of the national park, to the north the Blue Ridge separates the Potomac River watershed from the Shenandoah, a Potomac River tributary.  To the south of the national park, the Blue Ridge is part of the watershed divide between the James River and Roanoke River, and then between the Roanoke and New rivers. Countless other ridges in Virginia aren't as famous as the Blue Ridge, but whether high and obvious or low and indistinct, they all add to the landscape's pattern of waterways flowing through watersheds. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use parts of “Big Run Thrives” and “Hazel River.”  We close with another musical selection for mountain ridges and rivers, from the Rockingham County and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels.  Here's about 35 seconds of “Find Your Mountain.”MUSIC – ~35 sec – Lyrics: “Find your mountain.  Find your river.  Find your mountain.”  Then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 209, 4-14-14. “Big Run Thrives” and “Hazel River,” from the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” are copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.   More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  Information about the making of that album is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/timothys-blog/entry/the-making-of-our-album-here-on-this-ridge.  “Big Run Thrives” was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in in Episode 473. 5-20-19; “Hazel River was used previously in Episode 339, 10-24-16. “Find Your Mountain,” from the 2015 album “Leave Some Things Behind,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 425, 6-18-18, Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES South Fork Shenandoah River at the U.S. Rt. 211 bridge in Page County, Va., July 22, 2012.  Traveling east on 211 from this point takes you into Shenandoah National Park, across the Blue Ridge, and into the Rappahannock River watershed.The Rappahannock River, looking upstream from U.S. Route 29 at Remington, Va. (Fauquier County), December 27, 2009.  The Hazel River flows into the Rappahannock just a few river miles above this point.View of Floyd County, Va., from the Blue Ridge Parkway, June 1, 2014.  The photo shows the New River watershed; behind the photographer (on the other side of the Parkway) is Patrick County and the Roanoke River watershed. SOURCES Used for Audio College of William and Mary Department of Geology, “The Geology of Virginia—Hydrology,” online at http://geology.blogs.wm.edu/hydrology/. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000. National Park Service, “Shenandoah National Park,” online at http://www.nps.gov/shen/index.htm.Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission, “Local TMDLs,” online at https://www.rrregion.org/program_areas/environmental/local_tmdls.php.  Located at this site are Total Maximum Daily Load on the Upper Rappahannock River, the Hazel River, and other Rappahannock River basin waterways. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  Please see particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – Episode 365, 4-24-17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.  Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources 3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. 4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Earth Science ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.

canada bay university agency music natural earth state audio college north america impact accent dark steel wheels tech water web status index land rain musical united states pond research ocean government education recreation conservation maine route chesapeake snow helps traveling environment images va yarmouth msonormal commonwealth stream normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence williamsburg arial environmental national park service citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide located shenandoah water resources rivers grade colorful rt madison county signature geology continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech atlantic ocean natural resources grades k parkway roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table front royal rappahannock waynesboro harrisonburg acknowledgments countless seaman james river regions cosgrove msohyperlink fauquier county relyonvml smith river usi blue ridge parkway sections potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa rockingham county virginia department floyd county cumberland gap leave some things behind sols tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park united states history total maximum daily load virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 582 (6-21-21): Where Headwaters Flow, Rivers Begin

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:09). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-18-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 21, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 – instrumentalThat's part of “Highland,” by the group Wake Up Robin, with musicians from North Carolina, New York, California, and Washington State.  It opens an episode about waterways in the highest and most upstream part of watersheds, where water starts following a channel and flowing overland towards rivers.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two Virginia examples, and see if you can guess the name for these upper watershed features.  And here's a hint: get this right and you'll stream to the head of water class.SOUND - ~ 11 sec If you guessed headwater streams, you're right!  Headwater streams are the first flowing waters in the upper part of a river's watershed.  These relatively small streams have a big range of functions, including as habitat for certain organisms or life stages, and as a source of water, materials, and organisms for downstream waters. Understanding the location and length of headwater streams in the Appalachian Mountains, particularly in response to storms, was the research goal of Carrie Jensen, a graduate student from 2014 to 2018 in Virginia Tech's Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.   In November 2017, Ms. Jensen described her research and its significance in just 90 seconds during the “Nutshell Games,” held by Virginia Tech's Center for Communicating Science.  Here's Ms. Jensen's presentation. GUEST VOICE - ~84 sec – “Hi, everyone.  My name is Carrie, and I study changes in stream length in Appalachian headwaters, which are the small streams where our rivers start on the landscape.  So I literally walk upstream with a GPS unit until I find where a stream begins in the mountains.  And these headwaters can expand and contract in length through time, getting longer when it's wet after it rains, and getting shorter during dry periods.  And I wanted to know if this expansion and contraction behavior is the same everywhere.  So I matched changes in stream length across the Appalachian Mountains and actually found some pretty big differences.  At some of my sites, stream length is really stable and hardly changes across a huge range of flows, but at other sites there's a lot of expansion and contraction: stream length varies from tens of feet to a couple of miles.  And this work is relevant for pretty much any application that requires knowing where streams are and when they have water.  So where to build stuff; how to build stuff; where you need riparian buffers of trees to protect water quality.  And normally we rely on maps for this information.  But the blue lines representing streams on maps don't tell us if the stream has water all the time, or 75 percent of the time, or maybe only once every couple of years.  So research describing and predicting these changes in stream length can help us better manage and protect our water resources.  Thank you.”As Ms. Jensen's work shows, there's much to know about headwaters, and such information can help us better understand quantity and quality patterns far downstream. Thanks to Carrie Jensen for permission to use the audio from her Nutshell Games talk.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstand for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Highland.”MUSIC - ~17 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 397, 12-4-17. The Nutshell Games are organized by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science to give graduate students a forum for describing their research in a short presentation designed for non-scientists.  More information about the Center for Communicating Science is available online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/.  Nutshell Games videos are available online at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC01cz4Mal3-AOZeODCauLHw.  Two news articles about the Nutshell Games are New center focuses on the art of communicating science effectively, Virginia Tech News, 2/28/17; and Understandable communication aim of first 'Nutshell Games', Roanoke Times, 3/3/17.“Highland,” from the 2018 album “Wake Up Robin,” on Great Bear Records, by the group of the same name, is used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about the album and band is available online at https://wakeuprobin.bandcamp.com.The sounds of headwater streams heard in this episode were recorded in Blacksburg, Va.'s Heritage Park on July 27, 2016, and in Blacksburg on Brush Mountain on January 31, 2010 (the latter stream is shown in the photos below). Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two views of a headwaters stream tributary to Toms Creek (New River basin) on Brush Mountain in Blacksburg, Va.: upper photo December 25, 2013; lower photo December 2, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Carrie Jensen, “Project Report, 2016 VWRRC Student Grant: Sensors reveal the timing and pattern of stream flow in headwaters after storms,” July 10, 2017, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg. Sacramento [Calif.] River Watershed Program, “Importance of the Headwaters,” by Todd Sloat, 9/21/14, online at https://sacriver.org/watershed-blog/importance-of-the-headwaters/. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Resources of the United States/Water Basics Glossary/Headwaters,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/water-basics_glossary.html#H. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Glossary/Headwater,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/dictionary.html#H. Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science, online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “The Importance of Headwater Streams,” online at https://dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Headwaters.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/ U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity.  Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia river basins.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021, so the episode number, date, and link may change. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge and three watersheds - Episode 209, 4-14-14. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – EP365 – 4/24/17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16.Following are links to other episodes with information from presentations at the Nutshell Games, produced by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Sciences.Episode

new york bay university agency california music natural earth state audio college change sound accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol north carolina appalachian chesapeake snow gps environment wwe journal types organisms images ms va significance msonormal commonwealth stream highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence arial environmental dynamic citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide water resources biology rivers grade colorful forest resources washington state madison county signature bio continental scales blue ridge guest voice watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater ohio river environmental protection virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes acknowledgments communicating science blacksburg james river msohyperlink appalachian mountains smith river sections richard b life sciences stormwater headwaters headwater new river environmental conservation policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa heritage park new standard virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap emerald ash borer sols understandable tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park west virginia department biotic living systems roanoke times virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 581 (6-14-21): Introducing Watersheds with “Mountain Stream” by Bob Gramann

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:31). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-11-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 14, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~ 8 sec – instrumental This week, we feature a tune about stream paddling to introduce the key water resources concept of a watershed.  Have a listen to the music for about 40 more seconds. MUSIC – ~40 sec – Lyrics: “As I paddle down the mountain stream, the unsuspecting beaver slaps his tail and swims to flee the brightly colored threat, the drinking deer sniffs the air and bounds into thicket, while blue heron wing in front of me then fly back overhead.  And I love to ride the back of a rushing mountain stream, to thread between the eddies amidst the banks of April green.  The icy water warms my blood, waves splash over me; in the river I am young, I am free.” You've been listening to part of “Mountain Stream,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., with Laura Lengnick on fiddle, from the 2001 album “See Further in the Darkness.”  Streams flowing down mountain slopes are starting points for several of Virginia's major rivers, such as the James, Rappahannock, and Shenandoah, because those streams are in the highest parts of those rivers' watersheds.  A watershed is the land area from which surface water drains into a specific water body; accordingly a synonym for watershed is drainage area.  While water flowing downhill is a basic part of any watershed, different watersheds have distinctive features because of particular landscapes, geology, wildlife, vegetation, climate, and human land uses. Watersheds also vary greatly in size: as the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Science School has stated, “watersheds can be as small as a footprint or large enough to encompass all the land that drains water into…[the] Chesapeake Bay….”  The term “catchment” is sometimes used for smaller watersheds, while the term “basin” is often used for the watersheds of large rivers, coastal estuaries, and the seas and oceans. Virginia over 100,000 miles of streams, according to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.  All of those stream miles are part of 14 major watersheds, including those of Virginia's biggest rivers and the coastal areas that drain into the Chesapeake, Albemarle Sound, or the Atlantic Ocean.  On the largest scale, all of Virginia's surface waters drain into one of two basins: the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi River basin.  In parts of western Virginia—including Blacksburg, where this show originates—you can stand on the Eastern Continental Divide and have one foot in each of the Commonwealth's largest watersheds. Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Mountain Stream.” MUSIC – ~17 sec -  Lyrics: “To rise before the mist is clear, to chase the rainfall down the hillside.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 156, 4-8-13. “Mountain Stream” and “See Further in the Darkness” are copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  Laura Lengnick accompanied on fiddle.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com.  This music was used previously by Water Radio most recently in Episode 546, 10-12-20. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES  Thornton River, Shenandoah National Park, Rappahannock County, June 19, 2006.   Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Map showing North America's major watersheds.  Map from the U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT MAJOR VIRGINIA WATERSHEDS The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River Roanoke 6,274 Roanoke River, Dan River, Banister River, Kerr Reservoir Yadkin 118 Ararat River York 2,669 York River, Pamunkey River, Mattaponi River Holston (Upper Tennessee) 1,322 N. Fork Holston River, Middle Fork Holston River, S. Fork Holston River Clinch - Powell 1,811 Clinch River, Powell River, Guest River Big Sandy 999 Levisa Fork, Russel Fork, Tug Fork SOURCES Used for Audio U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surf

bay university agency mexico music natural earth state audio college north america map accent dark tech water darkness web index land rain musical pond research ocean government education gulf recreation conservation mountain chesapeake bay mississippi river chesapeake snow environment types images va msonormal commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence arial environmental citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide shenandoah lyrics rivers grade colorful resource madison county signature continental blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech back bay atlantic ocean natural resources grades k roanoke environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table fredericksburg rappahannock acknowledgments blacksburg james river cosgrove msohyperlink smith river sections potomac river ben cosgrove stormwater headwater new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa powell river virginia department cumberland gap sols tennessee river big sandy tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park little river yadkin dan river virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes dismal swamp
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 580 (6-7-21): Ana's May Arrival Opens the 2021 Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Season

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-4-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 7, 2021. MUSIC – ~10 seconds - instrumentalThat's part of “Tropical Tantrum,” composed for Virginia Water Radio in 2017 by Torrin Hallett, a recent graduate of Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  The music sets the stage for our annual preview of the Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season.  We start with some guest voices, calling out names that, if we're lucky, will not become infamous this summer or fall.   Have a listen for about 30 seconds, and see if you can guess who—or rather, what—is being named. GUEST VOICES - ~30 sec – “Ana.  Bill.  Claudette.  Danny.  Elsa.  Fred.  Grace.  Henri.  Ida.  Julian.  Kate.  Larry.  Mindy.  Nicholas.  Odette.  Peter.  Rose.  Sam.  Teresa.  Victor.  Wanda.” If you guessed the names planned for storms that may occur during this year's Atlantic tropical cyclone season, you're right!  The Atlantic basin includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic tropical cyclone season runs officially from June 1 through November 30.  Most Atlantic tropical cyclones occur within this period, but not all of them.  For the past six years in the Atlantic basin, named storms have formed before June 1, including Alex in January 2016, and this year, Ana, which strengthened into a tropical storm on May 23. [Editor's note, not in the audio: Other recent pre-June named Atlantic storms include Arlene in April 2017, Alberto in May 2018, Andrea in May 2019, and Arthur in May 2020.]Tropical storms and hurricanes are two categories of tropical cyclones, which are rotating storm systems that start in tropical or sub-tropical latitudes.  A tropical cyclone is called a tropical storm—and gets a name—when sustained wind speeds reach 39 miles per hour; at 74 miles per hour, a tropical cyclone is considered a hurricane.  Tropical depressions—with wind speeds below 39 miles per hour—don't get named if they never reach tropical storm wind speed,* but they can still bring damaging rainfall and flooding.  Hurricane-force storms are called typhoons in northwestern areas of the Pacific Ocean.[Editor's note, not in the audio: A tropical system that never gets above the tropical depression wind-speed level won't be given a name.  But a lingering tropical depression that previously was at the wind speed of a tropical storm or hurricane will have a name associated with it.]Before a tropical system of any speed or name barges into the Old Dominion, here are some important preparedness steps recommended by the National Weather Service. Know your zone – that is, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by checking the Virginia Department of Emergency Management's “Know Your Zone” Web site, or contacting your local emergency management office. Assemble an emergency kit of food, water, medicines, and supplies. Have a family emergency plan, including plans for evacuating and for getting in touch with one another in an emergency. Review your insurance policiesto ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property. And establish ways to stay informed, especially if the power goes out, and be sure you understand the meaning of Weather Service forecast terms. Detailed safety tips for hurricanes and other severe weather are available from the “Safety” link at the National Weather Service Web site, www.weather.gov. Thanks to several Blacksburg, Va., friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Torrin Hallett for this week's music, and we close with the last 15 seconds of “Tropical Tantrum.” MUSIC – ~15 seconds - instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Tropical Tantrum” is copyright 2017 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio, a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York, and a 2021 candidate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously in several episodes, most recently in Episode 526, 5-25-20, the 2020 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.  Click here to hear the full piece (28 seconds). Thanks very much to Blacksburg friends who recorded the planned tropical cyclone names.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.Map showing the names, dates, and tracks of named Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (tropical storms and hurricanes) in 2020. Map from the National Hurricane Center, “2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season,” online at https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/index.php?season=2020&basin=atl.One of several “5 Things to Know About…” posters related to hurricane safety, provided by the National Weather Service, “What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan.  The other posters in the series cover evacuation planning, strengthening one's home, getting information, and updating insurance. EXTRA INFORMATION ON TROPICAL CYCLONE PREPAREDNESS The following information is quoted from the National Weather Service, ‘Hurricane Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane. Plan for a Hurricane: What to Do Before the Tropical Storm or Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan)“The best time to prepare for a hurricane is before hurricane season begins on June 1.  It is vital to understand your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding, and wind.  Here is your checklist of things to do BEFORE hurricane seasons begins.Know your zone: Do you live near the Gulf or Atlantic Coasts?  Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation area by contacting your local government/emergency management office or, in Virginia, by visiting https://www.vaemergency.gov/hurricane-evacuation-zone-lookup/. Put Together an Emergency Kit: Put together a basic emergency kit; information to do so is online at https://www.ready.gov/kit.  Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators, and storm shutters.Write or review your Family Emergency Plan: Before an emergency happens, sit down with your family or close friends and decide how you will get in contact with each other, where you will go, and what you will do in an emergency.  Keep a copy of this plan in your emergency supplies kit or another safe place where you can access it in the event of a disaster.  Information to help with emergency plan preparation is online at https://www.ready.gov/plan. Review Your Insurance Policies: Review your insurance policies to ensure that you have adequate coverage for your home and personal property.Understand NWS forecast products, especially the meaning of NWS watches and warnings.Preparation tips for your home are available from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes, online at https://www.flash.org/. Preparation tips for those with chronic illnesses are available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, online at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/emergency.htm.Actions to Take When a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Threatens(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-action) “When a hurricane threatens your community, be prepared to evacuate if you live in a storm surge risk area.  Allow enough time to pack and inform friends and family if you need to leave your home. Secure your home: Cover all of your home's windows.  Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows.  A second option is to board up windows with 5/8 inch exterior grade or marine plywood, built to fit, and ready to install.  Buy supplies before the hurricane season rather than waiting for the pre-storm rush. Stayed tuned in: Check the websites of your local National Weather Service office (online at https://www.weather.gov/) and local government/emergency management office.  Find out what type of emergencies could occur and how you should respond. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or other radio or TV stations for the latest storm news. Follow instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if ordered! If NOT ordered to evacuate: *Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level during the storm.  Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can. *Stay away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. *If the eye of the storm passes over your area, there will be a short period of calm, but at the other side of the eye, the wind speed rapidly increases to hurricane force winds coming from the opposite direction.” After a Hurricane(online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-after) Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates. If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe. Once home, drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.  If you must go out, watch for fallen objects in the road, downed electrical wires, and weakened walls, bridges, roads, and sidewalks that might collapse. Walk carefully around the outside of your home to check for loose power lines, gas leaks, and structural damage. Stay out of any building if you smell gas, if floodwaters remain around the building, if the building or home was damaged by fire, or if the authorities have not declared it safe. Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the leading causes of death after storms in areas dealing with power outages.  Never use a portable generator inside your home or garage. Use battery-powered flashlights.  Do NOT use candles.  Turn on your flashlight before entering a vacated building.  The battery could produce a spark that could ignite leaking gas, if present.” EXTRA INFORMATION ON TROPICAL CYCLONE NAMES The following information is quoted from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “Tropical Cyclone Names,” online at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutnames.shtml, as of 6-8-21.“Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms had been named from lists originated by the National Hurricane Center.  They are now maintained and updated through a strict procedure by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization [online at http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/www/tcp/]. “[Six lists] are used in rotation and re-cycled every six years, i.e., the 2019 list will be used again in 2025.  The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity.  If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it.  Several names have been retired since the lists were created.  [More information on the hi

tv new york office bay university agency graphic mexico music national natural halloween earth state audio opens college map accent greek dark tech water web air index rain arrival pond research ocean weather government education gulf transportation skills tropical prevention chesapeake bay ohio chesapeake snow write environment plan images oberlin college va msonormal new year safety atlantic stream walk secure actions normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions hurricane irma arial do not environmental citizen times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading hurricane matthew predictions carbon hurricanes conservatory civics preparation grade assemble oberlin detailed colorful signature national weather service wild turkey manhattan school scales guest voices govt cyclone watershed transcript earth sciences wg permanent centers disease control virginia tech atlantic ocean glossary natural resources hurricane sandy grades k stayed name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table henri emergency response pacific ocean acknowledgments ar sa blacksburg virginia governor american red cross msohyperlink sections hurricane season old dominion stormwater national oceanic caribbean sea policymakers bmp tropical storms atmospheric administration emergency preparedness atmospheric administration noaa emergency management nws new standard virginia department safe homes cripple creek cumberland gap news release sols prepare now tmdl put together atlantic hurricane season wmo do before national hurricane center emergency kit weather service vdot torrin world meteorological organization virginia standards water center national ocean service space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 579 (5-31-21): Water from Wells, Springs, and Cisterns Gets a Check-up through the Virginia Household Water Quality Program

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:56). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-28-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 31, 2021.  This revised episode from March 2017 is part of a series this year of groundwater-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec – running water faucet This week, we drop in on an event where people line up to talk and learn about their household water faucets.  Sound plumb unbelievable?  Well, just have a listen for about 50 seconds. VOICES - ~51 sec – Excerpts from March 20, 2017, recording at Virginia Tech. “You’ve already paid with a credit card for two samples?”“That’s exactly right, yep.” …“All the instructions are on there.  Have you participated before?”“No.”“Ok…so the sample instructions are in there…There’s a survey you’ll want to fill out, as well.  The big thing is -- one of the big things is -- to let the water sit in the pipes overnight, [from say] 10 o’clock…And then the first thing in the morning, [at] the tap you’re going to collect from, collect that bottle with the X first, and then you can collect the other bottles in whatever order you want to.  OK?” …“If we have questions, is there somewhere to send them to by chance?”“There’s a link on the Web site that’s in there….”“Ok.” …“Have you participated with us before?”“I have.  And if there’s basic instructions in there, I’m good to go with those.” …“And the drop-off’s Wednesday morning.”“Good deal.”“All right?”“Thank you.”“Thank you, and you all have a good one.”“Thank you.” You’ve been listening to citizen participants and Virginia Tech faculty at a Virginia Household Water Quality Program clinic kick-offin Montgomery County on March 20, 2017.  The program offers drinking-water clinics in which people who rely on private wells, springs, or cisterns can get their water tested inexpensively and receive a report interpreting the results.  Citizens pick up a sampling kit and instructions, collect water from a household faucet (or in some cases, directly from a spring or other water source), and return the samples two days later.  Tech laboratories analyze the samples for bacteria, lead, arsenic, nitrate, iron, sulfate, and several other constituents.  After about four weeks, program faculty hold a meeting to give participants their confidential results, offer interpretation of the analyses, and provide other information on managing water systems.  The clinics in 2021 began in February and run into late November, serving over 60 Virginia localities.  In operation since 1989, the program has covered the Commonwealth several times, with the results providing valuable information to specific homeowners and offering broader snapshots of groundwater conditions within localities. In a companion program—the Virginia Well Owner Network—trained Virginia Cooperative Extension agents assist Virginians with water-well questions and problems.  Both programs are administered by Virginia Tech’s Department of Biological Systems Engineering, through Cooperative Extension. For more information about these programs, search online for the Virginia Household Water Quality Program; phone (540) 231-9058; or contact your local Cooperative Extension office. We close with some music, named for the weather every well-owner—in fact, every water user—needs regularly.  Here’s about 25 seconds of “Driving Rain,” by the Nelson County, Va., band, Chamomile and Whiskey. MUSIC - ~24 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELLVirginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode updates and replaces Episode 361, 3-27-17. Thanks to Kelli Scott of Virginia Cooperative Extension, and to Brian Benham and Erin Ling of the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering, for their help with the 2017 version of this episode, and again to Erin Ling for her help with the 2021 update. “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/, and information about Charlottesville-based County Wide records is available online at http://countywidemusic.worldsecuresystems.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 531, 6-29-20. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Kits containing sampling bottles and instructions await pickup by participants at the Virginia Household Water Quality Program kickoff for Montgomery County on March 20, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.Sample bottles and instruction sheets included in participant kits in the Virginia Household Water Quality Program, March 20, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Robby Korth, Virginia Tech researchers: Flint-like problems also present in Virginia wells, Roanoke Times, 4/10/16. Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering/Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well Owner Network, “Clinic Description,” online at http://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu; “Upcoming Events,” online at http://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu/events.php.  For more information about these programs, contact Erin Ling, phone (540) 231-9058; e-mail: wellwater@vt.edu. Virginia Cooperative Extension, “Home Water Quality” publications page, online at http://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/tags.resource.html/pubs_ext_vt_edu:home-water-quality.  This site includes locality reports from the Household Water Quality Program, along with other information on managing household water systems. For More Information about Groundwater in Virginia or Elsewhere Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access). Marshall Fishwick, Springlore in Virginia, Bowling Green State University Popular Press, Bowling Green, Ky., 1978. Henrico County, Va., “Well Water FAQ” (undated), online at https://henrico.us/health/environmental-health/groundwater-and-wells/. Philip LaMoreaux and Judy Tanner, eds., Springs and Bottled Waters of the World:  Ancient History, Source, Occurrence, Quality, and Use, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and Heidelberg Germany, 2001; information available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321613235_Springs_and_Bottled_Waters_of_the_World_Ancient_History_Source_Occurence_Quality_and_Use(subscription may be required). National Ground Water Association, online at http://www.ngwa.org/Pages/default.aspx. National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. “Pulse of the Planet” (Web site: http://www.pulseplanet.com/) segments with Virginia well-driller Eric Rorrer and with Erin Ling, the coordinator of the Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well Owner Network.  The three segments are as follows:March 10, 2014: Water-Drilling;March 11, 2014: Water - Surface and Ground;March 12, 2014: Water-Well Maintenance. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. U.S. Geological Survey, “Groundwater Wells,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater-wells?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects.  U.S. Geological Survey, “Karst Topography - Teacher's Guide and Paper Model,” online at http://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/parks/cave/karst.html. U.S. Geological Survey, “USGS Water Science School,” online at http://water.usgs.gov/edu/. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Natural Heritage Karst Program,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/karsthome; see particularly “Introduction to Virginia’s Karst,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/document/introvakarst.pdf. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Groundwater Basics,” at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/GroundwaterProtectionSteeringCommittee/FrequentlyAskedQuestions.aspx. Virginia Legislative Information System, “Private Well Regulations,” Virginia Administrative Code, Sec. 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section30/.  “Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section350/. Virginia Places, “Caves and Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/cave/. Virginia Places, “Thermal Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/hotsprings.html; Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are some key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247.*J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, 1999, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.   Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20.Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Groundwater introduction – Episode 575, 5-3-21.Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Springs – Episode 576, 5-10-21.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 577. 5-17-21.Well construction – Episode 578, 5-24-21.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. <

bay humans university design agency guide music berlin natural flint relationships earth state audio living college swift world sound accent pop dark tech water web index land rain united states pond research ocean ground government education public recreation conservation development vol checkup springs chesapeake snow caves environment types pulse images montgomery county va pages msonormal maintenance commonwealth stream ky normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices arial environmental dynamic citizen times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology whiskey civics grade kits ancient history colorful resource signature bio charlottesville sec karst excerpts govt watershed transcript earth sciences vac water quality household wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table nelson county virginians heidelberg germany upcoming events poff acknowledgments ar sa homeowners blacksburg environmental protection agency chamomile cosgrove msohyperlink occurrence cooperative extension relyonvml sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext bmp virginia department cumberland gap sols driving rain tmdl springer verlag cisterns geological survey countywide henrico county brian benham roanoke times virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
For The Good Of The Game
S2, E16 | Host the Hosts 2 - Darrin Sheffer & Steve Kuchefski

For The Good Of The Game

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 63:04


FTGOTG S2, E16 | Welcome to another "Special Feature" episode!  In addition to being outstanding coaches on the field and awesome leaders off the field, our over-achieving guests this week also host their own podcasts...through which they entertain and contribute to the education of the larger coaching community!Coach Darrin Sheffer is an Earth Science teacher and the Offensive Line Coach & Run Game Coordinator for Brentsville District High School in Nokesville, Virginia.  He is the host of the Armchair Coaching Podcast on Anchor, by Spotify.  Coach Sheffer started the Armchair Coaching Podcast in August 2020 doing Power 5 "Program Profiles."  He is passionate about triple-option football and loves watching the US Service Academy programs.  His 80+ shows offer a wide variety of football-related topics!Coach Steve Kuchefski is the Asst Girls Track & Field Coach and Asst Boys Basketball Coach at Neuqua Valley High School in Naperville, Illinois; as well as an Asst Varsity Football Coach at Addison Trail High School in Addison, Illinois.  Despite coaching three different sports, Coach Steve makes time to host the Coach Steve Show (podcast).  The Coach Steve Show began in February 2020 with a great pilot entitled "Why Can't We Be Friends," which asked the tough question...  "Why is there so much hating between coaches?"  With over 130 episodes to date, Coach Steve covers a diverse array of football topics in addition to everything from Wandavision to Fighting Illini basketball!In today's fast-paced world, I'm continually impressed by coaches who make time to follow their passion (helping young student-athletes grow) and share their craft with others.  Whether the intent is to entertain or educate, these podcasts share information from which other coaches may benefit.  Their energy and efforts are commendable and appreciated!Intro music "Next Level" used under license by Composer Rujay Torres.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 578 (5-24-21): Water Well Construction is an Ancient and Modern Human Practice

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:51). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-21-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 24, 2021.  This revised episode from June 2014 is part of a series this year of groundwater-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That rattling and humming sound opens an episode on an ancient human practice related to groundwater.  Have a listen for about 10 more seconds, and see if you can guess what’s making the sound.  And here’s a hint: think deep into human civilization, and you’ll guess well enough. SOUND  - ~9 sec If you guessed, drilling a water well, you’re right!  That was the sound of a well-drilling rig in June 2014, working through 100 to 200 feet of limestone bedrock to reach groundwater for a residence in Montgomery County, Virginia.  For thousands of years, humans have been developing ways to dig below the earth’s surface to reach groundwater aquifers.  Digging with hands and tools was the first method, of course.  Today dug wells, as well as bored or driven wells, remain in use in areas of the United States and in other parts of the world. But drillingallows deeper and narrower wells.  In the United States, water-well drilling dates back to the early 1800s.  Since then, many different drilling methods and machines have been developed to adapt to the various geological conditions drillers encounter and to make drilling more efficient.  Modern well drillers also must follow regulations intended to prevent groundwater pollution that could threaten public health or the environment.  In Virginia, thattradition dates back at least to 1610, when the Colony of Virginia’s first sanitation law required that, quote, “no man or woman...make cleane, any kettle, pot, or pan, or such like vessell within twenty foote of the olde well.” Thanks to Blacksburg well-driller Wayne Fenton for permission to record this week’s sounds. We close with some music from the era of that 1610 well-protection law in the Virginia colony.  Here’s about 20 seconds of “Sir John Smith His Almayne,” composed by John Dowland, a popular English musician during the early 1600s, and performed here by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va. MUSIC - ~24 sec – instrumentalSHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 219, 6-23-14.The sounds in this episode were recorded on June 20, 2014, at a residential well-drilling site in Montgomery County, Va.  Thanks to Wayne Fenton, owner at that time of Fenton Well Drilling and Pump Service in Blacksburg, Va., for permission to record his work that day and for providing information in for this original (2014) version of this episode.  More information about Fenton Well Drilling and Pump Service is available online at https://fentonwellandpumpservice.com/. “Sir John Smith, His Almayne,” from the 2006 album “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.   According to Timothy Dickey (“John Dowland—Sir John Smith, his Almain, for Lute, P47,” AllMusic Web site, online at http://www.allmusic.com/composition/sir-john-smith-his-almain-for-lute-p-47-mc0002373007), an almayne, or almain, is a dance typically considered to be of German origin, or a tune for such a dance; and John Dowland (ca. 1563-1626), composed this piece for some Englishman with that fairly common name (but not, evidently, for the Captain John Smith of Jamestown Colony fame).  More information from Timothy Dickey on John Dowland is available online at https://www.allmusic.com/artist/john-dowland-mn0000770105/biography.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 350, 1-9-17. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Top: Well-drilling rig.  Bottom: Rotary drilling and the mixture of soil, rock, and water being brought to the surface.  Both photos taken at a Montgomery County, Va., residential well-drilling project by Fenton Well Drilling and Pump Service of Blacksburg, Va., June 20, 2014. SOURCES Used for Audio Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access). Thomas V. Cech, Principles of Water Resources: History, Development, Management, and Policy, Third Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, N.J., 2010, pages 1-4.Fletcher G. Driscoll, Groundwater and Wells, Second Edition, Johnson Screen, St. Paul, Minn., 1986. Henrico County, Va., “Well Water FAQ” (undated), online at https://henrico.us/health/environmental-health/groundwater-and-wells/. as of 5/21/21. Bruce Misstear et al., Water Wells and Boreholes, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, England, 2006, pages 1-6. U.S. Geological Survey, “Groundwater Wells,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater-wells?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects.U.S. Peace Corps, “Wells Construction: Hand Dug and Hand Drilled (M0009),” April 13, 2017, online at https://pclive.peacecorps.gov/pclive/index.php/environment/item/1198-wells-construction-hand-dug-and-hand-drilled-m0009. Virginia Department of Health, “About Us (Old)” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/drinking-water/about-us/ (information on Virginia’s 1610 sanitation law). Virginia Humanities, Encyclopedia Virginia, “Lawes Divine, Morall and Martiall,” online at https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/lawes-divine-morall-and-martiall/ (information on Virginia’s 1610 sanitation law). Virginia Legislative Information System, “Private Well Regulations,” Virginia Administrative Code, Sec. 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section30/.  “Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630/section350/. Virginia Places, “Waste Management,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/waste/ (information on Virginia’s 1610 sanitation law). WaterAid, “Technology Resources,” online at https://washmatters.wateraid.org/publications/technology-resources. For More Information about Groundwater in Virginia or Elsewhere Stan Cohen, The Homestead and Warm Springs Valley, Virginia: A Pictorial Heritage, Pictorial Histories Publishing Company, Charleston, W. Va., 1984. Marshall Fishwick, Springlore in Virginia, Bowling Green State University Popular Press, Bowling Green, Ky., 1978. Philip LaMoreaux and Judy Tanner, eds., Springs and Bottled Waters of the World:  Ancient History, Source, Occurrence, Quality, and Use, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and Heidelberg Germany, 2001; information available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321613235_Springs_and_Bottled_Waters_of_the_World_Ancient_History_Source_Occurence_Quality_and_Use(subscription may be required). National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. “Pulse of the Planet” (Web site: http://www.pulseplanet.com/) segments with Virginia well-driller Eric Rorrer and with Erin Ling, the coordinator of the Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well-owner Network (in the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering).  The three segments are as follows:March 10, 2014: Water-Drilling;March 11, 2014: Water - Surface and Ground;March 12, 2014: Water-Well Maintenance. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Natural Heritage Karst Program,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/karsthome; see particularly “Introduction to Virginia’s Karst,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/document/introvakarst.pdf. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Museum of History and Culture, “The Regions of Virginia,” online at https://virginiahistory.org/learn/regions-virginia. Virginia Places, “Caves and Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/cave/. Virginia Places, “Thermal Springs in Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/hotsprings.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are some key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247. *J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, 1999, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268 RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.  Note that some of these episodes are being re-done in May-June 2021, following posting of this episode.  If that has occurred at the time you are viewing this post, the links below will redirect you to the updated episodes. Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20.Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Groundwater introduction – Episode 575, 5-3-21.Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater) – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Springs – Episode 576, 5-10-21.Testing water from wells and other household water sources – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 577. 5-17-21.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. G

health culture bay humans management university design agency german guide music berlin principles natural earth state audio living college english swift history world sound modern england accent pop dark network testing tech water web index land rain united states pond digging research ocean ground government education construction recreation conservation development vol charleston springs chesapeake snow caves environment pulse images policy montgomery county va englishman msonormal maintenance commonwealth hoboken stream ky normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions practice sons williamsburg arial environmental dynamic ancient citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology civics grade peace corps ancient history colorful resource chichester signature bio sec colony karst scales govt watershed transcript earth sciences vac waste management homestead wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources john dowland wateraid grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table virginia humanities in virginia heidelberg germany poff acknowledgments driscoll homeowners blacksburg minn virginia museum regions environmental protection agency lute msohyperlink occurrence sections john wiley second edition stormwater policymakers msobodytext thomas v bmp third edition new standard virginia department cech cripple creek cumberland gap sols tmdl springer verlag geological survey jamestown colony captain john smith henrico county virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 577 (5-17-21): Water's at the Heart of Virginia's Western Highlands

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021


 CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-14-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO

western merriam webster culture bay humans university agency america guide music highlands berlin natural relationships earth state audio living college swift history north america world abraham lincoln sound accent dark testing tech water web index land rain pond research tourism ocean government education recreation conservation development maine west virginia route charleston hot springs springs falls chesapeake snow caves environment images richmond va bath yarmouth msonormal maintenance commonwealth figures stream ky highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions confluence arial environmental spine citizen times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading morton shenandoah commerce grade ancient history colorful signature nonesuch resort karst watershed transcript earth sciences see what i have done homestead wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table harrisonburg heidelberg germany poff acknowledgments ar sa homeowners blacksburg virginia museum warm springs james river regions environmental protection agency cosgrove msohyperlink occurrence usi sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater annals policymakers bmp virginia department cumberland gap michael martz sols tmdl springer verlag united states history biotic alleghany county virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
New Books Network
Pandemic Perspectives: Loneliness in Graduate School

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 30:31


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@gmail.com. Find us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you’ll hear about: how Sarah dealt with loneliness, worked as a teaching assistant from a tent her own backyard, and what the pandemic means for her dissertation, her timeline, and her funding. Our guest is: Sarah Paschal Gerenday is a PhD student in Earth Science at University of California Santa Barbara researching the use of recycled water for groundwater replenishment. She lives with a few friends and a dog in Santa Barbara. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women, gender, and sexuality. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Education
Pandemic Perspectives: Loneliness in Graduate School

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 30:31


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@gmail.com. Find us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you’ll hear about: how Sarah dealt with loneliness, worked as a teaching assistant from a tent her own backyard, and what the pandemic means for her dissertation, her timeline, and her funding. Our guest is: Sarah Paschal Gerenday is a PhD student in Earth Science at University of California Santa Barbara researching the use of recycled water for groundwater replenishment. She lives with a few friends and a dog in Santa Barbara. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women, gender, and sexuality. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 576 (5-10-21): An Introduction to Springs

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021


Click to listen to episode (3:56)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-7-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO  From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 10, 2021.  This revised episode from August 2011 is part of a series this year of groundwater-relatedepisodes. MUSIC – ~ 12 sec – instrumental This week, that music opens an episode about a natural resource marking water’s transition from underground to the land’s surface.  We start with a series of guest voices and mystery names.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you can guess what kind of water resource connects this series of names and, by the way, is in the title of this week’s opening music.  And here’s a hint: settlements around the world have SPRUNG up around this resource. FLOWING WATER SOUND and VOICES - ~25 sec – “Yellow Sulphur, Laurel, Augusta, Iron Hill, Lacy, Willow, Highland, Glade, Virginia Mineral, Barren, Warm, Bloomer.”If you guessed springs, you’re right!  The opening music is titled “John Ashe’s Spring,” by the western Virginia-based band New Standard, referring to a spring in Ivy, Virginia.  The guest voices called out some of the many Virginia places named for nearby springs.  Some places, such as Yellow Sulphur Springs in Montgomery County, developed as recreational or health-promoting attractions for bathers and spa-goers.  But many towns and other settlements grew up near springs because the springs provided access to convenient, reliable drinking water; in fact, many Virginia public water systems still use springs as a water source.But what, exactly, is a spring?  Simply put, it’s a place where groundwater becomes surface water.  Springs appear where groundwater moves from underground storage areas to the land surface, particularly in low-lying areas and along hillsides or slopes.  Springs are found throughout Virginia, but most commonly in the western part of the Commonwealth among the Ridge and Valley region’s karst landscapes, which are also noted for caves, caverns, sinkholes, and sinking creeks.Thanks to Quinn Hull for creating this episode and to citizens in downtown Blacksburg for lending their voices.  Thanks also to New Standard for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “John Ashe’s Spring.” MUSIC – ~ 23 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 75, 8-15-11.  The original episode was created by Quinn Hull, who recorded the guest voices in Blacksburg, Va., in August 2011. “John Ashe’s Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Big Spring north of Leesburg, Va. (Loudoun County), December 10, 2006.Piped spring along the Appalachian Trail in Washington County, Va., December 14, 2008.Spring locations in a Virginia Department of Environmental Quality database, as of 2016.  Map accessed at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/GroundwaterCharacterization/SpringDatabase.aspx, on July 28, 2017; the map was no longer available at that URL as of May 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT SPRINGS IN VIRGINIA The following information was taken from J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, 1999, available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. (from pages 11-12): “In 1928, a team of geologists…explored Virginia’s fields and forest in search of springs.  They located over 500 springs in the Valley and Ridge Province.  Most of the springs were concentrated in the Shenandoah Valley and the counties of August, Rockbridge, Rockingham, Shenandoah, Bath, and Highland.  This is an area of karst topography, where water-soluble limestone is perforated by channels, caves, sinkholes, and underground caverns, and has an abundance of springs.  Researchers from the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences at Virginia Tech continued this survey some 50 years later.  The research team located more than 1,600 additional springs.  Most of the springs were on private lands west of the Blue Ridge.” (from pages 15-16): “Both cold-water and thermal (warm or hot water) springs are found in Virginia.  The Virginia Tech researchers located more than 1500 cold-water springs and 100 thermal springs.  The water temperature of cold-water springs averages between 52 and 58 degrees Fahrenheit (F), about the same as the mean air temperature.  Thermal springs with waters heated deep within the earth flow at temperatures of 100 to 600 F year-round. Warm springs have a mean water temperature greater than average air temperature but less than 98 F; hot springs have mean water temperatures above 98 F.”   SOURCES Used for Audio Cultural Landscape Foundation, “Yellow Sulphur Springs (Christiansburg, Virginia),” online at https://tclf.org/landscapes/yellow-sulphur-springs. DeLorme Company of Yarmouth, Maine, Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer, 2000. Philip LaMoreaux and Judy Tanner, eds., Springs and Bottled Waters of the World:  Ancient History, Source, Occurrence, Quality, and Use, Springer-Verlag, Berlin and Heidelberg Germany, 2001; information available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321613235_Springs_and_Bottled_Waters_of_the_World_Ancient_History_Source_Occurence_Quality_and_Use(subscription may be required). J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source (Blacksburg: Virginia Water Resources Research Center, 1999), available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Natural Heritage Karst Program,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/karsthome; see particularly “Introduction to Virginia’s Karst,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/document/introvakarst.pdf. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan. Virginia Museum of History and Culture, “The Regions of Virginia,” online at https://virginiahistory.org/learn/regions-virginia. For More Information about Groundwater Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access). Bruce Misstear et al., Water Wells and Boreholes, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, England, 2006. National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Administrative Code, “Private Well Regulations,” Section 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630, [“Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350.] Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are two key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.  Note that some of these episodes are being re-done in May-June 2021, following posting of this episode.  If that has occurred at the time you are viewing this post, the links below will redirect you to the updated episodes.Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20 (featuring Luray Caverns’ Great Stalacpipe Organ).Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Groundwater introduction – Episode 575, 5-3-21 (re-do of EP306 – 3/7/16).Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater) – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Testing water from wells and other household sources – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 379, 7-31-17.Well construction – Episode 219, 6-23-14.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia. Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. Grades K-3 Economics Theme

culture bay humans university design agency america guide music berlin natural earth state audio living college swift history valley world map england accent dark testing tech water web index land rain united states pond research ocean government education recreation conservation development vol maine spring springs chesapeake snow caves environment images montgomery county va bath yarmouth msonormal maintenance commonwealth stream highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions voices sons arial environmental citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah shenandoah valley bluegrass grade ancient history colorful resource chichester signature piped warm iron hill karst scales blue ridge washington county appalachian trail watershed transcript earth sciences vac researchers wg freshwater epa virginia tech sprung atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources thermal grades k glade drinking water fisheries environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table heidelberg germany poff acknowledgments homeowners blacksburg virginia museum regions environmental protection agency barren msohyperlink occurrence loudoun county usi sections john wiley stormwater policymakers bmp rockingham new standard bloomer virginia department leesburg cripple creek big spring cumberland gap sols tmdl springer verlag united states history virginia standards water center usic space systems audio notes
Weather Geeks
Artificial Intelligence in Weather & Earth Sciences

Weather Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 27:51


Guest: Neil SahotaIntroduction:When we think about artificial intelligence, or A.I., what comes to mind for many folks are robots or even IBM’s Watson, which went head to head with some of Jeopardy’s greatest contestants on television among other things.. But what might not come to mind is how this branch of science and technology is being used to study weather and climate, and how these affect the global population. Our guest today is Neil Sahota, an IBM Master Inventor and United Nations Artificial Intelligence subject matter expert and we’re going to talk about how A.I. is being used to help study and better our planet.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 575 (5-3-21): Making Connections to Groundwater

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:52)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-30-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 3, 2021.  This revised episode from March 2015 is part of a series this spring of episodes on a widespread, widely used, but mostly unseen water resource: groundwater.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds to some mystery sounds and music, and see if you can guess three connections to groundwater.  And here’s a hint: get pumped and the answer will spring right up, especially if you’ve been deep in a cave somewhere.SOUNDS and MUSIC (instrumental) ~ 34 secIf you guessed pumps, springs, and caves or caverns, you’re right!  You heard two hand-driven wellwater pumps; groundwater coming to the land surface in a Giles County spring; and part of “In the Cave,” by the group Pepe Deluxé on the Great Stalacpipe Organ in Page County’s Luray Caverns. The slow but steady work of groundwater created the stalactites used by the organ, but you don’t have to go into underground caverns to see the role and value of groundwater.  Groundwater wells supply many Virginia localities, citizens, and industries, providing about 11 percent of total water withdrawals in Virginia in 2019, excluding water for power generation.  Also, groundwater contributes to surface water bodies, as seen in springs and in streams that continue to flow even in times of low rainfall.  In turn, groundwater is recharged from surface waters and rainfall, a process that takes days for shallow or porous aquifers, but centuries or longer for deep, hard-to-reach aquifers. Location, movement, surface connections, and uses – all of these factors contribute to making groundwater a challenging, vital, and vulnerable resource.  And they make it important for citizens to be aware of groundwater. Spring’s a good time to do so.  National Groundwater Awareness Week, sponsored by the National Ground Water Association, is held each March; 2021 has been designated as the International Year of Caves and Karst, and May 8 is the date for the Virginia Cave Board’s program in observance of the event; and the 2021 version of Virginia Cave Week, organized by the Cave Board, is June 6-12. All year round, Virginians can get groundwater information from various agencies and organizations.  Here are some key ones: the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; the U.S. Geological Survey’s Water Science Center in Richmond; and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Well-owner Network, both operated by Virginia Tech’s Biological Systems Engineering Department.  More information about the Virginia Tech programs is available from your local Virginia Cooperative Extension office.Thanks to Pepe Deluxé for permission to use parts of “In the Cave,” and we close with another short excerpt of that music with a Virginia groundwater connection.MUSIC - ~ 14 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This episode updates and replaces Episode 306, 3-7-16. Virginia Water Radio thanks Shana Moore, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, for her suggestions in 2016 on the previous version of this episode. The groundwater-pump sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio along the C&O Canal Towpath in West Virginia, on July 9, 2010; and at New River Trail State Park in Pulaski, Virginia, on August 31, 2013. The spring water sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio on Angels Rest trail in Giles County on September 30, 2018.“In the Cave,” from the 2012 album “Queen of the Wave,” is copyright by Pepe Deluxé and Catskills Records, used with permission. More information about Pepe Deluxé is available at their Web site, http://www.pepedeluxe.com/; click on the “Album Companions” link on that page to access an article on the Great Stalacpipe Organ and the making of “In the Cave.” A music video of “In the Cave” is available on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkvvcN6rt-I.  “In the Cave” was previously used by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 527, 6-1-20.Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Diagram showing pathways and estimated travel times between groundwater aquifers and surface features. Diagram from the U.S. Geological Survey’s “Water Science School” Web site, at http://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercyclegwdischarge.html, accessed 5-3-21.Hand-driven pump (one of the two pumps heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode) in New River Trail State Park in Pulaski, Virginia (Pulaski County), August 31, 2013.Old Spring House in Winchester, Va., March 24, 2008. SOURCES Used for Audio Friends of the Virginia Cave Board, “Virginia Cave Week,” online at https://www.vacaveweek.com/. International Year of Caves and Karst, online at http://iyck2021.org/. Luray Caverns (home of the Great Stalacpipe Organ), online at http://luraycaverns.com/discover/caverns.  A 4 min./2 sec. video on the Great Stalacpipe Organ is online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crxmaFK31Fk. National Ground Water Association, “National Groundwater Awareness Week,” online at https://www.ngwa.org/get-involved/groundwater-awareness-week/groundwater-awareness-week-2021.  Also see the “About Groundwater” link at https://www.ngwa.org/what-is-groundwater/About-groundwater, and a 2 minute/46 second video on groundwater protection at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPm-3Y8GOoo. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “USGS Water Science School/Groundwater,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater. U.S. Geological Survey/Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center, online at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/va-wv-water. Virginia Cave Board, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/cavehome. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Ground Water,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/permits-regulations/permits/water/water-withdrawal/ground-water. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Status of Virginia’s Water Resources-October 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument?id=2119.  For water withdrawal information cited in this episodes, see the Executive Summary, page vii. Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering, “Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well Owner Network,” online at http://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu/index.php.  The contact for both programs is Erin Ling, 1230 Washington Street SW, Room 302, Virginia Tech (0554), Blacksburg, VA 24060; phone (540 231-9058; e-mail: wellwater@vt.edu. For More Information about Groundwater Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access).Bruce Misstear et al., Water Wells and Boreholes, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, England, 2006. National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Administrative Code, “Private Well Regulations,” Section 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630, [“Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350.] Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are three key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247.*J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, 1999, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. WaterAid, “Hand-dug Wells,” January 2013, online (as a PDF) at file:///C:/Users/araflo/AppData/Local/Temp/technical-brief-hand-dug-wells.pdf. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.  Note that some of these episodes are being re-done in May-June 2021; in those cases, the links below will redirect you to the updated episodes.Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20.Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater) – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Springs – Episode 75, 8-15-11.Testing water from wells and other household sources – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 379, 7-31-17.Well construction – Episode 219, 6-23-14.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.5.8 – Earth constantly changes. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment.

bay humans university design agency guide music natural relationships earth state audio friends living college swift materials england accent dark network testing tech water web status index land rain united states pond research ocean government education development vol west virginia cave spring springs chesapeake snow caves environment location images wave richmond va msonormal maintenance stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions sons arial environmental citizen times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading winchester shenandoah civics grade diagram colorful resource chichester signature karst govt watershed transcript earth sciences vac wg executive summary international year freshwater epa virginia tech ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources wateraid grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table tca pulaski virginians poff acknowledgments ar sa homeowners blacksburg environmental protection agency cosgrove msohyperlink sections life sciences john wiley ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext making connections bmp c users virginia department cumberland gap sols giles county tmdl geological survey biotic virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Innovation Now
Bees in Space

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021


Here on Earth, the tiny honeybee pulls its weight, adding an estimated 15 billion dollars to crops each year. And their contributions haven’t gone unnoticed by NASA.

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K102: About Earth Science - 科學家從百萬年猛獁象全球最古老DNA與彗星讓恐龍滅絕

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 3:28


每日英語跟讀 Ep.K102: About Earth Science - World's oldest DNA sequenced from million-year-old mammoths   Teeth from mammoths buried in the Siberian permafrost for more than a million years have yielded the world's oldest DNA ever sequenced, according to a study published on Wednesday, shining the genetic searchlight into the deep past. 據週三公布的研究,埋在西伯利亞永凍土層超過100萬年的猛獁象牙齒,提供全球最古老的去氧核醣核酸(DNA)定序,讓基因研究的探照燈指向遙遠的過去。 Researchers said the three specimens, one roughly 800,000 years old and two over a million years old, provide important insights into the giant Ice Age mammals, including the ancient heritage of the woolly mammoth. 研究人員表示,這3個樣本,一個約有80萬年歷史,另2個來自超過100萬年前,為現代人瞭解冰河時代猛獁象,包括「真長毛象」(woolly mammoth)的古老傳承,提供重要觀察角度。 The genomes far exceed the oldest previously sequenced DNA - a horse dating between 780,000 to 560,000 years ago. 此前,最古老的DNA定序來自78萬年前到56萬年前的一匹馬,而這些猛獁象基因組的年代更久遠得多。 The mammoths were originally discovered in the 1970s in Siberia and held at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow. 這幾頭猛獁象起初於1970年代在西伯利亞地區被發現,由莫斯科的俄羅斯科學院保管。   Next Article   Comet from edge of solar system killed the dinosaurs: study 研究:來自太陽系邊緣的彗星讓恐龍滅絕   Sixty-six million years ago, a huge celestial object struck off the coast of what is now Mexico, triggering a catastrophic "impact winter" that eventually wiped out three-quarters of life on Earth, including the dinosaurs. 6600萬年前,一個巨大星體撞上現在的墨西哥外海,引發釀成巨災的「衝擊性寒冬」,最後導致恐龍在內的地球上4分之3物種滅絕。 A pair of astronomers at Harvard say they have now resolved long standing mysteries surrounding the nature and origin of the "Chicxulub impactor." 哈佛大學2位天文學家表示,他們已經解開長久以來關於「希克蘇魯伯衝擊體」(Chicxulub impactor)的本質和來源之謎。 Their analysis suggests it was a comet that originated in a region of icy debris on the edge of the solar system, that Jupiter was responsible for it crashing into our planet, and that we can expect similar impacts every 250 million to 750 million years. 他們的分析顯示,這是源自太陽系邊緣冰冷碎片區域的一顆彗星,且木星也要為此彗星撞上地球負責。類似規模的彗星撞地球頻率為每2億5000萬年到7億5000萬年。 The duo's paper, published in the journal Scientific Reports this week, pushes back against an older theory that claims the object was a fragment of an asteroid that came from our solar system's Main Belt. 2人的論文本週在《科學報告》期刊發表,推翻了之前認為這個物體是來自太陽系「主小行星帶」小行星碎片的理論。 Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1435663 ; https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1437161   通勤學英語15mins.Today榮獲 Apple Podcast 2020年十大熱門節目 KKBox 2020年十大Podcast風雲榜 (唯一語言學習Podcast) Himalaya 人氣票選播客總冠軍   每日英語跟讀Podcast,就在http://www.15mins.today/daily-shadowing 每週Vocab精選詞彙Podcast,就在https://www.15mins.today/vocab 每週In-TENSE文法練習Podcast,就在https://www.15mins.today/in-tense

The Brian Lehrer Show
The Climate Emergency

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 43:58


On Earth Day: Laura Helmuth, editor-in-chief of Scientific American, Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, professor and chair in Earth Sciences, Life & Environmental Sciences Department at the University of California-Merced, and Sir David King, founder and chair of the Centre for Climate Repair, talk about the climate emergency we're living in, and where we go from here.

It Came from a Monster Movie!
Revenge of the Cinema: GODZILLA VS KONG (2021)

It Came from a Monster Movie!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 151:00


What happens when Henry, Lillie, Ripley the evolutionary biologist / geologist and art fashion student Sophia who has never seen a Godzilla or Kong movie sit down to watch the 2021 cinematic success, GODZILLA VS KONG? Tune in to find out if this movie has more substance than "Big Monke Punch Big Chonke"!  Remember to support our podcast through Patreon and follow us on social media @icfammpodcast

American Shoreline Podcast Network
Life and Writing with Legendary Coastal Scientist Dr. Gary B. Griggs | Shorewords!

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2021 39:20


On this special rebroadcast, Lesley Ewing is with Dr. Gary B. Griggs, longtime Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz and author of a dozen books, over 100 articles, and several scientific reports. Come along as Gary talks about how books changed his life, the coastal topics that have dominated his writing, his approach to writer’s block, and his favorite types of sand and beaches.

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Terry Wilson: Antarctica's bedrock rising as ice melts

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 30:44


Terry Wilson is a pioneer in using global positioning systems (GPS) to understand the loss of Antarctic ice. She says Antarctica's bedrock is rising as the ice melts and this will have implications for rising sea levels and our ability to manage their effect over time. Terry Wilson is a professor emerita in the School of Earth Sciences and senior research scientist at the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center at the Ohio State University. This week she delivered the S.T. Lee Lecture in Antarctic Studies at the Victoria University Antarctic Research Centre.

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann
Let's Call Them "Right to Life" or "Freedom" Passports!

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 33:00


Will America hold Trump & his enablers accountable for 400,000 unnecessary deaths? Is this manslaughter, now that Trump brags that he actively ignored the scientific advice? Prof. Richard Wolff is here on rising food prices and the impact on global unrest. If prices continue to rise — on top of the pain of the pandemic — the world could be in for a bumpy future. Plus - Vaccine Passports? Let's just call them "right to life" or "freedom" passports! What red blooded, Nazi-arm-band-wearing, Confederate-flag-waving, Capitol-invading, gun-toting American patriot could possibly object?

Noggin Notes Podcast
Podcast Episode: Are We Moving Towards a Better Society or Regressing?

Noggin Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 92:07


Man is considered the most intelligent amongst all animals. Hence, human beings are not only superior but also evolved, and civilized. Civilisation has seen a stark evolution over many decades now for us to stand where we are today. How we perceive "today" and being "evolved" is very subjective.   Looking around in our own vicinity, with the rise of crime, our immediate environment compromised for selfish motives, spoilt habits and unnecessarily luxurious lifestyles, also living with societal prejudices about gender, religion, and caste, are we really as evolved as we think we are?   We are joined by Donald Conte who is a Professor Emeritus, Department of Earth Sciences, California University of Pennsylvania. A consultant, a author and researcher. He also runs a blog called http://thisisnotyourpracticelife.com/.    Taking a mental health screening is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition. Mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety, are real, common and treatable. And recovery is possible. To take your Free Mental Health screening visit https://walkthetalkamerica.org/ or click the following link.  TAKE A MENTAL HEALTH TEST We hope you enjoy this episode. Today’s show is brought to you by Audible. Audible is offering our listeners a free audiobook with a 30-day trial membership. Just go to http://www.audibletrial.com/NogginNotes and browse the unmatched selection of audio programs – download a title free and start listening. It’s that easy. Go to http://www.audibletrial.com/NogginNotes Hope you enjoy the podcast and please go ahead subscribe and give us a review of our show. You can write a review on iTunes. 

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann
Rand Paul May Be Infecting America With a Brand New COVID Epidemic

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 27:53


Coming up on the Science Revolution this week, look out, as Rand Paul may be infecting America with a brand new COVID epidemic, and we may have no protection. Investigative Journalist, Greg Palast is here on the Exxon Valdez disaster 33 years ago. He's saying, "don't buy Exxon's fable of the drunken captain." We just passed World Water Day and Rianna Eckel, from Food and Water Watch, drops by about the growing threat of water privatization.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Icelandic Volcanoes and Us

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2021 17:45


This explosive episode is all about the effects of Icelandic volcanoes on us all. In 1783 a massive eruption of Lakagígar volcano nearly forced the abandonment of Iceland as 15 cubic kilometres of lava was blown into the air. The greatest single amount ever recorded. The effects of this eruption caused enormous death and destruction in Iceland but also led to the failure of crops across northern Europe causing the deaths of 25,000 Britains and helping to cause the French revolution. Whilst this latest eruption seems rather tame by comparison it gave Dan the perfect excuse to speak to Páll Einarsson, who works at the Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, about the history of Iceland's volcanoes and how their presence continues to be felt both in Iceland and around the world. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann
Dr. Justin Frank On the Trauma Of the Pandemic & 4 Years Of Trump

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 34:28


Coming up this week on the Science Revolution is Dr. Justin Frank, author of Obama on the Couch & Bush on the Couch. He's here on how to deal with the trauma of both the pandemic and 4 years of Trump... It's been a stressful time! Some of us have lost family and friends and have found it difficult to stay safe and pay the bills. The Trump years have been a challenge to democracy and to our sanity. Dr Justin Frank is here to help.

Space Explr
Space Science, Mechanical Engineering and Building NASA Cleanrooms | REGGIE MCNEILL | EP.73

Space Explr

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 74:37


Reginald McNeill II talks about space science, mechanical engineering, building NASA cleanrooms, and much more. He is a seasoned Mechanical Engineer with a focus on planning and project management for complex facilities and infrastructure projects. He currently serves as a Directorate Planner at NASA GSFC, where he lends his expertise to directly support Earth Science, Space Science, and Space Flight missions. His previous experiences as a design engineer and materials engineer have provided him with the necessary knowledge to oversee multi-discipline initiatives. Reginald's first internships were at NASA GSFC; he has come full circle and appreciates the impact that those early professional experiences have had on his career. He now strives to help aspiring engineers along their path to their dream careers. CONNECT WITH REGGIE : Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/regmcneill/​ Apply for NASA internships: https://intern.nasa.gov --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spaceexplr/support

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann
10th Year Anniversary of Fukushima: How Will the Crisis End?

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2021 20:47


Coming up on the Science Revolution is Beyond Nuclear's Kevin Kamps. On the 10th anniversary of the Fukushima Crisis, in a similar fashion to the current COVID-19 pandemic, opinion on Fukushima is diverging between those who are horrified by the health risks, and those who are angry at the possible economic damage that could be done to the community. Investigative Journalist Greg Palast drops by on how Stacey Abrams' REAL courage in Georgia was and is her opposition to Vogtle nuclear plant — the last and only nuclear plant under construction in the USA. She won’t back charging Georgians ruinous electric bills to finish it. Also in Geeky Science - good news on CBD. There is a new report out showing it reduces plaque and improves cognition in Alzheimer patients.

In Our Time
The Late Devonian Extinction

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 49:05


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the devastating mass extinctions of the Late Devonian Period, roughly 370 million years ago, when around 70 percent of species disappeared. Scientists are still trying to establish exactly what happened, when and why, but this was not as sudden as when an asteroid hits Earth. The Devonian Period had seen the first trees and soils and it had such a diversity of sea life that it’s known as the Age of Fishes, some of them massive and armoured, and, in one of the iconic stages in evolution, some of them moving onto land for the first time. One of the most important theories for the first stage of this extinction is that the new soils washed into oceans, leading to algal blooms that left the waters without oxygen and suffocated the marine life. The image above is an abstract group of the huge, armoured Dunkleosteus fish, lost in the Late Devonian Extinction With Jessica Whiteside Associate Professor of Geochemistry in the Department of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton David Bond Professor of Geology at the University of Hull And Mike Benton Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology at the School of Life Sciences, University of Bristol.

In Our Time: Science
The Late Devonian Extinction

In Our Time: Science

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 49:05


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the devastating mass extinctions of the Late Devonian Period, roughly 370 million years ago, when around 70 percent of species disappeared. Scientists are still trying to establish exactly what happened, when and why, but this was not as sudden as when an asteroid hits Earth. The Devonian Period had seen the first trees and soils and it had such a diversity of sea life that it’s known as the Age of Fishes, some of them massive and armoured, and, in one of the iconic stages in evolution, some of them moving onto land for the first time. One of the most important theories for the first stage of this extinction is that the new soils washed into oceans, leading to algal blooms that left the waters without oxygen and suffocated the marine life. The image above is an abstract group of the huge, armoured Dunkleosteus fish, lost in the Late Devonian Extinction With Jessica Whiteside Associate Professor of Geochemistry in the Department of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton David Bond Professor of Geology at the University of Hull And Mike Benton Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology at the School of Life Sciences, University of Bristol.

Chalk Radio
Visualizing the Future of Spaceship Earth (Prof. Dava Newman)

Chalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 15:00


Professor Dava Newman is an aerospace engineer whose career has largely focused on developing improved space suits for eventual interplanetary travel. But in recent years she has turned her sights back toward Earth, using the vast amounts of data collected by satellites in near space to inform and motivate the public for the fight against catastrophic climate change. In this episode, Prof. Newman fields listener-submitted questions about climate change and also talks more specifically about EarthDNA, a nonprofit startup she co-founded to serve as a platform for climate advocacy and action. EarthDNA aims to curate petabytes of data and presents it in eye-catching visualizations structured around the four major subsystems of our home planet—oceans, land, air, and near space. But it won’t just present the facts; it also seeks to steer users toward actions and activities that will make a difference. One of the chief goals for the platform is to provide personalized information that is relevant to the user’s specific interests and geographic location because, as Prof. Newman explains, we all care most about what’s happening in our own backyards or in the places that are important to us.     Relevant Resources:MIT OpenCourseWareThe OCW Educator PortalEarthDNA on the WebProfessor Newman’s climate resources on OCWProfessor Newman’s aerospace engineering course on OCWProfessor Newman at MIT’s Institute for Data, Systems, and SocietyMusic in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions Connect with UsIf you have a suggestion for a new episode or have used OCW to change your life or those of others, tell us your story. We’d love to hear from you!Call us at 617-715-2517On our siteOn FacebookOn TwitterOn Instagram Stay CurrentSubscribe to the free monthly "MIT OpenCourseWare Update" e-newsletter. Support OCWIf you like Chalk Radio and OpenCourseware, donate to help keep those programs going! CreditsSarah Hansen, host and producerBrett Paci, producer  Dave Lishansky, producer Show notes by Peter Chipman

Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts
Carton and Roberts Hour 3(02-24-21)

Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 45:33


A reporters awkward transition during a Justin Thomas Zoom call. Evan talks about a crazy story at the hospital. An Earth Science teacher calls in to give us a lesson on dinosaurs and much more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Climate Pod
Renewable Energy and Climate Lessons From Winter Weather Disasters (w/ Dr. Gabriel Filippelli and American Clean Power CEO Heather Zichal)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2021 54:45


This week, we look back on the winter weather disaster in Texas and assess the lessons moving forward: how do we properly adapt to a changing climate that's affecting our winters? Dr. Gabriel Filippelli, Professor of Earth Sciences at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, explains why winter weather is getting weirder and American Clean Power CEO Heather Zichal discusses the accelerated need for more clean energy to combat the crisis.  Co-hosts Ty Benefiel and Brock Benefiel also discuss America officially re-entering the Paris Agreement, partisan motivation behind renewable opposition, and natural gas nonsense.  Subscribe to our new Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website!  Further reading: Joe Biden's climate envoy admits US and Australia not on 'same page' As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business How Much the Oil and Gas Industry Paid Texas Republicans Who Are Lying About Wind Energy Dr. Leah Stokes' Texas Twitter Thread