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Best podcasts about New Standard

Latest podcast episodes about New Standard

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

america music american new york university history education washington battle college water state zoom song tech research government south songs north america pennsylvania congress north environment ladies dark maryland normal union web natural md rain impact ocean memory south carolina snow wars memorial day records civil war mississippi citizens southern columbus origin agency stream republic flowers sleeping priority richmond environmental bay images lives new york mets rivers tomb duke university vietnam war index protocol graves american history confederate pond streams finnish companion arial signature waterloo virginia tech reconstruction old friends scales accent library of congress atlantic ocean ferry natural resources tm waltz revolutionary war msonormal compatibility colorful veterans affairs fiddler times new roman decorating sections declaration of independence potomac watershed chesapeake lyndon johnson no strings attached policymakers birthplace new standard bull run yorktown atlantic monthly acknowledgment cambria math arlington national cemetery style definitions worddocument unknown soldier saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables bartleby dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable stormwater centergroup subsup undovr donotpromoteqf latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub usi smallfrac dispdef lmargin wrapindent rmargin defjc intlim narylim allowpng virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat potomac river semihidden unhidewhenused sols latentstyles table normal grand army james river bmp john logan united states history name title name strong name emphasis name normal name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference decoration day cripple creek vus vietnam veterans memorial grades k name e sharpsburg dark accent colorful accent light accent name list new york tribune name date name plain text name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional cumberland gap name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple jeremy keith horace greeley west va civil war battle relyonvml john a logan public broadcasting system ironclads audio notes smithsonian institution national museum tmdl 20image water center ebchecked donotshowrevisions bobby horton virginia standards
Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Giving immunotherapy before surgery for cancer treatment may establish a new standard of care, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 1:02


An immunotherapy agent called nivolumab given before surgery in people with lung cancer dramatically lengthened the interval before cancer returned, a new study shows. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, is thrilled. Nelson: Will we slowly but surely get to point where the treatments are good enough that maybe you […]

Wharton Digital Health Podcast
Isabelle Kenyon, CEO & Founder of Calibrate, on setting a new standard of care for managing metabolic health

Wharton Digital Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 43:04


In this episode, I sat down with Isabelle Kenyon, CEO and Founder of Calibrate. Founded in 2020, Calibrate is a metabolic health company on a mission to change the way the world treats weight. In August of 2021, Calibrate raised a $100M Series B round led by Founders Fund and Tiger Global. Since then, the company has hired hundreds of new employees and onboarded thousands of new patients, released its first Results Report, and geared up to launch its first enterprise clients. Isabelle and I discuss: 1) Isabelle's own interactions with the healthcare system and why these experiences led her to commit to spending her career building a better, more consumer-centric system, 2) Why Calibrate's emphasis on metabolic health represents a paradigm shift in how we treat weight loss and obesity, 3) Calibrate's clinical model that combines medication, a holistic curriculum guided by synchronous 1:1 video coaching, and community, 4) The company's plans to expand access to treatment through enterprise partnerships, and 5) Isabelle's focus on developing both her own and her company's self-awareness as Calibrate's leader.

The Ivy Podcast
Setting a New Standard Of Employment For People with Disabilities And Chronic Medical Conditions with Bree Sarlati, Chief Executive Officer at Peak Performers Staffing Agency

The Ivy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 51:10


Founded in 1994, Peak Performers employs skilled and dedicated people in administrative, professional, accounting, and information technology jobs. Peak recruits […]

ISAVE That Podcast
A New Standard of Care… a New Layer of Protection

ISAVE That Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 24:36


Sarah Capalla joins the podcast to discuss the implementation tissue adhesive hospital-wide. The what, why, and how of a house strategy to improve the patient experience and the cost savings in both staff time and material costs.AVA would like to thank Adhezion Biomedical LLC for sponsoring this episodeSupport the show

UBC News World
Diamonds Graded By AI Technology Offer A New Standard Of Engagement Rings

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 2:25


Show the brilliance and beauty of your love with a Rare & Forever® diamond engagement ring – graded by the most advanced AI technology. Find out more at: https://rareandforever.com (https://rareandforever.com)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 626 (4-25-22): A Sampler of Trees Inhabiting Soggy Virginia Sites

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-22-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of April 25 and May 2, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Baldcypress Swamp,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., sets the stage for exploring some of Virginia's tree species found in or near water, along with some of the water places those trees inhabit.  We start with a series of guest voices calling out 16 native Virginia tree species that can be found around watery habitats.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds. VOICES and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC - ~27 sec - “American Sycamore.  Atlantic White-cedar.  Baldcypress.  Black Gum.  Black Willow.  Boxelder.  Eastern Hemlock.  Hackberry.  Overcup Oak.  Red Maple.  Red Spruce.  River Birch.  Silver Maple.  Swamp Tupelo.  Water Hickory.  Water Tupelo.” Those 16 and other tree species can be found in a wide variety of water-related habitats in Virginia.  The Virginia Department of Conservation's 2021 report, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” lists over 30 community types associated with aquatic habitats.  Tree species are a characteristic of the vegetation in over 15 of those community types, ranging from Piedmont/Mountain Small-stream Alluvial Forests, to Coastal Plain/Piedmont Bottomland Forests, to Coastal Plain Depression Swamps and Ponds, to Maritime Swamps.  More generally speaking, you can find native Virginia trees beside small streams in uplands, for example, Eastern Hemlock; beside large rivers in the mountains or Piedmont, for example, American Sycamore and Silver Maple; beside large Coastal Plain rivers, for example, Overcup Oak and Water Hickory; and in a variety of swamps and other wetlands, for example, Baldcypress, Atlantic White-cedar, and Swamp Tupelo. Here's to Virginia's many tree species, its many water habitats, and the many combinations of those two groups of natural resources.  Thanks to seven Virginia Tech colleagues for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Baldcypress Swamp.” MUSIC – ~15 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Baldcypress Swamp,” from the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright 2004 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  The “Virginia Wildlife” album was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources).  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 479, 7-1-19, on the Dismal Swamp.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/. Virginia Water Radio thanks the seven Virginia Tech colleagues who recorded tree names on April 21, 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) River Birch photographed at Fredericksburg, Va., April 13, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user pfirth, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111309642(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Swamp Tupelo photographed at First Landing State Park in Virginia Beach, Va., July 9, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user karliemarina, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/86317064(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Black Willow trees along Toms Creek in Montgomery County, Va., August 18, 2011. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TREE SPECIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Following are the scientific names (in parentheses) of the tree species mentioned in this episode, in alphabetical order according to the species' common names. Atlantic White-cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides)Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)Black Gum (Nyssa syvatica)Black Willow (Salix nigra)Boxelder (Acer negundo)Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)Live Oak (Quercus virginiana)Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata)Red Maple (Acer rubrum)Red Spruce (Picearubens)River Birch (Betula nigra)Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)Swamp Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora) – a variety of Black GumWater Hickory (Carya aquatica)Water Tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Common Native Trees of Virginia,” Charlottesville, Va., 2016.  (The 2020 edition is available online [as a PDF] at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf.) A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” October 22, 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. Anita K. Rose and James S. Meadows, “Status and Trends of Bottomland Hardwood Forests in the Mid‑Atlantic Region,” USDA/Forest Service Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., November 2016; available online at https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53238. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject categoryFollowing are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.

music new york university game texas earth education college water state zoom land living tech research government benefits foundation search north america environment dark press normal web natural tree va rain disease ocean climate change voices snow citizens status trees agency stream priority richmond plants environmental bay images ash grade conservation copyright index charlottesville sites processes penn mid pond signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech asheville gothic scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources virginia beach adaptations williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful forestry times new roman ls sampler sections aquatic poison ivy watershed organisms montgomery county chesapeake piedmont acer soggy seaman policymakers ponds forest service fredericksburg photosynthesis shrubs new standard acknowledgment cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup live oak stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub dispdef lmargin smallfrac rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim allowpng virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat instrumental music lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused sols latentstyles table normal inhabiting inaturalist bmp quercus name title name normal name strong name emphasis name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent forest management cripple creek living systems grades k name e biotic space systems light accent wildlife resources dark accent colorful accent box elder name list rhododendrons name plain text name date name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light cumberland gap name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d salix relyonvml penn state extension betula atlantic region inland fisheries forest resources hackberry dismal swamp audio notes celtis 20image stormwater runoff tmdl water center donotshowrevisions virginia standards
McKinsey on Insurance
The new standard for insurance claims

McKinsey on Insurance

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 20:57


In this podcast, three claims experts discuss what insurers should consider as they update their technology, ways of working, and workforces to bring forth the future of claims Read more > Listen to the podcast (duration: 20:57) >

The Pool Guy Podcast Show
Betta 2.0 The New Standard in Solar-Powered Surface Cleaners

The Pool Guy Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 17:41


I for one applaud any manufacturer that corrects and updates their product after getting customer complaints. The Betta 2.0 is the latest updated solar surface cleaner and I believe it is a real winner. Leslie's Pro: Pool Service Pro, open a Wholesale account today! Customer referrals, free cleaner repairs, free water testing, open 7-days a week. It is fast and easy to become a Leslie's Preferred Pool Care Provider. https://lesliespool.com/commercial-services.html/?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=spll&utm_campaign=spll

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 624 (4-11-22): Sycamores are Sizable and Scenic at Streamsides

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:57).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-8-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 11, 2022.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, we feature a musical selection inspired in part by one of Virginia's largest and most distinctive riverside plants.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 34 sec – instrumental.You've been listening to part of “Sycamore Rapids,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va., on a 2002 album also called “Sycamore Rapids.”  The album was inspired by the trees of Virginia's state parks and forests, and the “Sycamore Rapids' tune honors particularly James River and Shenandoah River state parks.  According to the composer, the tune's progressions are meant to signify changes a paddler might experience from small riffles to larger rapids to smooth water. At any of those water features throughout the eastern United States, part of a paddler's scenery is often the American Sycamore tree.  Of the three sycamore species native to North America, the American Sycamore is the most familiar and by far the most widespread, ranging from New England to the Midwest and down to Texas, including all of Virginia.  Common in floodplain areas along rivers and streams, the sycamore's distinctive features are large, often hollow trunks; peeling, patterned bark; crooked limbs; large root masses visible along stream banks; and spherical fruits persisting on leafless twigs long into winter. Virginia riversides are of course commonly home to other tree species, too, such as Black Willow, Silver Maple, and Eastern Cottonwood.  But with its large size and distinctive bark, the American Sycamore is perhaps the Commonwealth's most noticeable waterway marker. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Sycamore Rapids.” MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 176, 8-26-13. “Sycamore Rapids,” from the 2002 album of the same name, is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Fruit on an American Sycamore beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), March 19, 2022.American Sycamore beside Sinking Creek in Newport, Va., (Giles County), April 10, 2022.American Sycamore roots along the James River near Wingina, Va., along the Nelson-Buckingham county line, July 12, 2009.Hollow trunk of American Sycamore beside the New River in Radford, Va., October 4, 2009.American Sycamores beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va., November 5, 2016.SOURCES Used for Audio eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1.  The American Sycamore entry is online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200010589. William C. Grimm, The Book of Trees, Hawthorn Books, New York, N.Y., 1962. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. University of Texas at Austin/Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, ‘Plant Database: Platanus occidentalis,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ploc. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home.  The American Sycamore entry is online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=PLOC. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia State Parks,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/.  The James River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/james-river; the Shenandoah River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/shenandoah-river. Virginia Department of Forestry, Common Native Trees of Virginia, Charlottesville, 2016. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/.) Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree buds – Episode 622, 3-28-22. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 407, 2-12-18

united states music new york university texas education college water state zoom land living tech research government foundation search north america environment dark press normal web natural tree va rain ocean fruit snow new england midwest citizens trees agency stream priority richmond plants biology environmental bay images ash dynamic grade bio conservation copyright recreation index charlottesville commonwealth processes pond signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech hollow asheville newport scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful forestry times new roman populations ls sections aquatic poison ivy watershed organisms montgomery county chesapeake radford policymakers scenic forest service photosynthesis shrubs new standard blacksburg acknowledgment cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim defunhidewhenused virginia department defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused sols latentstyles table normal james river bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis new river cripple creek virginia press living systems sizable grades k name e biotic light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name plain text name date rhododendrons name table web name normal indent name balloon text name normal web name table theme name list bullet name normal table name plain table name list number name no list name grid table light name closing name outline list name grid table name signature name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d name table contemporary name body text first indent name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle cumberland gap sycamores name mention name hashtag forest resources name unresolved mention giles county audio notes tmdl 20image platanus water center virginia standards
The Business Times Podcasts
S1E18: Mapletree sets new standard for REIT sponsors: BT Mark to Market Ep 18

The Business Times Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 13:47


Synopsis: Listen to Ben Paul's analysis and insight on market trends and corporate issues in Singapore in this podcast series based on his weekly column in The Business Times. How did the sponsor of Mapletree Commercial Trust and Mapletree North Asia Commercial Trust save their proposed merger? Senior Correspondent Ben Paul gives his take and offers investment views on the two Reits.  Highlights: (click/tap above) 04:10 How Mapletree Investments made a hated merger palatable 06:47 Why the MCT-MNACT combination is arguably not a merger 07:28 Other Reit sponsors may now face higher investor expectations 08:37 Why MNACT unitholders should hold on their units for now 10:15 Investors may view MCT more positively on sponsor's support Produced by: Ben Paul (benpaul@sph.com.sg) and Howie Lim Edited by: Howie Lim Follow BT Mark To Market podcasts and rate us at: Channel: http://bt.sg/btmark2mkt Apple Podcasts: https://bt.sg/4DJp Spotify: https://bt.sg/4DJN Google Podcasts: http://bt.sg/4D2E Website: http://bt.sg/mark2mkt Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Do note: All analyses, opinions, recommendations and other information in this podcast are for your general information only. You should not rely on them in making any decision. Please consult a fully qualified financial adviser or professional expert for independent advice and verification. To the fullest extent permitted by law, SPH Media shall not be liable for any loss arising from the use of or reliance on any analyses, opinions, recommendations and other information in this podcast. SPH Media accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever that may result or arise from the products, services or information of any third parties.  --- Discover more BT podcast series: BT Money Hacks Podcast at: https://bt.sg/btmoneyhacks WealthBT Podcast at:http://bt.sg/btwealthbt PropertyBT at: https://bt.sg/btpropertybt BT Podcasts at: https://bt.sg/pcOM See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Day In-Day Out
Lyn Yaffe - EPR the New Standard in Emergency Care

Day In-Day Out

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 97:06


Lyn YaffeLinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/lyn-yaffe-8b681a1/Website:https://www.epr-technology.com/https://www.startengine.com/epr-technologiesMy social media links:Podcast:https://podcast.app/day-in-day-out-p832991Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/muui23LinkedIn page:https://www.linkedin.com/company/day-in-day-out-podcast/?viewAsMember=trueYouTube:https://bit.ly/2UVszCm

Manifesting Wonder
EP #70- Self Care is the New Standard- Some unconventional tips to take care of yoself!!!

Manifesting Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 18:23


THERE IS SO MUCH TO BREAK DOWN WHEN IT COMES TO TRUE SELF CARE! In todays Episode I'm breaking down a few self care tips you may not know about... Its a whole thing! AND OF COURSE! Your Path To Me Time is LIVE ready to pour from a FULL cup every single day? If so, this is your sign to join to course today! With the mindset shifts you need to take time for yourself daily and not feel bad about it!!!!! Join Your Path To Me Time Today See you inside!

כל תכני עושים היסטוריה
Will Venetoclax Become The New Standard? [MDS Professional Report]

כל תכני עושים היסטוריה

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 34:49


We will discuss the addition of venetoclax to hypomethylating agents in the treatment of advanced myeloid neoplasms, especially higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.We will then report a study testing the efficacy and safety of imetelstat, a new telomerase-inhibitor, in the treatment of patients with lower-risk MDS and anemia following ESA failure.We will then review an interesting therapeutic approach to improve or restore erythroid response by adding lenalidomide to MDS patients treated with erythropoietin but lost the response.Finally, we will return to the "hot" topic of targeting the TP53 mutation, by summarizing an important clinical trial using a TP53 activator.

Saugatuck On Sunday Podcast
Saugatuck on Sunday 4-03-22

Saugatuck On Sunday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 135:05


Host Gregory Muncey is joined by regular co-host Jules of The Star of Saugatuck to welcome guests Birdie Holley from Old Pike Cottages and Erin Wilkinson from New Standard. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 622 (3-28-22): Tree Buds and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:59).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 3-25-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 28, 2022.  This revised episode from December 2018 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~ 10 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Hiking in the Highland Firs,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., opens an episode on a woody plant structure that's closed during wintertime and whose opening is a mark of spring.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds to some of the weather that trees and shrubs endure during a Virginia winter, and see if you can guess this structure.  And here's a hint: if you don't know this, you might ask a buddy. SOUNDS  - ~15 sec – March wind in previous year's oak leaves.If you guessed tree and shrub buds, you're right!  Buds are one of woody plants' adaptations for surviving winter's cold temperatures, drying conditions, and damaging winds.  Buds contain meristematic tissue, the tissue that will be future growing stems or flowers.  Sometimes woody plant buds include only the meristematic tissue, but more typically that tissue is covered by small, folded leaves and modified leaf structures called bud scales.  Just like tree and shrub leaves, buds have distinctive shapes and colors, often allowing identification when leaves are gone. Flowering trees and shrubs form both vegetative and flower buds.  The vegetative buds can be at the end of twigs or along the length of twigs in the axils where leaves attach.  Flower buds may look very different from vegetative buds, for example, as in the Flowering Dogwood.  Non-flowering trees and shrubs—that is, conifers, the cone-bearing woody plants, such as pines, spruces, and firs—also have vegetative buds that can develop into stems or into cones. In temperate climates, buds typically form at some point during the growing season and then become dormant—that is, stop actively growing—during the winter.  In spring, in response to hormones and environmental conditions, bud dormancy ends as the buds open and the enclosed tissues begin developing and growing.  But there's much variation among species, and even among individuals within a species, in patterns and timing of bud formation, dormancy, and activity. Now, what makes woody plant buds particularly a water story?  Here are three answers to that question. First, the availability of water during bud formation in one year can affect how much tissue is stored in the bud for growth and development the following spring.  Second, the meristematic tissue in a bud is protected from drying out by the covering bud scales and undeveloped leaves.  And third, while buds don't protect plant cells from freezing, their role in preventing dehydration contributes to the plant's ability to withstand injury from freezing temperatures. As spring unfolds in Virginia, some do the buds on the Commonwealth's woody plants, revealing some of the history—and water—of last summer, along with the future of this year's growing season. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Hiking in the Highland Firs.” MUSIC – ~ 22 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 449, 12-3-18. “Hiking in the Highland Firs,” from the 2001 album “Common Wealth,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.   “Hiking in the Highland Firs,” written in honor of Virginia's Grayson Highlands State Park, was previously featured in Virginia Water Radio Episode 320, 6-13-16, on Virginia's state parks. The sound of wind in oak leaves was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on March 15, 2013. Virginia Water Radio thanks Jen Gagnon, John Peterson, and John Seiler, all of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, for their help with this episode in 2018 and 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Yellow Buckeye bud opening and leaves emerging in Blacksburg, Va., April 1, 2010.Sawtooth Oak buds and previous year's leaves in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.White Pine bud among needles in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.Tulip Poplar bud opening and leaf emerging in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.Spruce bud among needles in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.Elm buds opening and leaves emerging in Blacksburg, Va., March 29, 2022.SOURCES Paul J. Kramer and Theodore T. Kozlowski, Physiology of Woody Plants, Academic Press, New York, 1979.  Steven G. Pallardy, Physiology of Woody Plants, Third Edition, Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass., 2008.  (This book is a revision of the 1979 work by Kramer and Koslowski listed above.) John R. Seiler, John W. Groninger, and W. Michael Aust, Forest Biology Textbook, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va., 2021.  Access requires permission of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, online at https://frec.vt.edu/; phone (540) 231-5483.Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. For More Information about Trees in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018,  Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service Plants Database, online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Common Native Trees of Virginia,” 2020 edition, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  This is the first comprehensive manual of Virginia plants published since the 1700s.  The Flora of Virginia Project is online at http://www.floraofvirginia.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs [good as of Episode 621] Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 176, 8-26-13.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forestry as work and as an industry in Virginia – Episode 160, 5-6-13.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree colors and changes in fall, including to water movement – Episode 285, 10-9-15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 –