Podcasts about Smithsonian Institution

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Group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government

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Best podcasts about Smithsonian Institution

Latest podcast episodes about Smithsonian Institution

Science History Podcast
Episode 50. Space & the Sixties: Neil Maher

Science History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 65:06


The 60s hosted the space race between the United States and the Soviet Union, which occurred in the midst of the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and civil unrest. How did the culture wars of the 1960s relate to the space race, especially in the United States? How did the Civil Rights Movement, the New Left, environmentalism, the women's movement, and the Hippie counterculture influence NASA, and vice versa? With us to answer these questions is Neil Maher. Neil received a B.A. in history from Dartmouth College in 1986, an MA in U.S. history from New York University in 1997, and a Ph.D. in history, also from New York University, in 2001. He is a professor of history in the Federated History Department at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University, Newark, where he teaches environmental history, political history, and the history of environmental justice. Neil has received numerous fellowships, awards, and grants from the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, Harvard University's Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, and Ludwig Maximilian University's Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society in Munich, Germany. His books include Nature's New Deal: The Civilian Conservation Corps and the Roots of the American Environmental Movement (Oxford University Press, 2008), and Apollo in the Age of Aquarius (Harvard University Press, 2017).

Where Did the Road Go?
Walter Boseley on Veiled Destinies - Dec 25, 2021

Where Did the Road Go?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022


Part 1 of 2. Seriah interviews researcher, writer, scholar, and retired federal investigator Walter Bosley. Topics include Juan Cabrillo, mysteries of old California, Sir Richard Francis Burton, Ambrose Bierce, Napoleon, intelligence operations in the colonial era, Ingersoll Lockwood, Margaretta Todd, esoteric lost history, Joan of Arc and her sacred sword, Excaliber, Saint Catherine of Alexandria, the Godess Hecate, Hypatia, Roman Catholic syncretism, Vodou, "Empire of the Wheel", Catalina Island, Hecate synchronicities, Marco Polo, anomalous maps, Pre-Columbian expeditions from Europe to the Americas, precious metal trading, Sir Francis Drake, the Cham culture and empire, a lost city in the Grand Canyon, an extremely ancient temple, Atlantis in Southeast Asia, lost cities in South America, underwater archeological finds off of Africa, ruins discovered after a tsunami, Randall Carlson, after-effects of the last ice age, California as an island, Queen Calafia, lost waterways, David Childress, the Smithsonian Institution and the National Park Service, bones of giants, destruction and suppression of inconvenient artifacts, Graham Hancock, classified storage facilities, ancient high-tech civilizations, Antarctica, the myth of linear progress vs. cyclical conditions, the South Pole ozone hole, John E. Brandenburg and Mars, Knights of Malta, Knights Templar, megaliths, Oak Island, hidden objects, Henry Sinclair, hidden seceret vaults, reality TV, missing artifacts, antikythera mechanism, the Cathars, Constantinople, and much more! This is fascinating conversation on a vast number of subjects! Ths s one not to be missed! - Recap by Vincent Treewell Outro Music by David Wirsig with Black Eyes Download

MinuteEarth
How Reindeer Explain Bitcoin

MinuteEarth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 3:26


Watch the new season of MinuteBody - and get access to both CuriosityStream and Nebula - at https://curiositystream.com/minuteearth Bitcoin and other blockchain technologies, like NFTs, work a lot like reindeer mating. LEARN MORE ************** To learn more about this topic, start your googling with these keywords: - Bitcoin: a digital currency known as a cryptocurrency, which uses a proof-of-work consensus to validate transactions and create new units of Bitcoin. - Proof-of-work: a decentralized consensus mechanism that requires members of a network to expend effort solving an arbitrary mathematical puzzle to prevent malicious activity - Blockchain: a record of transactions made in Bitcoin or another cryptocurrency maintained across several linked computers, which can also be used in non-cryptocurrency applications - Mining: the process of validating transactions and creating new Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies - Sexual selection: a form of natural selection driven by competition between members of a species of one sex for access to mating partners of another sex that favors certain characteristics SUPPORT MINUTEEARTH ************************** If you like what we do, you can help us!: - Become our patron: https://patreon.com/MinuteEarth - Share this video with your friends and family - Leave us a comment (we read them!) CREDITS ********* Julián Gustavo Gómez (@TheJulianGomez) | Script Writer and Narrator Ever Salazar | Director Aldo de Vos | Illustration, Video Editing, Animation, and Music MinuteEarth is produced by Neptune Studios LLC https://neptunestudios.info OUR STAFF ************ Sarah Berman • Arcadi Garcia i Rius David Goldenberg • Julián Gustavo Gómez Melissa Hayes • Alex Reich • Henry Reich • Peter Reich Ever Salazar • Leonardo Souza • Kate Yoshida OUR LINKS ************ Youtube | https://youtube.com/MinuteEarth TikTok | https://tiktok.com/@minuteearth Twitter | https://twitter.com/MinuteEarth Instagram | https://instagram.com/minute_earth Facebook | https://facebook.com/Minuteearth Website | https://minuteearth.com Apple Podcasts| https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/minuteearth/id649211176 REFERENCES ************** Antonopoulos, Andreas M. "Mastering bitcoin." (2019) Brennan, P. “Sexual Selection.” (2010) Nature Education Knowledge 3(10):79 https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/sexual-selection-13255240/ Cambridge Bitcoin Electricity Consumption Index (CBECI), University of Cambridge, https://ccaf.io/cbeci/index. de Vries, Alex. “Bitcoin Energy Consumption Index.” Digiconomist, 6 Nov. 2021, https://digiconomist.net/bitcoin-energy-consumption. Goss, Richard J. Deer antlers: regeneration, function and evolution. Academic Press, 2012. Panko, Ben. “Go Big or Go Generic: How Sexual Selection Is like Advertising.” Smithsonian Magazine, Smithsonian Institution, 6 Dec. 2016, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/either-go-big-or-go-generic-how-sexual-selection-advertising-180961311/.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Kevin Young, Ann Patchett, Elizabeth Gilbert and other author recs

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 164:54


Today's Boston Public Radio is on tape. We're bringing you the ultimate book club — back-to-back conversations from over the years with some of our favorite writers: Kevin Young shares from his collection of poetry, “Brown.” Young is the poetry editor of The New Yorker and the director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture. Ann Patchett discusses the autobiographical elements of her book “Commonwealth,” and makes a pitch to all readers to shop at local, independent bookstores. Patchett is an author and the owner of Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tenn.  Sy Montgomery offers up details about her newly-released book: an illustrated children's version of her memoir, “How to Be a Good Creature.” Montgomery is a naturalist, journalist and frequent Boston Public Radio contributor. David Duchovny talks about his book, “Miss Subways: A Novel.” Duchovny is an actor and writer, and recently appeared in the Netflix series “The Chair.” Elizabeth Gilbert discusses her book “Big Magic,” a self-help book about tapping into creativity. Gilbert is a journalist and writer — her other books include “Eat, Pray, Love” and “Committed.” T.C. Boyle drops in on the dropout culture with his novel “Outside Looking In,” which is based on the LSD research of Timothy Lear. Boyle is a novelist and short story writer. Lizzie Post weighs in on cannabis culture in her new book, “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties.” Post is a writer, co-director of The Emily Post Institute and great-great-granddaughter of etiquette writer Emily Post. Sebastian Smee talks about his book “The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art.” Smee is an art critic for The Washington Post.

Poetry For All
Episode 36: Denise Levertov, On the Mystery of the Incarnation

Poetry For All

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 16:42


In this episode, we discuss Denise Levertov's powerful meditation on the horrors of the twentieth century, and how the mystery of the incarnation might provide humanity with some hope. Our close reading of this poem is informed by Eavan Boland's Preface and Anne Dewey and Paul A. Lacey's Afterword in The Collected Poems of Denise Levertov (New Directions, 2013). To read "On the Mystery of the Incarnation," click here (https://allpoetry.com/On-The-Mystery-Of-The-Incarnation). To read Levertov's essay "Some Notes on Organic Form," click here (https://www.poetryfoundation.org/articles/69392/some-notes-on-organic-form-56d249032078f). ''On the Mystery of the Incarnation'' by Denise Levertov comes from her book A DOOR IN THE HIVE, copyright ©1989 by Denise Levertov. Used by permission of New Directions Publishing Corp. Photo of Denise Levertov © David Geier. For more information see National Portrait Gallery at The Smithsonian Institution: https://npg.si.edu/object/npg_NPG.2011.103

Creativity in Captivity
GARY STAAB: The Dinosaur Whisperer

Creativity in Captivity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 44:53


A world-class paleo artist who produces natural history and prehistoric life models for museums, publishing, and film. Gary has a degree in Art/Biology and he interned at the Smithsonian Institution and the British Museum of Natural History. He has created sculptures for National Geographic, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, the BBC, The Discovery Channel, and The American Museum of Natural History. His work recreating the mummy of the “Iceman” can be seen on PBS, in the NOVA special Iceman Reborn. Gary is a mammoth talent in a bigger-than-life profession. We talk about the physical conundrum of getting a 52-foot Megaladon through a man-size door and how he often disturbed his teachers by bringing roadkill to school for show & tell.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates West Side Story with Richard Barrios (12/10/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 69:00


For Video Editon, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/2ICFKnhAfJ4 The making and impact of West Side Story has so far been recounted only in vestiges. In the pages of this book, the backstage tale comes to life along with insight on what has made the film a favorite across six decades: its brilliant use of dance as staged by erstwhile co-director Jerome Robbins; a meaningful story, as set to Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim's soundtrack; the performances of a youthful ensemble cast featuring Natalie Wood, Rita Moreno, George Chakiris, and more; a film with Shakespearean roots (Romeo and Juliet) that is simultaneously timeless and current. West Side Story was a triumph that appeared to be very much of its time; over the years it has shown itself to be eternal. Richard Barrios received degrees in both music and film history and worked in both music and film before turning his attention to writing. Still in the realm of musicals, he then directed his attention to a beloved film with WEST SIDE STORY: THE JETS, THE SHARKS, AND THE MAKING OF A CLASSIC (2020). For Busby Berkeley: Going Through the Roof, a co-production of PBS Great Performances, Turner Classic Movies, and Channel 4 (UK), Barrios was both narrator and onscreen commentator.  Barrios served as both programmer and lecturer for the film series “Musicals Before the Code.” Among the many venues where he has spoken and presented films are the 92nd Street Y in New York, the American Film Institute, the Smithsonian Institution,and the Gershwin Festival in Washington DC. https://www.amazon.com/West-Side-Story-Sharks-Classic/dp/076246948X

B&H Photography Podcast
The Secret Industry - Shipping and Maritime Photography: The B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 67:00


To take photographs on ships or to work in ports and cover maritime transportation requires a full range of photographic know-how, including portraiture, landscape, product, aerial, architecture, corporate—even adventure-photography skills. And that's just on the first day!   On today's episode of the B&H Photography Podcast we discuss this type of industrial and corporate photography, which at its core is rooted in documentary and visual storytelling. We welcome to the program photographer Nick Souza and writer and photographer, Todd Vorenkamp.   Nick Souza translated years of photojournalism and sports photography experience into a career as corporate industrial photographer. He has traveled the world on assignments for companies including Maersk, DHL, Kalmar, Konecranes, Sperry Marine, and many others. A specialist in maritime transportation, his photographs have been exhibited at The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. With Souza we discuss the practical tools needed to stay safe and capture compelling imagery for clients. Souza is a Nikon shooter who will not apologize for his love of zoom lenses, including the 24-70mm and 200-500mm NIKKORS.   Todd Vorenkamp is a photographer, writer, and an adjunct instructor of photography at Dakota College at Bottineau. He is a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, a former merchant ship deck officer, and a former US Navy and Coast Guard helicopter aviator. His photo work has been published in Maritime Executive Magazine, Rotor & Wing, and Vertical Magazine, among others. With Vorenkamp we talk specifically about working on huge aircraft carriers and merchant ships and we learn how to maintain creativity on long ocean journeys.    Join us for this fascinating and very practical conversation, supported by Pelican.   Guests: Nick Souza and Todd Vorenkamp Photograph © Nick Souza  

By Any Means Necessary
Biden Hosts Summit For Global Imperialism

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 114:43


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Sameena Rahman, staff writer for Breaking the Chains Magazine to discuss a fuel leak at a naval facility in Hawaii poisoning the drinking water supply for thousands of people, the repeated record of fuel leaks at the Red Hill naval facility and warning signs before this fuel leak happened, how this fuel leak fits into the imperialist ambitions of the US, and the connections between movements for climate justice and anti-imperialism that are highlighted in this incident.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Netfa Freeman, Coordinating Committee member with the Black Alliance for Peace, organizer with Pan-African Community Action to discuss western attempts to legitimate the failed state it created in Libya through upcoming elections, the infrastructural issues which expose the hypocrisy of the west as it pushes for these elections while simultaneously denouncing elections in Nicaragua and Venezuela, and how resources in Libya motivate the west to push this sham election.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Mike Africa Jr., organizer for the Free Mumia Campaign to discuss the 40th anniversary of the arrest and political imprisonment of Mumia Abu-Jamal, the dubious circumstances around the arrest of Mumia and why the Philadelphia police state wanted to lock him up, Mumia's impact on movements for justice worldwide, and the importance of continuing the fight for his freedom and all political prisoners.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by James Early, Former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies to discuss the farcical summit for democracy hosted by the Biden administration which features the likes of Jair Bolsonaro and Juan Guaido, the absurdity of excluding of rich and complex political systems such as Venezuela and Cuba, and the laughable attempt to call the US a democracy as the pandemic rages among working and poor people and more money is spent on war.

EDS at Union NOW
Just Conversations with Kelly Brown Douglas | Lonnie Bunch III

EDS at Union NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 30:50


 On this episode of, Just Conversations, Dean Douglas speaks with Lonnie G. Bunch III, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. In this conversation, Dean Douglas will explore Dr. Bunch's former role as director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture and the importance of telling an accurate and truthful account of American history. In addition, they will discuss criticisms the museum faced and some of the parallels of the criticisms that The 1619 Project has faced since its publishing.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 140: Part 2 - Creating Modern Jewels with an Old-World Feel with Multiple Award-Winning Jewelry Designer, Cynthia Bach

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 27:05


What you'll learn in this episode: Why much of Cynthia's jewelry has an old-world, Renaissance feel Cynthia's advice for aspiring jewelry designers How Cynthia designs her pieces around her customers' style Why creativity is the driving force behind change How understanding jewelry history can help designers find new forms of expression About Cynthia Bach Cynthia Bach has been a jewelry designer for more than four decades. After studying art in Munich, Germany, Cynthia received her BFA degree in art and jewelry making from McMurry University in Abilene, Texas, where she met and apprenticed bench jewelry making with master jeweler Jim Matthews. In 1989 Jim and Cynthia were recruited by Van Cleef & Arpels in Beverly Hills to run design and fabrication of the jewelry department. In 1991 Cynthia launched her own collection with Neiman Marcus nationwide.  She has been the recipient of numerous awards from the jewelry industry including the coveted International Platinum Guild Award, the Spectrum Award, and the Couture Award. Her designs have been recognized and awarded by the American Gem Trade Association. She is internationally known and respected and in 2014 was invited to Idar-Oberstein, Germany to judge the New Designer Contest. In 2015 her work was part of the international traveling exhibition “The Nature of Diamonds” organized by the American Museum of Natural History and sponsored by DeBeers. An important piece of her work resides in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In 2019 Cynthia's jewelry was featured in Juliet de la Rochefoucauld's “Women Jewellery Designers”, a magnum opus book of women jewelry designers throughout history. Additional Resources: Website  Instagram Twitter Facebook Pintrest Photos: 18 karat yellow gold Crown Collection maltese cross crown ring with rubies, emeralds, sapphires, and diamonds 18 karat yellow gold Flower Bouquet Collection flower hoop earrings with multi-colored gemstones 18 karat yellow gold Gitan Collection, filigree paisley's with diamonds and rubies 18 karat yellow gold Royal Charm Bracelet  Transcript: Cynthia Bach has loved jewelry for as long as she can remember. That enthusiasm is what helped her land an apprenticeship with master jeweler (and later, her husband) Jim Matthews, scored her a 25-year partnership with Nieman Marcus, and continues to fuel her desire to create timeless yet innovative designs today. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the old-world techniques that inspire her designs; her experience working with Van Cleef & Arpels, Neiman Marcus, and red-carpet stylists; and her advice for budding jewelry designers. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: That's interesting. I'm thinking about a few things. First of all, that Fabergé and Schlumberger had an eye, whether it was for a shape or they were just extremely creative. What do you feel you have an eye for? Cynthia: I have an eye for shapes. My jewelry designing is classical and lyrical. I'm not doing post-modern shapes like the wearable art exhibit we saw. I think of my designs as more refined. I love to design jewelry for women. When I'm designing for them, I see what their style is and I want to design around their style, which is not necessarily the normal thing to do. When I design a piece of jewelry, I usually design something I want to wear. Having worked with Nieman Marcus for 25 years, after starting my collection with them, there was always fashion. Every season, I would follow the fashions that so that even though my designs are very classical, they would also be very now. What are the girls wearing now? What are the trends now? But I still wanted it to be timeless and able to be worn a hundred years from today.  Sharon: Have you ever found yourself altering your designs or pieces because you've sketched something out and you say, “Oh, that's too small or too large for what people want today. That's not what people want”?  Cynthia: I kind of design what I want to design, but because I've worked so hands-on doing trunk shows across the country and working with women, I know everyone has a different size earlobe and a different shape face. I will take a design and I'll make a smaller version and a medium and a bigger to go with the woman's style. Not every woman can wear a big earring. In that sense, I just take my design and make it more adaptable for different people. I usually design what I want to design because I figure if I want to wear it, other women want to wear it, too. Sharon: It sounds like that's been successful for you for decades. You said that you design around a woman's style. I guess what I want to know is if you saw a woman wearing jewelry that's very different from yours. Let's say modernist, angular, large. What do you mean you design around that? Cynthia: To clarify that a little bit more, I would say the last 25 years where I've really been a designer, I've worked with a lot of stylists for red carpet dressing. We would work with clothing designers, like when I did Cate Blanchett in the beautiful Gautier. I made the body jewelry—they're Indian-inspired—and she did the big chain down her back. I remember a lot of beautiful gowns coming in, and even though I would use my jewelry, I always wanted the jewelry to make a statement. To me, it wasn't all about the dress, but also to make a statement for the wearer. So, when I say I like to design around a woman's style, a lot of that came from working with stylists and doing red carpet things. It also comes from working hands-on with women at the Nieman Marcus stores. They would come in and have a dress they were wearing to the ball, and they needed jewelry to go with it. You can't just throw anything on them. It's got to go with the dress; it's got to go with them. I find the way I wear jewelry is I like very big jewelry. I like big rings, big earrings, lots of chains. I layer everything. There are women out there that are much more—they love an exquisite piece of jewelry, but they'll wear one exquisite earring and one necklace.  Sharon: What's wrong with them? Cynthia: You're another person who's very theatrical in your jewelry.  Sharon: I understand what you're saying, but I'm surprised to hear you say that because your jewelry seems very feminine and dainty. I can see how you can stack the rings and everything, but I'm surprised to hear you say you like larger jewelry. That's all. Cynthia: I mean when I'm dressing for myself. This is where I'm making pieces for other people. My collection I'm working on now is a lot of flowers with beautiful fall colors, orange and yellow, sapphires and reds and purples, all these colors together. I will take all those chains and wear like seven of them together, whereas if I were selling them in a store, maybe a woman would buy one chain. Ultimately, we have to make a living, but for me, selling my jewelry is my living. To some extent, you have to keep in mind who your audience is as well. Again, I can't always dictate the way I want them to look. Sharon: I was just thinking how impressive it is that you've been selling to Nieman Marcus for so long. That's a long run, and hopefully it continues for another 20 years. There are so many people who sell for one season and never see it there again. Cynthia: Like I told you, Sharon, I made up my mind at the age of 12 that this is what I wanted to do. My determination came from—it was very difficult being a woman. When I sold my collection to Nieman Marcus in 1991, we were brought out to Beverly Hills with Van Cleef & Arpels. The family-owned business went off to sell their company, so we were basically without a job. That was my window for, “O.K., you have nothing to lose. You're out of a job. If you want to be a jewelry designer, you're going to do it now.” Well, that was on Monday. On Friday, I called Nieman Marcus in Dallas and flew out there.  I had been making a little crown collection, because I had made a crown for a client for an anniversary present back in 1982. It was a design of a Trifari crown pin that he gave to his wife. He said, “I bought this for my bride in 1955, and now I can afford it in emeralds, rubies and diamonds.” It was a little Trifari crown pin, and I made her this little crown and she wore it every day on a chain. I just thought it was the neatest thing. This was in 1982, and I said, “This is what I'm going to do. I'm going to make crowns.” So, I started researching them at the library, all the different heraldic imagery and all the crowns throughout the world that kings and queens wore, and I brought them to everyone, to the masses. I had presented them to Van Cleef & Arpels, and they were like, “We would never do a crown,” but I made them anyway.  After we lost our job at Van Cleef & Arpels, five days later, I flew to Nieman Marcus. I had 13 crown brooches. Some were fantasies; some were actual miniature crowns from Saudi Arabia or Persia, the English crown. I talked to the buyer, who was actually the president of the jewelry department at that time. In 1991, they did not have a developed jewelry department. There were jewelry designers; there were fashion designers, but jewelry was very generic, so they didn't have creatives in jewelry that stood out. I said to them, “You need a stable of jewelry designers like you have in fashion.” The same thing I did with my husband, “I want to make jewelry. Here are my crowns.” I was all enthusiastic about it, and he was like, “I'll give you $6,000,” and I said, “I'll take it.” That launched my career, but it was in 1991 when, like I said, there weren't really any established jewelry designers at the time. I think Nieman's had Jean Mahie and Henry Dunay was there, but that was it. So, they grandfathered me at that time, and it just took off. The 90s and the 2000s was a wonderful time to be in the jewelry business. It was a wonderful time to be in business in anything in 2000, before 2006. So, that is how I got into it. I don't know that I could do something like that in 2021. It's always timing. Sharon: That's true. Do you think you couldn't do that because it's not possible to call Nieman Marcus today and say, “I want an appointment with the buyer”? Cynthia: With 13 pieces? No, I think because the competition now is steep. Women are more independent now. In 1991, it was still hard as a woman to head a company and to be taken seriously as being able to run a company. Even though I worked with my husband, I called the collection Cynthia Bach because it was a time for women when if they did not stick up for themselves and be a little more aggressive and persistent, they would disappear. I guess I'm a feminist, I don't know. But at that time, I had to fight really hard. I worked with a lot of men and good old boys. The jewelry industry was made up of men. It was a whole different time, and Nieman Marcus, at that time, was still family-owned as well. It was small. Now, it's become much bigger, more investors, owners, more corporate, so I don't think you can start with 13 pieces. I think you have to have a pretty big collection to move forward, and a business plan. Sharon: Right, it sounds you started the seeds of— Cynthia: A revolution, a jewelry revolution!  Sharon: Really. Because when you think about Nieman's today, the jewelry department is so well-developed in terms of all the different designers. Cynthia: Yes. Sharon: I was just going to ask you. We both attended a panel at Bonhams on wearable art jewelry. I was asking what attracted you, because your jewelry is so different. Cynthia: I am very much interested in jewelry history, jewelers throughout history, and the whole evolution of jewelry in any form. I love the silver jewelry that came out of Mexico. I love the period of the 30s and 40s. Like I said before, that is when casting was developed, and that is when jewelry was in a more industrial period, the shapes and the forms, the industrial revolution. Jewelry parallels music and history and art and fashion, so all of that interests me, and it doesn't just have to be my type of jewelry. I was very fascinated with the jewelry of the particular artists that I learned about through the Bonhams exhibit, the wearable art, the Crawford Collection. I learned about these artists I really didn't know about, and that was exciting. Sharon: Was there something in particular that called out to you, a designer or something a panelist said? Cynthia: I really loved the work of Art Smith. I think he worked in New York, and it was sculpture. His jewelry was sculpture, body sculpture. There were also some Native American Indian jewelers from the 30s and 40s that did lapidary work, the interesting turquoise with wood and the bracelets that were so colorful and beautiful. Some of the lapidary work they did was very now, like that guy that did the space travel bangle. There was one necklace I just fell in love with, and it's from William Spratling. It was a big necklace with little beads, and I thought to myself, “What a fabulous design! That design would look so good with my filigree beads that I do.” I've always loved bib-style necklaces. A lot of times when I look at jewelry, I'll see my piece of jewelry incorporated in some of the shapes or designs. It's all very visual to me, the bibs. Sharon: Those are fabulous pieces, and a broad spectrum too. Go on. Cynthia: I was just going to say relatively unknown artists. It was so refreshing to have Bonhams bring these out to the public awareness. Sharon: Yes, I hope we see a lot of more of it. It was nice. Cynthia: Me, too.  Sharon: Since you've been designing for so long, what do you think motivates you today that's different than what motivated you decades ago, when you first started? Cynthia: Right now, I'm working with more color. I love colors mixed together. Like I told you, I'm working a lot with flowers. I think because history and fashion play such an important part in my designing, I look at the kids, what they wear now, harkening back to the 1980s. I feel myself very influenced right now by 80s jewelry. I feel like it's also intertwined, like I said, with music and art and fashion and jewelry. They work together. During the Blue Rider period, the abstract expressionism with Kandinsky and Klee, you had music of that time that reflected it.  Creativity is what makes changes in the world, even though we repeat a lot of fashion. Some of what the kids are wearing is very unique. They wear a lot of body jewelry with tattoos and earrings that climb all the way up their ears. That is really new and fresh. Every generation is evolving into a new creative style. I think the depth of a designer is to keep coming out with new designs and to keep being creative. It's paramount and important to me to constantly be coming out with new designs, and I get that influence from what's going on in the world around me. Sharon: You sound very open to seeing new things as opposed to, “Oh my God, look at that person with all those tattoos.” Cynthia: It's basically body art. Yeah, it fascinates me; purple hair, green hair. Sharon: You can be very creative with hair and body art and all that. Cynthia: Absolutely. It's the time of personal style and expression now. Sharon: Do you think it's different now? People think of the 60s as being a time of personal art and expression. Do you think the 70s had less of that or the 80s had less of that? Cynthia: I think every decade, every era has that. Even if you look at the Rococo and Baroque periods in France, where they had their powdered wigs and their beautiful couture, they were out of the box. The music was out of the box, and that's how change happens in the world. Sharon: I like that change happens through creativity. You can look at different ways of saying that. Is it through creativity in tech or is it creativity in fashion? I guess it's everything.  Cynthia: Yeah. Sharon: You mentioned that enjoy studying jewelry history. Do you think it's important for jewelers and jewelry designers to be steeped in that, to know the history of jewelry, to see the trends through the ages? How important do you think that is? Cynthia: I think it helps. It certainly helps me to visually look at a lot of different styles and see what's been around for hundreds of years, but I don't think it's necessary for everyone. Some people are just creative, and they come out with their own unique style. I don't know if you've looked at what Boucheron is doing now with this kind of glasswork. It's like nothing I've ever seen before. It really is wearable art. They're pushing the envelope as to jewelry and wearable art.  A lot of the young designers coming up now are especially working with the fashion houses, and the fashion houses are saying, “Hey, we need to incorporate some important jewelry with our fashion.” It's unique. So, the answer to your question is I don't know if it's important to know jewelry history. I think the most important thing is to be forward and to come up with something creative that is unique and your own. Sharon: What do you when you find your creativity has stalled? If you have writer's block in terms of jewelry, what do you do? Cynthia: In the past, I can say that when someone commissions me to do a piece of a jewelry or I have a new collection I want to come out with and I just don't know what to do, sometimes I just put it in the back of my head and go around my business. It is haunting me in my head, and then all of a sudden, I'll be sitting there and I'll look at a chair or something. I'll see a shape and a light goes off in my head, and that's it; that's the concept. It's almost a subconscious process. This has happened with me time and time again. I'll be sleeping and somehow something will hit me, “This is it.” Sometimes it takes a week or two. I don't think it's taken over once I make my mind up that I need something new over two weeks. It usually goes into my subconscious brain, and I guess my conscious brain is looking for ideas. Sharon: That is the way it works. You're meditating and something comes, or you're in the shower. Exactly, it's when you're not looking. Cynthia, thank you so much for taking the time today to talk with us. This has been really enjoyable and fascinating. It's great to talk with somebody who's been through decades of jewelry design. Cynthia: Does that make me old? Sharon: No, it doesn't. Cynthia: The creative mind is never old. Creativity is always young.  Sharon: Yes, that's definitely it. Thank you so much. Cynthia: Thank you for having me. I enjoyed this very much, and I look forward to next time.  We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Long may she reign
Hatshepsut, Pharaoh of Egypt

Long may she reign

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 32:19


Hatshepsut was the first women to ever rule Egypt independently, but being the first comes with consequences. For a very long time she has been thought of the evil vindictive stepmother who stole the throne for her stepson. However in reality she was a capable ruler and a powerhouse of the ancient world. Works Cited “Ancient Egyptian Schools for Kids - Fun Facts.” History for Kids, 6 Feb. 2020, www.historyforkids.net/egyptian-school.html. Barger, Brittani. “Foremost of Noble Ladies - Hatshepsut.” History of Royal Women, 12 June 2020, www.historyofroyalwomen.com/hatshepsut/foremost-noble-ladies-hatshepsut/. “Hatshepsut.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Oct. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatshepsut. “Hatshepsut.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., www.britannica.com/biography/Hatshepsut. Magazine, Smithsonian. “The Queen Who Would Be King.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 1 Sept. 2006, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-queen-who-would-be-king-130328511/. Rattini, Kristin Baird. “Who Was Hatshepsut?” Culture, National Geographic, 3 May 2021, www.nationalgeographic.com/culture/article/hatshepsut. Small, Meredith F. “Mummy Reveals Egyptian Queen Was Fat, Balding and Bearded.” LiveScience, Purch, 6 July 2007, www.livescience.com/7336-mummy-reveals-egyptian-queen-fat-balding-bearded.html. “Thutmose I.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 13 Oct. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thutmose_I.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 140: Part 1 - Creating Modern Jewels with an Old-World Feel with Multiple Award-Winning Jewelry Designer, Cynthia Bach

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 22:05


What you'll learn in this episode: Why much of Cynthia's jewelry has an old-world, Renaissance feel Cynthia's advice for aspiring jewelry designers How Cynthia designs her pieces around her customers' style Why creativity is the driving force behind change How understanding jewelry history can help designers find new forms of expression About Cynthia Bach Cynthia Bach has been a jewelry designer for more than four decades. After studying art in Munich, Germany, Cynthia received her BFA degree in art and jewelry making from McMurry University in Abilene, Texas, where she met and apprenticed bench jewelry making with master jeweler Jim Matthews. In 1989 Jim and Cynthia were recruited by Van Cleef & Arpels in Beverly Hills to run design and fabrication of the jewelry department. In 1991 Cynthia launched her own collection with Neiman Marcus nationwide.  She has been the recipient of numerous awards from the jewelry industry including the coveted International Platinum Guild Award, the Spectrum Award, and the Couture Award. Her designs have been recognized and awarded by the American Gem Trade Association. She is internationally known and respected and in 2014 was invited to Idar-Oberstein, Germany to judge the New Designer Contest. In 2015 her work was part of the international traveling exhibition “The Nature of Diamonds” organized by the American Museum of Natural History and sponsored by DeBeers. An important piece of her work resides in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In 2019 Cynthia's jewelry was featured in Juliet de la Rochefoucauld's “Women Jewellery Designers”, a magnum opus book of women jewelry designers throughout history. Additional Resources: Website  Instagram Twitter Facebook Pintrest Photos: 18 karat yellow gold Crown Collection maltese cross crown ring with rubies, emeralds, sapphires, and diamonds 18 karat yellow gold Flower Bouquet Collection flower hoop earrings with multi-colored gemstones 18 karat yellow gold Gitan Collection, filigree paisley's with diamonds and rubies 18 karat yellow gold Royal Charm Bracelet  Transcript: Cynthia Bach has loved jewelry for as long as she can remember. That enthusiasm is what helped her land an apprenticeship with master jeweler (and later, her husband) Jim Matthews, scored her a 25-year partnership with Nieman Marcus, and continues to fuel her desire to create timeless yet innovative designs today. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the old-world techniques that inspire her designs; her experience working with Van Cleef & Arpels, Neiman Marcus, and red-carpet stylists; and her advice for budding jewelry designers. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, our guest is multiple award-winning jewelry designer Cynthia Bach, who has been designing jewelry for 40 years. Her designs are in demand by celebrities and high-end jewelry showcases. She's recognized for jewels that harken back to yesterday with a nod to the Renaissance. She is also included among an extraordinarily talented group of jewelry designers in the beautiful book “Women Jewelry Designers.” We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Cynthia, welcome to the program. Cynthia: Thank you, Sharon, for having me today. I'm very excited to be here. Sharon: I'm so glad to have you, and I'm looking forward to hearing about your jewelry journey. Tell us a little about that. Did you play with jewelry when you were young, or were you creative when you were young? Go ahead. Cynthia: Sharon, since I was a little girl, I was very attracted to my mother's jewelry and all the sparkly stones and the colors. I would take her costume jewelry apart and redesign it. I don't know how old I was, very young, maybe six, seven, eight years old, and I always had this fascination with sparkly jewels. I can remember back in the day when W Magazine had the paper magazine that was like a newspaper, probably before a lot of people were born. We're looking at probably the 80s. I remember looking at pictures of Paloma Picasso and Tiffany and Elsa Peretti and thinking, “I want to be a jewelry designer. I love jewelry.” Maybe I was 12, 13. That was in the back of my head. Sharon: So, it was early on. Cynthia: Early on. When I went to college, my grandmother, who was living in New York in a retirement home, wrote me a letter that said, “Cindy, make up your mind what you want to do because you have opportunities that I did not have as a woman.” She was born, I think, in the late 1800s, turn of the century. She said, “Decide what it is you want to do and do it.” I was taking art classes at the university, and I said, “I'm going to be a jewelry designer.”  We didn't have a jewelry department, but I was determined. I went to the sculpture teacher and said, “I want to learn how to make jewelry,” and he said, “I've never taught jewelry, but if you get six students together, we'll form a class.” I recruited six students and we made a class and learned together. We would do casting behind the art building in the sand, like the old, ancient art of sand casting, where we would put our wax in a coffee can and dig a hole in the dirt and then pour. At that time, I worked in brass and copper because silver was like what working in platinum would be to me today. That was the start of a passion for me that I pursued.  Sharon: You went to college in Texas if I recall. Cynthia: Yes. My father was in the military. He married a war bride. He was in World War II, and he met my mother in Berlin during the bombing of Berlin and he brought her back. She was a war bride, but she loved living in Europe, so my father always asked to be stationed in Europe. I spent 13 years growing up in Germany. I did a year of college in Munich, Germany, before I went to Texas to finish my degree. My father was stationed in Texas then. Sharon: How did growing up abroad in Germany influence you as a jewelry designer? Cynthia: My mother really focused on culture more than anything. I don't know why. She wanted us to be very cultured and well-rounded and to experience good food. She would take me to the Stuttgart Ballet, and she'd take me to Berlin and say, “You're going to see the Berlin Opera. It's the best opera in the world.” Living in Germany, we would travel every summer and go to Greece or Italy and go to museums and concerts. In Europe, it's much easier for everyone to enjoy the culture, the opera, the ballets because it's affordable to everyone. For $30, you can go to the opera. You don't have to spend thousands of dollars to become a member. Everyone is more a part of culture there, and of course Europe is so cultured because it's so old. It's hundreds and hundreds of years old, so you have that sense of history and architecture and the castles. It was a very creatively fertile place for me to grow up. I do equate that with a lot of my jewelry designs and my love of art and culture.  Sharon: I can see the influence in your jewelry when you say that, because your jewelry has a lot that appears Renaissance-like, let's say, and it has a granulation. Cynthia: Yes, I think it has a very European look to it. In 1991, when I officially became my own jewelry designer, creating my own vision and designs, it was based on medieval history and Gothic and Renaissance and crowns and all the symbolism I researched at the library. It really did harken back to a lot of what I saw growing up in Europe. Sharon: What is it that still attracts you decades later? You still have that sense in your jewelry, which is so elegant in many ways, in terms of having that European feel. What is it that still attracts you today? Cynthia: I think there are several things. One is that I look at a lot of jewelry books. One of my other passions is jewelry history and all the different designs throughout history: the 30s and 40s that were so industrial, when casting was invented back in the 40s, and the 50s, where jewelry could be made en masse, as opposed to when it was all hand-fabricated by the French and the Italians and the Russians. That was a turning point in jewelry.  What was the question? You were asking why it is still European. There are two reasons. One is I study art jewelry history. Art history, jewelry history, they're all related. The other is my husband who is my partner, Jim Matthews, who I met during college because I needed someone to help me set a stone. It was an amethyst, and I didn't have the equipment in college. I heard about this amazing jeweler downtown in Abilene, Texas. I went from Munich, Germany, to Abilene to Beverly Hills.  Anyway, he is just a genius. He started whittling wood when he was five years old. He ended up owning this jewelry store, and he would hand-carve the waxes making his own tools, which is very old-school and a dying art. I think it's the combination of my love of jewelry history and my influences of being in Europe, and then his old-school jewelry carving and filigree and this amazing, intricate carving he could do. To me, it's like Castellani or some of the Italian handwork that was done in the 18th century. I think it's the combination of that that gives it that old-world Renaissance feeling. Sharon: Can you tell us about the division of labor you have now? You work together, so how does that work? Do you design and then he takes the designs? Cynthia: Yes, we have been working together since I was in college, so for over 40 years we've worked together. We were brought out here with Van Cleef & Arpels. He ran the design and fabrication of Van Cleef in Beverly Hills. He had 13 jewelers there on Rodeo Drive when it was still family owned. We were hired by Phillipe Arpels, and they brought us out here from Abilene, Texas, which to me was like, “Wow, we've been discovered. Now, we get to make jewelry for kings and queens in Hollywood.”  We've worked together so long that we kind of read each other's minds. It's like we have ideas, and he has ideas. We have all these ideas on paper I'm sketching. I'm constantly sketching; I'm constantly thinking, and then he will take that and carve it in a three-dimensional space. Sometimes it changes a bit from two dimensions to three dimensions, but it's almost like we have one mind. Like if you cut us in half, maybe neither one of us could function. I hope not. Sharon: You sort of touched on this, because you describe your career over and over. When I was reading about you and reading different biographies, you say that your career was a fairy tale. Can you tell me more about why you say that? Cynthia: Yes, I often say that it was a fairytale for me. First of all, I've wanted to make jewelry since I was a very little girl, and then I had the opportunity to start jewelry in college. They actually have an official department now, and I feel like the six of us instigated that. At that time, I just wanted to be a bench jeweler. I wanted to sit down and hand-make pieces. That's what I loved. I loved fabricating with metal, not so much casting. Then I had the opportunity to start designing and working with Jim, and to have Van Cleef & Arpels call us and bring us out to Beverly Hills and start making jewelry for that milieu of clients. It was very Cinderella-like. My whole collection is about Cinderella. I even have a chain called the Cinderella necklace. It's making everyone princesses and kings and queens and adorning your court, bedecking them with jewels. I don't know if it's because I'm creative and an artist, but I go into a fantasy when I'm designing. It's a fantastical world. It doesn't have anything to do with the day to day, but that is what creativity and art is all about. Sharon: Wow! It sounds like a dream. Cynthia: Well, it's not always a dream. I call it a fairytale journey. I didn't think when I was a young girl, and even when we owned our own store in Abilene and then went to Van Cleef & Arpels, I didn't think I would actually be my own jewelry designer, Cynthia Bach, with my own vision, making my own jewelry. To me, that was like, “Wow!” That's what I always wanted to do and now I'm doing it. But it wasn't always easy because it's hard. It's a hard business. When Nieman Marcus bought my collection, it's very demanding and competitive. There were many times where I wanted to throw in the towel, but I kept pursing, persistent, persistent. You get your obstacles in life. I think the most important thing, if you really want something, is to be persistent about it and never give up. It is a fairytale, but there are a lot of hard knocks. Sharon: It sounds like that's what you would tell somebody starting out in the field, that they have to overcome the obstacles. Cynthia: Yes, because anytime you're starting something, any vision you have, the beginning especially is going to be one obstacle after another. You need to break through it. Sharon: When you graduated, did you work with your husband-to-be before you married him and then the two of you had a store?  Cynthia: Yeah, when I met him—Jim's about 13 years older than I was, so I think I met him when I was in my mid-20s going to college studying jewelry. I went to his shop, and I was very enthusiastic about how much I loved jewelry and wanted to be a jeweler and make jewelry. Two weeks later, he called me and asked if I would like to work in his trade shop. He also had a trade shop that was doing repairs and sizings and setting stones and casting jewelry, which was probably my best education because it was all basic, hands-on making jewelry. One of the things I am really proud of is that I started out making jewelry from the basic beginning onto now making fine jewelry. He had opened a jewelry store with some other investors, and I was apprenticing with him. After college, all the investors left. I don't know why. Maybe it was me; I ran them all off. Sharon: Probably not. Cynthia: We were the only two people left owning the jewelry business, but we were really the jewelers in it anyway. They were all businesspeople, and we were creative people. So yes, he opened the store before I finished college, and then after I finished college we worked together for three or four years before we married. Sharon: It's impressive that you say you were a bench jeweler before you were a designer because there are not many designers that can say that. Cynthia: That's very true. Jewelry's one of the fields in art that you can actually sit and hand-make the pieces yourself and call yourself an artist, or you can just be a designer and have a collection made by a shop somewhere. Back in the old days, to be a jeweler or a designer, you had to actually make jewelry; you had to actually be a jeweler. But what also sets jewelry apart is the creative. You look at Fabergé, he had a whole shop of artisans working for him, and he just had this vivid, fabulous imagination making some of the most brilliant jewelry in the world. The creative is, to me, one of the most essential parts to a great piece of jewelry.  Schlumberger had the creative. He didn't sit down and make jewelry himself, but he knew the shape of a woman's ear, and he would make this earring that would set his jewelry apart because of the shapes. He had such an eye for shapes. I always thought to myself, “Ultimately, what is jewelry? It is a beautiful shape to make a woman look beautiful.” That's not necessarily true, but that's how I look at jewelry when I'm designing it. How the wearer going to look in this piece of jewelry? How is it going to make her feel beautiful and look beautiful and enhance her beauty? Sharon: That's interesting. I'm thinking about a few things. First of all, that Fabergé and Schlumberger had an eye, whether it was for a shape or they were just extremely creative. What do you feel you have an eye for?

Asset Champion Podcast | Physical Asset Performance, Criticality, Reliability and Uptime
Ep. 68: Fire Protection and Life Safety Engineering in Asset Management with Kelly Kidwell, PE of the Smithsonian Institution

Asset Champion Podcast | Physical Asset Performance, Criticality, Reliability and Uptime

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 18:23


Kelly Kidwell, PE is a Fire Protection Engineer at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC where she applies her years of experience in design to support life and safety for the built environment. Mike Petrusky asks Kelly to share how she works with members of the design team, project managers, and clients to determine the appropriate level of fire protection for buildings and structures according to the relevant codes and present hazards. Mike and Kelly offer some inspiration and practical advice to help you become an Asset Champion in your organization! Connect with Kelly on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kellymkidwell/ Learn more about the Smithsonian's Office of Safety, Health and Environmental Management: https://www.sifacilities.si.edu/oshem Connect with Mike on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikepetrusky/ Learn more about the iOFFICE + SpaceIQ Asset Division and explore more interviews at: https://www.assetchampion.com/ Share your thoughts with Mike via email: podcast@iOFFICECORP.com  

Strange Country
Strange Country Ep. 213: Moonies, Part I

Strange Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 53:17


Sun Myung Moon claimed to be the Messiah who would bring about the kingdom of heaven. See God visited him and told him it was his turn to pick up where Jesus left off. And apparently that was convincing lonely college kids to peddle candy and flowers at street corners and airports. In this multi-episode show, cohosts Beth and Kelly talk about the Unification Church, the True Parents, and ways they could possibly convince loyal dashounds to peddle Strange Country merch to the masses. Theme music: Big White Lie by A Cast of Thousands Cite your sources: Benscoter, Diane. Shoes of a Servant: My Unconditional Devotion to a Lie. Lucky Bat Books, 2013. Blake, Mariah. “The Fall of the House of Moon” The New Republic, 30 Nov. 2021, https://newrepublic.com/article/115512/unification-church-profile-fall-house-moon. Blake, Mariah. “EXCLUSIVE: Meet the Love Child Rev. Sun Myung Moon Desperately Tried to Hide.” Mother Jones, 9 Dec. 2013, https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2013/12/reverend-moon-unification-church-washington-times-secret-son/. Fessenden, Marissa. “A Brief History of Sesame Street's Snuffleupagus Identity Crisis.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 20 Nov. 2015, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/brief-history-sesame-streets-snuffleupagus-iidentity-crisis-180957351/. “Frontline: The Resurrection of Reverend Moon.” 1992, PBS. https://vimeo.com/520151453. Gorenfeld, John. Bad Moon Rising: How Reverend Moon Created The Washington Times, Seduced the Religious Right, and Built and American Kingdom. PoliPointPress, 2008. Hong, Nansook. In the Shadow of the Moons: My Life in the Reverend Sun Myung Moons Family. Little, Brown, 1998. Kaplan, Anna. "The Moon's the limit." The Humanist, vol. 64, no. 5, Sept.-Oct. 2004, p. 14+. Gale OneFile: Popular Magazines, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A121765419/PPPM?u=nysl_sc_flls&sid=bookmark-PPPM&xid=e603ec35. Accessed 19 June 2021. Levine, Martin, et al. “Sun Myung Moon, We Hardly Knew Ye-or Your Church's Finances!” Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly, 12 Sept. 2018, https://nonprofitquarterly.org/sun-myung-moon-we-hardly-knew-yeor-your-churchs-finances/. Shoaib, Alia. “Trump Spoke at a 9/11 'Moonies' Conference Organized by the Widow of the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, Praising the Controversial Unification Church.” Business Insider, Business Insider, 12 Sept. 2021, https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-speaks-at-moonies-911-event-praises-unification-church-2021-9.

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond
699: Josh Bernstein - "Project Ianos"

Thrive LOUD with Lou Diamond

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 37:38


Josh Bernstein is extraordinary individual that has traveled more than 1 MILLION miles to over 75 countries in pursuit of knowledge and discovery. Audiences in over 220 countries and territories around the world know him from his roles hosting series for the History, Discovery, Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic channels Currently he is putting together incredible content for a cool new STEM education program with NASA called Project Ianos. Josh catches up with longtime friend Lou Diamond in this fun conversation about a man that lives his passion every day.

No Rain Date
No Rain Date Ep. 82: LV-Based Voice Actor Brian S. Atwood

No Rain Date

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 65:47


On Episode 82 of No Rain Date, our special guest is a man who had to try using many different voices--literally--in order to find his own. Voice actor and instructor Brian S. Atwood explains that while his talent at impersonating everyone from Homer Simpson to Jimmy Stewart was what he thought would help him break into voice acting, it was ultimately his decision to use his own voice that helped launch his successful career following jobs with The Philadelphia Orchestroa and at Sirius Radio. In recent years, Atwood has raised his voice for such well-known clients as the Smithsonian Institution, General Electric, Nissan, Walmart, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and Wikipedia, and his voice-over work has been featured on History Channel, H2, truTV, American Heroes Channel and HLN television programs, as well as in various national radio, internet and TV ad campaigns. Today, Atwood also stays busy by helping to train the next generation of voice actors as an instructor at Northampton Community College. As always, Josh has a news roundup of the latest local news, including a story about a local boy's role playing Tiny Tim in Civic Theatre of Allentown's production of "A Christmas Carol" and a feature about the newest member of the Saucon Valley Alumni Association's Wall of Fame. No Rain Date is conveniently available for listening and download on iTunes, Spotify, iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Deezer, Tunein, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts and other apps, in addition to Saucon Source. To learn more about the podcast, suggest an interview subject or share feedback, please email josh@sauconsource.com. No Rain Date is produced each week by Jonny Hart and is a production of Saucon Source LLC. Love No Rain Date? You can help support it by making a voluntary contribution and becoming a Saucon Source member today. Learn more here. And don't forget to sign up to receive the free Saucon Source newsletter three times a week. You'll enjoy the convenience of having the latest news delivered to your inbox every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, as well as peace of mind of knowing you'll never miss another story.

Researchat.fm
118. The father of the internet in a Gakuran

Researchat.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 73:09


スミソニアン博物館に行って感じたこと、インターネットの父と学ラン、ポッドキャスト音源を流し続ける配信について話しました。Show notes 実験医学 2021年11月号 Vol.39 No.18 … “はじめよう! 研究者ポッドキャスト―多様な研究者を“聴ける化”する新たなメディア” 研エンの仲 … “「研エンの仲」は、神経科学の研究者Ayakaとソフトウェアエンジニア Ryoheiの2人によるPodcastです。科学やエンジニアリング、カルチャーや日常の話題についても話しています。” NeuroRadio … “神経科学者のとによるポッドキャスト。論文紹介や日々の雑談など、大西洋をまたいで収録しています。” CPT Japan 予選 スミソニアン博物館・美術館のリスト 某先生のスペースデブリとハッブル望遠鏡のツイート … 貫通したとは言っていない National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center … いわゆる国立航空宇宙博物館 National Museum of Natural History … 国立自然史博物館。みんなが想像している化石の博物館はここ。 レンタル式電動キックボード … bostonにはないので乗ったことがない。乗ってみたい。 絶滅認定されたハシジロキツツキ Natural History … スミソニアンのNatural history本。あたらしい版が英語では出ました。アメリカ版、安過ぎる(小声) 一冊購入しましたが、紙もとてもいいです。 地球博物学大図鑑 …日本語版 カモノハシのクチバシ1 カモノハシのクチバシ2 The British Museum … 大英博物館 水圧によって潰される日清のカップラーメン … なぜ日清なのか、深海には破棄された未開封の日清が集まっているのか。調査隊はその調査をしに深海へ… 鯨骨生物群集 … ロマンしかない。色々実験がされていますよね。鯨骨生物群集(げいこつせいぶつぐんしゅう、(fauna of) whale falls)とは、深海において沈降したクジラの死骸を中心に形成される生物群集のことである。熱水噴出孔と同様、隔離された環境の特殊な生態系として注目されている。” 鯨爆発 … ドッッカアアアアアアアアン!!!!! National Museum of American History … 国立アメリカ歴史博物館 バーチャファイター3がスミソニアンに? 1 … 一体どこにあるのか… バーチャファイター3がスミソニアンに? 2 … ないぞ… “The Virtua Fighter series is recognized for its contributions in the fields of Arts & Entertainment and is the only video game on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution's Permanent Research Collection on Information Technology Innovation, at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington D.C.” ウミホタルとresearchat.fm … ep112 Vint Cerf … インターネットの父 Tim Berners-Lee The Webby Award Vint Cerf氏がWebby Awardを受賞した時の写真 … どうみても学ランである。 Vint Cerf氏と学ラン2 … カッコ良過ぎる。このお茶目感最高である。 Vint Cerf氏と学ラン3 … どっからどうみても学ラ(以下略) 慶應義塾大学にやってきたVint Cerf … どっからどうみても学ラ(以下略) インターネット … インターネットとはなんなのか。 DARPA(The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency: DARPA) … “.mil”ってあるのか…. トンビ服 … 昔の写真でしかみたことがないアレ 村井純 … tadasuは授業を受けていたような気がしなくもない。”「日本のインターネットの父」とされ、「ミスター・インターネット」と呼ばれることもある。英語圏では「インターネット・サムライ」のニックネームを持つ。” サソリ飴 … 次世代の虫食である。 サソリウォッカ … この会社、イカれてるぜ…!!! 竹中直純さん … 第一回ポッドキャストアワードではResearchat.fmにコメントをくださり実は死ぬほどうれしかった。 DX時代に考える シン・インターネット … 村井さんと竹中さんの本 Operation Sound Recovery … 竹中さんのポッドキャスト。まりんさんと、國崎さんと、竹中さんがデジタル時代の音楽についてあれこれ話すポッドキャスト。 Researchat.fm 24/7 streaming station … Researchat.fm 24時間配信。元ネタはep61 だった気がする。あらB氏の助言により、Raspiで完成。一回配信が止まるとリンクが死ぬのでこのリンクもいつまで維持できるか… コメントしてください〜。実際はニコ動みたいな感じで同じエピソードの同じ場所を聴いている時にコメントをみんなで残すのをやりたいのだけどねぇ… 今ポッドキャストに求められているのはそれじゃないかな?(適当) あらB氏のポッドキャストを24時間、RaspiからYouTubeに配信するための記事 … あらB氏、ほんまありがとう。アイデアのタネはポッドキャストで話しておくべきですね。 あらB.fm … 毎回多種多様なゲストを呼びまくっているあらB氏のポッドキャスト Researchat.fmのYouTube … 登録していただけるととてもうれしいです。 Editorial notes 学ランが似合うイケおじになりたい(無理)(tadasu) 詰襟は見る分には良いんですけど、着るのは嫌です。(coela)

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 137: Part 2 - Tess Sholom: From the Runways of Paris to the Goldsmith's Studio with Goldsmith Tess Sholom

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 21:28


What you'll learn in this episode: What it was like to design jewelry for high-fashion runways in the 70s and 80s How the right piece of jewelry can transform the wearer  Why creative problem solving is the best skill you can have as a goldsmith How Tess' work wound up in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution and other museums How the jewelry field has changed with the popularization of social media Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Photos: Blue Sky Chalcedony Byzantium Earrings Byzantium Necklace Circes Circle Necklace Illusion Necklace  Ionian Necklace  Its A Wrap Necklace Naiad Necklace About Tess Sholom Warm and malleable but also strong and enduring, gold shines with the spirit of life itself. For designer and jeweler Tess Sholom, gold is both medium and muse. Tess Sholom began her jewelry career in fashion jewelry in 1976, designing pieces that appeared on the runways of Karl Lagerfeld, Oscar de la Renta and James Galanos, and the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Her fashion work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, Museum of the City of New York, the Racine Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Fashion Institute of Technology, and other museums. After two successful decades in fashion jewelry, she trained as a goldsmith and fell under the spell of high-karat gold. She decided to stop designing high-volume fashion jewelry and begin again as a hands-on studio artist, creating one-of-a-kind 22k gold jewelry in the workshop. Tess Sholom always had an eye for accessorizing, but she didn't realize it would lead her to a long and fruitful career as a jewelry designer. While working as a cancer researcher, a long-shot pitch to Vogue opened the door to a 30-year career as a jewelry designer for fashion runways. Her latest career move was opening Tess Sholom Designs, where she creates one-of-a-kind, high-karat gold pieces. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she designed jewelry for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and Karl Lagerfeld; why problem solving is the thread that runs through all her careers; and how she plays on gold's timeless, mystical quality in her work. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Yes, when I see kids on their phones, I'm like, “Oh my god!” When you see kids who speak a language you're trying to learn, it's amazing. Do you find that you get a response from Instagram and other social media?   Tess: I do, yeah. It's amazing. Especially the past year, when everyone was pretty much isolated, it made a big difference. People are now getting accustomed to Amazon; everybody buys things through Amazon. When you want to find something, people say, “Oh, why don't you look on Amazon?” We have become this very immediate culture. We want things immediately so you don't have to go out of your house. You just click the computer and get what you want.   Sharon: Very true. The Metropolitan Museum has what looks like a large collection of your designs for the runway and fashion jewelry. How did that come about?   Tess: I'm trying to remember. It was after the curator had taken my work for the Museum of the City of New York. I don't remember, but I do remember spending an entire summer with my assistant giving everything a provenance. It took a long time to document everything because it had to be very specific. I think part of the reason why they have such a large collection is when the Brooklyn Museum of Art was renovating, they transferred some of their collection to the Met, I believe, and they just kept it in their archives.   Sharon: If you're researching online, there's a lot there. It's interesting to see the designers that the pieces were done for. As I was surfing and trying to get some background, how do you feel when you come across a piece of yours on eBay that you made in the 80s? How do you feel about that?   Tess: I love the fact that it still there. It's wonderful. I'm very pleased, and of course I'm amazed to see how much it's increased in value. On eBay, it goes for a lot more than I sold it 30 years ago. To go back and see that something that I made 30, 40 years ago is still relevant means so much. One of the worries of becoming an older person is if I am going to stay relevant, and it's very gratifying to see people are still purchasing something I made many years ago. It's interesting because it makes it timeless, even though it was made for a particular season; it was made either for a fall collection or a spring collection. 40 years later, somebody still wants it and it's still relevant. It's in a way timeless, and that's very gratifying to me.   Sharon: I can see how that would be validating.   Tess: It's excellent.    Sharon: Is that something you think about when you're making your current pieces, about whether somebody's going to be looking?   Tess: That's interesting. No, it never occurred to me because jewelry is problem solving. It's like a meditation because you must think about what you're doing, especially if you're using an acetylene torch. One second of inattention and it's gone. You have a lump of gold, which is very beautiful in itself, but not quite what you wanted. I'm thinking about what problems are presenting themselves while I'm making the piece, and they do. It's your vision coming to light. That's one thing, but it's a lot of overcoming obstacles. I'm working with a metal; I'm working with a flame, and they each have their own characteristics and their own minds, and I have to cooperate with all that. So, that's very interesting. I don't think about that. I just think about the piece I'm making and how I'm going to do the best I can. I have a lot of reverence for the material I'm using and I want to do it justice, so my focus is on trying to do the best I can while I'm working. I never thought about that before.   Sharon: Do you design your pieces? I think of a pencil and paper. Do you sketch out a design before you start?   Tess: Often I do that, but sometimes if I'm sculpting with gold, I have an idea of what I want and I just try to coax the metal to melt in the way I want it to. That's a lot of fun because you never know what's going to happen. Sometimes it's just that lucky accident that happens.    My inspirations have come from everywhere. I remember once Bill Blass called me into his office and said, “I'm going to do roses for my spring collection and I'd like you to do something to go along with that.” I thought, “Roses, oh my, I don't want to do anything representational.” I was leaving for a ski trip with husband. While I was skiing and I was on the slopes, this Greek song came to mind about roses. The word in Greek for rose is “30 petals” and I thought, “Oh, that's what I'll do. I'll do a distillation of the rose. I'll do three petals,” and I did. I did a bracelet that had three petals that were fanned out but connected at the base, and a necklace and earrings that way. I showed it to Bill who said, “Well, it doesn't look a rose, but I love it,” and he ordered 60 pieces of it in brass, nickel, copper and also in Lucite.    Often my inspiration is from nature. I never walk through the park—I walk through the park a lot—without seeing something that I want to translate into gold. The idea is flowers and leaves are ephemeral. That's it. They give us lots of joy when they're here, but then to capture them in gold is wonderful because that makes them last longer. So, my inspiration comes from nature as well, but it can be a thought; it can be a song; it can be the way a banister curves. I don't know.   Sharon: As you're working, is the vision in your head? Are you saying, “That's not the way I drew it out or did it on the computer”?   Tess: Yes, that happens a lot. It happens a lot that it doesn't translate. Paper and pencil are very different from three-dimensional things. So, it happens a lot, and if I don't like it then I start again. But often I do like it.   Sharon: Are people ordering commissions from you, or are they ordering straight from your website or Instagram? How is that working?   Tess: They do both. They either buy what they see or—and this is very gratifying—people will bring me their old pieces that have sentimental value. They don't want to get rid of them, but they are not their style; they're not attractive. I usually remake them. I redesign them. I like that because there's something about the energy of someone else having worn this. It becomes a legacy, but it's still my expression.   Sharon: That must be a lot of fun.   Tess: It is. I had an aunt when I was a young child who would send me jewelry from Greece. She would say to me, “I wore it before giving it to you because I want my energy to go with it,” and I've never forgotten that.   Sharon: There is that energy. It's also a testament to you because you walk down the street and so many jewelry stores say, “Bring us your old pieces and remake them.” They're looking for something they know only you can deliver on that remake.   Tess: Yes, they want me to do it in my expression. The jewelry stores do very beautiful work, obviously, but they're not always very customized or individual or taking you into consideration.   Sharon: And that was exactly the question I was going to ask. Are you working side-by-side in a sense with the person who asks you for something?   Tess: Absolutely. Of course it's my expression because that's why they came to me, but I never impose something. It has to be something we mutually agree on and is going to work.   Sharon: Have you ever made something that somebody said, “Oh, that's not what I had in mind at all”?   Tess: No.   Sharon: Well, that's a pretty good track record. When you were working on the runway, like you were talking about the rose theme, did each model on the runway have a Lucite rose and one had a silver rose?   Tess: Yeah, it was like that. The trick also was that I was working with a number of designers for the same season. I had to be very careful not to have one look like the other, which wasn't difficult because they were all different looks. When I was doing Galanos and Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta and Giorgio di Sant'Angelo all in the same season, that all had to look different, and it did because they had different personalities and their clothes were different.   Sharon: Did you ever have anybody say—no names, but “If you're doing work for John Smith, then I really—"   Tess: No, no one ever said that to me.   Sharon: Are you selling now to stores? Tell us about your business today, Tess Sholom Designs.   Tess: I have been approached by a former buyer at Bergdorf's who would like to introduce me to the buyer now. So, we'll see. I haven't tried to do retail yet because it's different, but they're willing to do one-of-a-kind. As long as someone is willing to do one-of-a-kind, it's different. In the past, retail wanted the whole story; they wanted multiples, but retail has changed. That's one thing, but the other thing is I mostly do private sales like events.   Sharon: Is it mostly word of mouth? Besides social media, let's say if you're doing a private event in New York, how are they hearing about you?   Tess: Right. I have a salesperson and a media person who scouts out these things for me.   Sharon: Wow! That's great. That must be very gratifying to meet people and talk to them about your pieces, give them your take on them.   Tess: That's one of the best parts of this, aside from the joy of making the jewelry: dealing with a customer who loves the jewelry and who loves how it makes them feel. Jewelry can really be transformative. It enhances your essence. It's beautiful so it reflects your beauty. People respond to that, and that's extremely gratifying. I had a customer once who said to me that normally when she goes to a restaurant, she gets up to go the powder room and she walks through the space with her head down. One night she was wearing my necklace, and she said she put her head up and walked to the bathroom, the walkway she had to go through, and she felt wonderful. That made me feel good because it did something for her. It's not superficial. Jewelry is not superficial. As I said before, it can be transformative. It can be commemorative. It can make you happy; it can enhance you, make you feel good about yourself.   Sharon: Yes, it can definitely make you happy.   Tess: I remember once I was selling to a banker and his wife in Luxembourg. He's looking at me and he's looking at his wife wearing her earrings, looking back and forth, and I said to him, “I understand your dilemma. You know a lot about finance. You don't know anything about pearls. What you need to know at this point is does your wife feel beautiful wearing the pearls?”    Sharon: And that was a sale.   Tess: That was a sale because that was all it needed to be. He wasn't buying an estate, and he wasn't putting down his mortgage for the earrings. Obviously, they were good quality; that's not the issue, but I gave him permission to look at what the reality is. The reality is does jewelry make you feel good? It did, and it was reasonable. His wife liked it, and he was happy that he could make his wife happy.   Sharon: That's a great way to look at it. Does your wife feel beautiful or does the person feel good in it?   Tess: Right.   Sharon: At one of these trunk shows, did you ever have a prospect or somebody looking at your jewelry and as they put it on, you just said, “No, that doesn't work”?   Tess: Yes, because part of my job is to pair the right piece of jewelry with the customer. That's more important. Even if they walk away with nothing, it's more important to get something that's right for them than not. I do remember an instance when I was at a trunk show years ago in Texas. A woman walked in with her daughter, a long, beautiful, slim girl, and her mother said, “Do you have anything for this strange, long body?” And I said, “Half of the world wants to look like this. Yes.” I saw the girl looking at these thin belts, and I said, “Why don't you try this on?” It was a big, bold brass belt. I watched her as she put it on and looked at herself in the mirror, and you could see the changeover. She was so surprised. She was amazed, but it was the right thing for her. It was totally different from anything she had worn or chosen before. It was right for her and it made me feel good.   Sharon: It sounds like you have a natural eye for that. I have interior designer friends who can walk into a room and say, “If you remove that table over there,” whereas I would never think about it.   Tess: Right, I guess it helps to have that eye. I love what I do, so I want it to be shown off to its best. The person and the jewelry enhance each other. It's the right thing.   Sharon: Well, it sounds like the buyer has the right person, the right advice, the right eye with you looking at them.   Tess: We share an interest. Obviously, we both love jewelry. The customer comes in because she loves jewelry and I love it, so we've already got a good meeting ground.   Sharon: I'm curious; this is an off-the-wall question perhaps, but do you see any similarities between what you were doing with cancer research early on, or botany and biology, and what you do now? Does any of this reflect in terms of your personality?    Tess: I'm trying to think about your question. It always comes down to problem solving. There's always something; it's either a puzzle that needs to be fitted or an obstacle that needs to be overcome. Those are skills that are transferrable from one line of work to another, being able to find the answer. There's always a question. There's an obstacle, sometimes, for the aura of gold to be achieved. So, the ability to think around something and to think out of the box, that's the thread that runs through all of my careers.   Sharon: That was the key word I was thinking of, the thread. That was exactly the word that came to mind. Tess, thank you very much. This is very interesting, and you have an interesting journey. Thank you for sharing with us. We really appreciate it.   Tess: My pleasure.   Sharon: So glad to have you.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.    

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 65: Disappearing Cities, Drive-Thru Robots, & a 1,200-Year-Old Canoe

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 79:28


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Keybilly Amber Ale from Lakeland, Florida, and gives a review of her fantastic weekend at The Villages in Florida with a shoutout to the JW Marriott in Orlando for having a cool lazy river pool that she spent more time in than she'd planned to. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Brach's Turkey Dinner Candy Corn, which she describes the smell as “candy corn on steroids” and doesn't actually think it tastes anything like turkey dinner OR candy corn. She moves on to taste Pringles Ranch Crisps, which she absolutely loves. She finishes her tasting menu with the limited edition Holiday Chocolate-Covered Ritz Crackers, which isn't her thing but she also thinks would wow guests at a Midwest holiday party. KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen gives an update on the Court, showcasing her new Dolly Parton holiday spatula and Holly Dolly holiday cookie cutter set from Williams Sonoma, which she intends to use while baking Christmas cookies with her nieces. UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on LAX's “Jetpack Guy,” new QAnon's conspiracy theories, the golden parachute of WeWork's Adam Neumann, the Colorado elk's liberation from his tire necklace, and the latest in the Elizabeth Holmes trial. NEW ORLEANS IS SINKING: Kathleen reads an article outlining the Climate Central project, which creates maps that show the impact of flooding due to rising sea levels. The project identifies specific cities around the globe that could find themselves underwater as early as 2030, based on the most reliable climate-change data from IPCC. MCDONALD'S ROBOTIC DRIVE-THRU: Kathleen shares McDonald's new drive-thru concept utilizing robots. The fast-food chain announced that it has a strategic partnership with IBM to develop artificial intelligence technology that will help McDonald's automate its drive-thru lanes to increase speed and volume. The concept was recently testedin the Chicago market, with evaluation and a potential roll-out strategy still in the works. FACEBOOK'S METAVERSE TROUBLES: Kathleen laughs when sharing an article outlining the Facebook rebranding efforts that have already failed within a few weeks of the launch, as the new company name “Meta” has been proven to already exist before the Zuckerberg team filed their trademark request. Meta PC has been a company for over a year, but only recently filed for a trademark on the name. Filing takes time to process so neither company has been granted the trademark yet, but Meta PC was the first to file and has offered to cancel their trademark request if Facebook is willing to pay them $20 million.ANCIENT CANOE DISCOVERED IN WISCONSIN: Kathleen is excited to read a news release out of Wisconsin where a dugout canoe thought to be 1,200 years old has been retrieved from Lake Mendota.Historians believe that dugout canoes are most likely the earliest forms of constructed watercraft in the world.MEET POLIO PAUL: Kathleen shares an article about a Texas man named Paul Alexander, who has been confined to an iron lung for over 70 years since contracting polio at the age of 6. Alexander states that he has had a fulfilling life, becoming a lawyer specializing in fighting for patient rights and promoting vaccination efficiency. Kathleen shares her own childhood stories regarding how vaccinations were handled in their Catholic school.SITTING BULL'S GRANDSON CONFIRMED: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article confirming that a South Dakota man who has maintained for decades that he is the great-grandson of the legendary leader Sitting Bull has confirmed his lineage through DNA analysis. A lock of the famous Lakota chief‘s hair once stored at the Smithsonian Institution was used to confirm the claim, Reuters.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Overheard at National Geographic
Ancient Orchestra

Overheard at National Geographic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:40


Sound on! From conch shells to bone flutes, humans have been making musical instruments for tens of thousands of years. What did prehistoric music sound like? Follow us on a journey to find the oldest musical instruments and combine them into one big orchestra of human history. For more information on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard  Want More? A conch is more than just a musical instrument. A mollusk lives in that shell, and it's a staple food in the Bahamas—so much so that overfishing is threatening their existence, but a few simple solutions may solve the problem. The oldest musical instrument was once thought to be a cave bear bone flute made by Neanderthals, but recent evidence suggests that the holes were made by animals rather than tools. More information about each instrument The organization First Sounds found and brought to life the recordings of Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville. For more information about that project, please visit www.firstsounds.org. Bettina Joy de Guzman travels the world, composing and performing music on ancient instruments. You can read more about her work on her website: www.bettinajoydeguzman.com More information about the bells of Bronze Age China can be found at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art. A virtual version of their collection can be viewed here: https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/resound-ancient-bells-of-china/ (Credit: Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; gift of Arthur M. Sackler, S1987.4-9) The conch shell sounds you heard were research recordings of the approximately 3,000-year-old Titanostrombus galeatus conch shell horn—excavated in 2018 by John Rick and team from the UNESCO World Heritage archaeological site Chavín de Huántar, in Perú—from a 2019 acoustics and performance study by Miriam Kolar, Riemann Ramírez Rodríguez, Ricardo Guerrero de Luna Rueda, Obert Silva Espinoza, and Ronald San Miguel Fernández. Recordings were made at the Centro Internacional de Investigación, Conservación y Restauración de Chavín (CIICR) in the Museo Nacional Chavín as research conducted within the Programa de Investigación Arqueológica y Conservación Chavín de Huántar (PIACCdH). Site music archaeology and archaeoacoustics research information can be found on the Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Acoustics project website: https://ccrma.stanford.edu/groups/chavin/pututus.html. National Geographic Explorer Jahawi Bertolli is collecting the sounds of rock gongs from all over the African continent. More information about his rock project can be found here: www.jahawi.com/first-rock Flutist Anna Potengowski specializes in recreating the sounds of ancient flutes. You can hear more of her work here: open.spotify.com/artist/4a9uIQ2g8A5BIDN1VExUZq

Indianz.Com
Under Secretary Kevin Gover / Smithsonian Institution

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 1:18


The White House and members of the Joe Biden-Kamala Harris administration host the 2021 Tribal Nations Summit. The summit brings together officials and leaders from federally recognized tribes together to discuss how the federal government can invest in and continue to strengthen the nation-to-nation relationship and ensure that progress in Indian Country endures for years to come. This is the second and final day of the two-day event. AGENDA - NOVEMBER 16, 2021 Welcome Remarks Kevin Gover, Under Secretary of the Smithsonian Lynn Malerba, Mohegan Tribe White House Director of Intergovernmental Affairs Julie Rodriguez Policy Panel: Climate Change Impacts and Solutions Featuring Tribal leaders in conversation with: White House Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy Council on Environmental Quality Chair Brenda Mallory Secretary Denis McDonough - Department of Veterans Affairs Policy Panel: Tribal Treaty Rights and Sacred Lands Featuring Tribal leaders in conversation with: Assistant Secretary Bryan Newland – Bureau of Indian Affairs Secretary Janet Yellen – US Department of the Treasury White House Domestic Policy Director Susan Rice Administration Listening Session Featuring Tribal leaders in conversation with: Secretary Deb Haaland – US Department of Interior Assistant Secretary Bryan Newland – Bureau of Indian Affairs General Counsel Sam Bagenstos – Office of Management and Budget Special Assistant to the President Libby Washburn – White House Policy Panel: Economic and Workforce Development Featuring Tribal leaders in conversation with: Secretary Marty Walsh – US Department of Labor Administrator Isabella Guzman – Small Business Administration American Rescue Plan Coordinator Gene Sperling Policy Panel: Infrastructure, Housing, and Energy Featuring Tribal leaders in conversation with: Secretary Jennifer Granholm – US Department of Energy Secretary Pete Buttigieg – US Department of Transportation Reading by US Poet Laureate Joy Harjo Introduction by Kenneth Kahn, Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Vice President Kamala Harris

By Any Means Necessary
Kyle Rittenhouse and The American Ethos of White Supremacist Violence

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 113:34


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Monica Cruz, labor reporter with BreakThrough News to discuss the whittled down infrastructure bill and the issues facing working and poor people that are not addressed in the bill, the corporate giveaways that the ambiguity of much of this bill will provide, why this bill fundamentally cannot and will not lead to real solutions for por and working people, and the need to organize a people's movement that pushes for real solutions.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Tina Landis, organizer and author of the book, ‘Climate Solutions: Beyond Capitalism' to discuss the greenwashing COP26 conference, the nonbinding and empty promises made at the COP26 climate conference, why Global North nations continue to demand emissions reductions from the Global South and how histories of colonialism and imperialism factor into climate, and how capitalism is the enemy of humanity in its driving of the climate crisis.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Nnamdi Lumumba, Ujima People's Progress Party State Organizer to discuss a reparations commission on the ballot in Greenbelt, Maryland, the resurgence of interest in the question of reparations in the United States, the shortcomings that this and other municipal reparations initiatives have had, and what transformative reparations should look like.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by James Early, Former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies to discuss the trials of Kyle Rittenhouse and the killers of Ahmaud Arbery and their context in the American ethos of white supremacist violence, the anti-democratic nature of the criminal-legal system, the planned protests in Cuba that coincide with the reopening with the Cuban economy, and the active participation of the Cuban people in defense of the revolutionary process.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 137: Part 1 - Tess Sholom: From the Runways of Paris to the Goldsmith's Studio with Goldsmith Tess Sholom

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:08


What you'll learn in this episode: What it was like to design jewelry for high-fashion runways in the 70s and 80s How the right piece of jewelry can transform the wearer  Why creative problem solving is the best skill you can have as a goldsmith How Tess' work wound up in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution and other museums How the jewelry field has changed with the popularization of social media Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Photos: Blue Sky Chalcedony Byzantium Earrings Byzantium Necklace Circes Circle Necklace Illusion Necklace  Ionian Necklace  Its A Wrap Necklace Naiad Necklace About Tess Sholom Warm and malleable but also strong and enduring, gold shines with the spirit of life itself. For designer and jeweler Tess Sholom, gold is both medium and muse. Tess Sholom began her jewelry career in fashion jewelry in 1976, designing pieces that appeared on the runways of Karl Lagerfeld, Oscar de la Renta and James Galanos, and the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Her fashion work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, Museum of the City of New York, the Racine Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Fashion Institute of Technology, and other museums. After two successful decades in fashion jewelry, she trained as a goldsmith and fell under the spell of high-karat gold. She decided to stop designing high-volume fashion jewelry and begin again as a hands-on studio artist, creating one-of-a-kind 22k gold jewelry in the workshop. Tess Sholom always had an eye for accessorizing, but she didn't realize it would lead her to a long and fruitful career as a jewelry designer. While working as a cancer researcher, a long-shot pitch to Vogue opened the door to a 30-year career as a jewelry designer for fashion runways. Her latest career move was opening Tess Sholom Designs, where she creates one-of-a-kind, high-karat gold pieces. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she designed jewelry for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and Karl Lagerfeld; why problem solving is the thread that runs through all her careers; and how she plays on gold's timeless, mystical quality in her work. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Tess Sholom. Many of you may have been aware of her fabulous statement pieces she designed for the runway, or you may have drooled over the pieces without knowing who the designer was. Today, she has taken a different path and is now both a designer and a jeweler in high-karat gold. She operates Tess Sholom Designs. We'll hear all about that today, her whole jewelry journey and about what she's doing. Tess, welcome to the program.   Tess: Thank you. It's good to be here.   Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It must be an interesting one, because you've covered a lot of different areas.   Tess: It has covered a lot of different areas, and it's been on for a long time. When I graduated college, I actually went into cancer research. I was working in a laboratory and found that I didn't like the isolation, so I went to Physicians and Surgeons Medical Center for a year to become a physical therapist. That I liked; solving problems, helping people.    Then, the year I married my husband in 1976, we were invited to a wedding in the woods. We were told to wear jeans because we were going to be in the woods and rolling around in the woods, and I thought, “This is awful. A wedding? This is when I try to get all dressed up in my best, and I'm wearing jeans?” But I complied. I bought a pretty gauze top; they were in style in the 70s. I made a necklace of beads and seeds and ribbons, and I made a belt to go with it. At the wedding, people kept saying, “That's beautiful. Where did you get it?” Every time I said I made it, they would say, “Well, you should be doing this professionally.” It's crazy. It put a bug in my ear, and I've always been like that. When a path presents itself, I say, “O.K., let's try this. Let's try it. Let's see what'll happen.”   Sharon: I love that.   Tess: And so, I did. I started walking around looking in stores to see how necklaces were finished. What were the clasps like? Within a month, I took a couple of things to Vogue Magazine. They gave me an instant credit; they gave me an editorial credit right away. Saks Fifth Avenue bought that necklace, and it was featured as an editorial credit in the magazine. That's how I started. Within a very short time, Vogue Magazine called me and said, “Oscar de la Renta is looking for a jeweler to make jewelry for his runway.” After that, it just kept growing and growing. One designer, Bill Blass, saw my work in Women's Wear Daily and he got in touch with me; Giorgio di Sant'Angelo and on and on. Karl Lagerfeld sent his secretary to meet me in New York, and then I went to Paris and collaborated with him on one of his shows. I designed jewelry for that show.   Sharon: Did you turn around and go, “Oh my god! Look what I'm doing now”?   Tess: It was like having the tiger by the tail, seriously. I hadn't planned it. Adornment is old. It's probably the first attempt at art that man ever made, to separate his body with berry dyes, with beads, with leaves. It's a very old idea, adornment, and I've always felt the picture was not quite finished unless you were accessorizing. It ultimately was natural for me to think about making jewelry to complement a look, an action look, a closing look.   Sharon: I can imagine the peasant blouse you had in that era, but you actually said, “Oh, I need something,” and you made it yourself. I would have just said, “Oh, it needs something,” and gone through my closet or gone without anything.   Tess: That's interesting. I guess what makes me a maker—from the time I was little, my mother brought me up with the housewifely arts. One of them was embroidery. I learned to use my hands early, and I was always changing things around.  If I had a garment and I didn't like the way it looked, I just changed it. I would put a stitch here, a stitch there. I broke apart some costume jewelry beads of pearls at Claire's and sewed them on a sweater because I wanted that look. I've always done that. I've always done things with my hands making things.   Sharon: Would you say you were artistic from a young age? Besides knowing how to do this, were you creative? It sounds like you were.   Tess: I was creative, but my family was focused on medicine, lawyers, doctors, that kind of thing. They did not think I was artistic. They thought I was a little fussy because I wanted things to look the way I wanted them to look. They didn't really think of me as an artist.    Sharon: You studied what, biology in college?   Tess: I went to Barnard and I had a bachelor's degree. My major was in science. It was botany, but I had just as many credits in fine arts, actually. That should have given me a hint, but I was focused on science. That's where I wanted to be, but it turned out no, I did not like the isolation of a lab.   Sharon: I can understand that. Were you going full time? It seems like there was quite a swath of your career where you were doing jewelry for the runway. Did you do that full time for different designers for a while?   Tess: While I was doing that, I was also supplying boutiques and department stores. I started this in 1976 and very soon, I realized once again that I was alone. I looked in Vogue Magazine to see who else was doing this kind of jewelry, because it was different. High-fashion costume jewelry was very different from the prestigious houses, Monet, Coraux, Trifari. They made beautiful costume jewelry that to this day lasts, but our expression was quite different.    I found a number of other designers in the city who were doing the same thing more or less that I was. We got together and formed an association called the Fashion Accessories Designers Association, called FADA. My husband used to tease me and say, “You're the mada of FADA,” but we were all entrepreneurs from some other place. One was a court stenographer; one was a potter; one was a knitter, but we all made accessories. So, we formed this organization and sold to the same places, so that we had an ability to protect ourselves a little. Sometimes the big stores would try to take advantage, and because we were all selling to the same people, we were able to defend ourselves.   Sharon: That's very smart. How did you ferret the people out? How did you find these other people?   Tess: I looked in the back of Vogue Magazine. Wherever I saw a credit that looked more or less like the expression that I was doing, I would look them up and get in touch with them.    Sharon: I want to talk to you more about this, but I want to hear how you got into—now you make things in high-karat gold and precious, not diamonds and stuff, but nice gems, colorful gems. How did you get into making and goldsmithing?   Tess: I had a desire. I always had this desire to have my collection in a museum and to be recognized by a museum. It was a goal of mine somehow, but I never knew what to do about it. However, quite accidentally, the business began to change. The designers were not using accessories so much, so I began to shift my focus towards making sterling silver tea sets and boxes, because I was trying to make sure that if in fact the jewelry did begin to lessen, I would have some other outlet. At that time, someone came to my house for tea and saw a silver tea set. She was a curator from the Museum of the City of New York, and it was fascinating to see her expression. If you remember the scene in Julius Caesar where he's offered the crown, he wants it; he refuses it, but he's reaching for it. I saw that same kind of reaction from this lady who was looking at my tea set. Finally, she asked me for it for the museum. It was their first sterling silver acquisition of the 20th century.   Sharon: Did you make it or did you design it?   Tess: I designed it and it was made in my factory by my head metalworker. By this point, I had 20 employees. I literally had a tiger by the tail, because as an entrepreneur, I started out on my tabletop and eventually had to keep moving because I kept increasing. So, that was the first acquisition. I don't quite remember how the Metropolitan Museum of Art got to me, but they came to me. The Brooklyn Museum of Art came to me, the Museum at FIT. There were a couple of museums in the Midwest that some clients donated to.    That got me thinking about my jewelry as art. I took a couple of courses at Jewelry Arts Institute, and I was fascinated by working with gold. There's nothing like 22-karat gold. It is beautiful. It's very malleable; you can do so much with it. There's something a little mysterious, a little mystical about 22-karat gold, because gold is eternal; nothing can happen to it. It doesn't rust; it doesn't turn to ash. The only thing that happens is that you can melt it down and reuse it. So, any piece you have, it could have been a nose ring for a peasant girl; it could have been part of a tiara of queen or a pope. It could be anything, and because it doesn't really disappear, it has this timelessness, this eternal quality about it. So, that's how I got into fine jewelry. The gold is the main piece. The main thing about jewelry for me is the gold and the stones. I love color, so of course I'm drawn to stones, but the gold is a means of showing the stones off.    Sharon: Interesting. We will have to link to your website when we post this, and I'm encouraging everybody to look at your website and see the color in the jewelry. It's just amazing. It's really striking. It's beautiful. Were these curators at the museums interested in your things because they thought, “Oh, that's the most fantastic design?” I think of a museum as saying, “If Paul Revere made that, I'd like to put in a museum.”   Tess: It's also a history because they wanted a provenance. They wanted to know for whom it was made, who wore it, what season. It was also a means of collecting and annotating history.   Sharon: The same thing with the tea pots?    Tess: No, the tea pot, she just loved the design. That was a different story. That wasn't jewelry. That was something else and she just loved it. I wasn't going to argue.    Sharon: I can think of, “Oh, I love it. I want it for my living room,” as opposed to “Oh, I love it. I want to put it in a museum.” I'm not sure I understand the connection between putting these in museums. It's fabulous to do.   Tess: Why do we collect things in museums then? Museums have changed a lot, but museums essentially are treasure houses. They house treasures; they house things that are deemed to be beautiful. Also, they may spark your imagination or make you think about something differently. So no, I'm not surprised. I was thrilled and surprised that the museums wanted my work, but I'm not surprised that when they think something is beautiful, they want it for the museum.    Sharon: I have to say, I think my whole concept of what a museum is has been changing. I used to think that museums were all history. As I looked at museums in the west, anything over 50 years old is old. I used to think that when I went to a museum, “That's not ancient,” or “It's not 500 years old. It's just from a decade or two ago.” Because I see so many things that are current in museums, or current within the last 25 years, I'm realizing that my concept of what a museum is is outdated.    Tess: Museums are having a difficult time also. In order to survive, they are switching gears. They're trying many different things so they don't only look to the past. They're trying to stay current and be relevant to what's going on in the world, which is part of what fashion does. Fashion does indicate, mirror and explain an era, always.   Sharon: You fell in love with metalsmithing and silver and gold. Your accessory business where you were designing for the runway, was that still going on?   Tess: No, that began to change, and I decided to stop doing that kind of work. As I said, I foresaw that it was going to begin to change, so I stopped that. I devoted myself more to learning the ancient goldsmithing techniques so I could make everything myself, and then I started selling. First, I stared with semiprecious and silver, and then I moved on to gold. Now I work exclusively in gold and precious and semiprecious stones.   Sharon: And you're making everything yourself too.   Tess: I'm making everything myself.   Sharon: Wow!    Tess: I'm still learning things, and I still also use the jewelry arts as a studio. It's fascinating. We all feel so privileged to be able to work in gold. It's such a wonderful medium. We all have that same attitude of awe about this wonderful metal.   Sharon: It's really true. I was at a conference several years ago, and someone pointed out that once you take the gold out of the ground, that's it. It never goes back in, and I thought, “Yeah, that's really true.” What are the differences you find, besides the fact that everything is a one-off, in terms of what you're doing? How are you finding the audiences you're doing this for compared to what you were doing before?   Tess: I started the costume jewelry business in 1976 and for a while, I essentially retired. Now, I find that social media is a very, very different world. I need a lot of help with that. I need help with social media. The younger people understand social media and are good at it, so I need help in that area to perfect everything. I have found that it has been very successful, especially Instagram. Instagram and my website, all of that, has been helpful. Before, I went to an editor, she liked my work and then the rest just fell in step, but now it's different. For example, in October I'm going to California to do a luxury event. My work is gold; it's heavy; it's expensive. That is not something that is sold easily all the time. So, I go to these targeted events where people who are willing to spend the money attend.    Sharon: It is such a different world with social media. I entered the digital world in the mid-90s and the changes since then—it's a different world. It's amazing, and it keeps changing every two days.    Tess: I was in a restaurant the other day and this little, two-year-old girl was using her phone. I thought about how it took me many, many years to start using my phone.   Sharon: Yes, when I see kids on their phones, I'm like, “Oh my god!” When you see kids who speak a language you're trying to learn, it's amazing. Do you find that you get a response from Instagram and other social media?

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme
Smithsonian Institution FUTURES Show: An Invitation for Everyone to Imagine the Future

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 29:28


Neil Koenig, ideaXme interviewer, senior television producer and journalist, interviews Rachel Goslins, Director of the Arts and Industries Building, at the Smithsonian Institution. Neil Koenig comments: What does the future mean to you? A forthcoming exhibition in America's capital city will attempt to help visitors to answer this question. The Arts and Industries Building (AIB) in Washington DC is one of the oldest parts of America's vast Smithsonian Institution. It originally opened in 1881 as the first national museum in the US. Over the years, millions of visitors have experienced world-changing inventions like the electric light bulb, the steam locomotive and Alexander Graham Bell's telephone at AIB. After almost a century of showing exhibits such as these, the building's 100,000 square foot halls closed completely in 2004. AIB will be relaunched soon with a new exhibition, called FUTURES. This multidisciplinary project will feature artefacts drawn from the Smithsonian's vast collection and research centres, as well as large-scale commissioned artworks and dozens of interactive exhibits, with the aim of “encouraging visitors to embrace their own role in shaping what is to come”. In this ideaXme interview, AIB Director Rachel Goslins talks to journalist and producer Neil Koenig about re-launching a museum in the middle of a pandemic; the wider challenges facing the museum sector; and her goals for the FUTURES show, and the original research under-pinning it, which reveals that what most of us want from the future is “not flying cars and robots” but values like “peacefulness and sustainability”. RACHEL GOSLINS, FIRST DIRECTOR OF THE ARTS AND INDUSTRIES BUILDING Rachel Goslins has more than 20 years of experience across the worlds of art, law and public policy. Before her new role as AIB's Director, Rachel served as Executive Director of the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, advising the Obama White House on cultural policy from 2009 to 2015. Under her tenure, the Committee spearheaded campaigns of cultural diplomacy and national investment in the arts, including: the Turnaround Arts project, the first federally-led, public-private partnership to introduce arts education programs to low-performing elementary schools, and Film Forward, which recovered and restored Haitian art and artefacts endangered by the 2010 earthquake and its aftermath. Earlier, Rachel founded a documentary production company, directing feature documentaries for the Public Broadcasting Service, Discovery Channel, National Geographic Channel and History. She is a 2012 Henry Crown Fellow of the Aspen Institute. VIDEO AND IMAGE CREDITS Contemporary images of Arts + Industries Building and portrait of Rachel Goslins by Farrah Sheiky All video b-roll and images courtesy Smithsonian except: Images of FUTURES exhibition, renderings courtesy Rockwell group. me + you in the Smithsonian's Arts + Industries Building, rendering, courtesy Reddymade. Pegasus' vehicle, 2020, Virgin Hyperloop, courtesy Virgin Hyperloop. Goddard 1935 A-Series Rocket, 1935, Robert H. Goddard, courtesy National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution. Water Harvester, Waha, Inc. courtesy Waha, Inc. LINKS Rachel Goslins https://www.si.edu/about/bios/rachel-... FUTURES exhibition at the Arts and Industries Building https://www.si.edu/exhibitions/future... ideaXme https://radioideaxme.com ideaXme is a global network - podcast on 12 platforms, 40 countries, mentor programme and creator series. Mission: To share knowledge of the future. Our passion: Rich Connectedness™!

Chasing Immortality
The Terracotta Legacy of the Dragon Emperor

Chasing Immortality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 52:28


All That's Interesting. “Meet The Most Well-Preserved Mummy In Human History.” All That's Interesting, All That's Interesting, 28 Feb. 2020, allthatsinteresting.com/xin-zhui-lady-dai.China Travel Blog, director. Virtual Tour to Terracotta Warriors Museum-兵马俑-HD | China Travel Vlog. China Travel Blog, YouTube, 12 Oct. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRMRJxvQfyE.Gannon, Megan. “China's First Emperor Ordered Search For An Immortality Elixir .” Live Science , 27 Dec. 2017, www.livescience.com/61286-first-chinese-emperor-sought-immortality.html#:~:text=China's%20First%20Emperor%20Ordered%20Official%20Search%20for%20Immortality%20Elixir,-By%20Megan%20Gannon&text=The%20first%20emperor%20of%20China%2C%20Qin%20Shi%20Huang%2C%20wanted%20to,China's%20Xinhua%20news%20agency%20reported.Harris, Shannon, and Radu Alexander. Performance by Simon Whistler, Qin Shi Huang: The First Emperor of China, Biographics , 4 Feb. 2021, www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2FUmD1pyVM.History.com Editors. “Great Wall of China.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 24 Aug. 2010, www.history.com/topics/ancient-china/great-wall-of-china.Katz, Brigit. “2,000-Year-Old Texts Reveal the First Emperor of China's Quest for Eternal Life.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 29 Dec. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/2000-year-old-texts-reveal-first-emperor-chinas-quest-eternal-life-180967671/.Minghua, Huang. “The 'Hundred Entertainments'; China's 2,000-Year-Old Tradition of Acrobatics.” UNESDOC, United Nations, 1988, unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000077031.Oliver, Mark. “How the Search for Immortality Killed the First Emperor of China.” Ancient Origins, Ancient Origins, 15 June 2018, www.ancient-origins.net/history-famous-people/search-immortality-killed-emperor-china-0010207.Pham, Larissa. “Https://Www.theparisreview.org/Blog/2019/12/18/a-Figure-Models-Brief-Guide-to-Poses-through-Art-History/.” The Paris Review , 18 Dec. 2019, www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/12/18/a-figure-models-brief-guide-to-poses-through-art-history/.Tombs and Ancestors, The British Museum, 2000, www.ancientchina.co.uk/tombs/home_set.html.Translations, Day. “How Many Languages Are Spoken in China?” Day Translations Blog, Day Translations, 2 Sept. 2020, www.daytranslations.com/blog/languages-spoken-china/.YongYu, Lee. China's First Emperor - Qin Shi Huang The Dragon Emperor. Performance by Steven Kamer, China's Dragon Emperor: Architect of the Afterlife , Smithsonian Channel, 18 Apr. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg1SGA3zYx8. 

Agents Of F.L.A.I.L - Improvised Marvel Podcast
Episode 31 - Smithsonian Institution

Agents Of F.L.A.I.L - Improvised Marvel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 13:39


Uncovered tapes of a town hall meeting at the Smithsonian Institute after Sam Wilson hands over Captain America's shield. Agents of F.L.A.I.L is an improvised podcast based in the Marvel Universe. We host a town hall for citizens in the MCU to voice their complaints about property damage. Dani Ahrens as the Recruiter

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 602 (11-8-21): Photosynthesis Fun, Fundamentals, and Confluence with Climate Change

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:26).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-5-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 8, 2021. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Racing the Sun,” by The Faux Paws, on that group's 2021 self-titled album, from Great Bear Records.  It opens a revised episode from November 2013, where we explore a sun-driven process that's fundamental to life on earth: photosynthesis, the process where green plants and algae make food, using the energy in sunlight to store chemical energy in the form of glucose.  Photosynthesis is also… VOICES IN SKIT - ~1 min./57 sec. REPORTER: We break into this show to bring you exclusive audio from the Virginia Tech campus, where a shadowy team of scientists are tinkering with the process underlying all life on earth.  They haven't yet revealed their possibly nefarious plans, so let's listen in... SCIENTIST 1: With this terrarium, we have a model system to test our carbon dioxide-manipulation scheme, and soon we'll be ready to control earth's fundamental food-producing process... SCIENTISTS 1 and 2: Photosynthesis! SCIENTIST 2: Are all the components of the system ready?  Green plants with chlorophyll? SCIENTIST 1: Check! SCIENTIST 2: Soil with proper nutrients? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2. Light? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Water? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Air with CO2? SCIENTIST 1.  CO2? SCIENTIST 2.  That's carbon dioxide! SCIENTIST 1.  Oh...right...I mean, check! SCIENTIST 2.  Let the photosynthesis start!  Engage monitoring device! SCIENTIST 1.  CO2 taken in from the air...water and nutrients being absorbed through roots...light falling on leaves.  All systems go!  Light energy is driving CO2 and water to combine and form glucose, the chemical-energy form, while releasing oxygen. SCIENTIST 2.  Apply the CO2 inhibitor! SCIENTIST 1.  Lid applied!  CO2 source blocked...system CO2 levels dropping rapidly...plants responding as expected, using up available CO2. SCIENTIST 2.  Reverse manipulation!  Apply the CO2 increaser! SCIENTIST 1. Lid removed!  CO2 added...plants responding.  Wait, they're responding too fast!  They're growing beyond the walls!  One has me...aieeeeeeee! SCIENTIST 2.  Now it's got me, too!  Noooooooo..... REPORTER: Well, this might be a good time for us to return to our regular show.  Back to you.... END VOICES IN SKIT Unlike this skit, with its far-fetched human-eating plants, there's nothing make-believe about Earth life's reliance on photosynthesis using sunlight, chlorophyll, nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide to make food.  Moreover, photosynthesis is a fundamental aspect of understanding and responding to climate change.  Photosynthesis millions of years ago created the hydrocarbon compounds that constitute today's fossil fuels, and photosynthesis now—absorbing and storing some of the carbon dioxide released in fossil fuel burning—has an important role in reducing Earth's carbon dioxide levels, warming, and other climate-change impacts.  For example, the capacity for photosynthesizing trees to take up atmospheric carbon dioxide was one aspect of the “Declaration on Forests and Land Use” at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, or COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland, from October 31 to November 12, 2021. Thanks to Eli Heilker and John Kidd for participating in this episode.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “Racing the Sun.”  We close with another musical selection appropriate for the climate challenges facing the COP26 meeting and all of us.  Here's about 25 seconds of “On a Ship,” by Blacksburg, Va., musician Kat Mills. MUSIC - ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship,” then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 186, 11-4-13. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 517, 3-23-20. Virginia Water Radio thanks John Kidd, formerly of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and Eli Heilker, a graduate of Virginia Tech in English who served an internship in Fall 2013 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, for their participation in this episode.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation demonstration of plant uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) during photosynthesis.  A terrarium (left) is attached via gas-transporting tubing to a CO2 monitor at right.  Photo taken in Blacksburg, Va., October 2013.  Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.Red Maple leaves in Blacksburg, Va., on October 30, 2013, in which green chlorophyll pigment was breaking down as photosynthesis and chlorophyll production in the leaves were stopping with the approach of winter.  The breakdown of chlorophyll in the fall allows pigments of other colors in the leaves to be revealed.  More information on fall leaf-color change is available in “The Miracle of Fall,” University of Illinois Extension, online at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/fallcolor/default.cfm. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Rick Groleau, “Illuminating Photosynthesis,” Public Broadcasting System (PBS) and WGBH-Boston, “NOVA” program, November 1, 2001, online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/photosynthesis.html. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, “Global Climate Change” Website, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/.  Specific pages used were the following:“A breathing planet, off balance,” by Kate Ramsayer and Carol Rasmussen, November 11, 2015, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2364/a-breathing-planet-off-balance/; and“Frequently Asked Questions,” online at https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/. John Seiler, John Groninger, and John Peterson, Forest Biology and Dendrology, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, Blacksburg, Va., 2009.Smithsonian Institution, “Ocean—Find Your Blue/What Are Fossil Fuels?”; online at https://ocean.si.edu/conservation/gulf-oil-spill/what-are-fossil-fuels. 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), October 31—November 12, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/.  [October 31-November 12, 2021]; for information on photosynthesizing forests serving as “sinks” for carbon dioxide and other “greenhouse gases,” see particularly “Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forests and Land Use,” November 2, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants,” “Science,” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes related to climate change. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Exploring Climate Change Basics, with Examples from Assateague Island National Seashore and Shenandoah National Park.Episode 312, 4-18-16 – Student's Research Digs into Streamside Soils, Rainfall Rates, and Greenhouse Gases. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.4 – There are basic sources of energy and that energy can be transformed.6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6     – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations.ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.  2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals. Virginia Studies CourseVS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at th

science bay humans university agency music photo national natural parties relationships earth political state audio living college english climate change change accent dark tech water web air index fall rain united states pond research ocean technology government education public racing conservation plants ship scotland sun scientists chesapeake snow environment glasgow organisms images green engage cooperation va student reporter domestic silver msonormal stream lid normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental soil dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology chemical specific civics grade diagram colorful resource forest resources signature bio reverse forests co2 scales govt watershed transcript earth sciences wg illinois extension freshwater virginia tech ls atlantic ocean declaration greenhouse gases natural resources fundamentals smithsonian institution grades k populations frequently asked questions name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes photosynthesis blacksburg noooooooo msohyperlink sections life sciences stormwater environmental conservation john peterson policymakers bmp new standard acknowledgment virginia department land use un climate change conference cripple creek cumberland gap sols tmdl shenandoah national park united states history vus dendrology biotic wgbh boston living systems virginia standards water center assateague island national seashore space systems audio notes
InSecurity
Greg Crabb: What CISOs can learn from the US Postal Service and… the Russian Security Service?

InSecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 60:10


  Messenger of Sympathy and Love Servant of Parted Friends Consoler of the Lonely Bond of the Scattered Family Enlarger of the Common Life Carrier of News and Knowledge Instrument of Trade and Industry Promoter of Mutual Acquaintance Of Peace and of Goodwill Among Men and Nations  -- Inscription found on the the Smithsonian Institution's National Postal Museum   Победить и вернуться  -- Motto of the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation   Imagine being in charge of securing an enterprise comprised of over 450,000 connected devices spread over 31,000 locations worldwide. The United States Postal Service is a pretty serious organization when it comes to the amount of data that flows through its network. It would take a pretty cool individual to stand up to the daily pressure of an organization that big and that diverse. Imagine cold calling the Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation and asking to speak with their head of Information Security in order to share the information you have uncovered regarding tens of thousands of incidents of mail and cyberfraud committed by Russian criminals. They took the call… It would take a pretty cool individual would have to be pretty cool to accept the FSB's invitation to sit face to face in Odessa at FSB headquarters. Now imagine that individual is the same person.   The good news? You don't have to imagine.   On today's No Name Security Podcast, Matt Stephenson welcomes Greg Crabb, founder of TenEight Cyber where he consults with CISOs and organizations needing CISO levels of expertise. With 25 years in law enforcement specializing in mail and cyber fraud as well as 6 years as CISO of the United States Postal Service, Greg has learned some things about security. Want to hear about the time he worked with the Russian FSB on a particularly large fraud case? Stick around…   About Greg Crabb     Greg Crabb is the founder of 10-8, LLC. With more than 25 years of law enforcement and security experience, he specializes in providing consultation to cybersecurity leaders and organizations to help protect their digital assets against evolving cyberthreats. Greg focuses specifically on delivering advisory services to C-suite executives, their boards, and other leaders responsible for securing their organization's operations, products, and services.   For six years as the U.S. Postal Service's chief information security officer, Greg secured the agency's technology and information assets against nation-state threat actors. These efforts helped protect military mail globally and the unprecedented 2020 U.S. elections.   About Matt Stephenson     Matt Stephenson (@packmatt73) leads the Social Media team at Forescout, which puts me in front of people all over the world. Prior to joining Forescout, I hosted podcasts, videos and live events all over the world which put me with experts on every corner of the cybersecurity landscape. The new No Name Security Podcast will continue and expand upon that tradition as we seak out the leading minds in the security industry as well as those may break things every now again. And… just for fun, there will be some wildcard guests as well.   In 10 years in the ecosystem of Data Protection and Cybersecurity I have toured the world extolling the virtues of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning and how, when applied to information security, these technologies can wrong-foot the bad guys. Prior to the COVID shutdown, I was on the road over 100 days a year doing live malware demonstrations for audiences from San Diego to DC to London to Abu Dhabi to Singapore to Sydney. One of the funniest things I've ever been a part of was blowing up a live instance of NotPetya 6 hours after the news broke... in Washington DC... directly across the street from FBI HQ... as soon as we activated it a parade of police cars with sirens blaring roared past the building we were in. I'm pretty sure they weren't there for us, but you never know...   Whether at in person events, live virtual events or podcasting, I get to interview interesting people doing interesting things all over the world of cybersecurity and the extended world of hacking. Sometimes, that means hacking elections or the coffee supply chain... other times that means social manipulation or the sovereign wealth fund of a national economy.   Wherever I go, my job is all about talking with the people who build, manage or wreck the systems that we have put in place to make the world go round...   If you tuned in to any of my previous podcasts, there's great news! The No Name Security Podcast is here! I will be bringing the same kind of energy and array of guests you know and love. Best part? We're still at the same spot. You can find it at Spotify, Apple, Amazon Music & Audible as well as, GooglePlay, Gaana, Himalaya, I Heart Radio and wherever you get your podcasts!   Make sure you Subscribe, Rate and Review!

Coin World Podcast
EP135: Ellen Feingold, National Numismatic Collection

Coin World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 66:01


Jeff and Larry get the latest on the big news on what's happening at the Smithsonian Institution's National Numismatic Collection from curator Ellen Feingold.Contact info:Jeff Starck: jstarck@amosmedia.comLarry Jewett: ljewett@amosmedia.comTo Sponsor the Coin World Podcast:Brian Hertel: bhertel@amosmedia.comor contact your Coin World sales representative.This episode of the Coin World Podcast was sponsored by Coin World+:Manage your inventory, digitally authenticate coins, create your Wantlist, buy & sell coins and much more. Learn more at CoinWorldPlus.com, or download the app now at Google Play or the App Store.

Unpleasant Dreams
The Strange Death of Edgar Allan Poe - Unpleasant Dreams 9

Unpleasant Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:13


For our Halloween episode, we explore the strange death of the master of the macabre himself, Edgar Allan Poe. --- Cassandra Harold is your host. EM Hilker is our principal writer and researcher with additional writing by Cassandra Harold. Jim Harold is our Executive Producer. Unpleasant Dreams is a production of Jim Harold Media. You can find EM Hilker's original article HERE PODCAST TRANSCRIPT There is much that can be said about Edgar Allan Poe, but in terms of his literary habits, little that needs to be. Much more famous in death than he was in life, he was nevertheless a literary critic of some renown in his own time. His true love, however, was lurid, ghastly fiction. Poe unknowingly fathered the genre of detective fiction, through his tales of C. Auguste Dupin. The most well-known Dupin story was The Murders in the Rue Morgue, which served to set the stage for Sherlock Holmes and his ilk. He is best known now for his gothic fiction, morbid tales filled with crumbling stone castles and candle-lit catacombs, of demonic foes and bitter sweet revenge. He brought us The Raven, Hop-Frog, The Fall of the House of Usher. The creative mind of Poe was deep and dark and mysterious as a night ocean.  … but little is so mysterious as Poe's own death.... FIND THE REMAINDER OF THE TRANSCRIPT HERE SOURCES – FURTHER READING Anon. “Poe's Death Theories.” Poe's Death | Edgar Allan Poe Museum | Richmond, VA, www.poemuseum.org/poes-death. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Birch, Doug. “The Passing of Poe: What Really Happened to the Master of the Macabre in the Days Leading up to His Death Here 145 Years Ago?” Baltimoresun.com, 24 Oct. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1994-10-02-1994275208-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Edgar Allan Poe: A Life from Beginning to End. Hourly History, 2018. Kindle ed. Eschner, Kat. “Who Was the Poe Toaster? We Still Have No Idea.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 19 Jan. 2017, www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/who-was-poe-toaster-we-still-have-no-idea-180961820/. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021  Geiling, Natasha. “The (Still) Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 7 Oct. 2014, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/still-mysterious-death-edgar-allan-poe-180952936. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Kay, Liz F. “Poe Toaster Tribute Is ‘Nevermore'.” Baltimoresun.com, 9 Dec. 2018, www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/bs-xpm-2010-01-19-bal-poe0119-story.html. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Lovejoy, Bess. Rest in Pieces. Simon and Schuster, 2013. Miller, John C. ‘The Exhumations and Reburials of Edgar and Virginia Poe and Mrs. Clemm,” Poe Studies, Dec. 1974, Vol. Vii, No. 27: 46-4, www.eapoe.org/pstudies/ps1970/p1974204.htm. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021 Meyers, Jeffrey. Edgar Allen Poe: His Life and Legacy. Cooper Square Press, 2000. Pruitt, Sarah. “The Riddle of Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 26 Oct. 2015, www.history.com/news/how-did-edgar-allan-poe-die. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Semtner, Christopher P. “13 Haunting Facts About Edgar Allan Poe's Death.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 13 Jan. 2021, www.biography.com/news/edgar-allan-poe-death-facts. Retrieved 5 Sept. 2021. Walsh, John Evangelist. Midnight Dreary: The Mysterious Death of Edgar Allan Poe. St. Martin's Griffin, 2000. 

Short Wave
Code Switch: Archeological skeletons in the closet

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:46


Today, we present a special episode from our colleagues at Code Switch, NPR's podcast about race and identity. In a small suburb of Washington, D.C., a non-descript beige building houses thousands of Native human remains. The remains are currently in the possession of the Smithsonian Institution, but for the past decade, the Seminole Tribe of Florida has been fighting to get some of them back to Florida to be buried. The controversy over who should decide the fate of these remains has raised questions about identity, history, and the nature of archaeology. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
The Official Do Good Better Podcast Season Four Ep11: Media Cause Nonprofit Marketing Expert Dan Reed

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:35


"They're people, not email addresses." Dan Reed, CFRE, is the Senior Account Director, Digital Fundraising for the nonprofit marketing agency, Media Cause. He joins Patrick today to share the most up-to-date advice on nonprofit marketing. Dan started his digital fundraising career at Us TOO International Prostate Cancer Education and Support Network, developing peer-to-peer activities for two annual Greater Chicago Prostate Cancer Run Walk & Rolls. From there, Dan spent seven years at the Smithsonian Institution, managing the digital components of the Friends of the Smithsonian direct response program, mid-level donor program and working across the different Smithsonian units, supporting their digital fundraising efforts. While at the Smithsonian, Dan earned his Masters Degree in Strategic Fundraising and Philanthropy. Next, Dan moved to World Food Program USA, building out their digital fundraising program from the ground up and developing an award winning monthly donor program over the course of three years.In 2021, Dan earned his Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation from CFRE International and has 15 years of digital fundraising experience.Since joining Media Cause in 2018, the favorite part of his job has been the opportunity to work with a wide variety of nonprofits that are striving to make the world a better place. He's been inspired on a daily basis helping passionate clients achieve their fundraising goals.Connect with Dan: Dan@mediacause.com   More About Media Cause: https://mediacause.com/Support This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterAbout The Official Do Good Better Podcast:Each episode features (fundraising expert, speaker, event creator and author) Patrick Kirby interviewing leaders and champions of small & medium nonprofits to share their successes, their impact, and what makes them a unicorn in a field of horses. Patrick answers fundraising questions and (most importantly) showcases how you can support these small nonprofits doing great big things!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate #dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable through Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1072070359

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Tall, bushy, spiny and fragrant, the pinyon pine is a beloved feature of the Mountain West — and not just for its beauty. The tiny piñon nuts in the tree's cones are so good, people in the region have eaten them every fall for countless generations. But as climate change continues to affect the United States, something terrible is happening. The piñon harvest is getting smaller and smaller.Today we go to New Mexico, where the pinyon is the state's official tree. We talk to Axios race and justice reporter Russell Contreras, who's based out of Albuquerque and has an up-close view of the piñon's slow disappearance. And a native New Mexican — Tey Marianna Nunn, director of the Smithsonian Institution's American Women's History Initiative — tells us about the nut and tree's cultural importance.More reading:Op-Ed: Pinyon and juniper woodlands define the West. Why is the BLM turning them to mulch?Locally foraged piñon nuts are cherished in New Mexico. They're also disappearingPine nut recipes: From small seeds, inspiration

Code Switch
Skeletons In The Closet

Code Switch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:22


In a small suburb of Washington, D.C., a non-descript beige building houses thousands of Native human remains. The remains are currently in the possession of the Smithsonian Institution. But for the past decade, the Seminole Tribe of Florida has been fighting to get some of them back to Florida to be buried. The controversy over who should decide the fate of these remains has raised questions about identity, history, and the nature of archaeology.

Political Misfits
The American Digital Divide; The Looting Of Cultural Artifacts; Book Censorship In Prisons

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 113:26


Esther Iverem, multidisciplinary author and independent journalist, host of "On The Ground: Voices of Resistance From the Nation's Capital" on Pacifica Radio, and founding member of DC Poets Against the War, joins us to talk about a couple of stories reflective on the state of policing in the country, with the case of Clifford Owensby, a paraplegic man who was pulled out of his car during a search under suspicion of drug possession in Ohio, and four Maryland police officers not being charged after a fatal shooting where the evidence does not exactly fit the officers' narratives. David Rosen is writer on media, tech, politics and sex whose books include “Sex, Sin & Subversion: The Transformation of 1950s New York's Forbidden into America's New Normal” and “Sex Scandal America: Politics & the Ritual of Public Shaming.” His most recent book is "Prohibition New York City: Speakeasy Queen Texas Guinan, Blind Pigs, Drag Balls and More.” He tells us about the growing digital divide in the U.S., why our internet is both so bad and so expensive, how we have fallen so far behind some other countries, how telecom giants are becoming a new cartel, and how community broadband networks could not just fill in gaps big internet providers won't cover, but also offer an alternative to those companies.James Early, former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the looting of cultural artifacts at a global scale after new revelations from the Pandora Papers, how not only collectors, but also recognized elite institutions engage in theft of priceless cultural items, and efforts underway to try to get stolen artifacts returned to their rightful homes.Sean Wilson, National Organizing Director for Dream Corps JUSTICE, talks to us about how hard it can be to access any books in prisons sometimes, what it's like trying to send books to people in prison, and how administrators engage in arbitrary censorship.

Choiceology with Katy Milkman
The Good Fight: With Guests Adam Grant & Tom Crouch

Choiceology with Katy Milkman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 31:19


Most of us would prefer to avoid an argument at work or at home. But there are times when arguments—at least when they're civil—can help surface important information for decision-making. In this episode of Choiceology with Katy Milkman, we look at situations where certain types of conflict can actually lead to better outcomes.You're probably familiar with the story of Orville and Wilbur Wright. The Wright brothers secured their place in history by achieving the world's first sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, in December of 1903. Less well known is the fact that the brothers would often argue intensely with each other over their engineering ideas.Tom Crouch reveals the family culture of argument and debate inside the Wright home as the brothers were growing up, and he explains how that argumentative streak may have helped them solve a key problem in their quest for powered flight.Tom D. Crouch is curator emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution and the author of The Bishop's Boys: A Lifeof Wilbur and Orville Wright.A version of the Wright Brothers story appears in Adam Grant's new book, Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know. Adam joins Katy to discuss how you can leverage constructive conflict to arrive at better decisions. He also explains how agreeableness can sometimes hold you back. Adam Grant is the Saul P. Steinberg Professor of Management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He's also host of the popular TED podcast WorkLife.Finally, Katy provides advice on how to find the right level of task conflict in order to maximize the creativity and innovation that comes from collaborative problem solving.Choiceology is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit schwab.com/podcast.If you enjoy the show, please leave a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ rating or review on Apple Podcasts.Important DisclosuresAll expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.The comments, views, and opinions expressed in the presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent the views of Charles Schwab.Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.The book How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be is not affiliated with, sponsored by, or endorsed by Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (CS&Co.). Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (CS&Co.) has not reviewed the book and makes no representations about its content.(1021-1WX2)

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner
China's Great Leap Forward w/ Dr. Ken Hammond, PhD, Esteemed Author and Historian (Part 1 of 2)

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 111:26


What's up to my belly-laughing bamboo shoots and burly baby pandas!Welcome back to the BNP everyone and thank you for joining! Shout out to my patrons, y'all are the butter flavor in my movie popcorn. This episode I'm thrilled to feature historian and author Dr. Kenneth Hammond, PhD. Dr. Hammond received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in History and East Asian Languages in 1994. He specializes in the history of China in the Early Modern period, and is the founder of the Confucius Institute at New Mexico State University. Since 2017, Dr. Hammond has been affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. He has been a lecturer for the National Geographic Society and for the Smithsonian Institution. Finally, Dr. Hammond is a writer and activist for Pivot to Peace, a coalition of concerned Americans from all walks of life, who have come together in opposition to the dramatically increasing drive toward confrontation between the United States and China. You can check it out at: https://peacepivot.org/. Dr. Hammond so generously jumped on the BNP to unpack two critical junctures in modern Chinese history: The Great Leap Forward, and the Cultural Revolution.  It is so important to have a materialist, non-bias awareness around these foundational chapters in recent Chinese history. Equally important is to push back against the many misconceptions held in the U.S. about China. This two part series with Dr. Hammond is my effort to dispel stereotypes and common tropes, and help my fellow citizenry to have a greater and more nuanced understanding of the forces and events that have shaped modern China.  This episode, Part One, covers The Great Leap Forward. Next week, I'll post Part Two, where we cover the Cultural Revolution. Help keep the BNP on the air by becoming a patron for as little as $1/month (3.3 cents a day) at www.patreon.com/noetics. You receive monthly truckloads of magnum black jaguars when you sign up!*I can haz followers? Find the BNP on IG @conantanner, and BNP's Original Poetry TikTok @barbarian.noetics. I can haz haikus? Send me one at barbarian.noetics@gmail.com and I'll read it on the air. Thank you for spreading the word and telling a friend about the BNP, and please don't forget to rate, review and subscribe! Until next week everyone, be good to yourselves and to each other. One Love,ConanTRACKLIST FOR THIS EPISODEAtyya - Eternally Blessed Mix (2014)Dykotomi - Corvid Crunk Chillhop - Essentials Winter 2020Alex Cortiz - GlamourgirlTrobar de Morte - Summoning the Gods Kent - Då Som Nu För AlltidSoulection Radio #522: Le Maestro TakeoverNo Angels - Sad Piano Instrumental (PSA Background)Chicano Batman - Ride Or Die Easy Star All Stars - Great Dub In The SkyTheo Blaise - Kounkou EdenSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/noetics)

By Any Means Necessary
Joe Manchin Holds Relief for Working and Poor People Hostage Again

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 114:15


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Sameena Rahman, staff writer for Breaking the Chains Magazine to discuss the so-called “heartbeat” bill in Texas and its effective banning of abortions, how poor and working class communities will bear the brunt of this law, and the resistance to these laws.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Tunde Osazua, the Coordinator of the U.S. Out of Africa Network, a project of the Black Alliance for Peace to discuss the use of AFRICOM by the US to control African resources and its people, its fostering of genocidal conditions in some parts of Africa, and the movement to expel AFRICOM from the continent.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Ivan Klepov, head of online RT DE to discuss the banning of two YouTube channels of RT Deutsch and the strange circumstances surrounding the ban, the stigmatization and targeting of Russian media, and the challenges that YouTube's vague community guidelines pose to alternative media.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by James Early, Former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies to discuss Joe Manchin's resistance to the already-compromised budget reconciliation bill, why working people need to organize outside of the political duopoly to demand that their needs are met, and the statement by the Cuban foreing minister on the US use of sanctions and its context in broader US imperialism.

Special Lady Day
19. Hypatia and Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn

Special Lady Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 111:27


This episode covers Hypatia: mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher, and Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn, Hawaii's Crown Princess.Act One: The Lilith FundPlan CHypatia SourcesEncyclopedia Britannica, inc. (n.d.). Hypatia. Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved September 10, 2021, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Hypatia Hypatia. (n.d.). Retrieved September 10, 2021, from http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_Romana/greece/paganism/hypatia.html. Zielinski, S. (2010, March 14). Hypatia, ancient Alexandria's great FEMALE SCHOLAR. Smithsonian.com. Retrieved September 10, 2021, from https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/hypatia-ancient-alexandrias-great-female-scholar-10942888/. Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn SourcesBranch, John. “'I'm Not Anti-Anything. I'm pro-Hawaii.'.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 17 May 2021, www.nytimes.com/2021/05/17/sports/olympics/olympic-surfing-hawaii-flag.html. Fahrni, Jennifer. “Princess Kaiulani Her Life and Times by JENNIFER FAHRNI.” Princess Kaiulani, Her Life and Times, A Biography, 2009, princesskaiulaniproject.com/about_princess_kaiulani.htm. Ho, Sally. “Olympic Surfing Exposes Whitewashed Native Hawaiian Roots.” AP NEWS, Associated Press, 13 July 2021, apnews.com/article/2020-tokyo-olympics-games-racial-injustice-hawaii-surfing-5048591ab4620f8796a08ff54331fec0. Ho, Sally. “Native Hawaiians 'RECLAIM' Surfing with Moore's Olympic Gold.” AP NEWS, Associated Press, 5 Aug. 2021, apnews.com/article/2020-tokyo-olympics-surfing-hawaii-carissa-moore-272e71e4203c138221e66808a87e9564. Hulstrand, Janet. “Ka'iulani: Hawaii's Island Rose.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 7 May 2009, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/kaiulani-hawaiis-island-rose-131796275/. Little, Becky. “Hawai'ian Surfers Have Been Riding Waves since the 17th Century.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 15 Aug. 2018, www.history.com/news/women-surfers-1600s-hawaii-princess-gidget.

TacticalPay Radio
Historical Firearms With Logan Metesh of High Caliber History

TacticalPay Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 28:58


The history of firearms is truly fascinating and this show's interview guest is a true historical expert. Logan Metesh is a firearms historian, vlogger, writer, and the man behind High Caliber History. Logan has worked for museums, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National Park Service. Logan's work has been published in a variety of print and online outlets. He is a frequent guest on NRATV's Curator's Corner, and has served as a historic arms facilitator for Mysteries at the Museum, Gun Stories with Joe Mantegna, NRA Gun Gurus, and American Rifleman TV. Listen along for his unique perspective on historical firearms and more! For more information and to view the show notes, visit: https://www.tacticalpay.com/078-hch/

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
623: Examining the Migration of Marine Animals to Inform Management and Conservation - Dr. Autumn-Lynn Harrison

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 47:19


Dr. Autumn-Lynn Harrison is Program Manager of the Migratory Connectivity Project and a Research Ecologist at the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center. She is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Duke University and an Affiliate Professor at George Mason University. Her research focuses on the migration of marine animals such as seabirds and seals. In order to help manage and conserve these animals, she uses data from small tracking tags to understand where these animals go, the habitats they depend on, and the places that are important to them. When she's not working, Autumn-Lynn loves to be out on the water paddling in a canoe or kayak. She also enjoys watching college football as well as playing the flute and piccolo in a community band. Autumn-Lynn received her B.S. degrees in Environmental Science and Fisheries and Wildlife Science from Virginia Tech, a Graduate Diploma of Science in Tropical Marine Ecology and Fisheries Science from James Cook University in Australia, and her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She worked for the Society for Conservation Biology for 11 years prior to accepting a postdoctoral fellowship with the Institute for Parks at Clemson University. Next, Autumn-Lynn joined the team at the Smithsonian Institution in 2014. In our interview, she shares more about her life and science.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Smithsonian Institution pieces together 9/11 history through personal, poignant relics

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 6:58


With memories of Sept. 11, 2001 fading for some, and images of that day unknown to a younger generation, the Smithsonian Institution is working at piecing together history object by object. William Brangham takes a behind-the-scenes look as part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Strange Country
Strange Country Ep. 206: Victorian Tapeworm Diet

Strange Country

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 51:20


One constant--besides death and taxes--is the notion that women need to work to attain that ever-morphing ideal body that doesn't actually exist. Strange Country co-hosts Beth and Kelly talk about diet plans like ingesting tapeworms to obtain the consumption look in Victorian times. There's also asides on the many ways humans choose to destroy themselves. Fun! Theme music: Big White Lie by A Cast of Thousands Cite your sources: Collins, Ben, and Brandy Zadrozny. “Ivermectin Demand Drives Some to pro-Trump Telemedicine Website.” NBCNews.com, NBCUniversal News Group, 27 Aug. 2021, www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-news/ivermectin-demand-drives-trump-telemedicine-website-rcna1791. Fuller, Kristen. “What Is the Cotton Ball Diet?” Verywell Mind, www.verywellmind.com/what-is-the-cotton-ball-diet-5115569. “Graves' Disease.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 5 Dec. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/graves-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20356240. Kesa, Ingrid. “Inside the Lasting Legacy of Tapeworm Diets.” VICE, 18 Mar. 2018, www.vice.com/en/article/xw5nnq/inside-the-lasting-legacy-of-tapeworm-diets. Klein, Gavi, and Audrey Gibbs. “Tools of the Patriarchy: Diet Culture and How We All Perpetuate the Stigma.” Ms. Magazine, 12 Aug. 2020, msmagazine.com/2020/07/16/tools-of-the-patriarchy-diet-culture-and-how-we-all-perpetuate-the-stigma/. Migala, Jessica. “What Is The Sleeping Beauty Diet-And Why Are People Doing It?” Women's Health, Women's Health, 11 June 2019, www.womenshealthmag.com/weight-loss/a19908241/sleeping-beauty-diet/. Mullin, Emily. “How Tuberculosis Shaped Victorian Fashion.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 10 May 2016, www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-tuberculosis-shaped-victorian-fashion-180959029/. O'Neill, Therese. “Diet: You're a Little Bag of Pudding.” Unmentionable: The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage & Manners, Little Brown and Company, 2016, pp. 75–90. Sommer, Will. “Trump's New COVID Doctor Says Sex With Demons Makes You Sick.” The Daily Beast, The Daily Beast Company, 28 July 2020, www.thedailybeast.com/stella-immanuel-trumps-new-covid-doctor-believes-in-alien-dna-demon-sperm-and-hydroxychloroquine. Starr, Michelle. “Vintage X-Rays Reveal the Hidden Effects of Corsets.” CNET, CNET, 26 Feb. 2015, www.cnet.com/news/vintage-x-rays-reveal-the-hidden-effects-of-corsets/. “Tapeworm Infection.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 16 Mar. 2021, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tapeworm/symptoms-causes/syc-20378174. Wells, Diana. “Tapeworm Diet: Weight Loss, Risks and Side Effects.” Healthline, Healthline Media, 11 June 2019, www.healthline.com/health/diet-and-weight-loss/tapeworm-diet. “What Are Sea-Monkeys?” LiveScience, Purch, 11 May 2012, www.livescience.com/33907-sea-monkeys.html.

Strange Country
Strange Country Ep. 205: Mountain Meadows Massacre

Strange Country

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 51:11


America's home-spun religion of Mormonism has a bloody past. The founder Joseph Smith was murdered, and the Saints run out of various places they settled. This us-versus-them mentality really fermented in the Great Salt Valley where Brigham Young whipped his flock into a frenzy about interlopers and outsiders. Strange Country cohosts Beth and Kelly talk about how that volatile mx led to some Mormons murdering approximately 120 adults and children heading to California in 1857 in Mountain Meadows, and then blamed it on the Paiute. Theme music: Big White Lie by A Cast of Thousands Cite your sources: Denton, Sally. American Massacre: the Tragedy at Mountain Meadows, September 1857. Vintage Books, 2004. King, Gilbert. “The Aftermath of Mountain Meadows.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 29 Feb. 2012, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-aftermath-of-mountain-meadows-110735627/. Krakauer, Jon. “For Water Will Not Do.” Under the Banner of Heaven , Anchor Books, 2003, pp. 211–227. Moore, Carrie. “LDS Church Issues Apology over Mountain Meadows.” Deseret News, Deseret News, 12 Sept. 2007, www.deseret.com/2007/9/12/20040883/lds-church-issues-apology-over-mountain-meadows#flags-wave-at-the-event-marking-the-150th-anniversary-of-the-mountain-meadows-massacre-at-the-memorial-site-near-enterprise. Smith, Christopher. “Unearthing Mountain Meadows Secrets: Backhoe at a S. Utah Killing Field Rips Open 142-Year-Old Wound.” Mountain Meadows Massacre (CESNUR), The Salt Lake Tribune, 14 Mar. 2000, www.cesnur.org/testi/morm_01.htm.

By Any Means Necessary
Faith Must Be A Part of Anti-Imperialist and Anti-Capitalist Movements

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 111:52


US Massacres Family in Afghanistan, Hurricane Ida Exacerbated by Capitalism, Energy Company Tries to Get Around Using Union LaborText: In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by David Swanson, activist, journalist, radio host, Executive Director of World Beyond War and author of the new book “Leaving World War II Behind” to discuss the US drone strike that killed an Afghan family, the US role in destabilizing Afghanistan, and the high costs paid by the Afghan people for US imperialism.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Tina Landis, organizer and author of the book, ‘Climate Solutions: Beyond Capitalism' to discuss the destruction left behind by Hurricane Ida and how capitalism makes such destruction much more devastating, the inhumanity of capitalism and why the ruling class won't do anything to mitigate the suffering endured by poor and working people, and the need for a people's movement that forces systemic change and climate action.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Taft Mangas, organizer with Laborers local 329 in Lima, Ohio to discuss the replacement of union labor with non-unionized workers at the Cenovus energy refinery in Lima, how Cenovus is pitting workers against workers and its attempts at union-busting, and the implications of this move on the broader Lima community.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by James Early, Former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies to discuss the converging crises of capitalism and what it means for the US empire and the working class, how faith has historically played into the drive for empire, and the need to reclaim faith to build a working class movement.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Book Club

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 161:20


Today's Boston Public Radio is on tape. We're bringing you the ultimate book club — back-to-back conversations from over the years with some of our favorite writers: Kevin Young shares from his collection of poetry, “Brown.” Young is the poetry editor of The New Yorker and the director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture. Ann Patchett discusses the autobiographical elements of her book “Commonwealth,” and makes a pitch to all readers to shop at local, independent bookstores. Patchett is an author and the owner of Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tenn.  Sy Montgomery explores animal intelligence and what people can learn from animals. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. Her latest book is “The Hummingbirds' Gift: Wonder, Beauty, and Renewal on Wings.” David Duchovny talks about his book, “Miss Subways: A Novel.” Duchovny is an actor and writer, and recently appeared in the Netflix series “The Chair.” Elizabeth Gilbert discusses her book “Big Magic,” a self-help book about tapping into creativity. Gilbert is a journalist and writer — her other books include “Eat, Pray, Love” and “Committed.” T.C. Boyle drops in on the dropout culture with his novel “Outside Looking In,” which is based on the LSD research of Timothy Lear. Boyle is a novelist and short story writer. Lizzie Post weighs in on cannabis culture in her new book, “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties.” Post is a writer, co-director of The Emily Post Institute and great-great-granddaughter of etiquette writer Emily Post. Sebastian Smee talks about his book “The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art.” Smee is an art critic for The Washington Post.

The Front Row Network
CLASSICS-"Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir" with Eddie Muller

The Front Row Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 65:47


Front Row Classics is about to take you on a journey through "Dark City" this week. We're thrilled to welcome back the "Czar of Noir" himself, Eddie Muller to discuss one of our favorite genres. Eddie has recently released a revised and expanded edition of his book, "Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir". The book covers the various destinations and colorful characters one comes across when traveling through the world of Noir.  Brandon and Eric are thrilled to discuss many of the Noir's famous & infamous people and places with one of the genre's foremost experts.  "Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir" is available from Running Press wherever books are sold.  Eddie Muller is the host of Noir Alley on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Every Saturday, Noir Alley visits classic noir films featuring some of the best set-ups and shake downs involving iconic antiheroes and the unforgettable, fatalistic dames they fall for. Muller is a contemporary renaissance man. He writes novels, biographies, movie histories, plays, short stories, and films. He also programs film festivals, curates museums, designs books, and provides commentary for television, radio, and DVDs. He produces and hosts NOIR CITY: The San Francisco Film Noir Festival, the largest noir retrospective in the world, which now has satellite festivals in seven other U.S. cities. As founder and president of the Film Noir Foundation, he has been instrumental in preserving America's noir heritage, which to date has included restoring and preserving more than 30 nearly lost classics in partnership with the UCLA Film & Television Archive, such as Too Late for Tears (1949), Woman on the Run (1950), and The Bitter Stems (1956). He has also presented and lectured on film noir at the Cinémathèque Française in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. His debut novel, The Distance, earned the Best First Novel “Shamus” Award from the Private Eye Writers of America. Muller is a two-time Edgar Award nominee from the Mystery Writers of America and has earned three Anthony Award nominations. Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star, which he co-wrote with the actor, was a national bestseller in 2007. He has twice been named a San Francisco Literary Laureate.

The John Batchelor Show
1501: 2/2 The Birth of the Amazon Forest. Carlos Jaramillo, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. @ScienceMagazine

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 9:05


Photo:  The banks of the Amazon forest 2/2  The Birth of the Amazon Forest.  Carlos Jaramillo, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. @ScienceMagazine Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute: Panamá The Birth of the Amazon Forest. Extinction at the end-Cretaceous and the origin of modern, neotropical rainforests https://science.sciencemag.org/content/372/6537/63  

The John Batchelor Show
1501: 1/2 The Birth of the Amazon Forest. Carlos Jaramillo, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. @ScienceMagazine

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 14:35


Photo: Workers Making Their Meals in Front of a Shack in Palmeiras - 508, USP Paulista Museum Collection 1/2  The Birth of the Amazon Forest..  Carlos Jaramillo, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. @ScienceMagazine Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute: Panamá The Birth of the Amazon Forest. Extinction at the end-Cretaceous and the origin of modern, neotropical rainforests https://science.sciencemag.org/content/372/6537/63