Podcasts about Forestry

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  • 856PODCASTS
  • 1,879EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Forestry

Show all podcasts related to forestry

Latest podcast episodes about Forestry

Life with Fire
The Tim Hart Act and Channeling Grief with Michelle Hart

Life with Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 21:49


When smokejumper Tim Hart passed away from injuries sustained during a hard landing in New Mexico in May, his wife Michelle Hart quickly realized that she needed a way to channel her grief into something tangible. She realized she was in a unique position to draw attention to the needs of wildland firefighters—she had a personal connection to the issues facing them, and as a lobbyist, she also had the legislative chops to make legitimate change at a congressional level. This all culminated in the creation of the Tim Hart Wildland Firefighter Classification and Pay Parity Act, which addresses firefighter compensation, benefits, access to mental health resources and availability of housing for firefighters, among other provisions. We spoke with Michelle about the bill and the grief that influenced its creation back in November. They've continued garnering support for the bill, though not much as changed with the bill since when we chatted with Michelle. As of January 19, the bill has been referred to the subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry, where it awaits support from the senate.

Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #161 - Greg Berndtson - Top Dollar Timber, Timber Contracts, 3 Timber Payment Options, Logger Selection Tips, Forestry Concerns & What To Watch Out For

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 94:43


Habitat Podcast #161 - Greg Berndtson from Episode 15 is back!  Greg was on years ago, and now we are diving deep and specific into Timber Harvests for us habitat managers on our hunting land.  This is an info-packed conversation so grab something to take notes with!  We cover: Timber Contracts - Different options to consider, Using Consulting Foresters vs. Loggers, 3 Payment Options to review when getting paid out for your timber, Logger Selection Tips - How to check if your Logger is legitimate and worth working with, Forestry Concerns - What To Watch Out For, How to get top dollar for your timber, The Habitat Hook – HP10 for 10% off - https://bit.ly/33go0Xy Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing - info@habitatpodcast.com Property Consultations - HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS Email us! info@habitatpodcast.com Leave us a great review here:  https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Habitat Podcast Site:  www.habitatpodcast.com Habitat PODCASTS & GEAR:  http://bit.ly/HABITATGEAR The Habitat Hook - https://bit.ly/3Em098Q  10% off with code: HP10 Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX  $25 off with code: HPC25 Realtree Land Pro - Lake States - https://bit.ly/34acwE9 Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Killer Food Plots - http://bit.ly/KillerFP  10% and free shipping w/code: HP10% Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast  

Charlottesville Community Engagement
January 5, 2022: Storm clean-up continues with power outages slowly being restored; Albemarle BOS ended 2021 by approving a major rezoning

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 20:39


The Charlottesville region continues to dig out after an early winter storm sets the tone for 2022, a year that has a lot to do to compete with its cousins 2020 and 2021. Only five days in, and it’s possible we’re going to be in for a bumpy ride. Charlottesville Community Engagement is prepared, and asks that you keep your arms and hands inside the vehicle at all times, lest you be thrown to the wolves. I’m Sean Tubbs. On today’s program:As the Albemarle Board of Supervisors begins a new year, the last year ended with rezoning on Rio Road East for a maximum of 328 units Governor-elect Youngkin appoints his top agricultural officialsThe community continues to recover from a devastating winter storm Subscriber-supported shout-out Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects such as an expungement project with the Legal Aid Justice Center, a map of Charlottesville streetlights, and the Charlottesville Housing Hub. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects.Storm recoveryThere are still many thousands of people without power across central Virginia, two days after a winter storm hit that surprised many after the New Year began with temperature in the sixties. As the sun rose this morning, Dominion’s outage map shows about a third of its customers in Albemarle remain without power. That number began to drop throughout this morning. The situation in Charlottesville is markedly improved with just over a tenth of the city’s 24,744 customers without power at su“As of 11:00 p.m. Tuesday, crews have already restored power to 310,000 customers impacted by this damaging storm,” reads an email the company sent out late last night. They urge anyone affected who hasn’t reported their outage to update that info at dominionenergy.com or phone 1-866-366-4357. Louisa County customers on Dominion Energy are still out, and about two-thirds remain out in Fluvanna. Several areas of the community are served by Central Virginia Electric Cooperative, who report about a third of their customers without power this morning. View their map here. Charlottesville has sent out a notice to property owners reminding them that public sidewalks must be shoveled 24 hours after a snowfall. “With widespread power outages and the severity of this particular snowstorm, the City recognizes the need for additional time,” reads the release. “As a result, the Deputy City Managers have declared 8:00 am on Thursday, January 6, 2022 to be the official end of snowfall.”That gives property owners until Friday at 8 a.m. to clear pathways, but the notice acknowledges the potential of another storm on Thursday and points out that the time will reset if a second storm hits this week. Charlottesville will delay trash and recycling pick-up one more day until Thursday and residents who get service Monday through Wednesday won’t get service this week. “With the potential for an additional snow system arriving at the end of the week this current revised schedule is subject to change,” reads a release. Interstate 95 was opened in both direction last night shortly after 8 p.m. after being closed for most of yesterday due to traffic jams caused by hazardous and impassable conditions. A release sent out by the Virginia Department of Transportation last night warned drivers that parts of the roadway in Stafford, Spotsylvania, and Caroline counties remained hazardous with below freezing temperatures. Albemarle public safety responds to shooting, structure fireIn addition to contending with the aftermath of the snow storm, Albemarle public safety had two other incidents yesterday. In one, police responded at 11:15 a.m. to a shots fired incident on Dick Woods Road and arrested an Afton man on charges of brandishing and reckless discharge of a firearm. Marc McCann, 62, is currently being held at Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail without bond.Later in the day at around 3 p.m., Albemarle County Fire Rescue responded to a structure fire on Route 53 near Milton Road that injured one and displaced three. While the cause of the fire is under investigation, the news release contains this warning. “Albemarle County Fire Rescue would like to remind everyone to keep anything that can burn at least three feet from heating equipment and to always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel-burning heaters,” reads the release. Youngkin makes agricultural picksIncoming Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin has named two people who will oversee policy and programs related to agriculture in Virginia. Matt Lohr will be the Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry and Joseph Guthrie will be the Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. According to a release sent out yesterday afternoon, Lohr is a fifth-generation farmer from the Shenandoah Valley who has been chief of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. He served in the House of Delegates from 2006 to 2010 before becoming the Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.That position will now be filled by Guthrie, who grew up on a family farm in Pulaski County. Guthrie is currently a senior instructor at Virginia Tech where he was named as Man of the Year in 1989 as a graduating senior. He and his family continue to own a beef farm in the New River Valley. There are several reports that Youngkin will nominate his Secretary of Natural Resources later today. I’ll have that information tomorrow. Prince Edward County seeks local sales tax for education; other billsThe General Assembly session convenes in seven days and about two new dozen bills were pre-filed yesterday including more proposed rollbacks of legislation that passed the General Assembly under Democratic control in both houses. Delegate James Edmunds (R-60) filed a bill that would add Prince Edward County to the list of localities authorized to levy a one percent sales tax to fund education projects, if approved by a referendum. (HB63)Edmunds also filed a bill allowing hunting on Sundays but only in wildlife management areas operated by the Department of Wildlife Resources. (HB64)In another piece of legislation, Edmunds has a bill that would allow employees of the Department of Wildlife Resources “to sell, possess, sell, offer for sale, or liberate in the Commonwealth any live fur-bearing animal commonly referred to as nutria.” (HB65)Edmunds has a fourth bill that would allow people with valid driver’s licenses to operate certain utility vehicles on secondary roads in counties with fewer than 100,000 people. (HB66)Incoming Delegate Tim Anderson (R-83) has a bill clarifying that active military with homes in Virginia are registered to vote if they are on active duty. (HB68)Delegate Glenn Davis (R-84) filed a bill altering the section of code dealing with custody to change the word “visitation” to “parenting time” and to encourage maximization of time spent with each parent. (HB69)Davis also filed a bill that would guarantee minimum rights for police officers and removing exceptions for those rights if a locality has a police civilian review board. (HB70)Delegate Lee Ware (R-65) filed a bill prohibiting campaign finance donations from utility companies or their subsidiaries. (HB71)Ware also filed legislation prohibiting the sale of marijuana seeds or plants if the Assembly passed other legislation to allow retail sale of the end-product. (HB72)Ware also has a bill that would remove several sections of language in the state code that pertains to the Air Pollution Control Board. (HB73)There’s other legislation from Ware that would tweak the Virginia Clean Economy Act by adding a definition for “energy-intensive trade-exposed industries.” (HB74)Last year, Albemarle County Supervisors suggested they would like to look into increasing the transient occupancy tax to more than four percent. Ware has another bill that would require a referendum for counties that want to do that or increase the meals tax. (HB75)Ware has another bill that would require the state government to reimburse localities for the cost of counting absentee ballots. (HB76)Delegate Glenn Davis (R-84) also has a bill specifying that skills games are gambling devices (HB77)Annoyed by free online trials that don’t seem to have a cancellation option? Davis has a bill that would make that illegal. (HB78)Delegate Ronnie Campbell (R-24) has a bill that would restore police ability to stop motorists and pedestrians for a variety of infractions including detecting the presence of marijuana. (HB79)Delegate Davis has another bill that would create the Virginia Healthcare Regulatory Sandbox Program for innovative and pilot health care products. (HB80)Today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out:Algorithms know how to put songs and artists together based on genre or beats per minute. But only people can make connections that engage your mind and warm your heart. The music on WTJU 91.1 FM is chosen by dozens and dozens of volunteer hosts -- music lovers like you who live right here in the Charlottesville area. Listener donations keep WTJU alive and thriving. In this era of algorithm-driven everything, go against the grain. Support freeform community radio on WTJU. Consider a donation at wtju.net/donate.Pandemic update: Another 10K+ dayThis morning the Virginia Department of Health reports another 10,728 new COVID cases and the percent positivity has increased to 32 percent, meaning that one in every three PCR is positive. Positivity in the Blue Ridge Health District is at 24.7, or one in four tests. There are 207 new cases in the district reported today. A town hall scheduled for last night was postponed and will be held on Thursday at 7 p.m. (meeting info)Starting January 1, VDH has updated its case definition for COVID-19 related deaths which will mean delays in the reporting of deaths. The agency recommends monitoring that information by date of death rather than date reported. Learn more here. Supervisors approved Rio Point project in late December In one of their last actions of 2021, the Albemarle Board of Supervisors voted to approve a rezoning in the Rio District that will bring over 300 rental units to the county’s urban ring. The project had originally been developed by a Virginia Beach firm who opted to not continue with the review process after Supervisors appeared ready to deny the project on a tie-vote on June 3, 2020. Local company Stony Point Design Build took over and have since purchased the 27-acre property. The company also built Dairy Central in Charlottesville. Stony Point Design Build renamed the project Rio Point but more or less kept the development, though they made a few changes. Cameron Langille is a planner with Albemarle County. “To the northeast is the Dunlora subdivision, to the southeast is the Dunlora Forest neighborhood,” Langille said. “The property is bounded by the north by the John Warner Parkway and across John Warner Parkway is the CATEC site and to the east is actually land that’s within the city of Charlottesville’s municipal boundaries.” Many of those neighbors have expressed concern about building more homes in that area, making the argument that the roads are already overburdened. The land has been zoned R-4 for many decades. “Under that zoning they could be developed for residential purposes up to 109 units or if they did a bonus level cluster development they could get 163 units,” Langille said.Doing so would likely mean all would be sold at market rate. That’s how Southern Development developed Dunlora Forest. The county’s Comprehensive Plan for many years has encouraged developers to seek rezoning to increase residential density in order to satisfy the county’s growth management policy.“The developer is proposing 328 units maximum,” Langille said. “There is some open space areas that are also proposed. Overall it is about 13 total acres and 1.1 acres of that open space is located closest to the intersection of the John Warner Parkway and Rio Road East. This applicant is proposing to dedicate that to public use to establish a county park that will be connected to the existing greenway system.” The new developer submitted a new traffic impact study that informed changes made to the vehicular entrances to the project and have dedicated other property along Rio Road to allow for tapered turn lanes. But Langille said the biggest change is the approval and funding of a roundabout at the intersection of John Warner Parkway and Rio Road. “It would get rid of the signalized intersection that’s currently at John Warner Parkway and Rio Road East and it would be a roundabout that would allow the traffic flow to move in any of the direction that it currently does,” Langille said. Stony Point Design Build would contribute $750,000 to the roundabout. Survey work is underway and Langille said its design will begin later this year. He added that Agnor-Hurt Elementary and Burley Middle School can both absorb students that would be generated by the development, but acknowledged that the project may contribute to existing overcrowding at Albemarle High School. All but two of the ten speakers at the public hearing asked the Board to deny the application. “In my opinion, doubling the allowable density for a development of this type which is built on a two-lane road which will always be a two-lane road and is surrounded by two lane roads in all directions is a little misguided,” said Lisa Drummond, a nearby resident. “The by-right with bonus still gets you within what’s in range of the master plan.” However, Supervisors appeared to be in favor of the project to help achieve the county’s goal to create more housing units as identified in the Housing Albemarle plan.  “Without a doubt, the market is demanding rental and we need more rental which is what this provides,” said Supervisor Diantha McKeel. Chris Henry, the president of Stony Point Development Group, said that his firm conducts market analysis before proceeding with its projects. “Today the vacancy rate for apartments in Albemarle County is like one percent,” Henry said. “What’s considered a healthy vacancy rate in any market is something like five percent and I don’t think Charlottesville  has had north of a five percent vacancy rate for a decade at least.” Henry also claimed that 30,000 commuters travel into Charlottesville every day and providing more homes within the urban ring would reduce the overall vehicle miles traveled. He said a comparable project is Arden Place for rents. The affordable rents will be over $1,000 for a one bedroom unit versus about $1,400 for a market rate unit. Supervisor Ned Gallaway noted that the proposal was submitted under Albemarle’s previous housing policies, which required 15 percent of housing units created under a rezoning to be affordable. Housing Albemarle moved that to 20 percent, though Supervisors have yet to approve an incentives package designed to help developers make that goal. “Going it under the old policy allows an easy, quick efficiency to happen,” Gallaway said. “To aspire to the new Housing Albemarle plan would require something different. Was that considered?”Henry said the project might have been able to make that 20 percent goal with additional density. The previous developer had originally requested more than 400 units, but that was reduced due to community engagement. “There’s always the trade-off between more density and more affordability because obvious the project is supported by the revenue that’s being generated from those units,” Henry said. “If the revenue is lowered, we have to have more units to get to the same result. And so, from our perspective we considered it. If we had to meet the county’s new requirement that was enacted after this application was completed, we would have wanted to have significantly more units to offset.” Supervisor Donna Price had been opposed to the rezoning went it was before the Board of Supervisors in June 2020 due to transportation concerns.“I feel like we have a better application in front of us today than we did then and I appreciate the changes you have made,” Price said. Gallaway, however, could not support the project because he said it was not quite ready because the second phase of a corridor study for Rio Road is not yet complete and because it does not meet the Housing Albemarle goals. “I’m frustrated that this application has made it before us before that corridor study is done and I’m equally frustrated that some comments have been made that we’ve learned enough from the corridor study to be able to make some of those decisions,” Gallaway said. The vote was 5-1 in favor of the rezoning. To learn more about the Rio Road Corridor Study, visit this website. Support the program!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

BFM :: Morning Brief
EFT Mechanism Could Be Gamechanger In Forest Conservation

BFM :: Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:26


The severe flooding occurring across multiple states this monsoon season is a reckoning of our environmental policies. Many environmentalists argue that deforestation and excessive logging are the main reasons for these flooding disasters, and that both federal and state governments need to step up conservation efforts. Forestry researcher Lim Teck Wyn walk us through the gaps in the present land management policies, and argues for the implementation of the ecological fiscal transfer (EFT) between federal and state governments to strengthen forest conservation. Image credit: EPA-EFE

BFM :: General
EFT Mechanism Could Be Gamechanger In Forest Conservation

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:26


The severe flooding occurring across multiple states this monsoon season is a reckoning of our environmental policies. Many environmentalists argue that deforestation and excessive logging are the main reasons for these flooding disasters, and that both federal and state governments need to step up conservation efforts. Forestry researcher Lim Teck Wyn walk us through the gaps in the present land management policies, and argues for the implementation of the ecological fiscal transfer (EFT) between federal and state governments to strengthen forest conservation. Image credit: EPA-EFE

Northern Community Radio presents Phenology
Forests and Carbon: Eli Sagor from U of MN Sustainable Forestry Education Cooperative

Northern Community Radio presents Phenology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 19:23


in-depth look at forests and carbon series continues with our producer Mark Jacobs

Today with Claire Byrne
Forestry Review + Latest Covid News

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 13:45


Minister Pippa Hackett, Minister of State at Cabinet for Land Use and Biodiversity

SilviCast
What's on your Mind?

SilviCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 47:02


Silviculture is important work!  Nobody has all the answers.  So that is why each month on SilviCast we try to bring you a diverse set of guests, from the perspective of researchers and field foresters.  Besides our guests, however, we receive great insights from you, the listeners.  Join us on this Season 2 finale as we find out what's on your mind and discuss some of the most intriguing questions we have received in the Dropbox.Learn more and interact with SilviCast on our webpage.

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Ohio Outdoors - Heritage Habitat and Forestry

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 51:09


Slow go on the home front for the guys.  Enjoying family time over the past couple weeks.  Paul recovering from the CoCo, and Andrew getting his knee back in shape.  Looking forward to some outdoor activities in the near future. Pay attention to your regulation books, as some species are going out of season soon.  Muzzleloader season for whitetail Deer is January 8-11.  Get out there and use those smoke poles to finish off the season!Today's discussion is with Anthony of Heritage Habitat and Forestry.  Anthony has an extensive background in land management both for wildlife and forestry.  Anthony's company is based in central Ohio, but he travels the state and beyond.  A lot of great knowledge of property management and how to help the landowners as well as the wildlife. Happy New YearO2Podcast on GoWild@the.o2.podcast -Instagram@Ohiohunt- Twitter Ohio Huntsman is Powered by Simplecast

Ohio Huntsman Podcast
Heritage Habitat and Forestry

Ohio Huntsman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 51:09


Slow go on the home front for the guys.  Enjoying family time over the past couple weeks.  Paul recovering from the CoCo, and Andrew getting his knee back in shape.  Looking forward to some outdoor activities in the near future. Pay attention to your regulation books, as some species are going out of season soon.  Muzzleloader season for whitetail Deer is January 8-11.  Get out there and use those smoke poles to finish off the season!Today's discussion is with Anthony of Heritage Habitat and Forestry.  Anthony has an extensive background in land management both for wildlife and forestry.  Anthony's company is based in central Ohio, but he travels the state and beyond.  A lot of great knowledge of property management and how to help the landowners as well as the wildlife. Happy New YearO2Podcast on GoWild@the.o2.podcast -Instagram@Ohiohunt- Twitter Ohio Huntsman is Powered by Simplecast

The Brian Kilmeade Show Free Podcast
Producers' Pick | Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-AL)

The Brian Kilmeade Show Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 16:12


Armed Forces; Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry; Veterans' Affairs; Health, Education, Labor & Pensions committees.

Tasmanian Country Hour
Call from timber industry to continue some native forest logging

Tasmanian Country Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 8:47


Southern Tasmanian sawmill operator Matthew Torenius says there needs to be a continuation of some native forest logging in Tasmania

From the Woods Kentucky
From the Woods Today - Christmas Traditions

From the Woods Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 50:52


This episode of From the Woods Today is a holiday special! Join us as we talk about the tradition of Christmas trees. We have a festive tree of the week, as well as segments on mistletoe and the annual Christmas Bird Count event. 12.15.21. Watch Video From the Woods Today

Coast Range Radio
Why Drinking Water & Industrial Forests Don't Mix - Betsy Herbert

Coast Range Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 29:00


Sam Krop and Andrew interview Dr. Betsy Herbert, an environmental scientist and published author who has expertise in researching how forest management impacts drinking water. She is also an active volunteer for North Coast Communities for Watershed Protection and Forest Waters Watch. Betsy describes how she started in this work, the importance of forests for providing quality drinking water and what is happening in Oregon drinking watersheds that are dominated by short rotation industrial forestry. Betsy also provides nine excellent examples of policy changes to Oregon's Forest Practices Act that would increase protections for drinking water.You can get involved by providing public comment that asks for increased protection for drinking water coming off Western Oregon State Forests through the Department of Forestry's Companion Western Oregon State Forest Management Plan and Implementation Plans project.Support the show (https://coastrange.org/donate/)

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 125: Rural America and Democratic Messaging with former Senator Heidi Heitkamp

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 46:25


“The single reason why the Democrats have lost rural America is because rural America doesn't think the Democrats respect them, appreciate them, or know them.” Former United States Senator Heidi Heitkamp, Democrat of North Dakota, returns to the podcast. Since ending her career in the Senate, Heitkamp has focused on connecting to rural America and figuring out what Democrats can do to make gains in these crucial swathes of the country. With midterm elections looming, how does this veteran of the Democrats see her party's odds of survival come November 2022? What are the Democrats doing— or not doing— particularly in rural America to ensure a viable path to the next elections? If you like what we do, please support the show. By making a one-time or recurring donation, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality substantive, long-form interviews with the world's most compelling people. Heidi Heitkamp served as the first female U.S. senator elected from North Dakota from 2013-2019. Senator Heitkamp grew up in a large family in the small town of Mantador, ND. Throughout her time in public service, Senator Heitkamp has stood up for tribal communities and worked to improve outcomes for Native American children, women, and families. The first bill she introduced in the Senate, which became law in 2016, created a Commission on Native Children. Her bill with former Senator John McCain became law to create Amber Alerts in Indian Country. She introduced Savanna's Act to help address the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women. On the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, Senator Heitkamp pushed to provide training and resources for first responders and worked to combat human trafficking in North Dakota, across the country, and around the world. Senator Heitkamp has a long record with energy development in North Dakota. She continued those efforts in the Senate, working to responsibly harness North Dakota's energy resources, and successfully pushed to lift the 40-year old ban on exporting U.S. crude oil while expanding support for renewable energies, like wind and solar energy development. Senator Heitkamp sat on the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, where she helped write, negotiate, and pass two long-term, comprehensive Farm Bills which Congress passed. Senator Heitkamp previously served as North Dakota's Attorney General where she helped broker an agreement between 46 states and the tobacco industry, which forced the tobacco industry to tell the truth about smoking and health. It was one of the largest civil settlements in U.S. history. Prior to her time as Attorney General, Senator Heitkamp served as North Dakota's Tax Commissioner. Senator Heitkamp received a B.A. from the University of North Dakota and a law degree from Lewis and Clark Law School. She currently serves as a contributor to CNBC and resides in Mandan, North Dakota with her husband.

KQED's The California Report
More Rain on the Way to California

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 17:49


More rain is on the way, first to Northern California, and then moving down to Southern California later this week. But how much will it impact the state's water resources? Reporter: Caleigh Wells, KCRW  State maps may soon show even more homes and buildings are at risk for wildfire. After years of delay, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention says it's almost ready to release new fire hazard severity maps. Reporter: Chris Nichols, CapRadio  Health officials across the state continue to raise concerns about rising hospitalizations and positive COVID-19 cases. This comes as friends and family gather for the holidays. Street food vendors and food trucks are a way of life in Los Angeles and have been for decades. But recent shutdowns of longtime established sites in East Los Angeles have many wondering if these businesses are facing too many restrictions to operate legally. Guest: Janette Villafana, Reporter, LA Taco

The Country
One-eyed edition

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 37:47


Interviews are with Roger Dickie, Tom Young, Steve Wyn-Harris, Grant McCallum, Ray Smith and Phil Duncan.

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
“The damage has already been done,” says Alberta fertilizer analyst

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 8:57


It’s a surprise to only a few at this point to hear we’re currently at a 20-year high in the fertilizer markets. The reasoning comes from a combination of things, but as Ryan Furtas, market analyst with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, explains, a hike in crop prices, an increase of feedstock costs, and as we... Read More

RNZ: Country Life
Farm Talk: Finnish Farmer Teemu Kinnari

RNZ: Country Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 5:43


Teemu Kinnari is the 14th generation to toil on the family farm. It has been in the family since 1667.

KZYX News
Activist files hit-and-run report in JDSF

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 6:28


December 15, 2021 — About a dozen activists from a coalition that's been pushing for a moratorium on logging in the Jackson Demonstration State Forest held an impromptu meeting with Assembly member Wood and Senator Mike McGuire's field staff in downtown Ukiah Tuesday, asking them to convey their concerns to elected officials. Among them were Polly Girvin, an authorized representative of the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians for government to government consultations with the state; and an activist who said he had been struck by a vehicle while blockading a road early Friday morning. “Vehicular attacks on protestors are very much in vogue,” said the protester, who goes by the name Mama Monkey. “Myself and other citizens were spread across Road 300, just east of the confluence of Roads 300, 350, and 360, near the egg-taking station,” said Mama Monkey. “We were preventing loggers from entering the Red Tail timber harvest plan, and a white four-door Toyota Tacoma with a camper shell and a heavy-looking black metal bully bar after-market front bumper came towards us (we were all wearing high visibility yellow safety vests and making our presence very obvious) and the truck came towards us really quickly, and kind of screeched to a halt just within a few feet of other folks in my group, then reversed direction and altered course to point towards myself…my suspicion is that the person driving miscalculated, expecting me to move out of the way, because I was a little bit more isolated on that side of the road, but I did not move, and I think when he realized that, he started to attempt to slow down, but he was not able to stop in time to prevent his bumper from hitting me in the chest.” In June, Sheriff Matt Kendall wrote a letter to then-CalFire Director Thomas Porter and the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection, saying he was concerned about public safety issues arising from people blocking roads in the forest. He urged the state to take action “to secure a safe working environment,” writing that, “My office cannot take over issues which are the responsibility of the State of California.” In July, Anderson Logging, which was under CalFire orders to stop working in the Caspar 500 timber harvest plan, told Mendocino Unit Chief George Gonzalez that the company wanted to hire private security to protect its workers. CalFire Chief Legal Counsel Bruce Crane told Myles Anderson and his lawyer that according to the Public Resource Code, “CAL FIRE cannot cede control of activities on JDSF, for law enforcement and security purposes, to any person or entity at any time.” Mama Monkey tried to file a report with the Sheriff's office and California Highway Patrol over the weekend, then overcame initial reluctance and filed a report with CalFire Monday morning. Cal Fire confirmed as much, but did not provide details, as the investigation had just been opened. Mama Monkey provided details of the incident to Wood and McGuire's representatives. They did not go to the hospital after the encounter, and chose to keep their medical information about the aftermath private. “I'm there to protect the trees for the well-being of everyone, of the loggers just as much as myself, for their children just as much as my children,” they declared. “It's very sad that certain parties are acting violently, and I feel it's my duty to make sure they're held accountable, so they don't continue to escalate violence.” In his letter last summer, Kendall wrote that he fully supports the right to civil disobedience, but that safety cannot be ensured if activists continue to protest in an active timber sale. “We can see where this is leading, and the outcome will be tragic if action isn't taken,” he warned. As for Mama Monkey, “What I want is a moratorium on logging within Jackson Demonstration State Forest.”

The Country
Knowledge gap edition

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 38:07


Interviews are with James Shaw, Warrick Catto, Andrew Morrison, Don Carson, Barry Soper and Chris Brandolino.

Transformers | The sustainability change makers
Is Biomass energy a threat or a solution to meet the Climate Crises?

Transformers | The sustainability change makers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 37:38


COP26 showed an urgent need to accelerate climate actions. Some relate to Forestry, Biomass and Biodiversity. My guests today are Anders Egelrud, CEO of Stockholm Exergi and Charles Secrett, a Climate Campaigner. Both have long experience in Climate Change Policies and Actions.

The Country
Christopher Luxon on Three Waters and carbon farming

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 6:27


National's new leader talks humour in the House, Three Waters, carbon farming and who he'd have in his team from the government.

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
RealAg Radio, Dec 15: Grain sample disputes, the new Alberta ag minister, and Bio-K

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 55:10


We’re midweek in mid-December, and you know what that means? Another episode of RealAg Radio! Thanks for tuning in — we appreciate you making us part of your day. On this Wednesday episode of the show, we hear from: Nate Horner, minister of Alberta Agriculture, Forestry, and Rural Economic Development; Doug Chorney from the Canadian... Read More

RealAg Radio
RealAg Radio, Dec 15: Grain sample disputes, the new Alberta ag minister, and Bio-K

RealAg Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 55:10


We’re midweek in mid-December, and you know what that means? Another episode of RealAg Radio! Thanks for tuning in — we appreciate you making us part of your day. On this Wednesday episode of the show, we hear from: Nate Horner, minister of Alberta Agriculture, Forestry, and Rural Economic Development; Doug Chorney from the Canadian... Read More

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Alberta ag minister keeping margin-based insurance on the table, but not for this round of BRM reform

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 10:15


A month into the job as Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Rural Economic Development, Nate Horner says he’s catching up with producer groups in the province and working to get up to speed on the priorities for Alberta agriculture. Up first on the docket following his appointment was the Federal-Provincial-Territorial ministers meeting last month, where Horner... Read More

The Country
The carbon farming debate: Damien O'Connor

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 9:29


The Minister of Agriculture and Trade takes credit for forecast primary sector exports to surge to $50.8 billion (up 6 per cent in the past 12 months) but will he take responsibility for carbon farming decimating East Coast farming communities?

The Country
The carbon farming debate: Kerry Worsnop

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:57


A Gisborne District Councillor and East Coast farmer responds to the Minister on behalf of her region, as more sheep and beef farms are converted to forestry/carbon farming.

The Country
Trees edition

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 38:04


Interviews are with Damien O'Connor, Kerry Worsnop, Cole Groves and Winston Peters.

RNZ: Morning Report
Coroner recommends key improvements for forestry sector

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 2:27


In a significant step, a coroner has recommended key improvements to forestry's code of practice. This follows the inquest into the death of Niko Brooking-Hodgson who was hit by a flying 9kg shackle that had snagged then pulled free under force, in a forest block near Napier in August 2016. He was 24. Coroner Donna Llewell said it was time that forestry's code of practice - also called The Bush Bible - was updated. Lawyer Hazel Armstrong was an expert witness in the hearing, she spoke to Morning Report's Corin Dann.

From the Woods Kentucky
From the Woods Today - Wildlife Friendly Trees

From the Woods Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 49:54


In this episode of From the Woods Today, we discuss some trees that are beneficial to wildlife. We have a segment on Christmas trees, as well as another edition of What's Bugging My Tree. 12.1.21. Watch Video From the Woods Today

From the Woods Kentucky
From the Woods Today - THANKFUL

From the Woods Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 54:24


This week's episode of From the Woods Today is a Thanksgiving special! We reflect on and celebrate how trees, woodlands, woodland owners, and those who support them enrich our lives and world. We have our tree of the week and a festive mushroom highlight, as well as some information and fun facts about turkeys. 11.17.21 Watch Video From the Woods Today

Real Talk with Rick
Branching Out

Real Talk with Rick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 32:08


Rick talks with Lauren Stufft, the City's forestry and natural resources specialist, as we learn about how she got her start in the field of urban forestry, some of the more interesting calls she's received and invasive species.

ABC Imagine This: Big ideas for little ones
How is paper made from trees?

ABC Imagine This: Big ideas for little ones

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 11:57


Have you ever wondered how little bits of paper comes from big, tall trees? How do they get it so thin and flat?

Superheroes of Science
The Density of Water and Measuring Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: Looking into Water Quality

Superheroes of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 45:31


While hypoxia, or the reduced amount of oxygen available in a body of water, is a naturally occurring phenomenon, human impact can make hypoxia worse. Paris Collingsworth, Assistant Research Professor in the Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and Great Lakes Ecosystems Specialist for the Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, discusses his research with hypoxia in Lake Erie along with Great Lakes ecosystems and special properties of water that lead to the development of hypoxic conditions in Lake Erie during the summer months.

Nature's Archive
#35: Ben Goldfarb - Beavers, The Quintessential Keystone Species

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 65:42


Today you'll become a Beaver Believer thanks to my guest, Ben Goldfarb. Ben is the author of the book Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter, winner of the 2019 PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award. Aside from being an author, Ben is an environmental journalist, with writing appearing in The Atlantic, Science, The Washington Post, and many other esteemed publications. Ben holds a Masters of Environmental Management from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.Beavers truly are ecosystem engineers, capable of creating a series of habitats just by living their semi-aquatic lives. But did you know that not all beavers build dams and lodges? And in order to spend so much time in water, they have many amazing adaptations, such a a second set of lips behind their teeth that acts like a valve sealing off water.And this is just the tip of the beaver lodge, so to speak. Ben tells us so many great facts about beavers and their ecology that I'm sure you'll walk away with an expanded respect for these animals. Ben tells us why beavers are perhaps the quintessential keystone species, creating a disproportionate impact on the land. For example, beavers may actually help salmon populations, reduce and slow wildfires, recharge groundwater supplies, and much more. They create ponds, dig creek channels, and trigger ecological succession. We also discuss how beavers fit into the classic Yellowstone trophic cascade. Maybe I could have had a shorter interview if I just asked Ben what beavers don't do?Find Ben on his website, or on twitter. Full Show NotesLinksPeople and OrganizationsEmily Fairfax, PhD - Ecohydrologist who has researched how beavers make landscapes more fire resilientJoe Wheaton - Fluvial Geomorphologist who has studied how beavers are restorative, and can be used like a restoration tool.Sarah Koenigsberg - filmmaker for The Beaver BelieversBooks and Other ThingsEager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter - by Ben Goldfarb

SPS
Ep. 41: On Rittenhouse & Aussie Protests against the Vaccine Mandate

SPS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 77:58


On this episode of SPS, Sophia and Pamela sit down with Spencer L., founding member of Platypus and historian of imperialism, to discuss the Rittenhouse trial and the “Left's” response. They clear up the confusion around the Second Amendment among todays leftists, address the anti-racism of progressive liberals, and take up responses by Daniel Lazare (Weekly Worker) and the Bolshevik Tendency. In the second part of the episode, Andreas W. and Platypus Melbourne member, Ryan M., interview Sue Bolton (Socialist Alliance) on the protests against the Australian vaccine mandate, including the September attack on the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) offices. Union leadership was under attack by union members for their complicity with state measures, which prevented a return to work without vaccination. Andreas and Ryan ask, how should the left respond? Are these protests simply cannon fodder for the right? How should socialists understand this discontent in civil society? SEGMENT I Links >The “Left” on Rittenhouse Daniel Lazare, “Rittenhouse and White Backlash” in the Weekly Worker, issue 1373 (25 November 2021) https://weeklyworker.co.uk/worker/1373/rittenhouse-and-white-backlash/ “...The idea that good guys need guns to defend themselves against bad guys is asinine, since it is often far from clear in a shootout which is which. It is a determination that cannot be made individually on the spur of the moment, but can only be made deliberately and collectively, which is why democracy requires judges, courts and other such apparatus.” Milwaukee DSA Statement on Rittenhouse Verdict, (22 November 2021) https://milwaukee.dsawi.org/milwaukee-dsa-statement-on-rittenhouse-verdict/ “It is no coincidence that Rittenhouse wants to be a police officer when he grows up. The US injustice system was developed to enshrine white supremacy at the expense of those who work to undo it. As those in power continue to build upon the fascist foundations of our nation, it becomes ever-clearer that abolition of police and the carceral state at large is the only path forward.” Bolshevik Tendency, “Killer Rittenhouse Goes Free—Fascists Celebrate” https://bolsheviktendency.org/2021/11/27/killer-rittenhouse-goes-free-fascists-celebrate/ “Decent people do not recognize the “right” of fascists and their various ultra-rightist friends and associates to mobilize—nor do we recognize their right to “defend” themselves against attempts to disarm them, which is what Rittenhouse's victims were seeking to do. While the latter's tactics were obviously seriously deficient, their intent was commendable.” >Education on Liberalism & Constitutional Rights Ira Glasser, Free Speech and the ACLU, an interview by Glenn Greenwald https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGI4fc_VB7c Platypus Public Fora Series: The Second Amendment and the Left Platypus Review 110 (October 2018): https://platypus1917.org/2018/10/01/the-second-amendment-and-the-left/ June 9, 2018, University of Houston: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaaAqAm6oAw SEGMENT II Links Sue Bolton's article in Green Left, Socialist Alliance's publication: https://www.greenleft.org.au/content/behind-attack-cfmeu-office The other Green Left article Andreas quotes, by Dave Kellaway: https://www.greenleft.org.au/content/italy-fascists-attack-biggest-trade-union-confederation Socialist Alliance's website: https://socialist-alliance.org/ Hosted by Sophia F., Pamela N. and Andreas W., with original tracks by Tamas Vilaghy, and editing assistance by Michael Woodson and Tamas Vilaghy. To learn more about Platypus, go to https://platypus1917.org/.

Granite State Gardening
All things trees! (part 2) Pruning and Solving Tree Problems, Plus Frost Cracks, White Oak and Wood Chips

Granite State Gardening

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 73:02


When you see something out of the ordinary with a tree, how do you know if it's really a problem or just something to shrug off? In part 2 of this 2-part episode on trees, Greg Jordan, Emma Erler and Nate Bernitz talk about pruning a bit to start and then focus most of the episode on a wide array of scenarios and what to do about them (if anything!). If you haven't listened to part 1 yet, go back and listen to that first.  Featured Question: How to prevent frost cracking?  Featured Plant: White oak (Quercus alba)  Closing Tip: Using Wood Chips  Promotions  Listener Survey  Growing Microgreens Webinar  Resources  Basics of Pruning Trees and Shrubs  Selecting an Arborist  UNH Extension County Foresters  List of Trees for New Hampshire Landscapes  Subscribe to the monthly Granite State Gardening newsletter.  Email us questions, suggestions and feedback at gsg.pod@unh.edu Photo from Wiki Commons Transcript by Otter.ai 

Voices of Forestry
Voices of Forestry Ep. 23 - Women Owning Woodlands

Voices of Forestry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 23:04


Join us this month as we wrap up the 2021 year with a discussion on the Women Owning Woodlands program in Arkansas. Host Seth Stephenson sat down with Jennifer Johnson who helps facilitate the WOW meetings in the state. The two discuss the importance of a group like this and some of the events that have been put on in the last year. To find a WOW program near you, visit https://www.womenowningwoodlands.net/. This month's episode is sponsored by Farm Credit. Thank you to them for their support of the show. Thank you to Some Guy Named Robb/Robb McCormick for the use of our theme song "The Same Love" from his album "The Folkster." You can find more of his music on Spotify and his website, https://www.sgnrobb.com/.For more information on the Arkansas Forestry Association or to check out some of the upcoming WOW events, you can visit arkforests.org.

What's Working with Cam Marston
Forester Charles Taylor Explains Carbon Offset Credits, the Need for New Forestry Talent, and Who's Making Money and How

What's Working with Cam Marston

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 49:05


Forester Charles Taylor must keep up with the trends shaping the forestry business today. That includes carbon offset credits, the need for new talent and skilled workers, and the challenges of finding loggers and drivers. Forestry is a HUGE industry in Alabama and this is an important conversation.

Positively West Virginia
Episode 196 – Ron & Matilda Fowler – French Creek Christmas Trees

Positively West Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 44:13


Married for 48 years (c. 1973), Ron and Matilda Fowler are owners of French Creek Christmas Trees. They have one son, two lovely grandchildren, and their number one farm greeter, Gus the Dog. Ron graduated from WVU with a degree in Forestry. After working for the WV Division of Forestry, and self-employment with Consulting Forester, […]

Capital Daily
Some of BC's Possible Old-Growth Deferrals Have Already Been Logged

Capital Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 35:18


On Wednesday, the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs held a press conference to air their concerns with the deferral deadlines given to First Nations by the province. They say they are upset about the lack of support from the government this the announcement and that they were given consent for deferrals but not logging in their territories. UBCIC President Grand Chief Stewart Phillip joins to discuss. We also speak with Torrance Coste from the Wilderness Committee over their new updated mapping that better reflects the state of logging in these deferral areas.   Get more stories like this in your inbox every morning by subscribing to our daily newsletter at CapitalDaily.ca Check our membership opportunity at CapitalDaily.ca/MemberAnd subscribe to us on our socials! Twitter @CapitalDailyVic  Instagram @CapitalDaily  Facebook @CapitalDailyVic 

Henrico News Minute
Henrico News Minute – Dec. 1, 2021

Henrico News Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:24


The Henrico Board of Supervisors approves several road projects; distracted driving responsible for more than 2,200 crashes in the county since 2019; a county agency is planning a job fair; one county neighborhood receives a grant from the Virginia Department of Forestry; the latest in our ‘Faces of Henrico Business' series.Henrico News Minute – Dec. 1, 2021.Support the show (http://www.henricocitizen.com/contribute)

Charlottesville Community Engagement
November 29, 2021: Charlottesville PC briefed on next capital budget

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 14:00


As of the typing of these words, there are 22 days until the solstice when our portion of the world will slowly begin illuminating a little more each day. This is the 333rd day of this year. What significance might there be in the number 4,444? Stick around for enough editions of Charlottesville Community Engagement, and that figure may one day show up. I’m your host Sean Tubbs, tracking the trivial and monitoring the memorable. On today’s show:Charlottesville’s Planning Commission gets a look at the preliminary capital budget for fiscal year 23University Transit Service buses return to full capacity More news about the transition team of Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin Let’s begin today with two Patreon-fueled shout-outs. The first comes a long-time supporter who wants you to know:"Today is a great day to spread good cheer: reach out to an old friend, compliment a stranger, or pause for a moment of gratitude to savor a delight."The second comes from a more recent supporter who wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, WINA, or some other place I’ve not mentioned - the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!As the week begins, the Virginia Department of Health reports a seven-day average of 1,377 new cases and the seven-day percent positivity is at 6.1 percent. On Friday, the VDH reported the first fatality of a child from Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome. In the Blue Ridge Health District, there are another 55 new cases today and a seven-day percent positivity of 5.8 percent. There have been two more fatalities reported since Wednesday. Last week, the Jefferson Madison Regional Library entered into a partnership with the Virginia Department of Health to distribute at-home COVID-19 testing kits. The pilot program offers rapid antigen tests that are guided by a virtual assistant. “The test kits must be used away from the library, via an internet-connected device with a camera (including smart phones) with digital test results available within 15 minutes,” reads a press release. “Library staff cannot assist with administering tests, and tests cannot be taken inside any JMRL location.”Today marks the first day in a year and a half that passengers on University Transit Service buses will board from the front door. UTS has ended rules that required riders to board from the middle door. Capacity restrictions have also been dropped, meaning buses will be able to fill to standing. However, masks and facial coverings are still mandatory. The University Transit Service will also restore service to stops at Garrett Hall and Monroe Hall whenever UTS is serving McCormick Road. Those stops had been dropped to help UTS manage the capacity restrictions. Visit the UTS website to learn more about specific details.To learn more about transit, consider attending the Regional Transit Partnership’s meeting on Thursday at 4 p.m. On the agenda is a look at the Regional Transit Vision plan that is in development by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District. (agenda)Jaunt buses returned to 100 percent capacity earlier this year. There are a few local names on what Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin is calling his transition landing teams. The “landing teams that will coordinate with the cabinet secretaries from the current administration and conduct due diligence across all agencies so that the Youngkin administration will hit the ground running and begin delivering on its promises on Day One,” reads a press release from Wednesday.Senator Emmet Hanger (R-24) will serve on the Agriculture and Forestry team and Delegate Rob Bell (R-58) is on the Education team. Bell will also serve on the Public Safety and Homeland Security team. Senator Bryce Reeves (R-17) will be on the Veterans and Defense Affairs team. For the full list, take a look at the full press release. In today’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement: The Charlottesville Jazz Society at cvillejazz.org is dedicated to the promotion, preservation, and perpetuation of all that  jazz, and there’s no time like now to find a time to get out and watch people love to play. The Charlottesville Jazz Society keeps a running list of what’s coming up at cvillejazz.org. Sign up for their newsletter today. The Charlottesville Planning Commission got a look last week at a preliminary budget for the capital improvement program for the fiscal years 2023 through 2027. Council will vote next spring to approve the first year of spending, but decisions for future years would be for future versions of Council. (November 23 presentation) (watch the meeting)But first, what is a capital improvement program? Krissy Hammill is a Senior Budget and Management Analyst for the City of Charlottesville. “It’s basically a five-year financing plan that contains infrastructure type projects that usually cost more than $50,000,” Hammill said. “They’re generally non-recurring and non-operational and they generally have a useful life of five years or more.” Major items are usually funded by debt the city takes on in the form of bond sales. Investors front the money in exchange for a steady and guaranteed return. Like Albemarle County, Charlottesville has a AAA bond rating that is both attractive to investors and has a low interest rate. The latter results in a lower debt-service payment for the city. “We are actually part of a very small group of localities that have that rating,” Hammill said. “It is the premiere marker of a locality’s financial stability in strength.” In recent years, Council has increased the amount of spending on affordable housing initiatives, directly funding redevelopment of public housing and Friendship Court. In the past budget cycle, Council expressed a willingness to fund the configuration of City Schools. “We had a placeholder for that project at $50 million and based on Council’s direction from a meeting in October, that has now been increased from $50 million to $75 million,” Hammill said. “The funding has been moved up from FY25 to FY24. We also know that in doing this there will need to be additional revenue enhancements to pay for the additional debt service that will be required.”Revenue enhancements can be translated as “tax increase” and Hammill has previously told Council and the public that the equivalent of a 15 cent increase on the property tax rate may be required to cover the cost. There’s the possibility of the next General Assembly allowing Charlottesville voters to decide on a sales-tax increase with proceeds going toward schools. Even with that possibility, the city may not be able to make any new investments for some time. “We know that our debt capacity will be exhausted for some period of time,” Hammill said. In the current fiscal year, debt service is just under five percent of the $192.2 million General Fund Budget. That amount does not include the amount of general fund cash used for capital projects. That number will increase. “The plan put before you has debt service basically doubling from just over ten million to just over $20 million within a very short period of time, about four years,” Hammill said. A draft of the next Capital Improvement Program won’t be officially presented to Council until late February or early March. Hammill documented several other revisions to the preliminary budget. At Council’s direction, $18.25 million in city funds for the West Main Streetscape were transferred to the school reconfiguration project as well as $5 million from a parking garage on 7th and Market Street. In December 2018, a previous City Council  signed an agreement with Albemarle County to provide parking as part of a multimillion project to locate a joint General District Court downtown. Subsequent Councils have opted to not build a new parking garage to honor the terms of that agreement. (read the agreement)“We don’t have any specifics right now,” said Chris Engel, the city’s economic development director. “We’re in the midst of conversation with the county about the fact that we’re not going to build a structure and what the agreement leaves them with regard to their options and trying to figure out what’s best for both parties.” Pre-construction of the courts facility is underway. Another adjustment in the city’s preliminary capital improvement program is additional funding for a comprehensive plan for the Parks and Recreation Department. “This would be to look at Parks and Rec programs,” Hammill said. “This is not the normal master plan for the parks per se master planning process, but more of a programmatic master plan.” There are also programs for drainage issues at Oakwood Cemetery and McIntire Park as well as funding to assist the removal of dead Ash trees in the city. Council has also approved a housing plan that asks for $10 million a year on affordable housing initiatives. Hammill said not all of the funding for that initiative would come from the capital improvement program budget. City Council will review the Charlottesville Affordable Housing Fund at its meeting on December 6. Another item not in the capital budget is private funding for a sidewalk on Stribling Avenue. Southern Development has offered to loan the city $2.9 million to cover the cost of the project as part of a rezoning in Fry’s Spring area. The Charlottesville Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the preliminary CIP on December 14. Finally today, the second shout-out for today specifically asked you to check out a local news story. Here’s one to begin with. Last week, Carly Haynes of CBS19 reported on the intersection of Preston Avenue and Grady Avenue in Charlottesville. Charlottesville was awarded $7.743 million in a Smart Scale project to alter the intersection. Learn more in this report from November 23rd.Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here!. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Discovering Forestry
Women in Forestry Part II with Charity Barnes

Discovering Forestry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 25:14


Joe & Korey sit down with Charity Barnes, a mother, arborist and business woman. Charity was introduced to climbing 10 years ago and now owns her own company called Daisy Tree. https://daisytreecare.com/

Slate Daily Feed
Hi-Phi Nation Presents: Decoder Ring, The Alberta Rat War

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 44:12


Barry invites Willa Paskin of Slate's Decoder Ring podcast to talk about their recent episode, The Alberta Rat War, as a set up to next week's Hi-Phi Nation episode on genetic engineering. We then proceed to that episode. Rats live wherever people live, with one exception: the Canadian province of Alberta. A rat sighting in Alberta is a major event that mobilizes the local government to identify and eliminate any hint of infestation. Rat sightings makes the local news. Alberta prides itself on being the world's sole rat-free territory, but in order to achieve this feat, it had to go to war with the rat. On this episode of Decoder Ring, we recount the story of how Alberta won this war, through accidents of history and geography, advances in poison technology, interventionist government policy, mass education programs, rat patrols, killing zones, and more. The explanation tells us a lot about rats and a lot about humans, two species that are more alike than we like to think. Some of the voices you'll hear in this episode include Karen Wickerson, rat and pest program specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry; Robert Sullivan, author of Rats: Observations on the History & Habitat of the City's Most Unwanted Inhabitants; Phil Merrill, former rat and pest specialist; George Colpitts, historian at the University of Calgary; and John Bourne, former manager of Alberta's rat control program. Decoder Ring is a podcast about cracking cultural mysteries. Every episode, host Willa Paskin takes on a cultural question, object, idea, or habit and speaks with experts, historians, and obsessives to try and figure out where it comes from, what it means, and why it matters. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hi-Phi Nation
Hi-Phi Nation Presents: Decoder Ring, The Alberta Rat War

Hi-Phi Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 44:12


Barry invites Willa Paskin of Slate's Decoder Ring podcast to talk about their recent episode, The Alberta Rat War, as a set up to next week's Hi-Phi Nation episode on genetic engineering. We then proceed to that episode. Rats live wherever people live, with one exception: the Canadian province of Alberta. A rat sighting in Alberta is a major event that mobilizes the local government to identify and eliminate any hint of infestation. Rat sightings makes the local news. Alberta prides itself on being the world's sole rat-free territory, but in order to achieve this feat, it had to go to war with the rat. On this episode of Decoder Ring, we recount the story of how Alberta won this war, through accidents of history and geography, advances in poison technology, interventionist government policy, mass education programs, rat patrols, killing zones, and more. The explanation tells us a lot about rats and a lot about humans, two species that are more alike than we like to think. Some of the voices you'll hear in this episode include Karen Wickerson, rat and pest program specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry; Robert Sullivan, author of Rats: Observations on the History & Habitat of the City's Most Unwanted Inhabitants; Phil Merrill, former rat and pest specialist; George Colpitts, historian at the University of Calgary; and John Bourne, former manager of Alberta's rat control program. Decoder Ring is a podcast about cracking cultural mysteries. Every episode, host Willa Paskin takes on a cultural question, object, idea, or habit and speaks with experts, historians, and obsessives to try and figure out where it comes from, what it means, and why it matters. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Zoo Logic
Ailing Forests

Zoo Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 39:34


Healthy forests provide immeasurable benefits to humans, animals and ecosystems from capturing carbon to preventing erosion and preserving water tables, just to name a few. So it is important to understand the complex and interconnected layers of threats trees face today. Forest health specialist, Aly McAlexander from Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management describes the deleterious effects stemming from years of mega drought, bark beetle infestation, and 100 years of fire suppression policy on the desert southwest's forests. That Sounds Wild:  African Wild Dogs feeding. Animal Care Software Zoo Logic KONG Zoo ZOOmility

Tennessee WildCast
TW 266 - Skinner Mountain, A Biodiversity Hotspot

Tennessee WildCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 28:31


We're excited to announce the addition of 11,000+ acres for public hunting, fishing and so much more. This week TWRA's Tim Churchill and Chris Simpson join us to help us learn more about this acquisition and opportunities on this great piece of land. Special thanks to The Conservation Fund, The Nature Conservancy, Forest Legacy, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Tennessee Department of Forestry, Walmart's Acres for America Program, and U-Haul for helping make this project a success. #tnwildlife #gooutdoorstennessee #wildlifemanagement #tennesseewildcast

The Kyle Thiermann Show
#293 River Surfing, Public Lands Hunting, Forestry & Unlikely Connections - Dylan Snyder & Paige Maul

The Kyle Thiermann Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 103:08


Dylan Snyder (Snydes__)was born and raised in western Montana where he lives a simple life. He is passionate about surfing, snowboarding, hunting, and conservation. He formally worked at Backcountry Hunters and Anglers and is an aspiring surfboard shaper. Paige Maul (P.maul_)is a local Montanan, exploring the recreational opportunities afforded to all public land owners through riversurfing, backcountry snowboarding, whitewater SUPing, trail running, hunting, etc. he has 8 years experience with USFS as a wild land firefighter/forestry technician, and civil engineer. He is a new surfboard shaper and gear tinkerer.   If you dig this podcast, would you be please leave a short review on Apple Podcasts? It's takes less than 60 seconds and makes a difference when I drop to my knees and beg hard-to-get guests to come on the show.  Learn about my work at kyle.surf Brought to you by Santa Cruz Medicinals, and RPM Training. Listen to Sourgrass   RPM Training is a Norcal based active lifestyle brand founded on the idea that legit, purposeful functional training is the foundation of a truly full, adventurous life. I love their workout equipment and use it daily. Use the code KYLE10 at checkout and get 10% off any order.  Santa Cruz Medicinals CBD has supported this podcast from day one. Their founder actually convinced me to start the podcast! They make a range of potent CBD products and my personal favorite is the Peppermint Tincture, which I use most nights before before I go to bed. Use the code KYLE10 at checkout, and get 10% off any order. Sore muscles, be gone! Please consider supporting my work on Patreon. If you are financially strapped, just keep listening and give lots of high-fives. That's all the payment I need.  Connect with Kyle on Instagram | Twitter | YouTube Contact: info@kyle.surf The Motherfucker Awards Intro music by Nashe Howe “Life moves pretty fast ... if you don't look around once and a while, you could miss it.” - Ferris Buller