Podcasts about Photosynthesis

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Biological process to convert light into chemical energy

  • 413PODCASTS
  • 664EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 23, 2022LATEST
Photosynthesis

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Best podcasts about Photosynthesis

Latest podcast episodes about Photosynthesis

Web37 Daily
Jeremy Fall | Web37 050

Web37 Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 26:46


Jeremy Fall, a restaurateur, celebrity chef and entrepreneur based in Los Angeles, is hoping to make his mark in the NFT space.After founding over a dozen successful restaurants and bars all over the United States, he decided to pivot to the tech and entertainment industry. He started his own NFT and metaverse education company, Probably Nothing and has now launched his first NFT project, Photosynthesis.He joins ONE37pm for a chat about his company, his pivot to tech, and why he decided to start his nft project. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 630 (6-20-22): A Sampler of Shrubs from Soggy Spaces

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-16-22.

music university texas earth education college water state zoom land living tech research government benefits foundation search north america environment dark normal web natural tree va rain disease climate change ocean voices snow plant citizens trees agency stream priority richmond plants biology environmental bay images ash found dynamic grade soil bio published conservation spaces copyright index charlottesville processes sh rub pond signature fort worth arial ludwig virginia tech asheville scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend natural resources maple forests adaptations environmental science compatibility msonormal colorful forestry populations photographs times new roman ls sampler sections aquatic poison ivy possum watershed organisms montgomery county calibri chesapeake soggy policymakers forest service alder photosynthesis shrubs new standard blacksburg university press acknowledgment cambria math elderberry style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning stormwater breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting harrisonburg lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr virginia department ar sa latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub lmargin smallfrac dispdef rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim sols allowpng defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp forest management name title name normal name strong name emphasis name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent john peterson cripple creek rhododendron living systems grades k biotic name e space systems steel wheels colorful accent light accent dark accent waterside name list cumberland gap rhododendrons great dismal swamp name date name plain text name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table ilex name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic understory rockingham county relyonvml penn state extension aronia forest resources cornus augusta county vaccinium audio notes itea tmdl 20image water center stormwater runoff donotshowrevisions virginia standards
The Slowdown
699: Photosynthesis

The Slowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 5:42


Today's poem is Photosynthesis by Ashley M. Jones.

Branch Out
Fast Flora Facts: Photosynthesis

Branch Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 9:03


Learn how photosynthesis was uncovered by scientists, how this amazing set of biochemical reactions might help find aliens, and meet a cunning species of bacteria that's evolved with stolen photosynthesizing technology.

Intelligent Design the Future
The Miracle of Man: Extraordinary “Coincidences” All the Way Down

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 25:07


On today's ID the Future, Miracle of Man author and biologist Michael Denton continues his conversation with host Eric Anderson. Here Denton does a rapid flyover of several more anthropic “coincidences” in chemistry, biochemistry, and Earth science that are fine tuned to allow air-breathing, bipedal, technology-developing terrestrial creatures like ourselves to exist and thrive. The fine tuning, what Denton calls anthropic prior fitness, would seem to require foresight and planning on literally a cosmic scale. The wide-ranging conversation, the final one in a four-part series, gives a flavor for the breadth—if not the depth and richness—of Denton's new book from Discovery Institute Press, available here. Source

The Climate Daily
2022 Goldman Prize Winners: Chima Wlliams of Nigeria & Julien Vincent of Australia, Scientists Resurrect Ancient Enzyme to Boost Photosynthesis, Listeners' Call to Action

The Climate Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 9:45


2022 Goldman Prize winners, Chima Wlliams of Nigeria & Julien Vincent of Australia, plus scientists resurrect ancient enzyme to boost photosynthesis, and listeners' call to action!

StarTalk Radio
Extraterrestrial Oceans – StarTalk Live!

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 46:50


What are the oceans like on Enceladus? Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the oceans of other planets in the search for alien life with planetary scientist Kevin Hand, oceanographer Julie Huber, and comedians, Eugene Mirman, Ellie Kemper, and John Mulaney!NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/extraterrestrial-oceans-startalk-live/Thanks to our Patrons ​​Nate Gilman, Amy Morton, erika brennan, Rob Cordes, Tyler Pitts, Arya Menon, Jessie Desmond, Beth Leitch, Zach, and Karen Berthot for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Pablo Carlos Budassi, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Board Game Barrage
#228: Bob Is Beautiful

Board Game Barrage

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 81:47


It's easy to get lost in mechanical discussions of games, and forget to appreciate them as physical creations. There can be beauty in games, and we're here to get to the heart of it the only way we know, the one on one fight to the death that we call BGBBOB. Before we get skin deep, we talk about First Empires, Mille Fiori, and Foundations of Rome. 01:44 - First Empires 08:25 - Mille Fiori 16:41 - Foundations of Rome 32:51 - BGBBOB: Beautiful games 34:18 - Photosynthesis 35:23 - Root 39:12 - Brass: Lancashire 40:34 - Rising Sun 43:26 - Spirit Island 44:36 - The Gallerist 46:28 - Yamataï 48:00 - Azul 49:51 - Agricola 51:17 - Pax Pamir: Second Edition 53:26 - Wingspan 54:23 - Inis 56:41 - Foundations of Rome 57:33 - Startups 1:00:19 - Ark Nova Check out our wiki at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/wiki Join the discussion at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/discord Join our Facebook group at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/facebook Get a Board Game Barrage T-shirt at: https://boardgamebarrage.com/store

Intelligent Design the Future
The Miracle of Man: Fine Tuning for Blood and Breath

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 17:42


In Part 3 of The Miracle of Man interview with author Michael Denton, the Australian biologist and MD explores with host Eric Anderson some of the bioengineering marvels of the human lung and, more fundamentally, some of the many things about chemistry, the sun, and planet Earth that had to be just so to allow our respiratory and circulatory systems to work—not merely as well as they do but at all. It's fine tuning for creatures very much like ourselves, what Denton terms The Miracle of Man. “Denton provides the a scientific underpinning for a theistic real humanism far beyond the nihilistic implications of so-called secular humanism,” writes German paleontologist Günter Bechly. “The book deserves to become a game changer Read More › Source

Intelligent Design the Future
Michael Denton: The Miracle of Man Rests on a Primal Blueprint

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 17:10


This ID the Future continues Miracle of Man author Michael Denton's conversation with host Eric Anderson about his latest book. The focus of this capstone work in his Privileged Species series is, as the subtitle explains, The Fine-Tuning of Nature for Human Existence. Here Denton and Anderson dive deeper into the book's argument that science has uncovered multiple ensembles of fitness for creatures much like ourselves—land-going, airbreathing, intelligent bipeds capable of controlling fire and developing new technologies. In other words, it's not just a handful of things about nature that appear fine tuned for our existence. It's a long list of things, and indeed, a long list of interdependent ensembles of prior fitness—what Denton sometimes refers to as a “primal Read More › Source

Habits and Hustle
Episode 168: Jeremy Fall – Restaurateur turned NFT creator, founder of Probably Nothing and Photosynthesis

Habits and Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 77:40


Jeremy Fall is a restaurateur turned NFT creator and founder of Probably Nothing and Photosynthesis. This is THE episode for anything NFT. If you've ever been interested in NFTs, if you already have minted one yourself, don't really know what you're doing, or even if you think they're pointless and don't care about them at all, you've got to listen to this episode. Jeremy does a calm and precise job of breaking down the crypto world and NFTs in a digestible, understandable way. Filled to the brim with analogies and heartwarming stories about what the space is actually capable of you might find yourself seeing NFTs in a new light by the time you're done listening.Youtube Link to This Episode Jeremy's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/jeremyfall/Probably Nothing's Website - https://probablynothing.io/

Optimist Daily Update
Rescuing Lithium and Algae-Powered Computing

Optimist Daily Update

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 16:09


Today's good news: Summers and Arielle dive into alternative energy stories with a new method that rescues lithium from wastewater and a basic computer that's been powered by algae for over half a year! If you'd like to lend your voice to the Optimist Daily Update, send an email to: editorial@optimistdaily.com. Listen to the Optimist Daily Update with Summers & Kristy - Making Solutions the News!

Limited Play Time
ep 129: Photosynthesis

Limited Play Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 22:04


This week we're talking about Photosynthesis. The board game, not the process you learned about in biology. It's all about growing trees, harvesting tress, and a Pac-Man-looking Sun that feeds instead of eats!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”

united states music new york university game texas world earth education college guide water state zoom living tech research society ms government benefits foundation search songs north america environment fish dark press normal web natural tree va rain birds sea disease climate change ocean baltimore animals south carolina cd snow maine citizens trees cambridge agency stream priority richmond plants biology guitar native environmental bay images ash dynamic bio conservation copyright wildlife trio index commonwealth processes menu penn pond signature fort worth arial ludwig virginia tech asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend natural resources maple forests adaptations compatibility msonormal colorful forestry baltimore orioles populations times new roman ls sections aquatic poison ivy merriam webster watershed organisms zoology chesapeake minn policymakers taxonomy forest service photosynthesis shenandoah shrubs songbirds wildlife service acknowledgment cosgrove ornithology cambria math style definitions worddocument nests xeno shenandoah valley saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning stormwater breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup msonormaltable donotpromoteqf subsup undovr virginia department latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim sols defunhidewhenused michelle smith defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused audubon society latentstyles table normal bmp forest management name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis bill thompson shepherdstown birdsongs ebird living systems grades k name e wildlife resources light accent dark accent colorful accent name list cumberland gap rhododendrons name date name plain text name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list spanish moss inland fisheries forest resources warble virginia society michigan museum ben cosgrove audio notes all about birds lang elliott national conservation training center 20image water center stormwater runoff tmdl donotshowrevisions lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
Optimist Daily Update
An Ancient Enzyme and Connecticut Expands Abortion Rights

Optimist Daily Update

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 17:39


May the fourth be with you! Today, Summers and Kristy get personal while talking about reproductive rights and access to women's healthcare. They then commend Connecticut lawmakers, who are reacting to the surge of anti-abortion legislation with a bill that expands the kinds of medical practitioners who can offer abortion services within the state.  They also talk about an ancient enzyme that can help address food production concerns around the world. If you'd like to lend your voice to the Optimist Daily Update, send an email to: editorial@optimistdaily.com. Listen to the Optimist Daily Update with Summers & Kristy - Making Solutions the News!

Malthaus Games
Ep.115 Parks, Replicating Experiences, What Experience?

Malthaus Games

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 48:19


Episode 115 is here! In this episode we talk about Parks from Keymaster Games. Parks is all about hiking, collecting resources, and spending those to get cards representing National Parks. We talk about what we like about the game before diving into the topic about games that try to replicate experiences. After we talk about that, we tell you about experiences in games. We do this while drinking a beer from Mountain Fork Brewing out of Hochatown, OK. Be sure to like, share, and subsribe! Game Talk: 14:07 Top Shelf Topic: 23:20 Pint Sized Question: 40:27 Game Mentions: Wingspan, Photosynthesis, Sunset Over Water, Patchwork, Calico, Broom Service Support: If you would like to help us improve our product, here's where you can do that! www.patreon.com/MalthausGames podpledge.com?p=3D8L1M1V4S7F8... ko-fi.com/malthausgames Sound Attributions: Something Elated by Broke For Free, Downloaded from freemusicarchive.org/music/Bro... Edits: Cut to length and Faded in. Heavy Happy With Drums by Ryan Cullinane, Downloaded from freemusicarchive.org/music/Ryan Cullinane/Heavy Happy With Drums – Beat Driven Productions – Heavy Happy With Drums Edits: Cut to length and faded out. Crowd in a bar (LCR recording) by Leandros.Ntounis, downloaded from freesound.org/people/Leandros... Edits: Cut to length, added vocals and own recorded drink making sounds. Vinyl_record_needle_static_01.wav by joedeshon, downloaded from freesound.org/people/joedesho... Edits: Cut to length, added to music and raised volume level. Hidden Wall Opening by ertfelda, downloaded from freesound.org/people/ertfelda... Edits: Adjust volume and cut to length added jungle sound and voice. Yucatan jungle.mp3 by folkart films, downloaded from freesound.org/people/folkart%... Edits: Adjust volume, cut to length, added door sound and voice. Footsteps, Concretem A.wav by InspectorJ, downloaded from freesound.org/people/Inspecto... Edits: Cut to length, adjusted volume, added jungle sounds and voice. Fantasy Sounds Effects Library, Ambience_Cave_00.wav by LittleRobotSoundFactory, downloaded from freesound.org/people/LittleRo... Edits: Cut to length, faded in, adjusted volume and added footsteps, jungle sounds, stone door, and voice. Game Show Theme Tune by FoolBoyMedia, downloaded from freesound.org/people/FoolBoyM... Edits: Cut to length, added vocals, adjusted volume. Audience, Theatre Applause.wav by makosan, downloaded from freesound.org/people/makosan/... Edits: Added music, added voice, cut to length and adjusted volume.

Staying In
Reacher, Hot Lap League, and Free Radicals - Ep150

Staying In

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 69:29


00:00 - The foundations of a hot tub. 03:03 - Coiledspring Games' Photosynthesis sets a new standard for gateway games and feels like it might genuinely be a good option for getting people into the hobby. Plus we get talking about how challenging that actually is. 21:57 - A sauna. The Red Zone. Fika. 34:11 - Hot Lap League reminds us, very deliberately, of TrackMania Turbo which we covered back on Ep4. This slick racer brings time trial-based high precision competitiveness to Android and iOS, and we're here for it. 45:33 - A very VERY funny joke. Oh and our thoughts on new book-turned-TV-series Reacher. 56:31 - Free Radicals from WizKids Games sure isn't a gateway game, but its bold use of colours is admirable, and even if it does get utterly silly at times that's all part of the fun. All that, and a silent scream, with Dan (@ThisDanFrost), Kris (@DigitalStrider), Peter (@XeroXeroXero), and Sam (@MrSamTurner). Our Spotify Playlist brings together lots of great thematic music inspired by the stuff we talk about. Go check it out, if you like. Links to where you can find us - StayingInPodcast.com Note: sometimes we'll have been sent a review copy of the thing we're talking about on the podcast. It doesn't skew how we think about that thing, and we don't receive compensation for anything we discuss, but we thought you might like to know this is the case.

Shambhala Living
#35: The Magic of Photosynthesis

Shambhala Living

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 43:43


This episode is a little bit different, its recorded in 2020 just after Birdie Skye was born. We were walking around the farm, I had my mic on and we just went for a deep dive through lots of different topics in the areas of sustainable living, regenerate living, the magic of photosynthesis and so many other concept..

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 626 (4-25-22): A Sampler of Trees Inhabiting Soggy Virginia Sites

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-22-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of April 25 and May 2, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Baldcypress Swamp,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., sets the stage for exploring some of Virginia's tree species found in or near water, along with some of the water places those trees inhabit.  We start with a series of guest voices calling out 16 native Virginia tree species that can be found around watery habitats.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds. VOICES and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC - ~27 sec - “American Sycamore.  Atlantic White-cedar.  Baldcypress.  Black Gum.  Black Willow.  Boxelder.  Eastern Hemlock.  Hackberry.  Overcup Oak.  Red Maple.  Red Spruce.  River Birch.  Silver Maple.  Swamp Tupelo.  Water Hickory.  Water Tupelo.” Those 16 and other tree species can be found in a wide variety of water-related habitats in Virginia.  The Virginia Department of Conservation's 2021 report, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” lists over 30 community types associated with aquatic habitats.  Tree species are a characteristic of the vegetation in over 15 of those community types, ranging from Piedmont/Mountain Small-stream Alluvial Forests, to Coastal Plain/Piedmont Bottomland Forests, to Coastal Plain Depression Swamps and Ponds, to Maritime Swamps.  More generally speaking, you can find native Virginia trees beside small streams in uplands, for example, Eastern Hemlock; beside large rivers in the mountains or Piedmont, for example, American Sycamore and Silver Maple; beside large Coastal Plain rivers, for example, Overcup Oak and Water Hickory; and in a variety of swamps and other wetlands, for example, Baldcypress, Atlantic White-cedar, and Swamp Tupelo. Here's to Virginia's many tree species, its many water habitats, and the many combinations of those two groups of natural resources.  Thanks to seven Virginia Tech colleagues for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Baldcypress Swamp.” MUSIC – ~15 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Baldcypress Swamp,” from the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright 2004 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  The “Virginia Wildlife” album was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources).  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 479, 7-1-19, on the Dismal Swamp.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/. Virginia Water Radio thanks the seven Virginia Tech colleagues who recorded tree names on April 21, 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) River Birch photographed at Fredericksburg, Va., April 13, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user pfirth, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111309642(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Swamp Tupelo photographed at First Landing State Park in Virginia Beach, Va., July 9, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user karliemarina, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/86317064(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Black Willow trees along Toms Creek in Montgomery County, Va., August 18, 2011. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TREE SPECIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Following are the scientific names (in parentheses) of the tree species mentioned in this episode, in alphabetical order according to the species' common names. Atlantic White-cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides)Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)Black Gum (Nyssa syvatica)Black Willow (Salix nigra)Boxelder (Acer negundo)Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)Live Oak (Quercus virginiana)Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata)Red Maple (Acer rubrum)Red Spruce (Picearubens)River Birch (Betula nigra)Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)Swamp Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora) – a variety of Black GumWater Hickory (Carya aquatica)Water Tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Common Native Trees of Virginia,” Charlottesville, Va., 2016.  (The 2020 edition is available online [as a PDF] at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf.) A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” October 22, 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. Anita K. Rose and James S. Meadows, “Status and Trends of Bottomland Hardwood Forests in the Mid‑Atlantic Region,” USDA/Forest Service Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., November 2016; available online at https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53238. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject categoryFollowing are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.

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