Podcast appearances and mentions of forest resources

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 22PODCASTS
  • 33EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 1MONTHLY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 27, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about forest resources

Latest podcast episodes about forest resources

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 609 (12-27-21): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2021 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:31).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 27, 2021.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec That's the sound of a Belted Kingfisher at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., on December 21, 2021.  The year-end chattering of Virginia Water Radio's favorite bird sets the stage for our annual look-back on Water Radio's year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds and voices from six episodes in 2021.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see how many you recognize. SOUNDS – ~38 sec If you guessed all of most of those, you're a water-sound world champion! You heard Brimley's Chorus Frog;Virginia Tech graduate Maddy Grupper discussing her research on public trust in water systems;Virginia Tech's siren used for tornado warnings;names of some 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Canvasback ducks; andice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use the chorus frog sound; to Lang Elliott for the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Maddy Grupper for the episode on her research; and to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone name call-outs. We close out 2021 with a two-minute sample of music heard in episodes this year.  Here are excerpts of “Wade in the Water,” by Torrin Hallett; “Racing the Sun,” by the Faux Paws; “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann; “John Ashe's Spring,” by New Standard; “The Coming Spring,” by Andrew VanNorstand with vocalist Kailyn Wright; and “On a Ship,” by Kat Mills, with violinist Rachel Handman. Thanks to those musicians for permission to use their music. So long, soon, to 2021, and here's hoping for a safe, sound, and sufficiently hydrated 2022. MUSIC – ~105 sec From “Wade in the Water” - ~18 sec – instrumental. From “Racing the Sun” - ~20 sec – instrumental. From “All Creatures Were Meant to be Free” - ~10 sec – instrumental. From “John Ashe's Spring” - ~13 sec – instrumental. From “The Coming Spring” - ~20 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin' on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” From “On a Ship” - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., December 21, 2021. The sound of Brimley's Chorus Frog was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/.  This sound was used in Episode 563, 2-8-21. Virginia Tech 2020 graduate Maddy Grupper discussed her research on public trust in water systems in Episode 564, 2-15-21. The tornado-warning siren was recorded in Blacksburg, Va., in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  This sound was used in Episode 568, 3-15-21. The call-out of Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2021 season were recorded by Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio in June 2021.  The voices were sued in Episode 580, 6-7-21. The sounds of Canvasback ducks were sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, online at https://musicofnature.com/.  These sounds were used in Episode 604, 11-22-21. The Claytor Lake ice sound was recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. This sound was used in Episode 606, 12-6-21. Musical Selections Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 566, 3-1-21, water in U.S. civil rights history. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 561, 1-25-21, on the Northern Harrier. “John Ashe's Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used in Episode 576, 5-10-21, an introduction to springs. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/.  Information on accompanying artists on “The Coming Spring” is online at https://andrewvannorstrandmusic.bandcamp.com/track/the-coming-spring.  This music was used in Episode 572, 4-12-21, on warblers and spring bird migration. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanying artists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. IMAGESAn Image Sampler from Episodes in 2021 From Episode 561, 1-25-21: Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 12-27-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 563, 2-8-21: Brimley's Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 580, 6-7-21: Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.From Episode 602, 11-8-21: Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.From Episode 606, 12-6-21: Thin ice on a pond in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., December 9, 2021.SOURCES Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the individual episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance o

new york science bay university agency graphic guide music photo natural state audio game college english sound accent cd dark tech water web index rain pond research ocean government education racing ship sun spring ohio chesapeake snow environment images oberlin college va silver msonormal atlantic stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental frogs times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading predictions shenandoah bluegrass lyrics conservatory diagram oberlin colorful forest resources yale school signature thin listed accompanying manhattan school co2 watershed toads transcript brimley virginia tech social studies atlantic ocean natural resources name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table draper blacksburg msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot sections attribution noncommercial ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback national oceanic lang elliott environmental conservation policymakers bmp be free atmospheric administration heritage park new standard acknowledgment virginia department coming spring cumberland gap inaturalist sols tmdl henrico torrin inland fisheries water center pulaski county audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 602 (11-8-21): Photosynthesis Fun, Fundamentals, and Confluence with Climate Change

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:26).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-5-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 8, 2021. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Racing the Sun,” by The Faux Paws, on that group's 2021 self-titled album, from Great Bear Records.  It opens a revised episode from November 2013, where we explore a sun-driven process that's fundamental to life on earth: photosynthesis, the process where green plants and algae make food, using the energy in sunlight to store chemical energy in the form of glucose.  Photosynthesis is also… VOICES IN SKIT - ~1 min./57 sec. REPORTER: We break into this show to bring you exclusive audio from the Virginia Tech campus, where a shadowy team of scientists are tinkering with the process underlying all life on earth.  They haven't yet revealed their possibly nefarious plans, so let's listen in... SCIENTIST 1: With this terrarium, we have a model system to test our carbon dioxide-manipulation scheme, and soon we'll be ready to control earth's fundamental food-producing process... SCIENTISTS 1 and 2: Photosynthesis! SCIENTIST 2: Are all the components of the system ready?  Green plants with chlorophyll? SCIENTIST 1: Check! SCIENTIST 2: Soil with proper nutrients? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2. Light? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Water? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Air with CO2? SCIENTIST 1.  CO2? SCIENTIST 2.  That's carbon dioxide! SCIENTIST 1.  Oh...right...I mean, check! SCIENTIST 2.  Let the photosynthesis start!  Engage monitoring device! SCIENTIST 1.  CO2 taken in from the air...water and nutrients being absorbed through roots...light falling on leaves.  All systems go!  Light energy is driving CO2 and water to combine and form glucose, the chemical-energy form, while releasing oxygen. SCIENTIST 2.  Apply the CO2 inhibitor! SCIENTIST 1.  Lid applied!  CO2 source blocked...system CO2 levels dropping rapidly...plants responding as expected, using up available CO2. SCIENTIST 2.  Reverse manipulation!  Apply the CO2 increaser! SCIENTIST 1. Lid removed!  CO2 added...plants responding.  Wait, they're responding too fast!  They're growing beyond the walls!  One has me...aieeeeeeee! SCIENTIST 2.  Now it's got me, too!  Noooooooo..... REPORTER: Well, this might be a good time for us to return to our regular show.  Back to you.... END VOICES IN SKIT Unlike this skit, with its far-fetched human-eating plants, there's nothing make-believe about Earth life's reliance on photosynthesis using sunlight, chlorophyll, nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide to make food.  Moreover, photosynthesis is a fundamental aspect of understanding and responding to climate change.  Photosynthesis millions of years ago created the hydrocarbon compounds that constitute today's fossil fuels, and photosynthesis now—absorbing and storing some of the carbon dioxide released in fossil fuel burning—has an important role in reducing Earth's carbon dioxide levels, warming, and other climate-change impacts.  For example, the capacity for photosynthesizing trees to take up atmospheric carbon dioxide was one aspect of the “Declaration on Forests and Land Use” at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, or COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland, from October 31 to November 12, 2021. Thanks to Eli Heilker and John Kidd for participating in this episode.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “Racing the Sun.”  We close with another musical selection appropriate for the climate challenges facing the COP26 meeting and all of us.  Here's about 25 seconds of “On a Ship,” by Blacksburg, Va., musician Kat Mills. MUSIC - ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship,” then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 186, 11-4-13. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 517, 3-23-20. Virginia Water Radio thanks John Kidd, formerly of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and Eli Heilker, a graduate of Virginia Tech in English who served an internship in Fall 2013 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, for their participation in this episode.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation demonstration of plant uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) during photosynthesis.  A terrarium (left) is attached via gas-transporting tubing to a CO2 monitor at right.  Photo taken in Blacksburg, Va., October 2013.  Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.Red Maple leaves in Blacksburg, Va., on October 30, 2013, in which green chlorophyll pigment was breaking down as photosynthesis and chlorophyll production in the leaves were stopping with the approach of winter.  The breakdown of chlorophyll in the fall allows pigments of other colors in the leaves to be revealed.  More information on fall leaf-color change is available in “The Miracle of Fall,” University of Illinois Extension, online at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/fallcolor/default.cfm. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Rick Groleau, “Illuminating Photosynthesis,” Public Broadcasting System (PBS) and WGBH-Boston, “NOVA” program, November 1, 2001, online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/photosynthesis.html. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, “Global Climate Change” Website, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/.  Specific pages used were the following:“A breathing planet, off balance,” by Kate Ramsayer and Carol Rasmussen, November 11, 2015, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2364/a-breathing-planet-off-balance/; and“Frequently Asked Questions,” online at https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/. John Seiler, John Groninger, and John Peterson, Forest Biology and Dendrology, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, Blacksburg, Va., 2009.Smithsonian Institution, “Ocean—Find Your Blue/What Are Fossil Fuels?”; online at https://ocean.si.edu/conservation/gulf-oil-spill/what-are-fossil-fuels. 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), October 31—November 12, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/.  [October 31-November 12, 2021]; for information on photosynthesizing forests serving as “sinks” for carbon dioxide and other “greenhouse gases,” see particularly “Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forests and Land Use,” November 2, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants,” “Science,” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes related to climate change. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Exploring Climate Change Basics, with Examples from Assateague Island National Seashore and Shenandoah National Park.Episode 312, 4-18-16 – Student's Research Digs into Streamside Soils, Rainfall Rates, and Greenhouse Gases. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.4 – There are basic sources of energy and that energy can be transformed.6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6     – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations.ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.  2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals. Virginia Studies CourseVS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at th

science bay humans university agency music photo national natural parties relationships earth political state audio living college english climate change change accent dark tech water web air index fall rain united states pond research ocean technology government education public racing conservation plants ship scotland sun scientists chesapeake snow environment glasgow organisms images green engage cooperation va student reporter domestic silver msonormal stream lid normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental soil dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology chemical specific civics grade diagram colorful resource forest resources signature bio reverse forests co2 scales govt watershed transcript earth sciences wg illinois extension freshwater virginia tech ls atlantic ocean declaration greenhouse gases natural resources fundamentals smithsonian institution grades k populations frequently asked questions name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes photosynthesis blacksburg noooooooo msohyperlink sections life sciences stormwater environmental conservation john peterson policymakers bmp new standard acknowledgment virginia department land use un climate change conference cripple creek cumberland gap sols tmdl shenandoah national park united states history vus dendrology biotic wgbh boston living systems virginia standards water center assateague island national seashore space systems audio notes
#beyondFLG
Episode 010: Brian Petersen, Ph.D.

#beyondFLG

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 84:02


Are solar panels and electric cars the way out of the current climate crisis? Is there any correlation between increasing rates of mental disorder, including anxiety and depression, and our perpetual pursuit of growth defined by increasing the GDP? Join Al Capone and Eliot Ness (aka Cody and Dan) as they go #beyondFLG with Brian Petersen to learn the answers to these questions. Brian Petersen is an Associate Professor in Geography, Planning, and Recreation in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at NAU (Harvard of the West). Brian earned his BS In Environmental Science from the University of Idaho, followed by Masters Degrees in Forest Resources and Public Administration from the University of Washington. He ultimately earned his PhD in Environmental Studies from the University of California Santa Cruz (Go Banana Slugs)! Brian's research focuses broadly on the social dimensions of climate change. He recently co-authored a book with Diana Stuart and Ryan Gunderson called "Climate Change Solutions: Overcoming the Capital-Climate Contradiction." His work also focuses on wilderness, public lands, biodiversity conservation, sustainability, and city planning. Brian has produced dozens of journal publications related to these topics. He recently served as the Chair of the City of Flagstaff Sustainability Commission for three years and speaks to his experience on this episode. Tune in to learn more about the alternative climate solutions that Brian addresses.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast
Episode 53 - Susan Day is a Professor of Urban Forestry in the Department of Forest Resources Management at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 45:44


Susan Downing Day is a Professor of Urban Forestry in the Department of Forest Resources Management at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and Program Director for the Bachelor of Urban Forestry. Susan's research focuses on managing urban soils to enhance tree growth and longevity in the context of environmental challenges such as stormwater mitigation and land development impacts on soil-mediated ecosystem services. She helped shape the soils metrics for the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES®) international crediting system for sustainable design projects and developed Soil Profile Rebuilding, a rehabilitation technique to restore damaged urban soils in situ and enhance urban soil carbon storage. Her research in the water relations of tree-engineered soil systems and in partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Trust has informed stormwater policy in the Chesapeake Bay region of the United States. Susan also led Urban Forestry 2020, a research-based investigation into urban forestry career paths and education. Susan has published more than 130 articles and book chapters on urban forests and urban soils and is the 2017 recipient of the L.C. Chadwick Award for Arboricultural Research. Susan holds a B.A. from Yale University, an M.S. from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. from Virginia Tech. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/plantatrilliontrees/support

Talking Forests
Cradle of Forestry and APSAF Centennial Monument with guest Patrick Hiesl ~ Episode 65

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 41:09


Patrick Hiesl the Assistant Professor of Forest Operations from Clemson University was interviewed by Candra Burns of Talking Forests about the Cradle of Forestry, the APSAF Centennial Monument, and Carl Schenck a German Forester who brought sustainable forest practices to the USA in 1895. His career profile from Clemson University in South Carolina: https://www.clemson.edu/cafls/faculty_staff/profiles/phiesl Patrick was an undergrad in Germany where he is from. During his first 4 years of school, he earned a B.S. in Forest Management at the University of Applied Forest Sciences Rottenburg and graduated in 2010. Then he moved to Maine, USA to go to graduate school and earned his M.S. in Forest Resources at the University of Maine and graduated in 2013. Then he got his Ph.D. in Forest Resources at the University of Maine in 2015. After his graduate school and Ph.D., he got lucky and interviewed for the forest operations teaching position at Clemson University in 2015 in South Carolina and accepted the position and started teaching. Later, after networking in his local Society of American Forester's chapters, he then worked on the regional level with the APSAF Monument Committee. He was excited to learn about Carl Schenck and his forestry school, as a German, himself. Candra was excited to talk with Patrick in this interview because she lived in Germany for 3 years from 2018-2020. She interviewed a German, Patrick Hiesl, on this podcast episode. She had friends in WA State that were foresters that helped German investment foresters use funding from USA forests to build bridges at their castles in Germany. When Candra lived in Germany, she could leave her backyard and go into a forest and that was not trespassing in Germany. That is very different than the private areas of the USA, especially in the fragmented areas where she currently lives in the south. Candra learned about Carl Schenck in 2015 at a WA State SAF meeting where they viewed “America's First Forest” in 2015. Ever since she has been intrigued and got lucky that she was able to live in Germany with her USAF husband and travel within Europe for the first 2 years, pre-COVID. She visited the Cradle of Forestry and the APSAF Monument in 2021 when she had a chance during Memorial Day weekend and was excited that the USAF picked her new state as the “First in Forestry” state. Voice By Gordon Collier in Introduction: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

Stories of Hope, Innovation and Impact
A Story of Innovation with Ara Erickson, VP Sustainability, Weyerhaeuser

Stories of Hope, Innovation and Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 36:25


In this episode, we talk about lumber and, more importantly, sustainability within the timber industry.Weyerhaeuser is one of the largest timber companies in the world. They own nearly 12,400,000 acres of timberlands in the U.S. and manage an additional 14,000,000 acres of timberlands under long-term licenses in Canada. In addition to its timberland business, Weyerhaeuser also has wood products used in millions of homes.Weyerhaeuser recently launched their 3 by 30 Impact Areas: three initiatives and goals in Climate, Affordable Homes, and Rural Communities.Our guest, Ara Erickson, joins the podcast to discuss her role as VP of Corporate Sustainability, where she is accountable for the development and implementation of the company's comprehensive sustainability strategy, including three areas where the company is in a unique position to participate:Working forests contribution to climate change solutionsThe role of sustainable products in ensuring housing for everyoneSupport for thriving rural communitiesAra is a proven leader who also served as Director of the Green City Partnerships program with a regional conservation organization, Forterra, and a forest-based researcher, environmental consultant, and educator. She received her M.S. in Forest Resources from the University of Washington and her B.S. in Resource Management from the University of California, Berkeley. Today, she serves as a board member for American Forests, the oldest national nonprofit conservation organization in the United States, is a founding steering committee member for the Women's Forest Congress, and uses her voice to advocate for sustainable, working forests.Weyerhaeuser is a primary sponsor for Operation Tiny Home's Building A Better Future for Veterans Program, providing funding and product donations to support us in building a tiny home to help Veterans in need.Visit Operation Tiny Home at https://www.operationtinyhome.org/A special thank you to Rodello's Machine for our theme song "The World Inside." Visit them at https://rodellosmachine.com/

News Updates from The Oregonian
Auditors find ‘ongoing concern' with Oregon Forest Resources Institute, potential law-breaking

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 4:32


4 people have drowned in Sandy River in the last month. Portland pays $600,000 to family of man who was shot and killed by police in 2017. Norman Powell will become free agent. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 582 (6-21-21): Where Headwaters Flow, Rivers Begin

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:09). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-18-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 21, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 – instrumentalThat's part of “Highland,” by the group Wake Up Robin, with musicians from North Carolina, New York, California, and Washington State.  It opens an episode about waterways in the highest and most upstream part of watersheds, where water starts following a channel and flowing overland towards rivers.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two Virginia examples, and see if you can guess the name for these upper watershed features.  And here's a hint: get this right and you'll stream to the head of water class.SOUND - ~ 11 sec If you guessed headwater streams, you're right!  Headwater streams are the first flowing waters in the upper part of a river's watershed.  These relatively small streams have a big range of functions, including as habitat for certain organisms or life stages, and as a source of water, materials, and organisms for downstream waters. Understanding the location and length of headwater streams in the Appalachian Mountains, particularly in response to storms, was the research goal of Carrie Jensen, a graduate student from 2014 to 2018 in Virginia Tech's Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.   In November 2017, Ms. Jensen described her research and its significance in just 90 seconds during the “Nutshell Games,” held by Virginia Tech's Center for Communicating Science.  Here's Ms. Jensen's presentation. GUEST VOICE - ~84 sec – “Hi, everyone.  My name is Carrie, and I study changes in stream length in Appalachian headwaters, which are the small streams where our rivers start on the landscape.  So I literally walk upstream with a GPS unit until I find where a stream begins in the mountains.  And these headwaters can expand and contract in length through time, getting longer when it's wet after it rains, and getting shorter during dry periods.  And I wanted to know if this expansion and contraction behavior is the same everywhere.  So I matched changes in stream length across the Appalachian Mountains and actually found some pretty big differences.  At some of my sites, stream length is really stable and hardly changes across a huge range of flows, but at other sites there's a lot of expansion and contraction: stream length varies from tens of feet to a couple of miles.  And this work is relevant for pretty much any application that requires knowing where streams are and when they have water.  So where to build stuff; how to build stuff; where you need riparian buffers of trees to protect water quality.  And normally we rely on maps for this information.  But the blue lines representing streams on maps don't tell us if the stream has water all the time, or 75 percent of the time, or maybe only once every couple of years.  So research describing and predicting these changes in stream length can help us better manage and protect our water resources.  Thank you.”As Ms. Jensen's work shows, there's much to know about headwaters, and such information can help us better understand quantity and quality patterns far downstream. Thanks to Carrie Jensen for permission to use the audio from her Nutshell Games talk.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstand for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Highland.”MUSIC - ~17 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 397, 12-4-17. The Nutshell Games are organized by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science to give graduate students a forum for describing their research in a short presentation designed for non-scientists.  More information about the Center for Communicating Science is available online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/.  Nutshell Games videos are available online at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC01cz4Mal3-AOZeODCauLHw.  Two news articles about the Nutshell Games are New center focuses on the art of communicating science effectively, Virginia Tech News, 2/28/17; and Understandable communication aim of first 'Nutshell Games', Roanoke Times, 3/3/17.“Highland,” from the 2018 album “Wake Up Robin,” on Great Bear Records, by the group of the same name, is used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about the album and band is available online at https://wakeuprobin.bandcamp.com.The sounds of headwater streams heard in this episode were recorded in Blacksburg, Va.'s Heritage Park on July 27, 2016, and in Blacksburg on Brush Mountain on January 31, 2010 (the latter stream is shown in the photos below). Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two views of a headwaters stream tributary to Toms Creek (New River basin) on Brush Mountain in Blacksburg, Va.: upper photo December 25, 2013; lower photo December 2, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Carrie Jensen, “Project Report, 2016 VWRRC Student Grant: Sensors reveal the timing and pattern of stream flow in headwaters after storms,” July 10, 2017, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg. Sacramento [Calif.] River Watershed Program, “Importance of the Headwaters,” by Todd Sloat, 9/21/14, online at https://sacriver.org/watershed-blog/importance-of-the-headwaters/. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Resources of the United States/Water Basics Glossary/Headwaters,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/water-basics_glossary.html#H. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Glossary/Headwater,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/dictionary.html#H. Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science, online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “The Importance of Headwater Streams,” online at https://dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Headwaters.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/ U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity.  Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia river basins.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021, so the episode number, date, and link may change. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge and three watersheds - Episode 209, 4-14-14. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – EP365 – 4/24/17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16.Following are links to other episodes with information from presentations at the Nutshell Games, produced by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Sciences.Episode

new york bay university agency california music natural earth state audio college change sound accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol north carolina appalachian chesapeake snow gps environment wwe journal types organisms images ms va significance msonormal commonwealth stream highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide water resources biology rivers grade colorful forest resources washington state madison county signature bio continental scales blue ridge guest voice watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater ohio river environmental protection virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes communicating science blacksburg james river msohyperlink appalachian mountains smith river sections richard b life sciences stormwater headwaters headwater new river environmental conservation policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa heritage park new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap emerald ash borer sols understandable tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park west virginia department biotic living systems roanoke times virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Northeast Delta Dental
Our New Hampshire Forests

Northeast Delta Dental

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 25:05


Our New Hampshire Forests is the theme for this weekend's broadcast on Northeast Delta Dental Radio.  Steve Roberge, Extension Specialist with Forest Resources of the UNH Cooperative Extension is our guest and we will talking about our forests.  Did you know that the state of New Hampshire is 82% forested and just over 70% of this forested land is owned by private landowners?  Join us for this informative discussion on our forests and get outside and enjoy them…  https://extension.unh.edu/programs/forests-trees

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 574 (4-26-21): Rhododendrons Span Virginia from Ridges to Swamps

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:36)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 26, 2021.  This revised episode from June 2014 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. MUSIC – ~17 sec – Lyrics: “I can’t explain away the reasons, I can’t wish away the seasons.  When springtime comes again, it’ll sure by my winter’s end.” This week, that music opens an episode about a group of plants with species found across Virginia and whose blooming times collectively span a period from early spring well into summer.  Have a listen for about 50 more seconds to the song and its celebration of some members of this plant group found high up in southwestern Virginia.MUSIC – ~48 sec – Lyrics: “Well I was high up in the fields, there above the rhododendron ridge.  My time up there was real, not like some other time I’ve spent.  And when the flowers bloom in June, it’s like something you’ve never seen—shades of purple, white, and blue, as far as you can see.” You’ve been listening to part of “Rhododendron Ridge,” by the Roanoke, Va., band The Floorboards, on their 2012 self-titled album.  The song was written about the area around Mt. Rogers—Virginia’s highest peak, located in Grayson and Smyth counties.  Mt. Rogers is noted for its populations of Catawba Rhododendronand its flower displays in June.  Catawba is one of Virginia’s nine native species in the scientific genus of Rhododendron, some of which are commonly called azaleas.  As a group, their habitats range from rocky mountainous areas, to Piedmont streams, to Coastal Plains wetlands.  Their blooming times range from March to August, depending on the species. These perennial spring and summer flower shows happen in places where the plants’ roots and leaves get their preferred combination of sun or shade, temperature, moisture, nutrients, and acidity levels in the soil and soil water.  Virginia’s rhododendron species typically prefer higher acidity, and they share that preference with other members of the heath family of plants, including blueberries and Mountain Laurel. While you can’t see the water chemistry going on around rhododendron roots, at the right time and place you can see a remarkable flower display, which might be for you—as for this week’s songwriter—like something you’ve never seen.  Thanks to the Floorboards for permission to use this week’s music, and close with about 25 more seconds of “Rhododendron Ridge.” MUSIC – ~28 sec – Lyrics: “Springtime’s comin’ now, oh it won’t be long—you and I we’re gonna sing, gonna sing our summer song.” SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 216, 6-2-14. “Rhododendron Ridge” is copyright 2012 by The Floorboards, used with permission.  More information about The Floorboards is available online at https://thefloorboardsmusic.com/.Thanks to the following people for providing information in 2014 for the original version of this episode: Susan Day, John Peterson, and John Seiler, all in the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation; and the staff and volunteers working at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Rocky Knob Visitor Center (mile post 169) on June 1, 2014. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Great Rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum, right), Flame Azalea (Rhododendron calendulaceum), orange flowers, left) and Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia, foreground) along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Floyd County, Va., June 1, 2014.Side-by-side Flame Azaleas (Rhododendron calendulaceum) showing color variation, along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Floyd County, Va., June 1, 2014.Swamp Azalea (Rhododendron viscosum), photographed at Sandy Bottom Nature Park in Hampton, Va., June 14, 2009.  Photo by Debbie Blanton, made available on iNaturalist, online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35506117(as of 4-26-21), for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT RHODODENDRONS IN VIRGINIA The following information about nine native species of Rhododendron found in Virginia is from pages 540-543 in A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.; copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond; published by Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  The species are listed in alphabetical order according to their scientific name (shown in italics). Sweet Azalea (also called Smooth Azalea), Rhododendron arborescens – Found rarely in Virginia’s mountains and Piedmont; in rocky forests and rocky areas along streams; blooms May to July. Dwarf Azalea, Rhododendron atlanticum – Found commonly in Virginia’s southern Coastal Plain; in woodlands and clearings that are dry to moist, sandy, and acidic; blooms April to May. Flame Azalea, Rhododendron calendulaceum – Found commonly in Virginia’s southern mountains; in forests that are dry to mesic (moderately moist), particularly in acidic oak forests; blooms May to June. Catawba Rhododendron (also called Pink Laurel and Mountain Rosebay), Rhododendron catawbiense – Found commonly in Virginia’s southern and rarely in the Piedmont; in dry forests on sheltered slopes or rocky ridges, as well as on balds, in bogs, and in acidic cove forests, and (in the Piedmont) along river bluffs; blooms April to June. Cumberland Azalea, Rhododendron cumberlandense – Found infrequently in Virginia’s far southwestern mountains; in mountainous forests and woodlands; blooms June to July. Great Rhododendron (also called Great Laurel and White Rosebay), Rhododendron maxiumum – Found commonly is Virginia’s southwestern mountains and Piedmont, less frequently in northern mountains, and rarely in other parts of the Piedmont or in the Coastal Plain; in acidic cove forests in the mountains, and in forests, wetlands, bluffs, and stream bottoms in other regions; blooms June to August. Wild Azalea (also called Pinxterflower and Pinxterbloom Azalea), Rhododendron periclymenoides– Found commonly throughout Virginia; in dry or mesic acidic forests, in certain wetlands, and along streams; blooms March to May. Early Azalea (also called Rose Azalea and Roseshell Azalea), Rhododendron prinophyllum – Found frequently or commonly in Virginia’s mountains, except in far southwestern Virginia, and rarely in the northern Piedmont; in dry or mesic forests, most abundantly in oak forests, and more often in less acidic soils than are other Rhododendron species; blooms May to June. Swamp Azalea (also called Clammy Azalea), Rhododendron viscosum – Found frequently in Virginia’s Coastal Plain, infrequently in the mountains, and rarely in the Piedmont; in acidic swamps, bogs, and other wetlands, and in wet woods; blooms May to July. SOURCES Used for Audio Blue Ridge Parkway Association, “Craggy Gardens, MP 364,” online at http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/v.php?pg=112.Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. W. Henry McNab, Ecological Subregions of the United States, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, D.C., 1994; available online at http://www.fs.fed.us/land/pubs/ecoregions/ch18.html.  See particularly Chapter 18, “Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest - Coniferous Forest – Meadow.”U.S. Forest Service, “Mt. Rogers National Recreation Area,” online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/gwj/specialplaces/?cid=stelprdb5302337.U.S. National Park Service, “Blue Ridge Parkway/Plants/Blooming Shrubs,” online at https://www.nps.gov/blri/learn/nature/showy-blooms.htm.Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora/Rhododendron,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?s=rhododendron&c=&do=search%3Aadvanced&search=Search.Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology,” online at http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/index.html. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  This is the first comprehensive manual of Virginia plants published since the 1700s.  The Flora of Virginia Project is nline at http://www.floraofvirginia.org/.For More Information about Plants in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, series of wildflower guides: Fall Wildflowers of the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountains, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1987; Wild Orchids of the Middle Atlantic States University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, 1986); Wildflowers of Tidewater Virginia (University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1982; and Wildflowers of the Shenandoah Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1979. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service Plants Database, online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes. Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Spring Peepers – Episode 570, 3-29-21.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 571, 4-5-21.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.Virginia Bluebells – Episode 521, 4-20-20.Warblers and spring bird migration – Episode 572, 4-12-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources.   Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.3 – There are levels of structural organization in living things.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.6 – Modern classification systems can be used as organizational tools for scientists in the study of organisms. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Following are links to Water Radio

bay university agency music photo natural earth state audio living found college knoxville modern accent texas dark tech water web index rain united states pond research ocean washington weather government education conservation plants trees foundation spring chesapeake snow environment organisms images search richmond va rogers adaptations copyright msonormal stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens fort worth great smoky mountains wildflowers environmental frogs soil national park service dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology shenandoah valley chemical span blue ridge mountains grade ludwig colorful townsend forest resources signature bio charlottesville mt catawba scales piedmont hampton blue ridge mp warblers watershed swamps transcript virginia tech smyth ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k roanoke university press forest service name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes rhododendron rhododendrons shrubs ar sa swope spring peepers msohyperlink blue ridge parkway sections attribution noncommercial life sciences stormwater environmental conservation john peterson policymakers msobodytext bmp new standard acknowledgment virginia department floyd county cripple creek floorboards virginia press cumberland gap inaturalist sols tennessee press tmdl ridges wild orchids biotic living systems virginia standards water center mountain laurel oscar w space systems audio notes
Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley
Leadership approaches to wicked problems and sustainability with Dr. R. Bruce Hull

Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 67:41


Dr. R. Bruce Hull is my guest on Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley. Bruce writes and speaks about organizations, communities, and leaders constructing sustainable development in the face of converging demographic, environmental, governance, and market transformations. He is most excited when learning and sharing lessons about innovative leaders who are forging collaborations among government, business, and civil society. He is a Senior Fellow in the Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability. Senior Fellow, Center for Leadership in Global Sustainability Professor, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation President of Board of Directors, Climate Solutions University Advisory Committee, Center for Communicating Science Curriculum Committee Chair, Interfaces for Global Change Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Program Leadership for Sustainability: Strategies for Tackling Wicked Problems Nov. 2020 Island Press. Leadership for Sustainability gives readers perspective and skills for promoting creative and collaborative solutions. Blending systems thinking approaches with leadership techniques, it offers dozens of strategies and specific practices that build on the foundation of three main skills: connecting, collaborating, and adapting. Inspiring case studies show how the book's strategies and principles can be applied to diverse situations. Readers will come away with a holistic understanding of how to lead from where they are by applying leadership principles and practices to a wide range of wicked situations. While the challenges we face are daunting, the authors argue that these situations present opportunities for creating a more just, healthy, and prosperous world. https://islandpress.org/books/leadership-sustainability

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 564 (2-15-21): Exploring Customers' Trust in Their Water Utility

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:42) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImageSources for More InformationRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 15, 2021. SOUND - ~7 sec – Pouring water then ice cubes This week, we focus on drinking water and Virginia Tech research on customers’ trust of their local water supply system.  Our guest voice this week is Maddy Grupper, a recent master’s graduate from the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.  We start with a 40-second except of a talk Maddy gave on her research at the Nutshell Games, conducted by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science. VOICE - 38 sec – Nutshell Games excerpt:“It’s 2014, you live in Toledo, OH…Thick green algae has invaded Lake Erie, your water source, and for days you can’t fill up your water from the faucet and drink. What if we could prevent this? What if we could predict when water is going to go bad the same way a weatherman predicts a tornado…  We’re developing this technology…  But successful technology isn’t just the ones that work, it’s what the public trusts, accepts, and uses.  I study what factors impact that trust.” GUEST VOICE Hello, I’m Maddy Grupper, speaking to you now in 2021.  As you heard in that excerpt, I study people’s trust in the quality and safety of their drinking water. The quality of lakes, reservoirs, and other sources that humans use for drinking water can be affected by climate change, infrastructure degradation, and pollutants. Researchers are looking for innovative methods to maintain drinking water quality, such as technology to forecast threats like algae blooms and metal increases. But without trust, people might not support such new technologies or other changes. That can slow the ability of utilities to stay ahead of fast-acting threats.  The focus of my Virginia Tech master’s study was on the trust that community members have, or don’t have, in their utility.  In the fall of 2019 we surveyed over 600 customers of the water utility serving the Roanoke Valley of Virginia.  We found that 61% of the respondents mostly or completely trusted their utility to deliver safe drinking water to them. What is the basis of such trust?  Our study found evidence supporting a framework that claims a person’s trust is based on four sources:  1. Rational – that is, I trust you because I think you’re capable and have a good track record. 2. Affinitive – that is, I trust you because I like you, think you share my values, and have my best interests at heart. 3. Dispositional – that is, I trust you because I’m a trusting person. And 4. Procedural – that is, I trust the system that regulates you. Our study in the Roanoke Valley showed that as each of these factors increased, so did trust.  But we also found that high trust didn’t rely on just one or two of these factors; it needed all four. If water managers want to increase community support through trust, they need to take all four factors into account.  Understanding these trust factors might help water managers build more resilient systems. For community members, such understanding might give them a greater sense of control and peace of mind about what they drink. So, the next time you take a sip of water ask yourself, why do you, or don’t you, trust what you are drinking? END GUEST VOICE Thanks to Maddy Grupper for lending her voice and expertise to this episode. SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio’s guest voice this week was Madeline (Maddy) Grupper, an August 2020 graduate of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. The opening excerpt heard in this episode was from Maddy’s presentation at the October 27, 2018, Nutshell Games, conducted by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science.  Maddy’s presentation was one of three top-honors winners at the event, where graduate students take 90 seconds to present their research and highlight its importance.  More information about the October 2018 event is available online at https://vtnews.vt.edu/articles/2018/11/2018-nutshell-game-winners.html.  More information about the Center for Communicating Science is available online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/. A 2020 report on Maddy’s research is available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/100105. The water utility participating in Maddy’s research was the Western Virginia Water Authority, serving customers in the City of Roanoke and the counties of Botetourt, Franklin, and Roanoke.  More information about that utility is available online at https://www.westernvawater.org/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Maddy Grupper during her survey in 2019 of trust in drinking water among utility customers in Virginia’s Roanoke Valley area.  Photo courtesy of Maddy Grupper. SOURCES OFFERING MORE INFORMATION ON DRINKING WATER U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Drinking Water,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/index.html. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “Drinking Water and Sources Water Research,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/mission-areas/water-resources/science/drinking-water-and-source-water-research?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Health/Office of Drinking Water, online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/drinking-water/. Virginia Cooperative Extension/Virginia Household Water Quality Program, online at https://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu/vahwqp.php. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance of Water” and “Science” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes on drinking water or water sources. Drinking Water Week – Episode 314, 5-2-16.SERCAP (Southeast Regional Community Assistance Project) work on rural water needs – Episode 366, 5-1-17. Virginia Household Water Quality Program – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Worldwide water needs – Episode 122, 8-6-12. Following are links to some other episodes on research by Virginia university students, including research presented the Nutshell Games, conducted by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science. On antibiotic resistance – Episode 290, 11-16-15.On avian malaria – Episode 259, 3-30-15.On the Emerald Ash Borer – Episode 376, 7-10-17 (based on a Nutshell Games presentation).On headwater streams – Episode 397, 12-4-17 (based on a Nutshell Games presentation).On oysters and nitrogen – Episode 280, 9-7-15On soils and greenhouse gases – Episode 312, 4-18-16.On streams buried under human infrastructure – Episode 409, 2-26-18 (based on a Nutshell Games presentation). FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth Resources 3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. 4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Civics and Economics Course CE.8 – government at the local level. CE.10 – public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography Course WG.2 – how selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth’s surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia and United States History Course VUS.14 – political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government Course GOVT.1 – skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision-making, and responsible citizenship. GOVT.8 – state and local government organization and powers. GOVT.9 – public policy process at local, state, and national levels. GOVT.15 – role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12thgrade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8thgrade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rdand 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia’s water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

science bay humans university agency photo natural earth state audio college sound accent worldwide dark tech water web index land rain pond research ocean government education voice chesapeake snow environment va trust msonormal stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading toledo civics grade procedural colorful resource pouring forest resources signature scales guest voice govt watershed transcript earth sciences rational researchers wg centers disease control freshwater virginia tech atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k roanoke drinking water name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table utility more information communicating science prevention cdc msohyperlink vml sections stormwater lake erie health office environmental conservation policymakers msobodytext bmp environmental protection agency epa new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap emerald ash borer sols tmdl roanoke valley vus virginia standards water center audio notes
Day Fire Podcast
Elk in Tennessee

Day Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2021 67:32


This week Dawson and Clint talk all things elk with Brad Miller and Jason Finnell. Brad serves as the Elk Program Coordinator for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Jason is an avid outdoor adventurer and hunter. The elk population in Tennessee is estimated to be between 400-500 and the ERZ (Elk Restoration Zone) covers 670,000 acres centered around the North Cumberland Plateau. They discuss how and why elk were introduced back into Tennessee, keeping the population healthy, the relationship between residents and the elk, why controlled hunts are important, the strategic plan moving forward, and much more! Brad Miller serves as the Elk Program Coordinator based out of the North Cumberland WMA work center. Brad came to TWRA in 2016 from the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) where he worked as the Regional Biologist for Tennessee and North Carolina. Prior to working for the NWTF, Brad was the Assistant Chief of Wildlife at the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission where he also served as the Deer Program Coordinator and supervised the elk program. Brad is from Knoxville and received his B.S. and M.S. Degrees in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from the University of Tennessee. His master’s topic examined silvicultural and prescribed fire techniques for improving wildlife habitat. Brad attended the University of Georgia and received a Ph.D. in Forest Resources. Jason Finnell was born and raised in Chattanooga Tennessee. Jason is the mountain bike program director for the Schejola Foundation and helps open mountain bike programs for the Boys & Girls Clubs across the southeast. Jason’s hobbies include mountain biking, snowboarding, hunting, and Brazilian jiu-jitsu. He has competed in numerous adventure races with his team Adventure Capitalists/BDAR. Thanks for listening! Find all our episodes at dayfirepodcast.com This podcast is powered by ZenCast.fm

Maine Science Podcast
Ivan Fernandez

Maine Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2020 41:46


Ivan Fernandez is a Distinguished Maine Professor at the University of Maine, in the School of Forest Resources, Climate Change Institute, and School of Food and Agriculture. Ivan has served on various U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board committees in Washington DC since 2000, and has been involved in leading the Maine’s Climate Future assessments. In 2019 Ivan was appointed to the Maine Climate Council, and also serves as co-Chair of its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee. He is a soil scientist, with a research program that focuses on the biogeochemistry of ecosystems in a changing physical and chemical climate and is actively engaged in promoting climate change solutions in Maine.Ivan presented at the 2015 Maine Science Festival, and was scheduled to present at the 2020 MSF before it was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Maine's Climate Future is found at the Climate Change Institute's website. The Maine Climate Council's website is found at https://bit.ly/2J0D7Na.

Weather Wise Guy Podcast
Virginia fall colors could be the best in years

Weather Wise Guy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 8:26


Brent talks with Dr. John Seiler, Professor of Tree Biology at Virginia Tech about why this year's fall colors could be the best in years. GUEST: Dr John Seiler, professor at Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation | View BioUS Forest Service Fall ColorsVirginia Fall Foliage Report

Talking Forests
Forestry Women Who Rock - Amanda Lang - Episode 54

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2020 38:08


Amanda Hamsley Lang is the COO & Vice President of Client Services, Forisk Consulting and we had a great chat about women working up to leadership positions in forestry companies. Have kids and being a mom is not easy, but worth it and when you work for a flexible team like Forisk, it makes the journey better. Reach her at: ahlang@forisk.com Amanda Lang is a Partner and, as COO and VP of Client Services, leads all of Forisk's operating, project management and Forisk Subscriber Support activities. She leads Forisk's mill capital investment research program, and she teaches workshops and delivers presentations related to tracking and evaluating wood markets and forest industry capacity. Prior to working with Forisk, she interned with International Paper and conducted award-winning forestry operations research at the University of Georgia under Dr. Dale Greene. In 2016, she was named one of the UGA Alumni Association “Forty Under Forty”, and was named the Warnell “Young Alumni of the Year.” She serves on the Georgia Forestry Association Board of Directors and is the chair of the Southeastern Society of American Foresters. Ms. Lang received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Forest Resources from the University of Georgia. Voice By Gordon Collier in Introduction: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

Talking Forests
Forestry Men Who Rock - Tyler Reeves from Forisk - Episode 53

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2020 30:33


Tyler and I had a great chat about forestry in all regions, how his internship led him into his position now, and adversity that we face in the industry. He has a wide variety of knowledge and brings a great education with him to his first year working as a Timber Industry Analyst at Forisk Consulting. Role: Currently, I am working as Timber Industry Analyst here at Forisk. I have been with them full-time since July of this year. Previously, I had interned with them going back to March of 2019. Education: My undergraduate degree was a B.A. in Biology from Georgia Southern University. Afterwards, I got my M.S. in Forest Resources and MFR in Forest Business both from the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia. This May, I finished up my PhD in Forest Finance and Economics also from Warnell. My master's work was centered around examining the costs of a chipping operation on an experimental track in South Carolina while my PhD was focused on how working forest conservation easements and their characteristics affect surrounding property value. Previous jobs: Primarily, I have worked as a graduate research assistant during my time in graduate school both at the masters and PhD level. However, prior to coming to UGA I also worked as women's assistant soccer coach at Georgia Military College in Milledgeville, GA. Hobbies: Emily (my wife) and I like to go hiking on the weekends when we can. Generally, we enjoy taking a trip up to the North Georgia mountains and spending a day doing so. Also, I have recently started gardening a bit more and enjoy reading and spending time around the house with Emily and our two cats Goblin and Petunia. Goal in social media: Generally, I would like to get to know more people in the industry. Hopefully, social media and events like this podcast can help with that. Forestry is such a broad field that it is always beneficial to talk to more people because everyone has a unique perspective. Voice By Gordon Collier in Introduction: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

Tennessee Home & Farm Radio
Protecting Our Forest Resources

Tennessee Home & Farm Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2020 2:03


Tennessee is blessed with an abundant forest resource and the role of the Tennessee Division of Forestry is to promote and protect that resource. The post Protecting Our Forest Resources appeared first on Tennessee Farm Bureau.

Tennessee Home & Farm Radio
Protecting Our Forest Resources

Tennessee Home & Farm Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2020 2:03


Tennessee is blessed with an abundant forest resource and the role of the Tennessee Division of Forestry is to promote and protect that resource. The post Protecting Our Forest Resources appeared first on Tennessee Farm Bureau.

Trees Are Key
Action Plans Are Key

Trees Are Key

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2020 13:40


We’ve talked about planning in previous episodes including #186 “Planning Is Key”. This week, join us in "Action Plans Are Key" as we discuss our Texas Forest Action Plan which helps guide our agency’s efforts for the next 10 years and how you can help us with Urban Forest Sustainability, Woodlands Conservation, Forest Resources, Water Resources, and Wildfire and Public Safety. Species Spotlight This week's tree is, usually, well armed and has been introduced to Texas. Black Locust, Robinia pseudoacacia, is a tough tree that can thrive in depleted soils because it is a legume.

Level E (with Eric LeMay)
It started at Muck Creek...South Puget Sound Salmon Expert Jeanette Dorner

Level E (with Eric LeMay)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2020 62:23


Jeanette Dorner has been working with communities to recover local salmon populations for the last two decades.  In her career she has been the Salmon Recovery Program Manager for the Nisqually Indian Tribe, the Director of Ecosystem and Salmon Recovery for Washington State’s Puget Sound Partnership, and is currently the Executive Director of the Mid Sound Fisheries Enhancement Group working on salmon recovery in King and Kitsap counties.  In her spare time she also serves as Chair of the Board of the Pierce Conservation District and President of the Washington Association of Conservation Districts.  Jeanette has a BS in Earth Sciences and a BA in Environmental Studies from Pacific Lutheran University and has an MS from the University of Washington’s College of Forest Resources where she studied Ecological Restoration. Some links like were discussed: http://regionalfisheriescoalition.org https://scc.wa.gov/conservation-district-map/  

Talking Timber
Forest Resources Association

Talking Timber

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2020 26:45


Deb Hawkinson, president of Forest Resources Association (FRA), discusses their work and dealing with COVID-19.Sponsored by TimberWest Magazine

Talking Forests
Michigan Tech Forestry Students Who Rock - Andi, Krause, and Claudia - Episode 48

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2020 45:07


My name is Krause, I am currently a Master of Forestry Student at Michigan Technological University where I am an office assistant working on recruiting and retention in the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science and an intern at the Center for Diversity and Inclusion working on diversity initiatives for the campus. I got my bachelor's degree from Northern Michigan University in Criminal Justice with a minor in Wildland Firefighting. I am from Freeland, Michigan and spent my entire childhood there until I moved to the Upper Peninsula in 2014. While taking criminal justice and wildland fire courses at NMU, I quickly realized that wildland fire and natural resource management was something I am extremely passionate about, and in the summer of 2016 began my wildland firefighting journey with the US Forest Service in Munising, Michigan. I travelled all over the U.P. my first summer doing prescribed burns, fighting wildfires on hand crews, and managing the land while on an engine crew. The following summer I got out west to Colorado and Idaho for severity on engine crews. Summer of 2018 I joined the DNR as a keyman while also working a bunch of odd jobs. After all the experience I got from fire, my career goals were pretty unclear but I decided to finish my CJ degree. My ultimate career goal when I complete my MF in December is to be a forester in the Upper Peninsula for quite a while, eventually get my PhD, then become a professor where I can educate others about fire and natural resources, as well as promote diversity in all of my places of employment in that time. My name is Andi. I am a third year Forestry student at Michigan Tech. I served as President of Women in Natural Resources this year and have been an active member of the Student Chapter of the Society of American Foresters and Women in Natural Resources for the past 2 years. I am a huge tree nerd, my favorite way to de-stress is to saunter through the woods so I can catch glimpses of wildlife and quiz myself on tree identification (see, told you I was a nerd!) I am a non-traditional student. I come from a customer service and office work background, so I consider myself extremely fortunate to have discovered forestry. I am very passionate about our natural resources and love to encourage others to seek and follow their own passions. My name is Claudia and since May 2019 I am a PhD student in foresty science at Michigan Tech. I am from northern Germany and grew up in a small town close to the city of Hamburg where I used to work as a vet assistant. In 2010 I decided to go back to school and moved to the city of Kiel (close to the Baltic sea) and graduated with a Master's degree in Biology from the Christian-Albrechts-University. I am particularly interested in the ecophysiology of plants and how harvest regimes affect forest biodiversity. Not only professional but also in my free time, I like to be outdoors, preferably hiking, horseback riding or scuba diving. And since last winter, downhill and cross-country skiing are definitely among my favourite recreational activities as well! Want to be featured? Schedule your interview with Talking Forests on this link: www.calendly.com/talkingforests Voice by Gordon Collier www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

Talking Forests
Forestry Men Who Rock - Joseph Vaughn - Episode 47

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2020 69:22


Joseph Vaughn has worked in the natural resource profession since 2011. He has experience in wildland fire management, political and environmental advocacy, and most recently the forest products industry working at Interfor, one of the world's largest lumber providers, as a Procurement Forester. He has earned an Associate of Science in Pre-Forestry from the University of North Georgia (UNG), a Bachelor of Science in Forest Resources from the University of Georgia's Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources (UGA) and is currently working on an Associate Certificate in Industrial Wood Processing at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT). One of his most notable achievements is becoming an alumnus of the National Park Service (NPS) Academy, a partnership with the Student Conservation Association (SCA). The goal of the program is to enhance professional and organizational excellence in the next century by recruiting and retaining a workforce that reflects the diversity of the nation. He is also proud to hold membership in AGHON, a honor society founded in 1920 at UGA, which seeks to recognize individuals with outstanding leadership, character and a passion for agriculture. His current projects include becoming a licensed Registered Forester and operating a forestry & natural resource specific twitter account, Joe Talks Timber. Joseph lives in Athens, GA with his wife Samantha and dog Toby. Reach Joe at: @ath_forester - https://www.instagram.com/ath_forester/ @joetalkstimber - https://twitter.com/joetalkstimber LinkedIn - www.linkedin.com/in/vaughnjoseph Want to be featured? Schedule your interview with Talking Forests on this link: www.calendly.com/talkingforests Voice by Gordon Collier www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Maine Currents 1/7/20: CMP Corridor Draws Opposition from Across the Political Spectrum

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2020 0:01


Producer/Host: Amy Browne Studio Engineer: John Greenman Production assistance: Meredith DeFrancesco, WERU-FM & Sunlight Media Collective Audio provided by: North American Megadam Resistance NOTE: The first audio file (below) is this program, and the second is a full, unedited recording of the Megadam Resistance tour speakers in Augusta in November 2019, used with their permission. If you come from a politically mixed family here in Maine, chances are there was one topic you were able to discuss over the holidays without anyone getting disowned. The New England Clean Energy Connect – or the CMP Corridor as it is widely known- is drawing opposition from all over the political spectrum. Building the corridor would involve cutting 53 miles through undeveloped forest in Western Maine. According to the Natural Resources Council of Maine, the damage would fragment the largest contiguous temperate forest in North America and perhaps the world. The corridor would traverse Maine to bring pricier energy, that supporters call “green”, from HydroQuebec dams in Canada to Massachusetts. Maine Governor Janet Mills supports the project, after, she says, she negotiated with HydroQuebec and “insisted that the project include electric vehicle charging stations, provisions to support renewable energy, broadband access, and heat pumps, as well as cash relief for ratepayers over and above the benefits of lower electricity prices”. Many towns that initially were in support have changed their minds, as has the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine after realizing that a majority of their members were in opposition. The guests on this program represent some of the different parts of the political spectrum that oppose the project. Dawn Neptune Adams is a member of the Penobscot Nation, a narrator and citizen-journalist with Sunlight Media Collective, Wabanaki liaison to the Maine Independent Green Party, and a Racial Justice Consultant to the Peace and Justice Center of Eastern Maine. She met with the Cree and Innu People from the North American Megadam Resistance speaking tour in November to learn more about the situations in their territories. We hear some clips from their presentation during this program as well. And joining us by phone, from arguably what is usually the other end of the political spectrum, is Tom Saviello, former Republican State Senator Franklin County and former State Representative for 6 towns in Franklin County including his home town of Wilton. He is the former Chair of the joint Standing Committee on the Environment and Natural Resources. He has a BS degree in Forestry from the University of Tennessee, and an MS in Agronomy & a PHD in Forest Resources from UMO. He has worked for 33 years in the forest industry starting as a research forester and retiring as the environmental manager at the Androscoggin Mill. FMI: Say No to NECEC Northeast Megadam Resistance Natural Resources Council of Maine CMP Transmission Line Proposal: A Bad Deal for Maine Sierra Club of Maine CMP Transmission Line RadioActive 11/14/19 Indigenous Resistance to Megadam Power in Canada New England Clean Energy Connect Governor Janet Mills’ statement on NECEC Catch the award-winning Maine Currents, independent local news, views and culture, on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of each month, 4-5pm on WERU-FM, streaming live at www.weru.org and on the WERU app About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU’s News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices and Maine Currents, she also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and the First Place 2017 Radio News Award from the Maine Association of Broadcasters.

Bethel College Chapel Podcast
RELEASED: Dr. Katie Weakland

Bethel College Chapel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2019 20:56


Katie studied Zoology at Ohio State University and went on to earn a Master’s degree in Wildlife Science from Purdue University. She has a PhD in Forest Resources, Wildlife Ecology and Management from West Virginia...

Talking Forests
Wood Products Women Who Rock: Pat Layton from Clemson - Episode 31

Talking Forests

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2019 30:19


Live from the International Mass Timber Conference in Portland, Oregon we talk openly about building with wood! Dr. Patricia A. Layton, Ph.D., Clemson, SC, Is the Director of the Wood Utilization + Design Institute and a professor Forestry. She is the former Director of the School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences (SAFE Sciences) (2010-2014) at Clemson University. She came to Clemson University in late 1999 as the Chair of the Department of Forest Resources. In 2003 she was chosen to lead the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. Before joining Clemson University, she was a Senior Director with the American Forest & Paper Association where she represented the industry in the area of recycling, life cycle analysis, sustainability, and energy. Prior to that Pat was a Manager at Scott Paper Company, where she developed new forestry and marketing initiatives, including playing a vital role in the development of the American Forest & Paper Association's Sustainable Forestry Initiative Program. While at Scott Paper, Dr. Layton served as the forest policy and technical lead on all of Scott Paper's international forestry investments and opportunities. Education: Ph.D. Forest Genetics University of Florida 1985 M.S. Forest Genetics Texas A&M University 1978 B.S. Forest Management Clemson University 1976 Research Interests Development of southern yellow pine cross laminated timber Extension and Outreach Expanding the Use of Wood Products in SC Want to be featured? Schedule your interview with Talking Forests on this link: www.calendly.com/talkingforests Voice by Gordon Collier www.linkedin.com/in/jgordoncollier/ Spring by Ikson www.soundcloud.com/ikson Music promoted by Audio Library www.youtu.be/5WPnrvEMIdo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkingforests/support

UW Sustainability -
WOHESC 2019 opening keynote by Dean Lisa Graumlich

UW Sustainability - "In Our Nature"

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2019 13:56


UW College of the Environment Dean Lisa Graumlich gave the opening keynote at the 2019 Washington & Oregon Higher Education Sustainability Conference, hosted at the University of Washington on February 26-27. She was introduced by Scarlett Foster-Moss, Swire Coca-Cola, USA Vice President of Public Relations and Government Affairs. More information on WOHESC can be found at wohesc.org Dean Lisa J. Graumlich, Mary Laird Wood Professor, is the inaugural dean of the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. As dean, she leads a College with unparalleled depth and breadth in environmental systems: from the forests to the seas and from the depths of the earth to the edges of the solar system. As a scholar, Graumlich pioneered the use of tree-ring data to understand long-term trends in climate, focusing on the mountains of western North America. Graumlich has served as a faculty member at University of California-Los Angeles, the director of the University of Arizona's Institute for the Study of Planet Earth and Montana State University's Mountain Research Center, as well as executive director of their Big Sky Institute. She received her B.S. in Botany and M.S. in Geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her Ph.D. in Forest Resources from the University of Washington.

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
391: Catherine Bukowski on Community Food Forests

The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2018 31:19


Building urban food resiliency with more that just vegetables. In This Podcast: A fascination with jungles and forests began at an early age for Catherine Bukowski, and she has studied these ecosystems throughout her education.  Then narrowing her focus just on the food forest aspect, she found similar regenerative patterns that work. She brought this to her new book and shares some of what she discovered with us. Catherine is a researcher, author, educator and consultant. She's worked internationally and domestically in sustainable land use and natural resource management, agroforestry, permaculture, and project planning to strengthen communities. She pursued her passion for tropical ecosystems by earning a Master of Science in Natural Resource Management. Then she returned to school and earned a PhD in the Human Dimensions of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech. Don't miss an episode! Click here to sign up for podcast updates At Tech she was introduced to the topic of community food forests, which ultimately became her dissertation research and focus of her new book The Community Food Forest Handbook: How to Plan, Organize and Nurture Edible Gathering Places published by our friends at Chelsea Green.  Go to www.urbanfarm.org/cffcathie for more information and links on this podcast, and to find our other great guests. 391: Catherine Bukowski on Community Food Forests

The Leadership Nature Podcast
092: You Can't Be Bogged down in This Moment, This Day or This Hour; This Is About Is About a Legacy

The Leadership Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2018 56:11


Alex Harvey is a 2005 graduate of Mississippi State University College of Forest Resources. He first began his career in Florida as a Forester before taking on a position with the U.S. Forest Service on the Allegany National Forest in Northwest Pennsylvania. Alex also took on a position as a Sustainable Forestry and Land Retention Program Manager for the Federation of Southern Cooperatives. On today's show, Alex explains how enriching his work is, why he's building a legacy he can be proud of, and how to incorporate more diversity into forestry.   Key Takeaways: [:55] A message from Leadership Nature. [3:45] How did Alex get started in forestry? [8:40] Alex shares what it was like to get his first job in forestry. [13:25] Alex is very proud to have worked with the U.S. Endowment for Forestry & Communities and with African American landowners in Alabama and Mississippi. [18:25] What has been the most memorable or fun job Alex has had so far? [20:40] What kind of mentors has Alex had over the years? [28:45] How can we bring in more diversity into forestry? [34:30] If you want to be successful in forestry, you have to be able to connect with people in an organic way. Nature unites us! [39:20] Why did Alex have to build trust with landowners about the forestry profession? [42:55] What kind of challenges has Alex faced as a person of color in the industry? [45:00] Alex shares some of his leadership experience and the first time he got a leadership role. [49:15] What advice does Alex have for young forest professionals? [53:50] Remember, you can achieve whatever you set your mind to!   Mentioned in This Episode: Federationsoutherncoop.com Alex on LinkedIn Crimson Tide

Ask Win
Evan Townsend

Ask Win

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2017 32:28


Butterflies of Wisdom is a podcast where we want to share your story. We want to share your knowledge if you have a small business if you are an author or a Doctor, or whatever you are. With a disability or not, we want to share your story to inspire others. To learn more about Butterflies of Wisdom visit http://butterfliesofwisdom.weebly.com/ Be sure to FOLLOW this program https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wins-women-of-wisdom/id1060801905. To find out more about Challenge Aspen go to https://challengeaspen.org. To see how Win walk and about Ekso go to http://www.bridgingbionics.org/, or email Amanda Boxtel atamanda@bridgingbionics.org.   On Butterflies of Wisdom today, Best-Selling Author, Win C welcomes Evan Townsend. Evan has been called "America's Unique Speculative Fiction Voice" and writes novels that cause thrills and rapid page-turning. After spending four years in the U.S. Army in the Military Intelligence branch, he returned to civilian life and college to earn a B.S. in Forest Resources from the University of Washington. In his spare time, he enjoys reading, driving (sometimes on a racetrack), meeting people, and talking with friends. He is a 12-step program for Starbucks addiction. Evan lives in central Washington State with his wife and has three grown sons. He enjoys science fiction, fantasy, history, politics, cars, and travel. He currently has ten published fantasy and science fiction novels. You can learn more about him at his website sevantownsend.com. To find out more about Win Kelly Charles visit https://wincharles.wix.com/win-charles. To follow Win on Twitter go to @winkellycharles. To support Win on Instagram go to winkcharles. To assist win on Snapchat go to Wcharles422. To help win on Snapchat go to Wcharles422. To see Win's art go to https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/2-win-charles.html. "Books for Books," you buy Win's books so she can purchase books for school. "Getting through school is a 'win' for her fans and a 'win' for her." Please send feedback to Win by email her at winwwow@gmail.com, or go to http://survey.libsyn.com/winwisdom and http://survey.libsyn.com/thebutterfly. To be on the show, please fill out the intake athttp://bit.ly/bow2017. Butterflies of Wisdom sponsored by Kittr a new social media tool that is bringing about new ways of posting on Twitter. It's fun, full of free content you can use, helps you schedule at the best times, is easy to use, and it will help you get more followers. Visit Kittr atgokittr.com. This is a 20% off code for www.gracedbygrit.com. The code will be XOBUTTERFLIES. If you would like to support Butterflies of Wisdom go to https://www.patreon.com/wcharles. If you want to check out what Win’s friend, Dannidoll, is doing (a.k.a. Dannielle) go tohttps://www.facebook.com/dannidolltheragdollclown/?notif_t=page_invite_accepted¬if_id=1492366163404241. To learn more about Danielle visit http://www.dancanshred.com. For iOS 11 update: https://www.youtube.com/embed/HNupFUYqcRY. To learn about the magic of Siri go to https://www.udemy.com/writing-a-book-using-siri/?utm_campaign=email&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email. If you want to donate Butterflies of Wisdom, please send a PayPal donation to aspenrosearts@gmail.com or aspenwin@gmail.com. Please donate to Challenge Aspen or the Bridging Bionics Foundation. Please send a check in the mail so 100% goes to Bridging Bionics Foundation.    In the Memo section have people write: In honor of Win Charles. Please donate to the charity of your choice thank you in advance, Win.   Send to:   Challenge Aspen PO Box 6639 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Or donate online at https://challengeaspen.org.   Bridging Bionics Foundation  PO Box 3767 Basalt, CO 81621   Thank you Win  

Ask Win
S. Evan Townsend E: 46 S: 3

Ask Win

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2016 27:54


Juan C https://www.gofundme.com/48z3io   To learn more about Butterflies of Wisdom visit http://butterfliesofwisdom.weebly.com/ Be sure to FOLLOW this program https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/wins-women-of-wisdom/id1060801905. To find out how Win walk and about Ekso go to http://www.bridgingbionics.org/, or email Amanda Boxtel at amanda@bridgingbionics.org.   On Butterflies of Wisdom today, Best-Selling Author, Win Kelly Charles and Juan Carlos Gill welcomes S. Evan Townsend. S. Evan has been called "America's Unique Speculative Fiction Voice" and writes novels that cause thrills and rapid page-turning. After spending four years in the U.S. Army in the Military Intelligence branch, he returned to civilian life and college to earn a B.S. in Forest Resources from the University of Washington. In his spare time, he enjoys reading, driving (sometimes on a racetrack), meeting people, and talking with friends. He is in a 12-step program for Starbucks addiction. Evan lives in central Washington State with his wife and has three grown sons. He enjoys science fiction, fantasy, history, politics, cars, and travel. He currently has eight published fantasy and science fiction novels. To learn more about S. Evan visit http://sevantownsend.com/. To find out more about Win Kelly Charles visit https://wincharles.wix.com/win-charles. Please send feedback to Win by email her at winwwow@gmail.com, or go to http://survey.libsyn.com/winwisdom andhttp://survey.libsyn.com/thebutterfly. To be on the show, please fill out the intake athttp://bit.ly/1MLJSLG. To look at our sponsorships go to http://www.educents.com/daily-deals#wwow. To learn about the magic of Siri go to https://www.udemy.com/writing-a-book-using-siri/?utm_campaign=email&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email. If you want to donate Butterflies of Wisdom, please send a PayPal donation toaspenrosearts@gmail.com. Please send a check in the mail, so 100% goes to Bridging Bionics Foundation.    In the Memo section have people write: In honor of Win Charles.    Send to:  Bridging Bionics Foundation  PO Box 3767 Basalt, CO 81621   Thank you, Win    

Yale Center for Business and the Environment
Effects of Watershed Science and Management on Public and Ecosystem Health

Yale Center for Business and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2010 78:52


Paul Barten, Associate Professor of Forest Resources at the University of Massachusetts, and co-author of Land Use Effects on Streamflow and Water Quality in the Northeastern United States, discusses the complex world of planning for watersheds and proposes a framework for answering the needs of the environment and the community.