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Occurrences and people in the US throughout history

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Best podcasts about united states history

Latest podcast episodes about united states history

The Photo Detective
An Iconic WWII Photo Identified

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 19:25


This week Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective, is joined by Lawrence Verria, whose first book The Kissing Sailor, takes a look at an iconic World War II photo and how to identify it. In the perfect intersection between history and photo identification, Maureen and Lawrence discuss this famous photo, and how even a photo icon can leave plenty of mystery, and twists and turns to discover the answers. Related Episodes: Episode 75: One Man's World War I JourneyEpisode 105: Women in the Dark: Female Photographers, 1850-1900Links: Sign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Lawrence Verria is the Social Studies Department Chair at North Kingstown High School, and Rhode Island's 2000 Teacher of the Year. He will be entering his 40th year teaching United States History and Civics. He is the recipient of the Susan B. Wilson Civic Education Merit Award and Rhode Island College's Evelyn Walsh Prize for excellence in history studies. "The Kissing Sailor" is Verria's first book, co-authored with George Galdorisi. Verria plans to publish his second book, "The Cool Moose: Robert J. Healey Jr., Beyond the Beard.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Support the show

The EBFC Show
Let Scrum help get your lesson planning from to do, to done with Howard Goldberg

The EBFC Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 69:00


Howard Goldberg is an educator in his 23rd year teaching with 18 of those in Loudoun County Virginia. Currently, he teaches United States History in 7th grade and enjoys every moment of it. His search for trying to find a way to make planning easier and better led to Felipe and usage of Scrum in education. Howard said that using Scrum in his classroom has been an eye opener for what is possible.    Show Links: What Every Team Should Know About Scrum https://www.theebfcshow.com/blog/what-every-lean-project-team-should-know/   Agile Estimating and Planning: Planning Poker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gE7srp2BzoM   10 Reasons to Use Fibonacci Sequence for Story Points https://www.agilebin.com/blog/10-reasons-to-use-fibonacci-sequence-for-story-points   Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time https://amzn.to/3MKrLbt   Connect with Howard via  Twitter at https://twitter.com/hgoldberg04   Connect with Felipe via Social media at https://thefelipe.bio.link  Subscribe on YouTube to never miss new videos here: https://rb.gy/q5vaht    --- Today's episode is sponsored by Bosch RefinemySite. It's a cloud-based construction platform. Bosch uses Lean principles to enable your entire team, from owners to trade contractors – to plan, communicate, document, and execute in real-time. It's the digital tool that supports the Last Planner System® process and puts it all together in one simple, collaborative ecosystem. Bosch RefinemySite empowers your team, builds trust, creates a culture of responsibility, and enhances communication. Learn more and Try for free at https://www.bosch-refinemysite.us/tryforfree    Today's episode is sponsored by the Lean Construction Institute (LCI). This non-profit organization operates as a catalyst to transform the industry through Lean project delivery using an operating system centered on a common language, fundamental principles, and basic practices. Learn more at https://www.leanconstruction.org   

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

america music american new york university history education washington battle college water state zoom song tech research government south songs north america pennsylvania congress north environment ladies maryland dark normal union natural web md rain impact ocean memory memorial day south carolina snow wars records civil war mississippi citizens southern columbus origin agency stream republic flowers sleeping priority richmond environmental bay images lives new york mets rivers tomb duke university vietnam war index protocol graves american history confederate pond streams finnish companion arial signature waterloo virginia tech reconstruction old friends scales accent library of congress atlantic ocean ferry natural resources tm waltz revolutionary war compatibility msonormal colorful veterans affairs fiddler times new roman decorating declaration of independence sections potomac watershed chesapeake lyndon johnson policymakers no strings attached birthplace bull run new standard yorktown atlantic monthly acknowledgment cambria math arlington national cemetery style definitions unknown soldier worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning bartleby breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves usi trackformatting stormwater lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup subsup undovr donotpromoteqf virginia department latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin wrapindent rmargin defjc intlim narylim allowpng defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority potomac river lsdexception locked qformat sols semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal grand army james river bmp john logan decoration day united states history name title name strong name emphasis name normal name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference cripple creek vus vietnam veterans memorial grades k name e sharpsburg dark accent colorful accent new york tribune light accent name list cumberland gap name date name plain text name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d name table contemporary name body text first indent name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map name table web name normal indent name balloon text name table theme name list bullet name normal web name plain table name list number name normal table name grid table light name closing name no list name grid table name signature name outline list name body text name table simple jeremy keith horace greeley west va civil war battle relyonvml john a logan public broadcasting system ironclads audio notes smithsonian institution national museum water center tmdl 20image ebchecked donotshowrevisions bobby horton virginia standards
Entertain This...
Forrest Gump: A Laugh Through US History

Entertain This...

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 73:34


This podcast is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get. And on this episode, you're getting a gentle float through the tumultuous modern era of United States History as told by Mr. Forrest Gump. This film is extremely quotable and endearing but also has some hidden metaphors that you might not have picked up on watching for the first time. We'll talk through the life and times of Forrest Gump, and delve deeper into the events that he was a part of. So come have a seat in Nick's history class, you're bound to learn something and have a laugh! That's all I got to say about that. Quick This: Forrest Gump Book and Movie Differences - Follow us on Twitter: @entertain_this Follow us on Instagram: @entertainthispodcast Buy some Merch on our Redbubble Page Check out our website too: entertainthis.net Music Produced by @D33jw on Twitter, or @d33jw on Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/entertainthis/message

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 623 (4-4-22): Exploring Forest Lands and Labors with Music of “Piney Mountains”

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:39).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-1-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 4, 2022.  This revised episode from May 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – Lyrics: “Lost my fingers in the Galax mill, Buddy sing a sad old song; And my heart got broke in the yew pine hills, Lordy my time ain't long.” This week, we feature music about some historical aspects of a natural-resource industry that's been important to Virginia's economy for hundreds of years and also plays an important role in managing the Commonwealth's water.  Have a listen for about 30 more seconds.MUSIC – ~31 sec – Lyrics: “I started out to loggin' when I was in my prime, Woman don't you weep for me; Hitchin' up the spruce to the big drag lines, You damned old piney mountain; Where the skidders start a-buckin' as the years come down, Buddy sing a sad old song; Makin' God's own thunder on the new-cut ground, Lordy my time ain't long.” You've been listening to part of “Piney Mountains,” by Bruce Molsky on his 2013 album, “If It Ain't Here When I Get Back,” from Tree Frog Music.  The song was written by Craig Johnson, a highly-regarded string-band musician who died in North Carolina in 2009.  Focusing on one logger-turned-millworker's tragic accident in a Galax, Virginia, mill, the song weaves in several aspects of the history of the forest industry in the southeastern states: hard work and rough leisure by loggers, opportunities and risks of working in sawmills and furniture factories, economic ups and downs of resource-based industries, changes to landscapes after land uses change, and a rich heritage of traditional music. With a complex history, forest use and management in Virginia remains of vital economic and ecological importance, including for water resources.  As the Virginia Department of Forestry has stated, quote, “In addition to lumber, paper, and a host of other products, forests provide benefits called ‘ecosystem services,'” unquote.  Those services include air quality, water quality, soil conservation, outdoor recreation, wildlife habitat, carbon storage, and scenic beauty. As of 2017, over 16 million acres in Virginia—about 62 percent of the state—were covered by forests, and those forests provided an estimated $30 billion annually in economic benefits, considering both forest products and ecosystem services.  At the same time, forest-related work can still be hazardous, as it was for the narrator in this week's music.  Logging, for example, typically has higher workplace injury and fatality rates than other occupations. With connections and impacts like these, piney mountains and other wooded landscapes will continue to influence Virginia's economy, culture, wildlife, air, and water. Thanks to Bruce Molsky for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Piney Mountains.” MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 160, 5-6-13. “Piney Mountains,” from the 2013 album “If It Ain't Here When I Get Back,” is copyright 2013 by Bruce Molsky and Tree Frog Music, used with permission.  More information about Bruce Molsky is available online at http://www.brucemolsky.com. Information on Craig Johnson was taken from his December 2009 obituary online at http://www.cremnc.com/sitemaker/sites/Cremat2/obit.cgi?user=151400Johnson; and “Most Done Traveling: A Tribute to Craig Johnson,” by Dave Shombert in the Dec. 2009-Jan. 2010 issue of The Old Time Herald (Durham, N.C.), online at https://www.oldtimeherald.org/issues/volume-12-number-2/(subscription required for access) [Used this source in 2013]. Virginia Water Radio thanks Jennifer Gagnon, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, for her help with the original version of this episode, done in 2013. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Percentage of forest land in Virginia counties as of 2016.  Map taken from the Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, page 40.  The report is available online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf.  The original source is Thomas J. Brandeis et al., “Virginia's Forests, 2016,”  Resource Bulletin SRS–223, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., 2018. Forests made up much of the watershed surrounding a Bedford County, Virginia, reservoir (center of photo) in this April 21, 2011, photo from Peaks of Otter. EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE STATUS OF FORESTS IN VIRGINIA The following information on trends and threats for Virginia's forest lands is from the Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, page 10.  The report is available online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf. Virginia's Forest Trends, Conditions, and Threats SummarySeveral important changes, trends, and threats in Virginia are likely to significantly impact the health,quality, and extent of Virginia's forests in the foreseeable future. TrendsPopulation growth and expanding metropolitan areas;Changes in forest ownership;Rising forest volumes;Positive growth/drain ratio for hardwood and softwood forests;Consistent timber harvest numbers and application of water quality Best Management Practices. ThreatsWildland fire and growing wildland urban interface;Declining diminished tree species;Declining hardwood resource;Forestland fragmentation and conversion;Forest health issues;Changing forest industry;Climate change;Funding of conservation work and programs. These trends and threats will increase the need for: innovative and proactive wildfire prevention andsuppression; water quality protection; forest stewardship; forest health management; and urbanforestry efforts in all areas of the Commonwealth. SOURCES Used for Audio University of Washington/Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, “Logging,” online at https://deohs.washington.edu/pnash/logging. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, “The facts of the faller: Occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities to loggers, 2006–2015,” by Jill Jonacha and Caleb Hopler, Beyond the Numbers, April 2018, online at https://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-7/the-facts-of-the-faller-occupational-injuries-illnesses-and-fatalities-to-loggers-2006-2015.htm. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, “State Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities,” online at https://www.bls.gov/iif/oshstate.htm#VA. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry:“Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/;“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/(this is the source of the quote used in the audio);“Virginia's Forest History,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-markets-sustainability/learn-about-forest-markets-sustainability/virginias-forest-history/; and“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf(see page 19 for statistics on forested land; p. 21 for economic benefits; and p. 23 for water quality benefits). For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service Plants Database, online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  This is the first comprehensive manual of Virginia plants published since the 1700s.  The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category.Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Sycamore – Episode 176, 8-26-13.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17. Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19. Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21. Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20. Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21. Tree buds – Episode 622, 3-28-22. Tree colors and changes in fall, including to water movement – Episode 285, 10-9-15. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life Science LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by g

god america music relationships university texas earth education college woman water state zoom land tech research government benefits foundation search positive north carolina numbers environment dark normal natural web rising tree va rain impact humans ocean snow focusing climate types threats citizens trees agency stream funding priority richmond plants biology mountains environmental bay buddy conditions images ash consistent dynamic grade bio conservation copyright resource bureau factors durham population index charlottesville map commonwealth lands pond signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend peaks maple forests natural resources makin declining otter compatibility msonormal colorful forestry times new roman ls logging sections poison ivy percentage watershed occupational illnesses freshwater wg chesapeake labor statistics policymakers forest service earth sciences photosynthesis wildlands shenandoah fatalities shrubs health centers labors acknowledgment cosgrove cambria math style definitions worddocument craig johnson saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves usi trackformatting stormwater lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr virginia department latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked sols semihidden lordy unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal bmp united states history name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid piney hitchin galax virginia press name e light accent dark accent colorful accent name list cumberland gap rhododendrons name plain text name date name table contemporary name body text first indent name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map name table web name normal indent name balloon text name table theme name list bullet name normal web name plain table name list number name normal table name grid table light name closing name no list name grid table name signature name outline list name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d bedford county best management practices forest resources bruce molsky ben cosgrove audio notes tmdl 20image water center stormwater runoff donotshowrevisions virginia standards
WXPR A Northwoods Moment In History
The Civilian Conservation Corps: Roosevelt's Tree Army in the Northwoods

WXPR A Northwoods Moment In History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 3:35


The Civilian Conservation Corps, or CCC, is one of the most storied and well thought of government programs in United States History. The CCC left a legacy that has withstood the tests of time, and evidence of it can be seen in parks, landscapes, and communities across America, including the Northwoods of Wisconsin.

Millennial Debt Domination
Episode 38: Women In Finance

Millennial Debt Domination

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 29:44


On this episode of Millennial Debt Domination, Katie discusses the history of women in finance. March is Women's History Month, which is a celebration of women's contributions to history, culture, and society. This month is dedicated to reflect on the often-over looked contributions of women to United States History. The history in finance doesn't back date as far as you may think. Women were only granted the ability to have their own credit in 1974, which was less than 50 years ago. Today, Katie is joined by the founder of Clever Girl Finance, Bola Sokunbi. Bola is a Certified Financial Education Instructor, money expert, and best-selling author. She created Clever Girl Finance to help women change their money stories and achieve financial success. Katie and Bola discuss when women started working outside of the home, the gender gap, couples combining finances, and much more. Follow Navicore on Social Media: Twitter: @NavicorePR Instagram: @navicoresolutions Facebook: NavicoreSolutionsPR More questions for Katie? E-mail us: olm@navicoresolutions.org About Navicore Solutions: We are a national nonprofit provider of financial education and compassionate personal finance counseling. We can help you gain control of your finances. A debt free future is possible. Learn more about us here: http://navicoresolutions.org/ Follow Navicore on Social Media: Twitter: @NavicorePR Instagram: @navicoresolutions Facebook: NavicoreSolutionsPR More questions for Katie? E-mail us: olm@navicoresolutions.org About Navicore Solutions: We are a national nonprofit provider of financial education and compassionate personal finance counseling. We can help you gain control of your finances. A debt free future is possible. Learn more about us here: http://navicoresolutions.org/ https://www.clevergirlfinance.com/ Follow Clever Girl Finance: Twitter:  @CleverGirlCGF Instagram: @CleverGirlFinance

Ship Hits The Fan
Greed and Graft Sink the Sultana - Ship Hits the Fan Episode 2

Ship Hits The Fan

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 39:44


Are you a FIRST Member and need your Private RSS feed for this show? Go here: bit.ly/FIRSTRSS This week Charlotte, Patrick, and Brian discuss the fiery demise of the Sultana, whose explosion while transporting Union Army POWs remains the worst maritime disaster in United States History. Follow us on social: https://twitter.com/mc_lotta https://twitter.com/handsomemaster2 https://twitter.com/briangaar

Western Civ
Presidential Draft With Author Scott Rank

Western Civ

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 64:20


Decided to have fun with this one. Rather than do the same old author interview, I sit down with author Scott Rank and conduct my first ever Presidential Draft. We take turns each of us drafting a United States President and justifying our reasons. If you like United States History and certainly US Presidents. You will enjoy the show. Happy Presidents Day! Full Disclosure: The audio did not come out perfect on this one.  Books by Scott Rank: History's 9 Most Insane Rulers The Age of Illumination: Science Technology and Reason in the Middle Ages Want to enjoy Audible for free and support the show? Click HERE for a free trial.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 616 (2-14-22): Uses of Water By and Against African Americans in U.S. Civil Rights History (Episode Three of the Series “Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History”)

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-11-22.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 14, 2022.  This week's episode –the third in a series of episodes on water in U.S. civil rights history—explores water access and use in African-American civil rights history.  The episode particularly focuses on a May 2018 essay, “The Role of Water in African American History,” written by Tyler Parry, of the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, for the blog Black Perspectives, published by the African American Intellectual History Society.  We set the stage with three water sounds related to different aspects of African American and civil rights history.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds and see what connections you think these sounds have to that history.   SOUNDS – ~32 sec. You heard Chesapeake Bay waves, children swimming at a public pool, and water coming out of a fire hose.  These represent three broad themes in African Americans' relationships with water: 1) uses of natural water bodies for livelihoods, recreation, transportation, repression, and resistance; 2) access, or lack thereof, to officially segregated water facilities, as occurred with swimming pools, water fountains, river ferries, and other facilities prior to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964; and 3) water used as a weapon against citizens demonstrating for civil rights, as in the use of fire hoses on demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama; Danville, Virginia; and other places.  In his essay on water in African American history, Tyler Parry notes these and several other ways that, quote, “water was often present at key moment in the Black experience.  Here are some other examples from Dr. Parry's essay: the location of African societies near water; the Atlantic transport of enslaved Africans to American colonies and then the United States; use of American waterways—including the James and other Virginia rivers—in the movement of enslaved people; rivers and other waters providing routes of escape from slavery; segregation of African Americans into areas susceptible to flooding; and the importance of water in culture and spiritual practices. Viewing these examples collectively, Dr. Parry's essay states, quote, “One finds that water holds a dual role in the history of Black culture and intellectual thought.  In one sense, water is an arena for resistance that liberates, nourishes, and sanctifies a people, but it can also be weaponized by hegemonic forces seeking to degrade, poison, or eliminate rebellious populations,” unquote. Thanks to Tyler Parry for his scholarship on this topic and for assisting Virginia Water Radio with this episode. We close with some music for the role of water in African American history.  Here's a 50-second arrangement of “Wade in the Water,” an African American spiritual dating back to the time of slavery in the United States and connected to the history of the Underground Railroad and the modern Civil Rights Movement.  This arrangement was composed by and is performed here by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~ 50 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Dr. Tyler Parry, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, for his help with this episode. The sounds heard in this episode were as follows:Chesapeake Bay waves on Kent Island, Md., recorded by Virginia Water Radio on June 22, 2010;swimmers at Blacksburg Aquatic Center in Blacksburg, Va., recorded by Virginia Water Radio in July 2019;fire hose sound recorded by user bigroomsound, made available for use by purchase on Pond5, online at https://www.pond5.com/sound-effects/item/5499472-watersprayfireman-hosevarious. The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 566, 3-1-21, the introduction to Virginia Water Radio's series on water in U.S. civil rights history. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Sculpture in Birmingham, Alabama's, Kelly Ingram Park, recalling fire hoses being used on civil rights protestors in the 1960s.  Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, March 3, 2010.  Accessed from the Library of Congress, online at https://www.loc.gov/item/2010636978/, 2/15/22. SOURCES Used for AudioJeff Adelson, “New Orleans segregation, racial disparity likely worsened by post-Katrina policies, report says,” Nola.com (New Orleans Times-Picayune and New Orleans Advocate), April 5, 2018. Taylor Branch, Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1998. Waldo E. Martin, Jr., and Patricia Sullivan, Civil Rights in the United States, Vol. One, Macmillian Reference USA, New York, 2000. Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project, Transport on James River: “African Presence in Virginia,” undated, online at https://www.middlepassageproject.org/2020/04/29/african-presence-in-virginia/.  National Civil Rights Museum (Memphis, Tenn.), “Jim Crow Water Dippers,” online at https://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/from-the-vault/posts/water-dippers. Tyler Parry, “The Role of Water in African American History,” Black Perspectives, African American Intellectual History Society, May 4, 2018, online at https://www.aaihs.org/the-role-of-water-in-african-american-history/. James Patterson, Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974, Oxford University Press, Oxford, England, and New York, N.Y., 1996. Donald M. Sweig, “The Importation of African Slaves to the Potomac River, 1732-1772,” The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 4 (October 1985), pages 507-524; online at https://www.jstor.org/stable/1919032?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents. Virginia Commission to Examine Racial Inequity in Virginia Law, “Identifying and addressing the vestiges of inequity and inequality in Virginia's laws,” November 15, 2020, online at https://www.governor.virginia.gov/racial-inequity-commission/reports/, as of August 2021.  As of February 2022, this report is no longer available at this URL.  A description of the project is available in a February 10, 2021, news release from then Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, online at https://www.governor.virginia.gov/newsroom/all-releases/2021/february/headline-892615-en.html. Victoria W. Wolcott, “The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks,” UB NOW, University of Buffalo, July 11, 2019. Ed Worley, “Water fountains symbolize 1960s civil rights movement,” U.S. Army blog (unnamed), February 22, 2018, online at https://www.army.mil/article/200456/water_fountains_symbolize_1960s_civil_rights_movement. Water Citizen LLC, “Until Justice Rolls Down Like Waters—Water & the Civil Rights Movement,” Water Citizen News, January 16, 2014, online at http://watercitizennews.com/until-justice-rolls-down-like-water-water-the-civil-rights-movement/. Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States, HarperCollins, New York, N.Y., 2003. For More Information about Civil Rights in the United States British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), “The Civil Rights Movement in America,” online at https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zcpcwmn/revision/1. Georgetown Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/civilrights. Howard University Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://library.law.howard.edu/civilrightshistory/intro. University of Maryland School of Law/Thurgood Marshall Law Library, “Historical Publications of the United States Commission on Civil Rights,” online at https://law.umaryland.libguides.com/commission_civil_rights. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, online at https://www.usccr.gov/. U.S. House of Representatives, “Constitutional Amendments and Major Civil Rights Acts of Congress Referenced in Black Americans in Congress,” online at https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Data/Constitutional-Amendments-and-Legislation/. U.S. National Archives, “The Constitution of the United States,” online at https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. This episode is part of the series, Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History.  As of February 14, 2022, other episodes in the series are as follows: Episode 566, 3-1-21 – series overview.Episode 591, 8-23-21 – water symbolism in African American civil rights history. Following are links to some other previous episodes on the history of African Americans in Virginia. Episode 459, 2-11-19 – on Abraham Lincoln's arrival in Richmond at the end of the Civil War.Episode 128, 9-17-12 – on Chesapeake Bay Menhaden fishing crews and music.Episode 458, 2-4-19 – on Nonesuch and Rocketts Landing in Richmond. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATIONFollowing are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals.3.13 – People of America's diversity of ethnic origins, customs, and traditions, under a republican form of government with respect for individual rights and freedoms.Virginia Studies CourseVS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups.VS.8 – Reconstruction era in Virginia, including “Jim Crow” issues and industrialization.VS.9 – How national events affected Virginia and its citizens. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.5 – Factors that shaped colonial America and conditions in the colonies, including how people interacted with the environment to produce goods and service.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.3 – Effects of Reconstruction on American life.USII.4 – Developments and changes in the period 1877 to early 1900s.USII.6 – Social, economic, and technological changes from the 1890s to 1945.USII.8 – Economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world after World War II.USII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics Course CE.2 – Foundations, purposes, and components of the U.S. Constitution. CE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities. CE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.6 – Major events in Virginia and the United States in the first half of the 19th Century.VUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.VUS.13 – Changes in the United States in the second half of the 20th Century.VUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century.Government CourseGOVT.4 – Purposes, principles, and structure of the U.S. Constitution.GOVT.5 – Federal system of government in the United States.GOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.GOVT.11 – Civil liberties and civil rights. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/.Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

united states america music american new york university history black earth social education house england college water state zoom tech research government ohio army public national alabama african americans congress african new orleans environment political dark normal natural web md va rain ocean atlantic snow buffalo world war ii effects oxford civil war citizens federal identifying agency economic stream birmingham commission constitution foundations priority richmond vol civil environmental bay civil rights domestic abraham lincoln factors transport legislation index citizenship black americans pond signature brief history virginia tech reconstruction developments pillar scales schuster jim crow library of congress accent sculpture purposes atlantic ocean civil rights movement harpercollins govt natural resources yale school underground railroad oxford university press compatibility msonormal colorful times new roman african american history sections parry civics tenn watershed civil rights act national archives wg chesapeake exhibitions oberlin college james patterson ralph northam conservatory policymakers chesapeake bay danville new standard maryland school blacksburg accessed acknowledgment howard zinn oberlin cambria math style definitions worddocument manhattan school constitutional amendments saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves usi trackformatting stormwater lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr virginia department latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority potomac river qformat lsdexception locked sols semihidden unhidewhenused nevada las vegas latentstyles table normal james river bmp pond5 united states history virginia gov name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis black perspective cripple creek nonesuch importation vus united states commission grades k name e colorful accent light accent dark accent name list cumberland gap name date name plain text name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic taylor branch new orleans advocate new orleans times picayune torrin kent island name mention name hashtag king years name unresolved mention virginia law patricia sullivan african slaves mary quarterly fire america audio notes tmdl water center carol m highsmith waldo e martin virginia standards
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 608 (12-20-21): Virginia's Coastal Resilience Planning Moves Forward in December 2021

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:18).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-17-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 20, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec - - Lyrics: “When the rains come, when the rains come, is it gonna be a new day?” That's part of “Rains Come,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band The Steel Wheels, from their 2019 album “Over the Trees.”  It opens an update of a previous episode on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan—an effort to prepare for and adapt to sea-level rise, recurrent flooding, and impacts of climate change.  As in the earlier episode, we set the stage with part of “Cypress Canoe,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., from his 2019 album “I Made It Just for You.”  The song's a commentary on the current and potential impacts of sea-level rise, and in the part you'll hear, the story-teller bemoans a lack of planning and action to avoid or reduce such impacts. Have a listen for about 20 seconds. MUSIC – ~18 sec – Lyrics: “Half of a city awash in the tides; when I think of what happened, it tears my insides. Oh, we could've been smarter, we could've have planned, but the world caught a fever, infected by man.” Facing current and predicted impacts to coastal areas from sea-level rise and recurrent flooding, Virginia has started planning.   On December 7, 2021, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced completion of Phase One of the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  Work on the plan started about four years ago accelerated after the November 2020 release of a planning framework identifying guiding principles and specific steps to complete the plan.  Since then, a technical study, the work of a technical advisory committee, and input from some 2000 stakeholders have helped form the plan. The 266-page plan covers the area of Virginia from the Fall Line to the Atlantic coastline, which includes about six million residents.  For those areas, the plan identifies vulnerabilities to, and impacts from, current and expected sea-level rise and increased flooding.  It focuses on ways the Commonwealth can increase resilience, which the plan defines as “the capability to anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from hazards to minimize damage to social well-being, health, the economy, and the environment.”  A Coastal Resilience Database compiled for the plan includes over 500 examples of projects to adapt to changing conditions and of initiatives to build capacity in information, skills, and tools.  Funding for such efforts may come from various sources, but one key source is the Virginia Community Flood Preparedness Fund, created by the Virginia General Assembly in 2020 and using money accrued from the auction of carbon allowances. Implementation of the plan will be managed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation in cooperation with the Commonwealth's Chief Resilience Officer and the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection.  Phase Two of the plan, with more data and project information, is to be completed by 2024, and updates to the whole plan are supposed to occur every five years. According to the plan's impact assessment, between now and 2080 Virginia is projected to face large increases in residents exposed to coastal flooding, in flood property damage, in roadway miles exposed to chronic flooding, and in losses of tidal wetlands, dunes, and beaches.  As Gov. Northam stated in a December 7 letter accompanying the plan's release, the plan provides a “clearer picture of the scope and scale” of these challenges, catalogs current resilience efforts, and identifies gaps in actions and in information.  Here's hoping Virginia puts its Coastal Resilience Master Plan to good use. Thanks to The Steel Wheels and to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 10 more seconds of Mr. Gramann's “Cypress Canoe.” MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.   In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode is a follow-up to Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Cypress Canoe,” from the 2019 album “I Made It Just for You,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 552, 11-23-20. “Rains Come,” from the 2019 album “Over the Trees,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  A July 2019 review by Americana Highways of this album and track is available online at https://americanahighways.org/2019/07/09/review-the-steel-wheels-over-the-trees-is-primary-rhythms-and-organic-melodies/.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/ and in a July 2015 article at http://whurk.org/29/the-steel-wheels.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 552, 11-23-20. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Map of the four master planning regions, with their respective and the planning district commissions (PDC) and regional commissions (RC), in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Map from the plan document, page 9, accessed online https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. Chart of population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the four master planning regions identified in the “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, Phase I,” December 2021. Image from the plan document, page 24, accessed online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA COASTAL RESILIENCE MASTER PLAN, PHASE I Following is an excerpt from the December 7, 2021, news release from Virginia Governor Ralph Northam's office, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels. “HAMPTON—Governor Ralph Northam today released the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, providing a foundational and fundamental step towards protecting Virginia's coast. “Virginia's coastal areas face significant impacts from rising sea levels and increased storm flooding.  The Commonwealth, regional and local entities have to take meaningful and continuous action to ensure the long-term sustainability of Virginia's coastal resources and communities. … “Earlier this year, the Commonwealth worked with 2,000 stakeholders to build the Coastal Resilience Master Plan.  This plan documents which land is exposed to coastal flooding hazards now and into the future, as well as the impacts of those future scenarios on coastal Virginia's community resources and manmade and natural infrastructure. “The Master Plan concluded that between 2020 and 2080: the number of residents living in homes exposed to extreme coastal flooding is projected to grow from approximately 360,000 to 943,000, an increase of 160%; the number of residential, public, and commercial buildings exposed to an extreme coastal flood is projected to increase by almost 150%, from 140,000 to 340,000, while annualized flood damages increase by 1,300% from $0.4 to $5.1 billion; the number of miles of roadways exposed to chronic coastal flooding is projected to increase from 1,000 to nearly 3,800 miles, an increase of nearly 280%; and an estimated 170,000 acres, or 89%, of existing tidal wetlands and 3,800 acres, or 38%, of existing dunes and beaches may be permanently inundated, effectively lost to open water. “The Coastal Resiliency Database and Web Explorer is a publicly available database that shows the impact of coastal flood hazards, current and proposed resilience projects, as well as funding sources.  This database will serve as a vital tool to support resilience efforts at the state, regional, and local levels. … “The Commonwealth intends to develop successive updates of the Master Plan on at least a five-year cycle, managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation in consultation with the Chief Resilience Officer, the Special Assistant to the Governor for Coastal Adaptation and Protection, and the Technical Advisory Committee. “The next phase of the Master Plan is anticipated by 2024, will aim to address recommendations of the TAC to broaden the analysis of natural hazards by including rainfall-driven, riverine, and compound flooding, expand and improve the inventory of resilience projects, by continuing to add efforts and working with project owners to better understand the benefits of projects, and extend this critical work beyond the coastal region to encompass statewide resilience needs. …” SOURCESUsed for AudioVirginia Governor's Office News Release, Governor Northam Releases Virginia's First Coastal Resilience Master Plan; Virginia takes monumental action to build a resilient coast, combating climate change and rising sea levels, December 7, 2021. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, December 7, 2021, letter accompanying release of the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan, online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/document/CRMP-Gov-Letter.pdf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Community Flood Preparedness Fund Grants and Loans,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/dam-safety-and-floodplains/dsfpm-cfpf. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/crmp/plan.  The full document and a two-page summary are available on the page.   “Resilience” is defined in the Master Plan “Introduction” on page 5; the areas covered by the plan are identified in the “Introduction” on page 9; who's coordinating the plan is identified in the “Introduction” on page 6. Virginia Legislative Information System (LIS), online at http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm. See particularly the following bills related to recurrent coastal flooding: 2014 HJ 16 and SJ 3, calling for formation of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding; 2016 HJ 84 and SJ 58, continuing the work of the joint subcommittee formed in 2014 and changing it to the Joint Subcommittee on Coastal Flooding;2016 SB 282, establishing the Virginia Shoreline Resiliency Fund;2020 HB 22 and SB 320, continuing the Shoreline Resiliency Fund as the Community Flood Preparedness Fund;2020 HB 981 and SB 1027, establishing a carbon allowances trading program for Virginia and providing that some of the revenue from the sale of carbon allowances go to the Community Flood Preparedness Fund. For More Information about Sea Level Rise, Coastal and Tidal Flooding, and Resilience John Boon et al., “Planning for Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding,” Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), October 2008, online (as PDF) at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/legacy/icccr/_docs/coastal_sea_level.pdf. City of Alexandria, Va., “Flood Mitigation,” online at https://www.alexandriava.gov/special/waterfront/default.aspx?id=85880. City of Norfolk, Va., “Flood Awareness and Mitigation,” online at https://www.norfolk.gov/1055/Flooding-Awareness-Mitigation. City of Virginia Beach Department of Public Works, “Sea Level Wise,” online at https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/public-works/comp-sea-level-rise/Pages/default.aspx. Coastal Resilience, online at https://coastalresilience.org/. Coastal Resilience/Virginia is online at https://coastalresilience.org/category/virginia/. Sandy Hausman, “Online Tool Helps Coastal Communities Plan for Climate Change,” WVTF FM-Roanoke, Va., 10/11/18, 2 min./34 sec. audio https://www.wvtf.org/post/online-tool-helps-coastal-communities-plan-climate-change#stream/0. This is a report about the Virginia Eastern Shore Coastal Resilience Mapping and Decision Support Tool. Joey Holleman, “Designing for Water—Strategies to Mitigate Flood Impacts,” Coastal Heritage, Winter 2019, South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, online at https://www.scseagrant.org/designing-for-water/. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), “Sixth Assessment Synthesis Report,” online at https://www.ipcc.ch/ar6-syr/.  Sea level rise is addressed in the “Physical Science Basis” section (by Working Group I), online at https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-i/. The IPCC “Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate,” September 2019, is online at https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/home/. Rita Abou Samra, “Alexandria is already often waterlogged. How will it adjust to climate change?” 9/13/18, for Greater Greater Washington, online at https://ggwash.org/view/69058/alexandria-is-already-often-waterlogged-how-will-it-adjust-to-climate-change. SeaLevelRise.org, “Virginia's Sea Level Is Rising—And It's Costing Over $4 Billion,” online at https://sealevelrise.org/states/virginia/. U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (US CLIVAR), “Sea Level Hotspots from Florida to Maine—Drivers, Impacts, and Adaptation,” April 23-25, 2019, workshop in Norfolk, Va., online at https://usclivar.org/meetings/sea-level-hotspots-florida-maine. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “U.S. Sea Level Report Cards,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/products/slrc/index.php. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “Recurrent Flooding Study for Tidewater Virginia,” 2013, available online (as a PDF) at http://ccrm.vims.edu/recurrent_flooding/Recurrent_Flooding_Study_web.pdf.  This study was significant in the Virginia General Assembly's formation in 2014 of the Joint Subcommittee to Formulate Recommendations for the Development of a Comprehensive and Coordinated Planning Effort to Address Recurrent Flooding. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)/Center for Coastal Resources Management, “Climate Change and Coastal Resilience,” online at https://www.vims.edu/ccrm/research/climate_change/index.php.  This site includes a 40-second video on sea level rise in Virginia and a 40-second video on nuisance flooding. Wetlands Watch, “Dutch Dialogues—Virginia: Life at Sea Level,” online at http://wetlandswatch.org/dutch-dialogues. William and Mary Law School/Virginia Coastal Policy Center, 7th Annual Conference: “The Three P's of Resilience: Planning, Partnerships, and Paying for It All,” November 15, 2019, Williamsburg, Va., online at this link. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on climate change, sea-level rise, and coastal flooding in Virginia. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Climate change impacts in Virginia National Park Service units, including Assateague Island National Seashore. Episode 441, 10-8-18 – on sea-level rise and citizen measurement of king tides. Episode 494, 10-14-19 – on sea-level rise and coastal flooding. Episode 511, 2-10-20 – on sea-level rise and the Saltmarsh Sparrow. Episode 552, 11-23-20 – on the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Planning Framework. Episode 602, 11-8-21 – on photosynthesis, including its relationship to climate change. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. 6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life Science LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations. ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Virginia Studies Course VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present Course USII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics Course CE.7 – Government at the state level. CE.8 – Government at the local level. CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography Course WG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. WG.18 – Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Virginia and United States History Course VUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century. Government Course GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers. GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels. GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.