Podcasts about Biotic

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  • 49PODCASTS
  • 112EPISODES
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Best podcasts about Biotic

Latest podcast episodes about Biotic

The Poor Prole's Almanac
Biotic Korean Natural Farming

The Poor Prole's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 58:11


In this episode, we dive into the biological components of Korean Natural Farming, discuss the reasons for the wide use of brown sugar, spend way too much time talking about lactobacillus acid, and discuss how complex systems science reinforces core concepts of Indigenous Micro Organisms (IMO).   Sources: Beck, Matthew Et Al "Lactobacillus fermented plant extracts provided to yearling ewes improves their lambs' antioxidant status at weaning" September 2021 Animal Feed Science and Technology  Garg, Neelima"ENZYMATIC ANALYSIS OF LACTIC ACID FERMENTED ANIMAL FEED PREPARED FROM DIFFERENT FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WASTE" December 2018, Conference: INTERNATIONAL Lakstina, Jana Et Al "The Novel Solution for Acid Whey Permeate Application in Animal Feeding", December 2020, Rural Sustainability Research  Sarenkova, Inga "THE EFFECT OF CONCENTRATED WHEY SOLIDS ON LACTOBIONIC ACID PRODUCTION BY PSEUDOMONAS TAETROLENS", May 2019, DOI:10.22616/FoodBalt.2019.030 Sarenkova, Inga "The current status and future perspectives of lactobionic acid production : a review" December 2018 DOI:10.22616/rrd.24.2018.037, Conference: Research for Rural Development, 2018 Jan, Umair "Characterization of Soil Microorganism from Humus and Indigenous Microorganism Amendments" September 2020 Mycobiology 48(5) DOI: 10.1080/12298093.2020.1816154 Núria Daranas,Gemma Roselló,Jordi Cabrefiga,Irene Donati,Jesús Francés,Esther Badosa,Francesco Spinelli,Emilio Montesinos,Anna Bonaterra "Biological control of bacterial plant diseases with Lactobacillus plantarum strains selected for their broad-spectrum activity" 26 November 2018, https://doi.org/10.1111/aab.12476     Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Reviewer 2 does geoengineering
Biotic silicate weathering - Vicca

Reviewer 2 does geoengineering

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 31:59


Sara Vicca schools @geoengineering1 on biotic silicate weathering. He, meanwhile, screws up the audio production to previously unimagined levels of dire incompetence.

The Gas Boys Podcast
Ep 17 | Pro-Biotic Blast

The Gas Boys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 67:50


The Gas Boys discuss why Lightning should have just finished the race, Decentraland, and our worst injuriesFollow us on Instagram @gasboyspodcast

Taste Radio
What This Big Deal Could Mean For You. And, Why It's Okay To Use The ‘F' Word.

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 63:34


As we gear up for BevNET Live and NOSH Live, Taste Radio hosts Ray Latif, John Craven, Jacqui Brugliera and Mike Schneider discussed one of the biggest deals in beverage history and what it might mean for future entrepreneurial drink brands, how a David rose up against a Goliath and notable products to cross our desks over the past week, including those of a particular fast “flying”brand.  This episode also features an interview with Kyle Peters, who recently made the gut-wrenching decision to shut down his high protein ice cream brand, Carter and Oak. Peters explained how he came to a crossroads, one in which he saw no option other than to shut down the business, and offered advice on how entrepreneurs can gird themselves for the ever-present challenges of operating a food or beverage company. Show notes: 0:55: Billions Do A ‘Body' Good. Dew The Wrong Thing. Dumplings And Waffles Make Us Happy. -- The hosts chatted about the industry's excitement for BevNET Live, NOSH Live and Brewbound Live, as well as the news of Coke's $5.6 billion acquisition of sport drink brand BodyArmor and Rise Brewing Co.'s big win in its trademark battle with PepsiCo. They also spoke about a top retail executive joining the agenda for NOSH Live and sampling opportunities for brands attending the event, Fly By Jing's move into the frozen aisle and new canned coffee, RTD cocktails and indulgent desserts. 31:01: Kyle Peters, Founder, Carter & Oak --  Peters joined Taste Radio editor Ray Latif for a conversation about why he closed the doors on Carter & Oak, which had been positioned as a better-for-you, high-protein ice cream brand made with no added sugar. Peters spoke about the company's pandemic-induced pivot, and why, despite strides in the retail and distribution of its products over the past year, he determined Carter & Oak could not survive. He also urged entrepreneurs to focus on improving their margins, why aggressive patience is a virtue and why he's comfortable with saying “failure.”  Brands in this episode: BodyArmor, Rise Brewing Co., Mtn Dew, Harmless Harvest, Honey Mama's, YumEarth, Nature's Bakery, TRUFF, Fly By Jing, Omsom, Ramona, Yes You Can, Russian Standard, Vital Sign, Novo Brazil, La Di Da, Biotic, Eastern Standard Provisions, Juneshine, Carter & Oak

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 602 (11-8-21): Photosynthesis Fun, Fundamentals, and Confluence with Climate Change

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:26).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-5-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 8, 2021. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. That's part of “Racing the Sun,” by The Faux Paws, on that group's 2021 self-titled album, from Great Bear Records.  It opens a revised episode from November 2013, where we explore a sun-driven process that's fundamental to life on earth: photosynthesis, the process where green plants and algae make food, using the energy in sunlight to store chemical energy in the form of glucose.  Photosynthesis is also… VOICES IN SKIT - ~1 min./57 sec. REPORTER: We break into this show to bring you exclusive audio from the Virginia Tech campus, where a shadowy team of scientists are tinkering with the process underlying all life on earth.  They haven't yet revealed their possibly nefarious plans, so let's listen in... SCIENTIST 1: With this terrarium, we have a model system to test our carbon dioxide-manipulation scheme, and soon we'll be ready to control earth's fundamental food-producing process... SCIENTISTS 1 and 2: Photosynthesis! SCIENTIST 2: Are all the components of the system ready?  Green plants with chlorophyll? SCIENTIST 1: Check! SCIENTIST 2: Soil with proper nutrients? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2. Light? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Water? SCIENTIST 1.  Check! SCIENTIST 2.  Air with CO2? SCIENTIST 1.  CO2? SCIENTIST 2.  That's carbon dioxide! SCIENTIST 1.  Oh...right...I mean, check! SCIENTIST 2.  Let the photosynthesis start!  Engage monitoring device! SCIENTIST 1.  CO2 taken in from the air...water and nutrients being absorbed through roots...light falling on leaves.  All systems go!  Light energy is driving CO2 and water to combine and form glucose, the chemical-energy form, while releasing oxygen. SCIENTIST 2.  Apply the CO2 inhibitor! SCIENTIST 1.  Lid applied!  CO2 source blocked...system CO2 levels dropping rapidly...plants responding as expected, using up available CO2. SCIENTIST 2.  Reverse manipulation!  Apply the CO2 increaser! SCIENTIST 1. Lid removed!  CO2 added...plants responding.  Wait, they're responding too fast!  They're growing beyond the walls!  One has me...aieeeeeeee! SCIENTIST 2.  Now it's got me, too!  Noooooooo..... REPORTER: Well, this might be a good time for us to return to our regular show.  Back to you.... END VOICES IN SKIT Unlike this skit, with its far-fetched human-eating plants, there's nothing make-believe about Earth life's reliance on photosynthesis using sunlight, chlorophyll, nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide to make food.  Moreover, photosynthesis is a fundamental aspect of understanding and responding to climate change.  Photosynthesis millions of years ago created the hydrocarbon compounds that constitute today's fossil fuels, and photosynthesis now—absorbing and storing some of the carbon dioxide released in fossil fuel burning—has an important role in reducing Earth's carbon dioxide levels, warming, and other climate-change impacts.  For example, the capacity for photosynthesizing trees to take up atmospheric carbon dioxide was one aspect of the “Declaration on Forests and Land Use” at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, or COP26, in Glasgow, Scotland, from October 31 to November 12, 2021. Thanks to Eli Heilker and John Kidd for participating in this episode.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “Racing the Sun.”  We close with another musical selection appropriate for the climate challenges facing the COP26 meeting and all of us.  Here's about 25 seconds of “On a Ship,” by Blacksburg, Va., musician Kat Mills. MUSIC - ~ 24 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship,” then instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 186, 11-4-13. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 517, 3-23-20. Virginia Water Radio thanks John Kidd, formerly of the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, and Eli Heilker, a graduate of Virginia Tech in English who served an internship in Fall 2013 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, for their participation in this episode.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation demonstration of plant uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) during photosynthesis.  A terrarium (left) is attached via gas-transporting tubing to a CO2 monitor at right.  Photo taken in Blacksburg, Va., October 2013.  Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.Red Maple leaves in Blacksburg, Va., on October 30, 2013, in which green chlorophyll pigment was breaking down as photosynthesis and chlorophyll production in the leaves were stopping with the approach of winter.  The breakdown of chlorophyll in the fall allows pigments of other colors in the leaves to be revealed.  More information on fall leaf-color change is available in “The Miracle of Fall,” University of Illinois Extension, online at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/fallcolor/default.cfm. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Rick Groleau, “Illuminating Photosynthesis,” Public Broadcasting System (PBS) and WGBH-Boston, “NOVA” program, November 1, 2001, online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/photosynthesis.html. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, “Global Climate Change” Website, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/.  Specific pages used were the following:“A breathing planet, off balance,” by Kate Ramsayer and Carol Rasmussen, November 11, 2015, online at https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2364/a-breathing-planet-off-balance/; and“Frequently Asked Questions,” online at https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/. John Seiler, John Groninger, and John Peterson, Forest Biology and Dendrology, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, Blacksburg, Va., 2009.Smithsonian Institution, “Ocean—Find Your Blue/What Are Fossil Fuels?”; online at https://ocean.si.edu/conservation/gulf-oil-spill/what-are-fossil-fuels. 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), October 31—November 12, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/.  [October 31-November 12, 2021]; for information on photosynthesizing forests serving as “sinks” for carbon dioxide and other “greenhouse gases,” see particularly “Glasgow Leaders' Declaration on Forests and Land Use,” November 2, 2021, online at https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants,” “Science,” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to some other episodes related to climate change. Episode 231, 9-15-14 – Exploring Climate Change Basics, with Examples from Assateague Island National Seashore and Shenandoah National Park.Episode 312, 4-18-16 – Student's Research Digs into Streamside Soils, Rainfall Rates, and Greenhouse Gases. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.5.9 – Conservation of energy resources is important. Grade 66.4 – There are basic sources of energy and that energy can be transformed.6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.7 – Air has properties and the Earth's atmosphere has structure and is dynamic.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6     – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations.ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations.ES.12 – The Earth's weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun's energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.  2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals. Virginia Studies CourseVS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at th

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Journal of Biophilic Design
The COP26 Nature Pilgrimage

Journal of Biophilic Design

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 62:01


Loss of biodiversity, loss of productivity of our lands, emergence of new disease threats, now, here in 2021 we are on a tipping point. COP26 is a focus of concerns and we hope action. Glen Cousquer is a lecturer on the MSc and MVetSci programmes in One Health and Conservation Medicine at the University of Edinburgh. This podcast expounds a passionate philosophy on how we should educate and collaborate, as well as understand and co-exist with our natural world, our home. We talk about a Biotic and a wider connection to life. How Biophilic Design is a physical incarnation of that connection. How COP26 will see multiple generations speaking out more clearly than ever across our global village. We are seeing the emergence of a new discourse and Glen's advocation of “Awareness Based Action Research” which he teaches, which is a fast-cycle learning through deeper listening, using humility and empathy. Glen also describes the COP26 Pilgrimage which starts at the birthplace of John Muir, who inspired the conservation movement, and which will end at Glasgow where COP26 takes place.We discuss that sense of “awe” which we talk about creating in Biophilic Design, how we are born with that sense of wonder and that the way we relate to the world, out good health, our wellbeing, is connected and dependent on that. How engaging with that complexity that nature provides us with, with every element of ourselves, the way we move, the way we think, the way we breathe, we are constantly in relation to nature, we are not independent from it. We should also connect with “our” nature.There are some excellent one line quotes in this podcast, we'd love to know your favourites. We talk about wholeness, and how in Biophilic Design, we encourage mystery as well as creating environments that calm and heal through nature connection. Glen talks about how it is important for us neurologically for fear to arise and then subside, but if as a species how in an activated state of anxiety, we don't have sympathetic nervous systems activated and into that deactivation where our ventral vague nerve is active, we are better able to engage and connect. When we are in that calmer state, the work that we do has a completely different quality. The ways we create this state will almost always will be through some form of connection with our own nature and with nature itself.Listen to Glen explain the significance of an Ecological pilgrimage, how it can expand spiritual and ecological intelligence. Glen Cousquer Glen is a writer, photographer and has been lecturing on and coordinating the MSc and MVetSci programmes in One Health and Conservation Medicine at the University of Edinburgh.He is also a recipient of this year's EUSA Outstanding Commitment to Social Justice and Sustainability Award and the 2020 Social Responsibility and Sustainability Changemaker Awards in recognition of his work on sustainability across the University, including the embedding of deep listening and sustainability into postgraduate training courses for healthcare professionals.We spoke last year https://journalofbiophilicdesign.com/podcast-journal-of-biophilic-design/glen-cousquer (and listeners can search for it on your podcast platform or our website www.journalofbiophilicdesign.com From Veterinary Science to a Wellbeing Biophilic Economy Credits: with thanks to George Harvey Audio Production for the calming biophilic soundscape that backs all our podcasts. To keep upto date with all our podcasts why not subscribe

Gay Talk 2.0: The Ultimate LGBT PodCast
GayTalk 2.0 – Episode 274 – The All New Play-Biotic with Guest Dr. Evan Goldstein

Gay Talk 2.0: The Ultimate LGBT PodCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 68:46


On the first half of today's show the boys talked about their weekends together. Going out to see GAG Reflex, a local comedy show and the boys realize going out … The post GayTalk 2.0 – Episode 274 – The All New Play-Biotic with Guest Dr. Evan Goldstein appeared first on GAYTALK 2.0: An LGBT Podcast.

Digital Stream Radio Podcast
GayTalk 2.0 – Episode 274 – The All New Play-Biotic with Guest Dr. Evan Goldstein

Digital Stream Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 68:46


On the first half of today's show the boys talked about their weekends together. Going out to see GAG Reflex, a local comedy show and the boys realize going out  it's not that same after a certain age, when you have to wake up the next day. Tom moves us into a conversation about our local PRIDEFest begging this week… Read more →

Yield Masters Podcast
Disease: The Biotic Stress Threatening Your Crop With Brian Foss

Yield Masters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 45:23


How do you minimize diseases threatening your crop? The first step is to learn as much as you can about these potential diseases. Todd Steinacher's guest today is Brian Foss, Plant Pathologist at AgReliant Genetics. Brian shares with Todd about the PCR pathology experiments he conducts on hybrids and inbreds. Join in the conversation to get the latest updates on pest management, disease identification, prevention tips, and more. Learn more to make better choices. Tune in! Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the Yield Masters Podcast Community today:https://agrigold.com/podcastLinkedInTwitterInstagramFacebookYouTube

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 588 (8-2-21): A Singing Paddler's Take on Time and Changes in the Upper Rappahannock River

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:22). Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 2, 2021.  This revised episode from September 2018 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~10 sec – instrumental This week, we feature a Virginia singer/songwriter's music about time and changes along one of the Commonwealth's major rivers.  Have a listen for about 30 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 30 sec – Lyrics: “Roads and boards, mills and mines used to line this stream--all reclaimed by floods and vines, foundations sprouting gums and pines. River flows on, so does time.  Canoe splits Rappahannock water; dip my paddle, let it glide.” You've been listening to part of “Solitude,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, on the 2000 album, “That Squirrel Song.”  This and other river-themed songs by Mr. Gramann come in large part from his years of paddling the upper Rappahannock River and its tributaries, in the area between the Blue Ridge and the Fall Line at Fredericksburg.  The part of “Solitude” you heard describes some of the changes along the Rappahannock wrought by time and the effects of water, weather, humans, and other organisms.  Observers of other Virginia rivers and their watersheds might tell similar stories of change. Some riverside changes—such as flood impacts—happen relatively quickly.  Others move at a slower pace, as with trees growing in an abandoned building foundation.  Whatever the pace, changes seen in and along a river reflect events happening not only in the river channel but also upstream in the river's watershed.  Flooding, for example, is affected by upstream land uses and tributary patterns.  In turn, water flows affect stream and river shapes and materials, determining what habitats are available for living things.  And throughout a watershed, humans have land and water uses that affect downstream water quantity and quality.Virginia's rivers are continually being changed by unrelenting time and unceasing forces, and those rivers continue to provide services like water supply, irrigation, power generation, and others.  With all that going on, it's challenging and worthwhile to ensure that the Commonwealth's rivers retain places offering solitude and fostering creativity, such as in this week's music.  Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use the music, and we close with about 35 more seconds of “Solitude.” MUSIC – ~ 33 sec – Lyrics: “Rain and sleet, wind or heat, it's all the same to me.  Weather—you can never choose; each day that's mine, that day I'll use, to flee from time in my canoe, its bow splits Rappahannock water.  Dip my paddle, let it fly.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 437, 9-10-18. “Solitude,” from the 2000 album “That Squirrel Song,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/folksinger.html. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES The following photos along the Rappahannock River in Virginia were taken by Bob Gramann (except as noted) and used with his permission. Rappahannock River at the confluence with the Rapidan River (at the juncture of the Virginia counties of Culpeper, Spotsylvania, and Stafford), April 2004.Rappahannock River at low water (view toward Stafford County, Va.), August 2011.Rappahannock River in winter (view toward Stafford County, Va.), February 2006.Bob Gramann, composer of the music heard in the Virginia Water Radio episode, canoeing in the Rappahannock River's “First Drop” at Fredericksburg, Va., April 1, 2018.  Photo by Lou Gramann.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE UPPER RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER AND ITS WATERSHED The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Rappahannock River-Upper," online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-upper/. “The Rappahannock River flows from its origin at Chester Gap in Rappahannock County approximately 184 miles to the Chesapeake Bay.  The first 62 miles, from the headwaters to Mayfield Bridge (Fredericksburg), are designated State Scenic River.  The river has a watershed of approximately 2,715 mi2, and average annual discharge near Fredericksburg is typically about 1,639 cubic feet per second (cfs). “During Colonial days, the Rappahannock River was a major shipping artery for transporting tobacco, salted fish, iron ore, and grains.  The watershed supports a variety of land uses; largely agricultural in the upper watershed, with manufacturing, light industrial, and retail applications throughout.  Soil erosion is a problem in the upper watershed.  Runoff from the major tributaries (Rapidan and Hazel Rivers) leaves the Rappahannock muddy after even minor storm events. “Access to the Rappahannock system (defined here as the Rapidan and Rappahannock Rivers) is fairly limited and primitive. Established access points on the Rappahannock (traveling downstream) are at Kelly's Ford (Route 672 off Route 651) in Culpeper County and Motts Landing (Route 618) in Spotsylvania County.  About 25 miles separates these canoe/Jon boat slides, and an overnight camp stop is nearly mandatory for those that float fish this reach. Another access point is located on the Rapidan River at Elys Ford (Route 610) in Spotsylvania County about 14 miles upstream of Motts Landing. Access may also be gained via several non-established points.  These consist of VDOT right-of-ways along bridges (e.g., Route 522 on the Rapidan). … “The Rappahannock River's character changes abruptly in Fredericksburg at the fall line (the limit of tidal influence).  Above the fall line, the river is usually clear, swift, and dominant substrates are bedrock, boulder and cobble providing perfect habitat for smallmouth bass and related species.  However, below Route 1 the river is tidal, and the substrate is finer, dominated by sand; and the water is frequently murky.  Species composition shifts with habitat, and largemouth bass, catfish and anadromous species are more common in and below Fredericksburg.  Boaters and anglers can now navigate from upstream access points such as Motts Landing across the old Embrey Dam site and into the tidal waters adjacent to Fredericksburg.” SOURCES Used for Audio U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Use in the United States,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/mission-areas/water-resources/science/water-use-united-states?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality:“Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan;“Final 2020 305(b)/303(d) Water Quality Assessment Integrated Report,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quality/assessments/integrated-report;“Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000;“Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources:“Rappahannock River-Upper," online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-upper/; “Rappahannock River-Tidal,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/waterbody/rappahannock-river-tidal/.For More Information about the Rappahannock River City of Fredericksburg, Va., “Rappahannock River,” online at https://www.fredericksburgva.gov/210/Rappahannock-River. Friends of the Rappahannock (non-profit organization), online at http://www.riverfriends.org/. Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission, “Local TMDLs,” online at https://www.rrregion.org/program_areas/environmental/local_tmdls.php.  Located at this site are Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) reports on the Upper Rappahannock River, the Hazel River, and other Rappahannock River basin waterways. RappFLOW (Rappahannock Friends and Lovers of Our Watersheds; non-profit organization), online at https://rappflow.org/.For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Radford University, “Virginia's Rivers, online at http://www.radford.edu/jtso/GeologyofVirginia/VirginiasRivers/Drainage-1.html. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds. Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo (pages 8-11); available online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category. Following are links to some previous episodes on the Rappahannock River or its watershed.Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16.Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15.Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11.Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia rivers. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18.Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18.Blue Ridge origin of river watersheds – Episode 583, 6-28-21.Bluffs on rivers and other waters – Episode 587, 7-26-21.Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19.Headwater streams – Episode 582, 6-21-21.Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19.Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15.New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12.Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18.Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18.Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16.Shenandoah River introduction –

bay humans university agency music photo natural relationships earth state audio friends college change accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical united states pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol chesapeake bay route chesapeake snow environment journal types images va singing significance msonormal commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial species environmental soil dynamic established times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide canoe located water resources biology upper rivers lovers grade dip colorful resource solitude madison county signature flooding bio continental stafford scales blue ridge watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater streams ohio river virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources observers stafford county grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table fredericksburg rappahannock james river msohyperlink wildlife resources runoff smith river sections bluffs richard b life sciences stormwater headwater radford university new river policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa water use new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap sols tennessee river tmdl spotsylvania boaters geological survey shenandoah national park culpeper county culpeper vdot biotic virginia standards water center first drop fall line total maximum daily load tmdl space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Die Darmexperten
Instahelp X OMNi-BiOTiC®: Darm & Depression - kann der Darm unsere Gefühle beeinflussen?

Die Darmexperten

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 41:00


Kann der menschliche Darm depressiv machen? Beziehungsweise, was hat der Darm mit Depressionen zu tun? Diese Fragen stellten sich unsere Experten Mag. Kerstin Jäger (Klinische und Gesundheitspsychologin) und Dr. Michael Katzensteiner (Humanmediziner und diplomierter Burnoutprophylaxetrainer). In dieser Podcastfolge möchten sie über das Thema Depression sprechen und inwiefern der Darm damit zusammenhängt. Melde dich zu unserem Newsletter an: Mit unserem Newsletter bist du immer über Veranstaltungen, neue Blogbeiträge und spannende News im Bereich der Mikrobiomforschung informiert! -> https://www.omni-biotic.com/at/newsletter/ Abonniere unsere Social Media Kanäle, damit du immer weißt, wann ein Podcast online geht! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/omnibiotic_com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/omnibiotic/ Mehr über Instahelp: https://instahelp.me/at/ https://www.instagram.com/instahelp.me/

Die Darmexperten
Intimsphäre X OMNi-BiOTiC®: Das Mikrobiom - Die Fußballmannschaft des Darms

Die Darmexperten

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 41:48


Das Mikrobiom bezeichnet die Gesamtheit aller Mikroorganismen der Erde. Und davon haben wir im Körper auch so einige - wie im Darm und in der Vagina zum Beispiel. Wir haben uns mit @intimsphaere_com über die verschiedenen Mikrobiome, die es im menschlichen Körper gibt und andererseits, welchen Einfluss der Zustand dieser Mikrobiome auf unsere Gesundheit hat, ausgetauscht. Intimsphäre Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/intimsphaere_com/ Melde dich zu unseren Newsletter an: Mit unserem Newsletter bist du immer über Veranstaltungen, neue Blogbeiträge und spannende News im Bereich der Mikrobiomforschung informiert! -> https://www.omni-biotic.com/at/newsletter/ Abonniere unsere Social Media Kanäle, damit du immer weißt, wann ein Podcast online geht! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/omnibiotic_com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/omnibiotic/ In unserem kostenlosen Ratgeber für Frauen findest du alles rund um Scheidenflora & Co: https://www.omni-biotic.com/at/scheidenflora-ratgeber/

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 582 (6-21-21): Where Headwaters Flow, Rivers Begin

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:09). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-18-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 21, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2017 is part of a series this year of episodes related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 – instrumentalThat's part of “Highland,” by the group Wake Up Robin, with musicians from North Carolina, New York, California, and Washington State.  It opens an episode about waterways in the highest and most upstream part of watersheds, where water starts following a channel and flowing overland towards rivers.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to two Virginia examples, and see if you can guess the name for these upper watershed features.  And here's a hint: get this right and you'll stream to the head of water class.SOUND - ~ 11 sec If you guessed headwater streams, you're right!  Headwater streams are the first flowing waters in the upper part of a river's watershed.  These relatively small streams have a big range of functions, including as habitat for certain organisms or life stages, and as a source of water, materials, and organisms for downstream waters. Understanding the location and length of headwater streams in the Appalachian Mountains, particularly in response to storms, was the research goal of Carrie Jensen, a graduate student from 2014 to 2018 in Virginia Tech's Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.   In November 2017, Ms. Jensen described her research and its significance in just 90 seconds during the “Nutshell Games,” held by Virginia Tech's Center for Communicating Science.  Here's Ms. Jensen's presentation. GUEST VOICE - ~84 sec – “Hi, everyone.  My name is Carrie, and I study changes in stream length in Appalachian headwaters, which are the small streams where our rivers start on the landscape.  So I literally walk upstream with a GPS unit until I find where a stream begins in the mountains.  And these headwaters can expand and contract in length through time, getting longer when it's wet after it rains, and getting shorter during dry periods.  And I wanted to know if this expansion and contraction behavior is the same everywhere.  So I matched changes in stream length across the Appalachian Mountains and actually found some pretty big differences.  At some of my sites, stream length is really stable and hardly changes across a huge range of flows, but at other sites there's a lot of expansion and contraction: stream length varies from tens of feet to a couple of miles.  And this work is relevant for pretty much any application that requires knowing where streams are and when they have water.  So where to build stuff; how to build stuff; where you need riparian buffers of trees to protect water quality.  And normally we rely on maps for this information.  But the blue lines representing streams on maps don't tell us if the stream has water all the time, or 75 percent of the time, or maybe only once every couple of years.  So research describing and predicting these changes in stream length can help us better manage and protect our water resources.  Thank you.”As Ms. Jensen's work shows, there's much to know about headwaters, and such information can help us better understand quantity and quality patterns far downstream. Thanks to Carrie Jensen for permission to use the audio from her Nutshell Games talk.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstand for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Highland.”MUSIC - ~17 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 397, 12-4-17. The Nutshell Games are organized by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science to give graduate students a forum for describing their research in a short presentation designed for non-scientists.  More information about the Center for Communicating Science is available online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/.  Nutshell Games videos are available online at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC01cz4Mal3-AOZeODCauLHw.  Two news articles about the Nutshell Games are New center focuses on the art of communicating science effectively, Virginia Tech News, 2/28/17; and Understandable communication aim of first 'Nutshell Games', Roanoke Times, 3/3/17.“Highland,” from the 2018 album “Wake Up Robin,” on Great Bear Records, by the group of the same name, is used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about the album and band is available online at https://wakeuprobin.bandcamp.com.The sounds of headwater streams heard in this episode were recorded in Blacksburg, Va.'s Heritage Park on July 27, 2016, and in Blacksburg on Brush Mountain on January 31, 2010 (the latter stream is shown in the photos below). Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two views of a headwaters stream tributary to Toms Creek (New River basin) on Brush Mountain in Blacksburg, Va.: upper photo December 25, 2013; lower photo December 2, 2017. SOURCES Used for Audio Richard B. Alexander et al., “The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality,” Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 43, No. 1, February 2007, pages 41-59; available online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307624/(subscription may be required). Carrie Jensen, “Project Report, 2016 VWRRC Student Grant: Sensors reveal the timing and pattern of stream flow in headwaters after storms,” July 10, 2017, Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg. Sacramento [Calif.] River Watershed Program, “Importance of the Headwaters,” by Todd Sloat, 9/21/14, online at https://sacriver.org/watershed-blog/importance-of-the-headwaters/. Craig Snyder, et al., “Significance of Headwater Streams and Perennial Springs in Ecological Monitoring in Shenandoah National Park,” 2013, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2013–1178; available online (as a PDF) at https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1178/pdf/ofr2013-1178.pdf. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Resources of the United States/Water Basics Glossary/Headwaters,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/water-basics_glossary.html#H. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Glossary/Headwater,” online at https://water.usgs.gov/edu/dictionary.html#H. Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Science, online at https://communicatingscience.isce.vt.edu/. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, “The Importance of Headwater Streams,” online at https://dep.wv.gov/WWE/getinvolved/sos/Pages/Headwaters.aspx. For More Information about Watersheds and River Basins Natural Resources Conservation Service/Virginia, “2020 Virginia Water Resources Progress Report,” online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/.  This report has descriptions of projects in many Virginia watersheds.  The 2017 report is online at https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/va/programs/planning/wo/ U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “How's My Waterway,” online at https://www.epa.gov/waterdata/hows-my-waterway. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Science School/Watersheds and Drainage Basins,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/watersheds-and-drainage-basins?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Hydrologic Unit Geography,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/hu; and “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml.  Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Commonwealth of Virginia State Water Resources Plan,” April 2015, available online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/water-supply-planning/virginia-water-resources-plan; “Status of Virginia's Water Resources,” October 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument/2119/637432838113030000; and “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity.  Virginia Places, “The Continental (and Other) Divides,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/divides.html. Virginia Places, “Rivers and Watersheds of Virginia,” online at http://www.virginiaplaces.org/watersheds/index.html. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Divide and Confluence,” by Alan Raflo, pages 8-11 in Virginia Water Central Newsletter, February 2000, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49316. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to some other episodes on watersheds and Virginia river basins.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in summer 2021, so the episode number, date, and link may change. Big Otter River introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Big Sandy River watershed introduction – Episode 419, 5-7-18. Blue Ridge and three watersheds - Episode 209, 4-14-14. Bullpasture and Cowpasture rivers introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 469, 4-22-19. Hazel River introduction (Rappahannock River watershed) – Episode 339, 10-24-16. Jackson River introduction (James River watershed) – Episode 428, 7-9-19. Madison County flooding in 1995 (on Rapidan River, in Rappahannock County watershed) – Episode 272, 6-29-15 Musical tour of rivers and watersheds - Episode 251, 2-2-15. New River introduction – Episode 109, 5-7-12. Ohio River basin introduction – Episode 421, 5-21-18. Ohio River basin connections through watersheds and history – Episode 422, 5-28-18; Passage Creek and Fort Valley introduction (Shenandoah River watershed) – Episode 331 – 8/29/16. River bluffs – Episode 173, 8-5-13. Rappahannock River introduction – Episode 89, 11-21-11. Shenandoah River introduction – Episode 130 – 10/1/12. Smith River and Philpott Reservoir introduction (Roanoke River watershed) – Episode 360, 3-20-17. South Fork Holston River introduction (Clinch-Powell/Upper Tennessee River watershed) – Episode 425, 6-18-18. Staunton River introduction (part of the Roanoke River) – Episode 374, 6-26-17. Virginia rivers quiz – Episode 334, 9-19-16. Virginia surface water numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20. Virginia's Tennessee River tributaries – Episode 420, 5-14-18. Watershed and water cycle terms related to stormwater – EP365 – 4/24/17. Watersheds introduction – Episode 581, 6-14-21. Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Werowocomoco native people's civilization history, centered in the York River watershed – Episode 364, 12-12-16.Following are links to other episodes with information from presentations at the Nutshell Games, produced by the Virginia Tech Center for Communicating Sciences.Episode

new york bay university agency california music natural earth state audio college change sound accent dark tech water web status index land rain musical pond research ocean weather government education recreation conservation vol north carolina appalachian chesapeake snow gps environment wwe journal types organisms images ms va significance msonormal commonwealth stream highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading divide water resources biology rivers grade colorful forest resources washington state madison county signature bio continental scales blue ridge guest voice watershed transcript earth sciences wg roanoke river freshwater ohio river environmental protection virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k environmental quality watersheds name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes communicating science blacksburg james river msohyperlink appalachian mountains smith river sections richard b life sciences stormwater headwaters headwater new river environmental conservation policymakers bmp environmental protection agency epa heritage park new standard acknowledgment virginia department cripple creek cumberland gap emerald ash borer sols understandable tennessee river tmdl geological survey shenandoah national park west virginia department biotic living systems roanoke times virginia standards water center space systems rappahannock river audio notes
Just Bein' Honest
Episode 174 : What is BIOTIC SKINCARE + Catching up with KB's Life!

Just Bein' Honest

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2021 59:36


On this Episode, number 174, of the “Just Bein’ Honest Podcast”, it's been a while and the questions are coming on about WHAT has been going on in KB's world : Health, Daily life with the mask (errrrr) sort of off, and is love on the line? Opening up just a tad to keep things juice, because - you wanted to know, right?Also, the latest in BIOTIC SKINCARE - yep. This is the newest big thing folks, so buckle up! That PRE - PRO - POST - BIOTIC lifestyle is going right in to how you should be treating your entire skincare routine.let's get started on this scientific savior, shall we?We are diving in deep about:What is BIOTIC SKINCARE?PRE . PRO . POST - BIOTICS + how they work?Lifestyle techniques that accommodate.How's my health? Mentally? Physically?WIN! You could WIN a 60 day supply of ANSER's Women's Multivitamin + Beauty Formula. All you have to do is leave a COMMENT + 5-STAR RATING over on APPLE PODCASTS / iTUNES (Subscribing is a PLUS!)Resources:@JustBeinHonestKB*** Thank you to today's Sponsor! Grab it now :C B D + S E L F C A R E . By PRIMAWellbeing essentials made with broad spectrum hemp CBDand functionally innovative botanicals — and the highest standards of purity, potency and transparency. Use code: "HONEST" for 15% OFF!!!G U T + B R A I N | H E A L T H . By ION BIOMEION*Gut Health supports the body’s production of beneficial enzymes through redox signaling (cellular communication).Those beneficial enzymes support the tight junctions (the seals between cells) in our gut lining – the barrier protecting us from toxic substances like glyphosate and gluten while allowing the entry of beneficial nutrients. Shop + Save with the Subscription + Bundles: ION BIOMEThe "Just Bein' Honest" Podcast is a production made from the ♡xoxo KB*Business Inquiries : katherine@justbeinhonest.com*Music : "Alone" by Emmit Fenn // "Bravado" by Rondo BrothersSPONSORS + PARTNERSHIPS: My platform is rooted on the bases of natural healing and clean product integrity - Products linked are affiliate relationships, meaning if one purchases through this link, I may benefit a small commission from your support.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 577 (5-17-21): Water's at the Heart of Virginia's Western Highlands

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021


 CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53). Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-14-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO

western merriam webster culture bay humans university agency america guide music highlands berlin natural relationships earth state audio living college swift history north america world abraham lincoln sound accent dark testing tech water web index land rain pond research tourism ocean government education recreation conservation development maine west virginia route charleston hot springs springs falls chesapeake snow caves environment images richmond va bath yarmouth msonormal maintenance commonwealth figures stream ky highland normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens confluence arial environmental spine times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading morton shenandoah commerce grade ancient history colorful signature nonesuch resort karst watershed transcript earth sciences see what i have done homestead wg freshwater epa virginia tech bowling green ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table harrisonburg heidelberg germany poff ar sa homeowners blacksburg virginia museum warm springs james river regions environmental protection agency cosgrove msohyperlink occurrence usi sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater annals policymakers bmp acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap michael martz sols tmdl springer verlag united states history biotic alleghany county virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 575 (5-3-21): Making Connections to Groundwater

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:52)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-30-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 3, 2021.  This revised episode from March 2015 is part of a series this spring of episodes on a widespread, widely used, but mostly unseen water resource: groundwater.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds to some mystery sounds and music, and see if you can guess three connections to groundwater.  And here’s a hint: get pumped and the answer will spring right up, especially if you’ve been deep in a cave somewhere.SOUNDS and MUSIC (instrumental) ~ 34 secIf you guessed pumps, springs, and caves or caverns, you’re right!  You heard two hand-driven wellwater pumps; groundwater coming to the land surface in a Giles County spring; and part of “In the Cave,” by the group Pepe Deluxé on the Great Stalacpipe Organ in Page County’s Luray Caverns. The slow but steady work of groundwater created the stalactites used by the organ, but you don’t have to go into underground caverns to see the role and value of groundwater.  Groundwater wells supply many Virginia localities, citizens, and industries, providing about 11 percent of total water withdrawals in Virginia in 2019, excluding water for power generation.  Also, groundwater contributes to surface water bodies, as seen in springs and in streams that continue to flow even in times of low rainfall.  In turn, groundwater is recharged from surface waters and rainfall, a process that takes days for shallow or porous aquifers, but centuries or longer for deep, hard-to-reach aquifers. Location, movement, surface connections, and uses – all of these factors contribute to making groundwater a challenging, vital, and vulnerable resource.  And they make it important for citizens to be aware of groundwater. Spring’s a good time to do so.  National Groundwater Awareness Week, sponsored by the National Ground Water Association, is held each March; 2021 has been designated as the International Year of Caves and Karst, and May 8 is the date for the Virginia Cave Board’s program in observance of the event; and the 2021 version of Virginia Cave Week, organized by the Cave Board, is June 6-12. All year round, Virginians can get groundwater information from various agencies and organizations.  Here are some key ones: the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality; the U.S. Geological Survey’s Water Science Center in Richmond; and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Well-owner Network, both operated by Virginia Tech’s Biological Systems Engineering Department.  More information about the Virginia Tech programs is available from your local Virginia Cooperative Extension office.Thanks to Pepe Deluxé for permission to use parts of “In the Cave,” and we close with another short excerpt of that music with a Virginia groundwater connection.MUSIC - ~ 14 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This episode updates and replaces Episode 306, 3-7-16. Virginia Water Radio thanks Shana Moore, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, for her suggestions in 2016 on the previous version of this episode. The groundwater-pump sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio along the C&O Canal Towpath in West Virginia, on July 9, 2010; and at New River Trail State Park in Pulaski, Virginia, on August 31, 2013. The spring water sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio on Angels Rest trail in Giles County on September 30, 2018.“In the Cave,” from the 2012 album “Queen of the Wave,” is copyright by Pepe Deluxé and Catskills Records, used with permission. More information about Pepe Deluxé is available at their Web site, http://www.pepedeluxe.com/; click on the “Album Companions” link on that page to access an article on the Great Stalacpipe Organ and the making of “In the Cave.” A music video of “In the Cave” is available on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkvvcN6rt-I.  “In the Cave” was previously used by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 527, 6-1-20.Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Diagram showing pathways and estimated travel times between groundwater aquifers and surface features. Diagram from the U.S. Geological Survey’s “Water Science School” Web site, at http://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercyclegwdischarge.html, accessed 5-3-21.Hand-driven pump (one of the two pumps heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode) in New River Trail State Park in Pulaski, Virginia (Pulaski County), August 31, 2013.Old Spring House in Winchester, Va., March 24, 2008. SOURCES Used for Audio Friends of the Virginia Cave Board, “Virginia Cave Week,” online at https://www.vacaveweek.com/. International Year of Caves and Karst, online at http://iyck2021.org/. Luray Caverns (home of the Great Stalacpipe Organ), online at http://luraycaverns.com/discover/caverns.  A 4 min./2 sec. video on the Great Stalacpipe Organ is online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crxmaFK31Fk. National Ground Water Association, “National Groundwater Awareness Week,” online at https://www.ngwa.org/get-involved/groundwater-awareness-week/groundwater-awareness-week-2021.  Also see the “About Groundwater” link at https://www.ngwa.org/what-is-groundwater/About-groundwater, and a 2 minute/46 second video on groundwater protection at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPm-3Y8GOoo. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “USGS Water Science School/Groundwater,” online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/groundwater. U.S. Geological Survey/Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center, online at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/va-wv-water. Virginia Cave Board, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/cavehome. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Ground Water,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/permits-regulations/permits/water/water-withdrawal/ground-water. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Status of Virginia’s Water Resources-October 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/home/showpublisheddocument?id=2119.  For water withdrawal information cited in this episodes, see the Executive Summary, page vii. Virginia Tech Department of Biological Systems Engineering, “Virginia Household Water Quality Program and Virginia Well Owner Network,” online at http://www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu/index.php.  The contact for both programs is Erin Ling, 1230 Washington Street SW, Room 302, Virginia Tech (0554), Blacksburg, VA 24060; phone (540 231-9058; e-mail: wellwater@vt.edu. For More Information about Groundwater Charles W. Carlston, “Notes on the early history of water-well drilling in the United States,” Economic Geology (Vol. 38, pages 119-136, 1943); available online at https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/segweb/economicgeology/article/38/2/119/15747/Notes-on-the-early-history-of-water-well-drilling(subscription may be required for access).Bruce Misstear et al., Water Wells and Boreholes, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, England, 2006. National Speleological Society, online at http://www.caves.org/. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “Ground Water and Drinking Water,” online at https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water. George Veni et al., “Living with Karst,” American Geological Institute Environmental Awareness Series, 2001; available online at http://www.agiweb.org/environment/publications/karst.pdf. Virginia Administrative Code, “Private Well Regulations,” Section 12 VAC 5-630, online at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/admincode/title12/agency5/chapter630, [“Design and Construction Criteria” are in Part III, starting at Section 12 VAC 5-630-350.] Virginia Water Resources Research Center groundwater-related publications from the 1980s to the 2000s are listed and linked online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23964/discover?rpp=10&etal=0&query=groundwater&group_by=none&page=3.  Here are three key publications:*Author unidentified, A Guide to Private Wells, 1995, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55265.*J.A. Poff, A Guide to Virginia’s Groundwater, 1997, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55247.*J.A. Poff, A Homeowner’s Guide to the Development, Maintenance, and Protection of Springs as a Drinking Water Source, 1999, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/55268. WaterAid, “Hand-dug Wells,” January 2013, online (as a PDF) at file:///C:/Users/araflo/AppData/Local/Temp/technical-brief-hand-dug-wells.pdf. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to other groundwater-related episodes.  Note that some of these episodes are being re-done in May-June 2021; in those cases, the links below will redirect you to the updated episodes.Caves, caverns, and other karst features – Episode 527, 6-1-20.Eastern Virginia groundwater and the SWIFT project – Episode 534, 7-20-20.Information sources on Virginia’s water resources generally, including groundwater) – Episode 546, 10-12-20.Springs – Episode 75, 8-15-11.Testing water from wells and other household sources – Episode 361, 3-27-17.Virginia’s Western Highlands and thermal springs – Episode 379, 7-31-17.Well construction – Episode 219, 6-23-14.Winter precipitation and water supplies, including the role of groundwater replenishment – Episode 567, 3-8-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.5.8 – Earth constantly changes. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment.

bay humans university design agency guide music natural relationships earth state audio friends living college swift materials england accent dark network testing tech water web status index land rain united states pond research ocean government education development vol west virginia spring springs chesapeake snow caves environment location images wave richmond va msonormal maintenance stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens sons arial environmental times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading winchester shenandoah civics grade diagram colorful resource chichester signature karst govt watershed transcript earth sciences vac wg executive summary international year freshwater epa virginia tech ls atlantic ocean groundwater natural resources wateraid grades k drinking water environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table tca pulaski virginians poff ar sa homeowners blacksburg environmental protection agency cosgrove msohyperlink sections life sciences john wiley ben cosgrove stormwater policymakers msobodytext making connections bmp c users acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols giles county tmdl geological survey biotic virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
INDIMASALA (इंडिमसाला) Health, Fitness & Awakening! More Life- Everyday!
S2E26- Best Pre & Pro Biotic Foods for Good Skin & Gut Health.

INDIMASALA (इंडिमसाला) Health, Fitness & Awakening! More Life- Everyday!

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 8:14


What are the easily available prebiotic and probiotic foods that we can include in our diet. The benefits are better stomach health which gives you healthy skin and overall better sleep, mood and immunity. Kindly listen. https://www.healthline.com/health/probiotics-skin-care#The-facts https://food.ndtv.com/beauty/7-natural-face-packs-our-grandmothers-used-for-beautiful-skin-1684221 https://www.ndtv.com/food/indigestion-problem-try-these-10-probiotic-foods-to-improve-digestion-and-immunity-1919628 https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/14598-probiotics --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/indimasala/message

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 574 (4-26-21): Rhododendrons Span Virginia from Ridges to Swamps

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:36)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-23-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 26, 2021.  This revised episode from June 2014 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. MUSIC – ~17 sec – Lyrics: “I can’t explain away the reasons, I can’t wish away the seasons.  When springtime comes again, it’ll sure by my winter’s end.” This week, that music opens an episode about a group of plants with species found across Virginia and whose blooming times collectively span a period from early spring well into summer.  Have a listen for about 50 more seconds to the song and its celebration of some members of this plant group found high up in southwestern Virginia.MUSIC – ~48 sec – Lyrics: “Well I was high up in the fields, there above the rhododendron ridge.  My time up there was real, not like some other time I’ve spent.  And when the flowers bloom in June, it’s like something you’ve never seen—shades of purple, white, and blue, as far as you can see.” You’ve been listening to part of “Rhododendron Ridge,” by the Roanoke, Va., band The Floorboards, on their 2012 self-titled album.  The song was written about the area around Mt. Rogers—Virginia’s highest peak, located in Grayson and Smyth counties.  Mt. Rogers is noted for its populations of Catawba Rhododendronand its flower displays in June.  Catawba is one of Virginia’s nine native species in the scientific genus of Rhododendron, some of which are commonly called azaleas.  As a group, their habitats range from rocky mountainous areas, to Piedmont streams, to Coastal Plains wetlands.  Their blooming times range from March to August, depending on the species. These perennial spring and summer flower shows happen in places where the plants’ roots and leaves get their preferred combination of sun or shade, temperature, moisture, nutrients, and acidity levels in the soil and soil water.  Virginia’s rhododendron species typically prefer higher acidity, and they share that preference with other members of the heath family of plants, including blueberries and Mountain Laurel. While you can’t see the water chemistry going on around rhododendron roots, at the right time and place you can see a remarkable flower display, which might be for you—as for this week’s songwriter—like something you’ve never seen.  Thanks to the Floorboards for permission to use this week’s music, and close with about 25 more seconds of “Rhododendron Ridge.” MUSIC – ~28 sec – Lyrics: “Springtime’s comin’ now, oh it won’t be long—you and I we’re gonna sing, gonna sing our summer song.” SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 216, 6-2-14. “Rhododendron Ridge” is copyright 2012 by The Floorboards, used with permission.  More information about The Floorboards is available online at https://thefloorboardsmusic.com/.Thanks to the following people for providing information in 2014 for the original version of this episode: Susan Day, John Peterson, and John Seiler, all in the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation; and the staff and volunteers working at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Rocky Knob Visitor Center (mile post 169) on June 1, 2014. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Great Rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum, right), Flame Azalea (Rhododendron calendulaceum), orange flowers, left) and Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia, foreground) along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Floyd County, Va., June 1, 2014.Side-by-side Flame Azaleas (Rhododendron calendulaceum) showing color variation, along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Floyd County, Va., June 1, 2014.Swamp Azalea (Rhododendron viscosum), photographed at Sandy Bottom Nature Park in Hampton, Va., June 14, 2009.  Photo by Debbie Blanton, made available on iNaturalist, online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35506117(as of 4-26-21), for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT RHODODENDRONS IN VIRGINIA The following information about nine native species of Rhododendron found in Virginia is from pages 540-543 in A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.; copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond; published by Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  The species are listed in alphabetical order according to their scientific name (shown in italics). Sweet Azalea (also called Smooth Azalea), Rhododendron arborescens – Found rarely in Virginia’s mountains and Piedmont; in rocky forests and rocky areas along streams; blooms May to July. Dwarf Azalea, Rhododendron atlanticum – Found commonly in Virginia’s southern Coastal Plain; in woodlands and clearings that are dry to moist, sandy, and acidic; blooms April to May. Flame Azalea, Rhododendron calendulaceum – Found commonly in Virginia’s southern mountains; in forests that are dry to mesic (moderately moist), particularly in acidic oak forests; blooms May to June. Catawba Rhododendron (also called Pink Laurel and Mountain Rosebay), Rhododendron catawbiense – Found commonly in Virginia’s southern and rarely in the Piedmont; in dry forests on sheltered slopes or rocky ridges, as well as on balds, in bogs, and in acidic cove forests, and (in the Piedmont) along river bluffs; blooms April to June. Cumberland Azalea, Rhododendron cumberlandense – Found infrequently in Virginia’s far southwestern mountains; in mountainous forests and woodlands; blooms June to July. Great Rhododendron (also called Great Laurel and White Rosebay), Rhododendron maxiumum – Found commonly is Virginia’s southwestern mountains and Piedmont, less frequently in northern mountains, and rarely in other parts of the Piedmont or in the Coastal Plain; in acidic cove forests in the mountains, and in forests, wetlands, bluffs, and stream bottoms in other regions; blooms June to August. Wild Azalea (also called Pinxterflower and Pinxterbloom Azalea), Rhododendron periclymenoides– Found commonly throughout Virginia; in dry or mesic acidic forests, in certain wetlands, and along streams; blooms March to May. Early Azalea (also called Rose Azalea and Roseshell Azalea), Rhododendron prinophyllum – Found frequently or commonly in Virginia’s mountains, except in far southwestern Virginia, and rarely in the northern Piedmont; in dry or mesic forests, most abundantly in oak forests, and more often in less acidic soils than are other Rhododendron species; blooms May to June. Swamp Azalea (also called Clammy Azalea), Rhododendron viscosum – Found frequently in Virginia’s Coastal Plain, infrequently in the mountains, and rarely in the Piedmont; in acidic swamps, bogs, and other wetlands, and in wet woods; blooms May to July. SOURCES Used for Audio Blue Ridge Parkway Association, “Craggy Gardens, MP 364,” online at http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/v.php?pg=112.Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. W. Henry McNab, Ecological Subregions of the United States, U.S. Forest Service, Washington, D.C., 1994; available online at http://www.fs.fed.us/land/pubs/ecoregions/ch18.html.  See particularly Chapter 18, “Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest - Coniferous Forest – Meadow.”U.S. Forest Service, “Mt. Rogers National Recreation Area,” online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/gwj/specialplaces/?cid=stelprdb5302337.U.S. National Park Service, “Blue Ridge Parkway/Plants/Blooming Shrubs,” online at https://www.nps.gov/blri/learn/nature/showy-blooms.htm.Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora/Rhododendron,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?s=rhododendron&c=&do=search%3Aadvanced&search=Search.Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology,” online at http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/index.html. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  This is the first comprehensive manual of Virginia plants published since the 1700s.  The Flora of Virginia Project is nline at http://www.floraofvirginia.org/.For More Information about Plants in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, series of wildflower guides: Fall Wildflowers of the Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountains, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1987; Wild Orchids of the Middle Atlantic States University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, 1986); Wildflowers of Tidewater Virginia (University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1982; and Wildflowers of the Shenandoah Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1979. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service Plants Database, online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes. Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Spring Peepers – Episode 570, 3-29-21.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 571, 4-5-21.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.Virginia Bluebells – Episode 521, 4-20-20.Warblers and spring bird migration – Episode 572, 4-12-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.3.6 – Soil is important in ecosystems. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources.   Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.3 – There are levels of structural organization in living things.LS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.6 – Modern classification systems can be used as organizational tools for scientists in the study of organisms. BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Following are links to Water Radio

bay university agency music photo natural earth state audio living found college knoxville modern accent texas dark tech water web index rain united states pond research ocean washington weather government education conservation plants trees foundation spring chesapeake snow environment organisms images search richmond va rogers adaptations copyright msonormal stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens fort worth great smoky mountains wildflowers environmental frogs soil national park service dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology shenandoah valley chemical span blue ridge mountains grade ludwig colorful townsend forest resources signature bio charlottesville mt catawba scales piedmont hampton blue ridge mp warblers watershed swamps transcript virginia tech smyth ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k roanoke university press forest service name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes rhododendron rhododendrons shrubs ar sa swope spring peepers msohyperlink blue ridge parkway sections attribution noncommercial life sciences stormwater environmental conservation john peterson policymakers msobodytext bmp new standard acknowledgment virginia department floyd county cripple creek floorboards virginia press cumberland gap inaturalist sols tennessee press tmdl ridges wild orchids biotic living systems virginia standards water center mountain laurel oscar w space systems audio notes
Unknown.FM - Worldwide Radio 24/7
mR_BLACk - Special Guest Mix - Unknown.FM [2021-04-24]

Unknown.FM - Worldwide Radio 24/7

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 119:06


mR_BLACk Guest mix deep and dark electronic music. Saturday April 24. 2-4pm GMT Leipzig-based selector mR_BLACk, with more than 20 years of experience behind the decks, is certain to deliver the deepest and darkest sounds in the field of underground electronic music. Not particularly pinned to a specific genre or tempo, he has produced countless mixes for his online audiences that show off versatility but at the same time consistency in his sound aesthetic. His primary goal in a set is to create a mood of exploring the unknown while keeping the bass-heavy and the atmosphere gloomy." BIO links: https://www.facebook.com/misteRBLACkmusic/ https://soundcloud.com/quantum-world https://www.mixcloud.com/mR_BLACk/ https://hearthis.at/mrblack/ https://soundcloud.com/kuraidubs 01 Ben Salisbury - Two Theories [Invada] 02 Rrose - Arms And Legs (Variation Two) [Eaux] 03 Nastika - A Place Among Them [Modern Bön] 04 Sum Of R - Please Ring The Bells [Cyclic Law] 05 Reeko - Journalistic Tool#5.wav [Mental Disorder] 06 Ruhig - Bashir [Semantica] 07 Akinsa & Yanai - Far Away [Third Foundation] 08 Alternate Current - Hissssss [Unknown Movement] 09 Shifted - K Pop [Stroboscopic Artefacts] 10 Cub - Teenage Fists [Downwards] 11 Unknown Path - Weathered Peak, Pt. 4 [Auxiliary] 12 ASC - Disclosure [Trauma Collective] 13 Sam KDC - Kykeon [Self Release] 14 Torn - Devoid Of Truth [Self Release] 15 ASC - Node [Auxiliary] 16 Sciama - Ceto [Auxiliary] 17 Ibunshi - Sustain [Free] 18 Nthng - Dissappeared But Not Forgotten [Lobster Theremin] 19 Ghost Warrior - Meet At Infinity [Well Street] 20 Ahmad - Inversion VIP [Paradise Lost] 21 Entire & Istota - Tundra [forthcoming Vykhod Sily] 22 Talker - Hari [Standards & Practices] 23 Dreadmaul - De-Civilized [Tech Cycle] 24 The Untouchables - Interlooper [Mutable Beats] 25 Shinbu - Sphere#2 [Self Release] 26 Spiritual Voices & Shiza - Cretaceous [Diffuse Reality] 27 Tnnl - Sphere [Onset] 28 Cryogenics - Past & Future [Self Release] 29 Synchronise - Arc Light (Scythe Remix) [Biotic] 30 Shiken Hanzo - 5th Dimension [Inperspective] 31 Dreadmaul - Tecora [Self Release] 32 11th Hour - Distress [Circle Vision] 33 Personnage - Shock [Sigrún] 34 Bruno Sanchez - The Blackest Sunday [Paradise Lost] 35 Scythe - Subject 05 [Biotic] 36 Concealed Identity - Io [Repertoire] 37 Aksum - Keisaku [Zodiac] 38 Intorean - Tied Shaman [Self Release] 39 ASC - Volatile [Samurai]

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 571 (4-5-21): Spring Signals for Fish and Those Who Would Catch Them

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021


Click to listen to episode (3:47) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-2-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 5, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2016 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. SOUND – ~7 sec - Kayaking on the Appomattox River, recorded from underwater.This week, those sounds above and below the surface of the Appomattox River open an episode about spring signals on and in Virginia’s water bodies. Have a listen for about 10 seconds to the following mystery sound, and see if you can guess what group of water-resources users this signal is designed to alert.  And here’s a hint: it’s a powerful signal, for reel...and rod.SOUND - ~11 sec If you guessed, a signal for people fishing, you’re right!  You heard a June 2013 recording of a warning siren at the Claytor Lake hydroelectric facility on the New River in Pulaski County, Virginia.  The siren was being used to alert anglers and any other nearby river users that a power-generating unit was about to start operating and releasing more water. While that siren sounding was a human-generated signal to stop fishing in that location, spring in Virginia sends out plenty of natural signals that serve to start or increase fishing activity.  Anglers follow fish, and fish follow various environmental and biological cues, such as temperature, daylight, sources of insects and other food, predator behavior, and life-cycle demands.  Spring brings significant changes to those fish cues, and as a result, gives many anglers their cue to resume trying to outwit the finned inhabitants of the Commonwealth’s ponds, lakes, streams, rivers, and coastal waters. Thanks to Raven Harris for the Appomattox River sounds.  We close with some music for Virginia’s anglers.  Here’s about 25 seconds of “Bass Fisherman’s Reel,” an adaptation of a traditional tune called “Fisher’s Hornpipe,” done by Williamsburg musician Timothy Seaman on his 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.” MUSIC - ~28 sec SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episodes 208, 4-7-14, and 311, 4-11-16. The opening sounds were recorded by Raven Harris, of Newport News, Va., on the Appomattox River in Petersburg, Va., on April 18, 2014; used with permission. The warning signal was recorded by Virginia Water Radio near the Claytor Hydroelectric Facility on the New River in Pulaski County, Va., on June 30, 2013. “Bass Fisherman’s Reel,” from the 2004 CD “Virginia Wildlife,” copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  This music was previously used by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 241, 11-24-14.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF; now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) sign indicating a trout-stocking area on Cripple Creek along Rt. 641 in Wythe County, Va., February 22, 2014. Fish nest in Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va., (Montgomery County), May 8, 2010.A signal for fly-fishing anglers: adult mayflies swarming around a ballfield light in Shawsville, Va. (Montgomery County), near the South Fork Roanoke River, May 12, 2014. SOURCES Used for Audio Information on the warning signal at the American Electric Power (AEP)/Appalachian Power (APCO) Claytor Hydroelectric Facility, located on the New River in Pulaski County, Virginia, was provided by Elizabeth Parcell, a process supervisor at the Claytor facility, in a 7/16/13 e-mail.  More information about the Claytor Lake facility is available from AEP’s Web site for the facility, at http://www.claytorhydro.com. Traditional Tune Archive, “Fisher’s Hornpipe,” online at https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Fisher%27s_Hornpipe.Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Fish found in Virginia are listed at this link.  ___, “Fishing,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/.  This source has information on kinds of freshwater fish, places to fish, fishing seasons, and regulations. ___, “Fishing Forecasts and Reports,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/forecasts-and-reports/.  ___, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. ___, “Virginia Fishes,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/fish/.Virginia Marine Resources Commission (VMRC), online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/.For More Information about Fish in Virginia and Elsewhere Paul Bugas et al., Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes of Virginia, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2019.  Information is available online at https://www.vafreshwaterfishes.com/2019/05/field-guide-to-freshwater-fishes.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Fish,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/fish/all. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org.  “Rays, Sharks, and Relatives” are online at https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Chondrichthyes/classification/; “Ray-finned Fishes” are online at https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Actinopterygii/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Fish” and “Recreation” subject categories. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes.  (Please note: several of these may be redone in spring 2021.  As that occurs, the links below will include directions to the blog post for the updated episodes.) Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 212, 5-5-14.Spring Peepers – Episode 570, 3-29-21.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.Warblers and spring bird migration – Episode 157, 4-15-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes; including that changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism’s survival in an ecosystem.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth Science ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12thgrade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8thgrade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rdand 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia’s water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

bay humans university agency music natural relationships earth state audio game college sound accent animals dark tech water web index rain pond research ocean weather government education recreation native baltimore spring fish chesapeake snow environment organisms images reel montgomery county va adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens fishing williamsburg environmental frogs dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology sharks reports grade signals petersburg colorful rt md signature bio rays warblers watershed transcript kayaking earth sciences anglers freshwater hornpipe virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean fishes natural resources claytor grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table field guides processes zoology blacksburg cosgrove spring peepers relatives msohyperlink wildlife resources sections life sciences ben cosgrove stormwater new river policymakers msobodytext bmp aep acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum newport news cripple creek johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols tmdl biotic living systems virginia standards water center pulaski county space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 569 (3-22-21): Treating Spring Fever with Water, Featuring “Until the Summer Comes” by The Steel Wheels

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:23)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 22, 2021.  This revised episode from March 2016 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. MUSIC  – ~ 13 sec – Lyrics: “see I ate all my dinner, and so much for winter; I’m gonna run till the springtime’s gone.” This week, music from the Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, captures some of the “fever” of spring, which begins astronomically in the northern hemisphere on March 20 this year.  Have a listen for about 40 more seconds. Music – ~ 41 sec – Lyrics: “Hey, hey, hey, what a day.  I’m gonna soak up sun, gonna dry out the river, I’m gonna run to the shimmering pond, until the summer comes….” You’ve been listening to part of “Until the Summer Comes,” from The Steel Wheels’ 2013 album, “No More Rain.” Water is part of spring’s feverish pull for this song’s narrator and for many non-humans, like Spring Peepers [SOUND ~ 3 sec] seeking temporary ponds for breeding; Red-winged Blackbirds [SOUND ~ 3 sec] nesting in wetlands; and—to humans’ dismay—mosquitoes [SOUND ~ 2 sec] seeking all kinds of standing water for egg-laying.As of this recording on March 19, water supplies were mostly in good condition across Virginia.  The U.S. Drought Monitor from the University of Nebraska showed no current drought in Virginia; the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality’s drought indicators map showed mostly normal conditions, except for low groundwater in part of northern Virginia; and the U.S. Geological Survey’s WaterWatch showed stream flows over the past 28 days at or above normal across the Commonwealth.Let’s hope that those good water conditions persist well beyond when summer begins astronomically on June 20, for the sake of kids in creeks, frogs in ponds, birds in wetlands, water supplies in reservoirs, plants in the ground, and countless other aquatic connections. Thanks to Freesound.org for the mosquito sound, and thanks to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week’s music.  Here’s to spring’s arrival, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “Until the Summer Comes.” MUSIC – ~ 26 sec – Lyrics: “Until the summer comes.” SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 308, 3-21-16. “Until the Summer Comes,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the 2013 album “No More Rain,” used with permission. More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.The Spring Peeper sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., on March 17, 2021. The Red-winged Blackbird sound was recording by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on March 26, 2015. The mosquito sound was recorded by user Zywx and made available for public use on Freesound.org, online at https://www.freesound.org/people/Zywx/sounds/188708/, under Creative Commons License 0 (public domain).  More information about Creative Commons is online at http://creativecommons.org/; license information specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/about/cclicenses/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Above: Two early spring views of shimmering ponds in Blacksburg, Va.: upper photo - a temporary pool and an adjacent wetlands where several kinds of frogs breed and Red-winged Blackbirds are common, April 4, 2015; lower photo - part of Virginia Tech's Duck Pond, March 21, 2016.Above: Map of stream flows at Virginia gaging stations averaged over the past 28 days, as of March 18, 2021, and compared to normal flows, according to the color-coding chart below the map.  Map from the U.S. Geological Survey’s “WaterWatch” site, online at https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=pa28d&r=va&w=map, accessed 3/19/21. Above: Virginia drought indicator map as of 3/18/21, from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, accessed online at this link, 3/19/21. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Deborah Byrd, “Everything you need to know: Vernal equinox 2016,” EarthSky, 3/16/16, online at http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/everything-you-need-to-know-vernal-or-spring-equinox. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Red-winged Blackbird entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-winged_Blackbird. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “Meteorological Versus Astronomical Seasons,” online at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/news/meteorological-versus-astronomical-seasons. National Weather Service/Climate Prediction Center, “U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook for March 18—June 30, 2021” (released March 18. 2021), online at http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/sdo_summary.php. U.S. Geological Survey, “Water Watch,” Virginia 28-day streamflow map, online at https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?m=pa28d&r=va&w=map, on 3/18/21. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, “U.S. Drought Monitor,” online at http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/. U.S. Naval Observatory, “Earth’s Seasons—Equinoxes and Solstices—2021-2025,” online (as PDF) at http://www.weather.gov/media/ind/seasons.pdf.Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/.Va. Drought Monitoring Task Force, “Current Drought Conditions in Virginia,” online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx, accessed 3/18/16. Virginia Herpetological Society, online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/.  Herpetology is the study of amphibians (including frogs, toads, and salamanders) and reptiles (including lizards, snakes, and turtles). Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Mosquitoes and Water,” Virginia Water CentralNewsletter, June 2009 (pages 6-15), online at http://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49357. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians,” “Birds,” and “Overall Importance of Water” subject categories. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes.  (Please note: several of these may be redone in spring 2021.  As that occurs, the links below will include directions to the blog post for the updated episodes.) Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 212, 5-5-14.Spring Peepers – Episode 105, 4-2-12.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 311, 4-11-16.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.Warblers and spring bird migration – Episode 157, 4-15-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive.1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth. Grades K-5: Earth Resources4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.8 – Changes occur in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. Earth ScienceES.12 – The Earth’s weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun’s energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms. World Geography CourseWG.2 – how selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth’s surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12thgrade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8thgrade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rdand 4th grade.

bay university agency music newsletter natural earth state audio college sound map accent animals dark steel wheels tech water blackbird index rain pond research ocean weather government education birds plants nebraska spring chesapeake snow environment organisms images va freesound msonormal commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial environmental frogs herpetology dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology lyrics colorful signature bio treating warblers watershed transcript earth sciences wg ornithology virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k mosquitoes environmental quality name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes blackbirds harrisonburg nebraska lincoln blacksburg amphibians cosgrove spring peepers msohyperlink wildlife resources vernal earthsky all about birds sections life sciences ben cosgrove spring fever stormwater national oceanic policymakers bmp heritage park atmospheric administration noaa water watch acknowledgment virginia department cumberland gap sols duck pond tmdl geological survey solstices biotic living systems virginia standards water center naval observatory space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 567 (3-8-21): Spring’s Approach and the Water that Winter Left Behind

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:22) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 3-5-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 8, 2021.  This episode is a revised version of an episode from March 2015. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental This week, we feature a tune to mark the arrival soon of spring and give a bit of water-credit to the departing winter.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds.MUSIC - ~32 sec – instrumentalYou’ve been listening to part of “Winter’s Fall,” by No Strings Attached, on their 1999 album, “In the Vinyl Tradition, Vol. II,” from Enessay Music.  In one sense, the “fall” in the title brings to mind the approaching end of winter and the bursts of biological activities that start in spring [SOUND – Spring Peepers - ~4 sec] and continue through summer and early autumn [SOUND – Evening insects in early October - ~5 sec].But those activities—from frog calling, to insect buzzing, to many humanactivities—take water, and the water that’ll be available during spring and summer in pools, ponds, streams, and underground depends in large part on the water that falls during winter.  About 37 percent of Virginia’s statewide average annual precipitation falls from November through March, according to Southeast Regional Climate Center records from 1895 through 2020.  But compared to warm-weather rainfall, winter precipitation is less likely to evaporate rapidly and less likely to be used by plants.  As a result, much of winter precipitation can seep into groundwater, recharging supplies that’ll be available in warmer months for plants and as base flow in streams and rivers.  Winter recharge of water supplies is even more important in relatively dry—but snowy—western states; in California, for example, typically over 78 percent of the annual average precipitation occurs from November through March, according to records between 1971 and 2000. While Virginia’s water managers don’t have to focus each winter on snowpack levels, like many westerners do, what falls each Commonwealth winter is still key to our summer water supplies. Thanks to No Strings Attached for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter’s Fall.”MUSIC - ~22 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 258, 3-23-15. “Winter’s Fall,” from the 1999 album “In the Vinyl Tradition, Vol. II,” is copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 461, 2-25-19. The sounds heard were Spring Peepers in Blacksburg, Va., March 11, 2015; and various night-time insect sounds in Blacksburg, October 2, 2014.Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Snow and ice on December 30, 2014, in Blacksburg, Va., at a temporary pond that provides spring breeding habitat for frogs and other amphibians.Icy snow on an American Beech twig in Blacksburg, Va., January 28, 2021.  Photo by Lesley Howard, used with permission.Ice hanging from a tree twig at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., February 20, 2021.  This was ice that had collected on the twig during an ice storm and then separated from most of the length of the twig during melting except for a short section that kept the ice attached.  This phenomenon was widespread that day in this area. SOURCES Used for Audio Paul Rogers, Sierra snowpack at 61% as new drought looms for California this summer, Bay Area News Service, as published by The Mercury News, March 2, 2021. Southeast Regional Climate Center at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, “State Climate Data,” online at https://sercc.com/state-climate-data/. University of Nebraska-Lincoln. “U.S. Drought Monitor,” online at https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/.  For a representative comment on the importance of snowpack in the western United States, see the March 4, 2021, weekly report, “Summary/West.” Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Drought,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity/drought.Virginia Drought Monitoring Task Force, “Drought Status Report for March 2015,” accessed 3/23/15 online at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/Water/WaterSupplyWaterQuantity/Drought.aspx; this page was no longer available online, as of 3-5-21.Western Regional Climate Center, “Historical Data/Comparative Summaries/Average Statewide Precipitation for the Western U.S. States,” online at https://wrcc.dri.edu/Climate/comp_table_show.php?stype=ppt_avg. For More Information about Water Quantity in Virginia U.S. Geological Survey/Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center, online at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/va-wv-water.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Water Quantity,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/water-quantity.RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Groundwater,” “Overall Importance of Water,” “Science,” and “Weather/Natural Disasters” categories. Following are links to some other episodes on water quantity or supply.Groundwater generally – Episode 306, 3-7-16.Virginia water resources numbers – Episode 539, 8-24-20.Water quantity information sources – Episode 546, 10-12-20. Following are links to some other episodes on winter precipitation. Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems1.7 – Weather and seasonal changes affect plants and animals, including humans.2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.4.4 – Weather conditions and climate affect ecosystems and can be predicted. Grades K-5: Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex. ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.12 – The Earth’s weather and climate result from the interaction of the sun’s energy with the atmosphere, oceans, and the land. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth’s surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12thgrade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8thgrade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rdand 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia’s water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

Biocitizen Banter
Biocitizen Banter #8: Baird Callicott and Ricardo Rozzi on Leopold’s “Biotic Citizen” and “Land Organism”

Biocitizen Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021


Welcome to Biocitizen Banter, a podcast dedicated to environmental philosophy featuring lively discussions between people active in the effort to bring biotic health to our communities and commonwealth. In this episode Executive Director Kurt Heidinger discusses the meanings of Aldo Leopold's "biotic citizen" and "land organism" with foremost ecosophists Baird Callicott and Ricardo Rozzi          

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 561 (1-25-21): The Northern Harrier's a Hawk on the Marsh

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:04)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 1-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 25, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental That’s part of “Midwinter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va.  It opens an episode about a kind of hawk that’s commonly found around eastern Virginia marshlands in wintertime.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to the following mystery sound, and see if you know this bird of prey. [Clarification, not in audio: “raptor” is a more precise term for hawks and related birds than is “bird of prey.”]  And here’s a hint: what might you call a cross-country runner located far north of Virginia? SOUNDS  - ~11 sec If you guessed a Northern Harrier, you’re right!  Besides being a name for cross-country runners, harrier refers to a group of birds within the family that includes hawks, eagles, and kites.  The Northern Harrier is the only harrier species found in North America.  Occurring widely across the continent, this species sometimes is a summer breeder in southeastern coastal Virginia, but it’s more typically found in the Commonwealth during winter.It was formerly called the Marsh Hawk because it’s frequently found around marshes, as well as in meadows, grasslands, and other open, vegetated areas.  In these areas, it flies low over the ground in search of its usual prey of small mammals, other birds, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.  Northern Harriers are also capable of taking larger prey like rabbits and ducks, and    they’ve been reported to overcome some of these larger animals by drowning them.  The Northern Harrier’s face looks somewhat like that of an owl, and, according to the National Audubon Society, the bird also resembles owls in using sharp hearing to help locate its prey.  As Alice and Robert Lippson put it in their book, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, quote, “Northern Harriers have an owl-like facial disc that apparently concentrates the sound of its prey; couple this with its keen eyesight, and mice and voles are in constant jeopardy of becoming lunch.” Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Northern Harrier sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use part of “Midwinter Etude.”  We close with a little more music, in honor of all wild creatures, including harriers and other hawks.  Here’s about 10 seconds of “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va.  MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  The Northern Harrier sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was previously used by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 524, 5-11-20. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Painting of Marsh Hawk (former common name for Northern Harrier), originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 356).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image was https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/marsh-hawk, as of 1-22-21.  Northern Harrier in flight at Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge in Massachusetts, July 2011.  Photo by Amanda Boyd, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/13235/rec/1, as of 1-22-21. Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 1-25-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE NORTHERN HARRIER The scientific name of the Northern Harrier is Circus hudsonius. The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Tundra Swan,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040094&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18649. Physical Description “Adult female [is] brown above and on tail bands; lighter brown below with heavy brown streaking.  [Adult] male [is] ashy gray above and on tail bands; white with cinnamon spots below; wing tips black.  [B]oth sexes have long banded tail with prominent white rump patch.  [F]lies a few feet above ground; tilting from side to side and holding its long narrow wings upwards at slight angle.” Reproduction and Behavior “[R]itualized courtship, calls, skydancing, performed by male to advertise territory; males arrive at breeding grounds ahead of females; male provides food during incubation and early nestling period by passing food items to female in flight; rarely visits nest himself….  [N]ests built on ground often in marshy areas and surrounded by low shrubs or tall grasses rather than open.  [N]est is small structure of reeds and sticks on dry ground….  Forage by slowly flying over marshes and fields, usually below 10 feet (3 meters); they generally take small mammals but also use birds, [reptiles and amphibians], and insects. Status of Population“Harriers occur in relatively low numbers as breeders in Virginia, where they may be found using both open marshes and open upland grassland habitat.  Their numbers swell during the winter with the influx of migrants, and it is this winter population that should be the focus of conservation efforts.  Like other grassland species, Harriers rely on relatively large tracts, such that preserving and restoring blocks of native grasslands is a high priority conservation action for this species.  Wintering harriers will likewise use emergent wetlands; identification, protection, and management (for example, Phragmites control) of suitable marshes will be necessary to ensure continued habitat availability for this species…” SOURCES Used for Audio Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Sounds Wild/Northern Harrier,” 1 min./31 sec. podcast, online at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=soundswild.episode&title=Northern%20Harrier. John James Audubon, Birds of America, online by The National Audubon Society at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america.  The entry for the Marsh Hawk (the former common name for the Northern Harrier) is online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/marsh-hawk. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide/Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Northern Harrier entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/northern_harrier; “Raptors” is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/raptors); and “Marshes and Wetlands” is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/marshes_wetlands/all/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Northern Harrier entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Bird of prey,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/bird-of-prey; and “Harrier,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/harrier-bird. Goddess of Never Broken blog site, “The Harrier Incident,” April 9, 2013, online at https://maibey.wordpress.com/tag/northern-harrier-drowning-prey/.  This blot post has a series of photos showing a Northern Harrier drowning an American Coot. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rd Edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006, page 234. National Audubon Society, “Guide to North American Birds/Northern Harrier,” online at https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-harrier. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Missouri Raptor Rehabilitation Project, “Raptor Facts,” online at http://raptorrehab.cvm.missouri.edu/raptor-facts/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Northern Harrier,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040094&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18649. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. The Northern Harrier was one of the birds included in Episode 430, 7-23-18, on birds associated with marshes.  (Other birds featured in that episode are the Great Blue Heron, Wood Duck, Least Bittern, Common Moorhen, and Marsh Wren). Following are links to other episodes on raptors (often also referred to as “birds of prey”). Bald Eagle – Episode 375, 7-3-17.Barred Owl – Episode 382 – 8-21-17.Eastern Screech-Owl – Episode 227, 8-18-14.Osprey – Episode 116, 6-25-12; Episode 175, 8-19-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining

new york society bay university agency america guide music photo natural state audio living game college north america circus world painting accent animals cd dark tech water xeno web status index rain pond press research ocean government education birds behavior plants massachusetts chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment adult organisms images harrier va cambridge adaptations northern msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom citizens hawk williamsburg arial environmental dynamic goddess times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading raptors marsh population shenandoah biology colorful md signature bio wetlands incarnation reproduction marshes watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources clarification wildlife service grades k populations forage name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes fredericksburg wintering seaman zoology minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove barred owl great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections encyclopedia britannica attribution noncommercial life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater john james audubon lang elliott policymakers msobodytext never broken bmp be free acknowledgment virginia department alaska department michigan museum occurring robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap wood duck inaturalist sols harriers tmdl virginia society inland fisheries ebird biotic phragmites living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Além da Curva
Vitor Bidetti, da Integral BREI, fala sobre o histórico do setor financeiro no mercado imobiliário e sobre novas teses de investimentos, como desenvolvimento urbano, turismo e residencial de renda

Além da Curva

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2021 66:29


Sócio-fundador e CEO da Integral BREI, Vitor Bidetti criou o primeiro fundo imobiliário do Brasil e fundou a Brazilian Mortgages com forte atuação no crédito imobiliário do País. Nesse podcast, além de revisitar a sua carreira e o histórico da atuação do setor financeiro no mercado imobiliário, ele também aborda o cenário econômico e as novas fronteiras dos investimentos imobiliários, como desenvolvimento urbano, turismo e residencial de renda. :: Estrutura do episódio • 00:52 - 20 anos de carreira e o nascimento dos fundos imobiliários no Brasil. • 11:27 - Primeira alienação fiduciária do Brasil. • 14:55 - Surgimento da Integral BREI. • 16:39 - Atuação da BREI no ramo imobiliário. • 19:57 - BIOTIC: Mercado financeiro atuando no desenvolvimento de bairros planejados. • 25:03 - Cenários pós juros a 2%. • 26:56 - Escassez de ativos de qualidade no futuro. • 32:41 – Atuação dos Fundos de Pensão no mercado imobiliário. • 39:50 - BIOTIC: Smart City com 1 milhão de m². • 43:10 - Formatação inicial do projeto BIOTIC. • 47:27 – Perspectivas para empreendimentos residenciais de renda. • 49:56 - A redução da taxa de juros pode interferir na renda? • 51:02 - PIB Imobiliário no Brasil e Mundo. • 54:47 - Novas teses: turismo x mercado financeiro. • 57:34 – Timeshare e expansão do Beach Park. • 01:00:49 - Novo momento para incorporadores e empresários. • 01:04:18 - Agenda positiva.

Hooked on Hope The Podcast
Episode 4 - Turning Pro-biotic - One Of Us Is Dead

Hooked on Hope The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2020 34:32


TC - Chapter 3 & 4 Having had a taste of Aberdeenshire Dee – Lamont and I try to join the monied elite via the shortest route possible. We battle HR, dodge, and skive while also contemplating what makes a contest. Chapter 3 – Turning pro-biotic Chapter 4 – One Of Us Is Dead --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hookedonhope/message

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Fall in use of anti-biotic medicine

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2020 5:29


Dr Nuala O Connor, Irish College of General Practitioners and Anti-Biotics Lead, discusses the sharp fall in anti-biotic use this year and potential plans to ease Covid-19 restrictions next week.

Daily Weight Loss Podcast
What is the Macrobiotic Diet?

Daily Weight Loss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2020 7:22


Biblical Nutrition Academy Podcast
Pre Biotic and Probtioic Rich Foods for Gut Health and Weight Loss

Biblical Nutrition Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2020 27:07


Did you know that prebiotics can help you to lose weight? Learn more about prebiotics and what they do for you in this insightful podcast episode.   The Biblical Nutrition Academy podcast is all about transforming your life physically and spiritually through healthy living tips and a fresh perspective on eating, fasting, and praying - no hype, just pure, delicious truth!  As a biblical life coach, I am here to help you stick to your health goals. We'll cover so many topics - from healthy living habits, how to improve your relationship with God and with others, biblical verses about health, and the list goes on! I will also share with you the 3 Bible diet principles that helped me lose 60 pounds - and how it can help you, too.   Thank you for tuning in this podcast episode. To learn more about how to achieve transformation both physically and spiritually, please visit our website https://thebiblicalnutritionist.com/ and get your FREE biblical health plan https://thebiblicalnutritionist.com/free-biblical-health-roadmap/  today!   God is doing amazing things through The Biblical Nutritionist.  If you LOVE the YouTube content   If you LOVE knowing there is a dependable resource.   If you LOVE sharing God's love through food.   Please consider helping us continue this ministry with a $3 month donation! https://give.cornerstone.cc/give3   We serve together as we share the love of God through His amazing creation. Please help us do this!

The Dictionary
#B144 (biostratigraphy to bioturbation)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2020 10:13


I read from biostratigraphy to bioturbation.     The word of the episode is "biotic potential". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biotic_potential     dictionarypod@gmail.com Facebook Twitter Instagram Patreon 917-727-5757

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
Canola School: Extra time spent at seeding pays dividends all season long

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2020 13:28


When it comes to stress on a canola crop, there are two ‘buckets’ that it can fall into: abiotic stress and biotic stress. Biotic stressors can include things such as harmful insects — flea beetles, for example — and abiotic stressors have to do with factors dealing with the environment, such as frost. This time... Read More

Die Darmexperten
Omni Biotic Power Teammanagerin Simone Kumhofer stellt sich vor

Die Darmexperten

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2020


Simone Kumhofer ist Profi Triathletin und unsere Omni Biotic Power Teammanagerin. Welcher Stellenwert der Sport hat, warum Nahrungsergänzungsmittel für sie Sinn machen und wie ihr Training zu Zeiten von Covid-19 aussieht erzählt sie uns heute im Interview.

88% Perfect Podcast
Episode 23: Intuitive Eating with Simi Botic

88% Perfect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2020 50:59


“Weight is not a behavior and BMI is not a proper indicator of health.” Simi Botic In today’s episode, Kit is joined with Simi Botic, an intuitive eating counselor, and a barre instructor who helps women all over the world ditch perfection and heal their relationships with food and body image. Kit and Simi discuss intuitive eating & leaving and how dieting, perfectionism, and a need for outside validation is rather damaging than beneficial for our health. More specifically, you will learn more about Simi’s background and why she decided to visit a health coach, what is intuitive eating, what it means to reject the diet culture, how to exercise with joy, and many more! Last but not least, join Kit’s FREE 5-Day Spring Reset that is currently running and practice intuitive eating and living during these challenging times!

Reignite
Episode #2.17: Subject Zero - The Biotic Cowboy w/ Jeane Harlot

Reignite

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2019 53:41


Burlesque performer and pin up model Jeane Harlot joins MJ & Matt to help them gain the chaotic biotic’s loyalty. Jack wants to leave a hole in the ground where her trauma began, but a survivor from the same facility has other plans. Fandom corner features FreshNGeeky perfume inspired by Mass Effect. Special thanks to David Boyle for our amazing logo and to Dan Bull for the song MASS EFFECT RAP, which we use as our theme.

Hence The Future
Ep. 62 - The Future of Carbon Capture

Hence The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2019 68:52


Fighting Climate Change with Carbon Capture

Biotic Records Podcast
Biotic Podcast 009 - 2019 Session Tapes 05 - Paragon

Biotic Records Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2019 53:33


The Biotic crew continue in sessions throughout the year. Live group sessions where artists collaborate and make music to brief, with specified concepts, mandatories and time constraints. With over 100 challenges complete, we now bring a glimpse of future Biotic to you through this series of podcasts: The Biotic Session Tapes. Support us on Bandcamp Biotic on YouTube

The Bottom Line
Anti-Biotic Resistance

The Bottom Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2019 28:53


Antibiotic resistance is a global problem but there have been no new drugs produced since the 1980s. So who is to blame? The public's over-consumption or the current economic model for drug research and production? Evan Davis and guests discuss. GUESTS Seema Patel, Medical Director, Hospital Business, Pfizer, UK, Ireland and the Nordics Lord Jim O'Neill, Chair Anti-Microbial Resistance Review (2016), Former Chief Economist, Goldman Sachs Professor Colin Garner, Co Founder and Director, Antibiotic Research UK

Reignite
Episode #2.07: The Convict - The Chaotic Biotic

Reignite

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2019 48:12


MJ & Matt are back on the hunt for allies to help them stand against the Collectors. Our hosts cover the corrupt prison system, betrayal, and the ethics of buying prisoners (spoiler: it’s unethical). Fandom corner features The Mass Effect Fan Collective run by LiLi Ruppert (@DirtyEffinHippy on Twitter). Special thanks to David Boyle for our amazing logo and to Dan Bull for the song MASS EFFECT RAP, which we use as our theme.

Healthy INSIDER Podcast
The evolving ‘-biotic’ category in natural health products – podcast

Healthy INSIDER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2019 15:20


Once upon a time, probiotics were the only “-biotic” that ruled the healthy CPG (consumer packaged good) landscape. As consumer understanding and research findings grew, other -biotic categories formed with their own research supporting human and animal health. Some, such as prebiotics and synbiotics, are gaining consumer traction, but others, such as postbiotics and psychobiotics are still gaining their footing. And CBD-biotics? Is that a thing? (No, it’s not.) In this podcast Ivan Wasserman, managing partner, Amin Talati Upadhye LLP, discusses the growth of these -biotics in the marketplace and the regulatory challenges they face.

Griswold the AI Reads Unusual Wikipedia Articles

When should you throw an expensive shipment of tea in the river? What does it mean to peacefully protest? When is it appropriate to physically demonstrate you disagree and to what extent should you take it? All good questions. Listen here. You may or may not find answers.

Biotic Records Podcast
Biotic Podcast 008 - Session Tapes Volume 04 - Scythe

Biotic Records Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2018 61:07


The Biotic crew have been busy in session throughout the year with a brand new production concept. Live group sessions where artists collaborate and make music to a brief, with specified concepts, mandatories and time constraints. With over 100 challenges complete, we now bring a glimpse of future Biotic to you through this series of podcasts: The Biotic Session Tapes. Support us on Bandcamp Biotic on YouTube

Biotic Records Podcast
Biotic Podcast 007 - Session Tapes Volume 03 - Indidjinous

Biotic Records Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2018 40:54


The Biotic crew have been busy in session throughout the year with a brand new production concept. Live group sessions where artists collaborate and make music to a brief, with specified concepts, mandatories and time constraints. With over 100 challenges complete, we now bring a glimpse of future Biotic to you through this series of podcasts: The Biotic Session Tapes. Support us on Bandcamp Biotic on YouTube

Biotic Records Podcast
Biotic Podcast 006 - Session Tapes Volume 02 - Synchronise

Biotic Records Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2018 68:37


The Biotic crew have been busy in session throughout the year with a brand new production concept. Live group sessions where artists collaborate and make music to a brief, with specified concepts, mandatories and time constraints. With over 100 challenges complete, we now bring a glimpse of future Biotic to you through this series of podcasts: The Biotic Session Tapes. Support us on Bandcamp Biotic on YouTube

Biotic Records Podcast
Biotic Podcast 005 - Session Tapes Volume 01 - Facs

Biotic Records Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2018 69:05


The Biotic crew have been busy in session throughout the year with a brand new production concept. Live group sessions where artists collaborate and make music to a brief, with specified concepts, mandatories and time constraints. With over 100 challenges complete, we now bring a glimpse of future Biotic to you through this series of podcasts: The Biotic Session Tapes. Support us on Bandcamp Biotic on YouTube

The Common Descent Podcast
Episode 43 - The Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI)

The Common Descent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2018 101:32


For tens of millions of years, North and South America were separate sisters across the sea, each with their own unique ecosystems. But around 3 million years ago, the Isthmus of Panama brought the landmasses together and kicked off an incredible mass migration of life between the continents. Some species thrived, others suffered, and in the end the very ecosystem structure of both continents was drastically altered, setting the stage for the American wildlife we know today. In the news: prehistoric parasites, early turtle evolution, teeth through time, and a surprising hominin hybrid. Also, a devastating museum fire in Brazil. Time markers: Intro & Announcements: 00:00:00 News: 00:06:00 Main discussion, Part 1: 00:38:30 Main discussion, Part 2: 01:04:00 Patron question: 01:35:00 Check out our blog for bonus info and pictures: http://commondescentpodcast.wordpress.com/ Follow and Support us on: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/commondescentpodcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/CommonDescentPC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/commondescentpodcast/ PodBean: https://commondescentpodcast.podbean.com/ iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-common-descent-podcast/id1207586509?mt=2 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCePRXHEnZmTGum2r1l2mduw The Intro and Outro music is “On the Origin of Species” by Protodome. More music like this at http://ocremix.org. Muscial Interludes are "Professor Umlaut" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Beans, Bullets, Bandages & You
Episode 123: Water Filters

Beans, Bullets, Bandages & You

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2018 33:20


Salty and Spice take a look at water filters and how to clean up water to make it safe to drink. Go to Beans, Bullets, Bandages & You by clicking HERE!

Fireplace Church
The Biotic Potential of the church

Fireplace Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2018 30:25


God's church and how it grows!

Palaeo After Dark
Podcast 125 - Feeling Isolated; Biogeography and Evolution

Palaeo After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2017 83:25


The gang discusses two papers that investigate the impact that the geographic occupation of a species has on its evolution, both in the distant past and in modern systems. Also, James pops some pills, Amanda takes a deep dive into Deviant Art, and Curt acts as a passive enabler.   Up-Goer Five (Amanda Edition): This week our friends talk about how many animals there are in the whole world. They also talk about where animals live all over the world. The first paper does a good job talking about both where animals live and how many animals there are. It talks about many, many times when there were lots of new kinds of animals showing up, and also times when there were not many animals showing up. They also talk about times when it looks like many animals died but maybe they didn't. There are different ways to talk about how many animals there are in the whole world. Whether there are all kinds of different animals but they are the same all over, whether there are all kinds of different animals and they are all different all over, and whether there are some animals that are only found only in little places. The other paper talks about how when new kinds of animals show up that it is important to look at where the new animals are from, and whether they can talk to other animals that are like their brothers and sisters. If they can talk to other animals that are like their brothers and sisters, then they are not new kinds of animals. But if they can't talk to the animals that are like their brothers and sisters, then they are a new kind of animal. This paper thought that maybe it would be a kind of important piece of the animal that would make it new and not able to talk to its brother and sister animals. But it turns out that where the animal is from is very important, and it seems like if the animal lives far away and can't talk to its brother and sister animals for even a short time, it will become a new kind of animal. So we know that where animals are from is important, and if where they are from means they can't talk to brother and sister animals, that is really big for making new kinds of animals.   References:  Worsham, McLean LD, et al. "Geographic isolation facilitates the evolution of reproductive isolation and morphological divergence." Ecology and Evolution.   Stigall, Alycia L., et al. "Biotic immigration events, speciation, and the accumulation of biodiversity in the fossil record." Global and Planetary Change 148 (2017): 242-257. 

Discover DEP: the Official Podcast of the NJ Department of Environmental Protection
Episode 64-Fish and Headwaters’ Index of Biotic Integrity with John Vile and Brian Henning

Discover DEP: the Official Podcast of the NJ Department of Environmental Protection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2017 25:36


DEP is responsible for monitoring the quality of New Jersey’s water. One way by which this is done is through biological monitoring. The Fish and Headwaters’ Index of Biotic Integrity monitoring programs, also known as FIBI & HIBI, use fish and other aquatic species as measures of water quality. John Vile and Brian Henning, research scientists in DEP’s Division of Water Monitoring and Standards, Bureau of Freshwater & Biological Monitoring, sit down with Bob Bostock to discuss how the health of fish in streams can help scientists to assess the health and condition of the water, as well as to identify ecological changes. To learn more about these programs visit http://www.state.nj.us/dep/wms/bfbm/ibipagemain.htm Photo: John Vile (left) and Brian Henning (right)

Health Quest Podcast with Steve Lankford
227 – The Next Generation of Probiotic and Prebiotics – My Interview with Dr. Jason Mitchell

Health Quest Podcast with Steve Lankford

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2017 39:30


What is a Probiotic? The word Probiotic, according to the WHO (World Health Organization) means: “Probiotics are living microorganisms, which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.” Pro means “For” Biotic means “Life” Probiotic means “Pro-Life” In other words, probiotics are “good bacteria”. Your native intestinal micro flora is your indigenous probiotics. Probiotic supplements provide beneficial living bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobactia, that help to support digestive balance and digestive health. The post 227 – The Next Generation of Probiotic and Prebiotics – My Interview with Dr. Jason Mitchell appeared first on Health Quest Podcast.