Podcasts about forests

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Dense collection of trees covering a relatively large area

  • 1,281PODCASTS
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  • May 20, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about forests

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Latest podcast episodes about forests

On Point
How climate change is moving the world's forests north

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 47:25


Trees are on the move. Because of climate change, the world's forests are heading north. What does this mean for us and our survival? Ben Rawlence joins Meghna Chakrabarti.

For The Wild
InTheField: NUSKMATA (Jacinda Mack) on the Gold Rush That Never Ended [ENCORE] /287

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Nuskmata (Jacinda Mack) originally aired in February of 2020. From roller coaster rides at Disney World to museums dotting the Pacific Northwest, symbols of mining and the Gold Rush remain deeply enshrined in the collective imagination of the mythic West. Hidden beneath this cultural veneer, the material realities of today's superscale mining are often out of sight, out of mind. In this week's In The Field episode, we trace the historical contours and material legacy of the mining industry across so-called British Columbia, unearthing stories from a region that bears an estimated 1,100 abandoned mines, 150-year-old mining laws, and more mining exploration companies than anywhere else on Earth. Guided by the raw testimony of mother, water protector, and organizer Nuskmata (Jacinda Mack), this episode braids together the history of the Gold Rush and colonization in B.C., the state of salmon, the practice of free, prior, and informed consent, dirty mining for a “clean” energy revolution, and the urgent necessity of reform. Music by Cary Morin, Compassion Gorilla, Lynx and the Servants of Song, The Mynabirds, The Melawmen Collective, and The Honey Tongues. Please visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

YourForest
121-Forest Carbon Futures with Alex Craven, Bev Law and Jim Furnish

YourForest

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022


Forests suck up roughly 30% of our carbon emissions annually. If we want a fighting chance against climate change, we need them to keep doing this, and if possible to suck up more. However, there are different theories as how to best manage forest for carbon storage. Luckily, some research has shed some light on this issue. Do new forests suck up more carbon than old? How does carbon released during a forest fire compare to carbon released during harvesting? How do we do the most good for the most people?ResourcesSierra ClubSponsorsWest FraserGreenLink Forestry Inc.Damaged TimberForest ProudQuotes1.01.34 - 1.01.44: “We know that forests can be a missing piece of… the things we could do to combat climate change.”TakeawaysForest service: then and now (12.11)Jim narrates the history of logging and construction in US forests, which inspired the conservation movement in the late 1800s. Canada and USA differences (16.45)Jim outlines the differences between Canada and the USA: Canada has less people but more public forest estate and uses less wood.Determine where to conserve nature (24.15)Bev has been involved in various aspects of global carbon cycle research for over 30 years to understand the role of forests in taking carbon from the atmosphere. Carbon density and biodiversity (28.00)Bev's team's research showed that where carbon density was higher, so was biodiversity. They modelled future carbon accumulation under future climate conditions. Forest carbon accounting (32.40)Afforestation increases forest carbon 10 times more than reforestation, and a young forest takes the “slow in, fast out” approach in restoring carbon balance. “Greatest good for the greatest number” (37.59)While private industrial lands are managed for economic value, public forests, particularly old growth ones, should be managed for carbon sequestration. Reexamining forest management practices (42.37)Jim shares his experience working with the forest of the Pacific Northwest in the early 1990s when the northern spotted owls became endangered, which stopped the massive logging. “The environment is the people at large” (49.15)Jim's book, Toward a Natural Forest, expounds his views on managing climate change and meeting natural resource needs by restoring the character of mature and old growth forests. Strategic forest reserves (1.00.34)Alex proposes thinking along the lines of creating executive action for old growth and mature forests' direct mapping, cataloguing and conservation. Measure twice, cut once (1.06.46)Bev discusses her research around carbon stocks in mature and old growth forests. Maturity of different species and fire intensity of the forests impact forest management approaches. Captain Planet (1.17.14)Bev would like to protect species biodiversity and drinking water sources, and prevent extinction on federal lands. “With fire, it's one size does not fit all” (1.20.32) Bev speaks about the considerations in fire and forest management and how fire impacts different types of forests differently. Hold onto the forests and grow more (1.27.25)Jim clarifies that prescribed burning only causes 2-3% of carbon to be lost to the atmosphere but the forest soon recovers and starts sequestering carbon again. Review this podcast, share it on Instagram and Facebook, and give us your feedback!

Hello From The Hallowoods
Episode 76 - Lungs

Hello From The Hallowoods

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 45:34


Arnold goes fishing, Danielle wakes up, and Polly regrets his choices. The theme of tonight's episode is Lungs.   (To avoid spoilers, content warnings are listed at the end of this episode description).   The bonus story that goes with this episode is ‘Housekeeping', and is available for Hallowoods patrons on the show's Patreon, along with behind-the-scenes, exclusive merchandise, and more! Because the show runs without ads or sponsors, we rely on support from fans to guarantee the survival of this LGBTQ+ horror podcast.   Hello From The Hallowoods is written and produced by William A. Wellman, a queer horror author and writing coach. You can visit their website for more information!    The transcript for this episode is available on the Hello From The Hallowoods Website. Click here to read!   You can also find Hello From The Hallowoods on social media! The show is on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @thehallowoods. If you'd like to connect with other fans of the show, there's even a fan-run Discord Server!   Music for this episode was used under license from Artlist.com. The soundtracks featured were:    ‘Forest Overture', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Walking in Forests', by Ben Winwood,  ‘Too Much', by Michael Vignola,  ‘Under the Waves', by Borrtex, ‘Tea for One', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Witness - Extended Version', by Oliver Michael,  ‘Retrospecting', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘The Tree Who Grew On Water', by Yoav Ilan,  ‘Pentecost - Reworked', by Christopher Galovan,  ‘Don't Mind The Rain', by the Oriole Orchestra (public domain),  ‘Choral No. 56 - Bach', by Ardie Son,  ‘Yearning', by Michael FK,  ‘Ganymede', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Snake Island', by Piotr Hummel,  ‘Searching Through The Rubble', by Josh McCausland,  ‘Redemption', by Ben Winwood,  ‘Exhale', by Salt of the Sound,  And ‘Farewell', by Maya Belsitzman and Matan Ephrat      Content warnings for this episode include: Saliva & Bodily Fluids, Paralysis, Abuse, Ableism, Animal death (a worm), Violence, Kidnapping and abduction, Death + Injury, Blood, Broken Bones, Dysphoria, Birds, Strangulation/suffocation, Static (including sfx), Emotional Manipulation, Drowning, Bugs and Spiders, Body horror, 

Voices of Montana
Managing Montana’s Forests Ahead Of Fire Season

Voices of Montana

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Where’s the beef? Montana, that’s where! The month of May has been declared Beef Month and Montana Governor Greg Gianforte stops by to talk about the Treasure State’s growing meat production along with CI-121, forest management, drought and how exactly […]

Beyond Blathers
Kelp Forests

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:08


This week we're talking about kelp forest ecosystems, why they're so important, and why they're threatened. From sea stars to sea otters to sea urchins, this story has a lot of interesting characters. Listen to learn more! Check out the story on Haida Gwaii's kelp forests here.If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. And don't forget to check out our TikTok! Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game. Special music in this episode: Fluid Dreams by Daniel Birch

Planthropology
Influencing Conservation, Finding Balance, and the Connectedness of Everything w/ Dr. Becky Bowling- Replay

Planthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 46:45


Hey Plant People! I'll be doing some traveling and will be in and out a bit this summer, so this is the first of what will be a few sporadic throwbacks to some of my very favorite episodes from the back catalog! Stay cool and stay well this summer, my friends!********************************************************************************Y'all, today's episode is great. Dr. Becky Bowling is an Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist in Urban Water with the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Texas A&M. She's also hilarious, brilliant, a wonderful educator, and one of my very closest friends. I've wanted to interview Dr. Becky for the show since it started, and was so excited to finally have the opportunity. You're going to love all the awesome stuff she's doing in conservation and education. Grab a bag of popcorn and a frosty beverage and jump into episode 20!Dr. Becky BowlingTwitter: https://twitter.com/TXWaterWomanWater U Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AgriLifeWaterU/*********I'm super excited to announce our partnership with Forest Proud! Forest Proud is a non-profit organization supporting forest-based climate solutions. Their mission is to build awareness and support for keeping forests as forests to fight climate change. Forest Proud believes:Forests provide powerful climate solutions.Forest management is how we deliver those solutions.Forest markets and products are how we sustain those solutions.I'm incredibly honored to get to work with them to highlight climate solutions coming out of the forest management and forestry industry! Head over to www.forestproud.com to learn more. If you want to snag some #ForestProud swag, use the promo code "planthropology" at checkout for 10% off for your order!#ForestProud Links:FacebookInstagramTwitterWebsiteAs always, thanks so much for listening! Subscribe, rate, and review Planthropology on your favorite podcast app. It really helps the show keep growing and reaching more people! Also, check out Planthropology on our website and various social media pages, all listed below. As an added bonus, if you review Planthropology on Apple Podcasts or Podchaser and send me a screenshot of it, I'll send you an awesome "Plant People are Cool" sticker!Listen in on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, or wherever else you like to get your podcasts.Website: www.planthropologypod.comPodchaser: www.podchaser.com/PlanthropologyFacebook: PlanthropologyFacebook group: Planthropology's Cool Plant PeopleInstagram: @PlanthropologyPodTwitter: @Planthropology_ Support the show

Hard Factor
5/13/22: Justice For Bald Men Laid Down In The UK, Medical Breakthroughs, Sinkholes With Ancient Forests, “Shrinkflation” & Birds Falling From The Sky

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 87:01


On today's Hard Factor… Calling men “bald” is now considered sexual harassment in the UK (00:10:25) , man who tipped off U.S. Marshalls to Casey and Vicky White still hasnt been paid, Resident Evil trailer dropped and not everyone gets it, Greg Norman suffers another loss, researchers have discovered the cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) (00:24:45), companies are screwing consumers with “shrinkflation” (00:35:43) , India is so hot birds are dropping from the sky (00:46:05) , sinkhole in China reveals beautiful ancient forest, & voicemails and reviews (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:04:30) - Fun Fact: Strands of hair and hair loss (00:09:50) - Joke Of The Day (00:10:25) - Calling men “bald” now considered sexual harassment in the UK (00:13:20) - Man who tipped off authorities to Vicky & Casey White still hasn’t gotten his reward money (00:15:40) - Resident Evil Trailer dropped and some people express their displeasure (00:20:40) - Greg Norman puts his fut in mouth over the new Saudi Golf League (00:24:45) - Researches from Australia have finally pinpointed what causes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) (00:35:43) - Pat tell us about “Shrinkflation” and how companies are screwing consumers by offering less AND charging more TikTok International Moment (00:46:05) - India - Its so hot and dry birds are falling out of the sky and dying (00:51:00) - China - Huge sinkhole reveals ancient forest with 120 foot trees (00:54:50) - Georgia USA - Bonus Dog sinkhole Voicemails & Reviews (00:59:55) - Aussie Man commits coolest crime possible - Sex on the Run. These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Noom Mood - Worry less and feel happier. Sign up for your trial at https://Noom.com/FACTOR Sunday - Full-season plans start at just $129, and you can get 20% off at checkout when you visit https://GetSunday.com/Factor Fast Growing Trees - Go to https://FastGrowingTrees/FACTOR right now, and you’ll get 15% off your entire order BirdDogs- Go to https://www.birddogs.com/ enter code “HardNews” at checkout for a free Yeti Tumbler and the best shorts in the world! Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hard-factor/support

Maine Environment: Frontline Voices
Frontline Voices, Ep. 73: Protecting the Unique Character of the Moosehead Lake Region

Maine Environment: Frontline Voices

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:23


A proposed land use plan for the Moosehead Lake region has been released that balances economic development with conservation. Forests & Wildlife Director Melanie Sturm discusses what the proposal means for the future of the Moosehead Lake area and how NRCM is working to protect the unique character of this special region. Advocacy Director Pete Didisheim also gives his closing thoughts on the 130th legislative session and what's next for NRCM's advocacy priorities.

RNZ: Nights
Four Forests for Cimate

RNZ: Nights

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 24:36


Our forest correspondent, Dean Baigent-Mercer joins us for a discussion on permanent carbon sinks in the Emissions Trading Scheme which the Govt is about to announce. This discussion has often been framed as pines vs natives, but Dean thinks there is a way reshape this binary thinking with four categories of carbon sinks.

For The Wild
ALOK on Unruly Beauty [ENCORE] /286

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with ALOK, originally aired in August of 2021. “I validate the idea that survival is the ultimate act of creation in a world that has reduced us to fascist arithmetic, of being a quantitative statistic, not a human soul. So we still found a way to care, love, and create - isn't that art? I teach people to decipher the art that they're already doing, recognize the artistry and the everyday miracles of life around them, and create from that place.” This week we immerse ourselves in the aforementioned call to recognize the myriad of creations all around us from guest ALOK, who guides us in an ever-expansive dialogue around spiritual wellbeing, the importance of creative literacy, and the tremendous freedom that awaits us when we make gender unknowable. We begin our conversation by foregrounding the importance of moving out of the paradigm of understanding trans and queer as something that is exclusive to the body. Instead, ALOK shares how challenging the gender binary is not only in service to our collective wellbeing but is a reverential offering in acknowledging our true celestial expansiveness that has been dimmed under binarism, heteronormativity, and colonialism. ALOK is a gender non-conforming writer and performance artist. Their distinctive style and poetic challenge to the gender binary have been internationally renowned. As a mixed-media artist Alok uses poetry, prose, comedy, performance, fashion design, and portraiture to explore themes of gender, race, trauma, belonging, and the human condition. They are the author of Femme in Public (2017) and Beyond the Gender Binary (2020). Music by Soda Lite, Rising Appalachia, and Lady Moon & The Eclipse.  Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Internet of Nature Podcast
S4E2 — Planting 500 Million Trees in Five Years in Neighborhoods and Forests of Greatest Need with Ben Wilinsky of the Arbor Day Foundation

Internet of Nature Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:07


Dr. Nadina Galle is joined by Ben Wilinsky, Director of Partnerships and Innovation at the Arbor Day Foundation, to discuss how the Arbor Day Foundation is planting 500 million trees in five years to celebrate its 50th anniversary, how they'll target their tree-planting efforts in neighborhoods and forests of greatest need, the role NatureQuant's NatureScore™ data will play, why Ben is optimistic about greening communities, and which technologies he thinks will realize the Arbor Day Foundation's mission to “inspire people to plant, nurture, and celebrate trees”. Follow Nadina and the Internet of Nature Podcast on all social platforms: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/internetofnature_ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nadinagalle/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/earthtonadina

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”

united states music new york university game world texas earth education college guide water state zoom living tech research society ms government benefits foundation search songs north america environment dark fish press normal web natural tree va rain birds sea disease baltimore climate change ocean animals south carolina cd snow maine citizens trees agency cambridge stream priority richmond plants biology guitar native environmental bay images ash dynamic bio conservation copyright wildlife trio index commonwealth processes penn menu pond arial signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations msonormal compatibility colorful forestry baltimore orioles times new roman populations ls sections aquatic poison ivy merriam webster watershed organisms zoology chesapeake minn taxonomy policymakers forest service photosynthesis shenandoah shrubs wildlife service songbirds acknowledgment cosgrove cambria math ornithology style definitions worddocument nests xeno saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent shenandoah valley punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority michelle smith qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal audubon society sols bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis forest management bill thompson shepherdstown birdsongs living systems ebird grades k name e light accent dark accent colorful accent wildlife resources name list name date rhododendrons name plain text name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light cumberland gap name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list spanish moss inland fisheries forest resources warble virginia society michigan museum ben cosgrove all about birds audio notes lang elliott 20image stormwater runoff tmdl national conservation training center water center donotshowrevisions lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
The RegenNarration
118. Farming Fire, Forests & Fish: Agostino Petroni on solutions journalism & great success stories

The RegenNarration

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 56:21


Agostino Petroni is a journalist, author, economist, gastronome, and 2021 Pulitzer Center Reporting Fellow. His work appears in National Geographic, BBC, The Atlantic and many more. I first came across it in Reasons to be Cheerful, the terrific news outlet founded by one of my all-time favourite musicians and producers, David Byrne. That outlet is part of a growing movement sometimes called ‘solutions journalism'. Though you might just call it good journalism. And Agostino's article that first caught my eye is a great example of that – outlining a terrific success story so relevant to some of the pioneering efforts – and vital needs - we've heard about in this podcast. One of the most fascinating and popular stories on the podcast was featured in the 100th episode under the title Wanted Land Doctors. I've had many interesting exchanges in the wake of that episode, including with a listener in the eastern states who shared stories of goats being used by public agencies to reduce fire fuel loads after the horrific Black Summer fires here in Australia. It turns out that the Mediterranean region has created some great models in this mould, that are successfully getting people back on Country, with communities and their livelihoods reinvigorated, and trajectories of mega-fire, extinction and polarised politics reversed. In the first half of this episode, we talk about Agostino's unexpected personal journey into the work he does, his formative film-making journey to Latin America, and this phenomenon of so-called ‘solutions journalism'. In the back half, we delve into some of the incredible stories he's found, principally that piece from Reasons to be Cheerful, and the patterns we've observed. This conversation was recorded online with Agostino at home in Puglia, Italy, on 3 May 2022. Title slide image: Agostino Petroni at TEDx Barletta (sourced at https://tedxbarletta.it/2019.html#) Music: Regeneration, composed by Amelia Barden, from the soundtrack of the new film Regenerating Australia, screening around the country now - https://theregenerators.co/regenerating-australia/ Find more: The article from Reasons to be Cheerful ‘Grazing Livestock Among the Trees Is Helping to Prevent Wildfires' - https://reasonstobecheerful.world/grazing-animals-in-forests-prevent-wildfires/ Some of Agostino's broader work - https://apetroni.contently.com/ Including ‘How to Save the Sea: Lessons from an Italian Fishing Community' in the legendary Yes Magazine - https://www.yesmagazine.org/environment/2020/08/24/how-to-save-the-ocean-fishing-community-lessons Thanks very much to the generous supporters of this podcast, for making this episode possible. If you too value what you hear, please consider joining them by heading to the website at https://www.regennarration.com/support. Thanks for helping to keep the podcast going!

Climate Cast
Forest loss in 2021 emitted as much carbon as India does

Climate Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 3:55


Forests are supposed to help us remove carbon from the atmosphere. But forest loss to development and fires last year meant some forests added carbon to the atmosphere.

UnDisciplined
UnDisciplined: why you should be scared about the spread of 'ghost forests'

UnDisciplined

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 25:58


Researchers documented some coastal forests are now inundated by water they can't use because it contains high levels of salt, a consequence of sea levels rising due to climate change.

Planthropology
81. Evolutionary Biology, Plant Collections, and Moss that Matters w/ Dr. Matt Johnson

Planthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 65:19


****************************************************I'm super excited to announce our partnership with Forest Proud! Forest Proud is a non-profit organization supporting forest-based climate solutions. Their mission is to build awareness and support for keeping forests as forests to fight climate change. Forest Proud believes:Forests provide powerful climate solutions.Forest management is how we deliver those solutions.Forest markets and products are how we sustain those solutions.I'm incredibly honored to get to work with them to highlight climate solutions coming out of the forest management and forestry industry! Head over to www.forestproud.com to learn more. If you want to snag some #ForestProud swag, use the promo code "planthropology" at checkout for 10% off for your order!#ForestProud Links:FacebookInstagramTwitterWebsiteAs always, thanks so much for listening! Subscribe, rate, and review Planthropology on your favorite podcast app. It really helps the show keep growing and reaching more people! Also, check out Planthropology on our website and various social media pages, all listed below. As an added bonus, if you review Planthropology on Apple Podcasts or Podchaser and send me a screenshot of it, I'll send you an awesome sticker pack!Listen in on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, or wherever else you like to get your podcasts.Website: www.planthropologypod.comPodchaser: www.podchaser.com/PlanthropologyFacebook: PlanthropologyFacebook group: Planthropology's Cool Plant PeopleInstagram: @PlanthropologyPodTwitter: @Planthropology_e-mail: Planthropologypod@gmail.com Support the show

Conversations
The hunt for the world's largest owl

Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 51:06


Wildlife biologist Jonathan Slaght on his adventurous quest to save the rare, shaggy fish owls of Russia's Far East (R)

KAXE/KBXE Morning Show
Forests and Carbon: Minnesota's Biofueled Future with David Pelican from Conservation Minnesota

KAXE/KBXE Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 20:49


KAXE's Tuesday Morning show strives to take an in-depth look at some natural resource-based issues important to our region. Producer Mark Jacobs and hosts Heidi Holtan and John Latimer hope to discuss not only the problems but also highlight some creative solutions.

For The Wild
Dr. BAYO AKOMOLAFE on Slowing Down in Urgent Times [ENCORE] /285

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Dr. Bayo Akomolafe, originally aired in January of 2020. Our hearts and minds are set to work by the urgent eco-social crises of this time. Caught in a cultural twitch of frenetic production and the sticky paradigms of modernity, we've penned vocabulary and designed technologies, manufactured frameworks and crunched numbers in an effort to diagnose and “treat” planetary collapse. We are invited by this week's guest, Dr. Bayo Akomolafe, to pause and abandon solutionism, step back from the project of progress, and dance into a different set of questions: What does the Anthropocene teach us as a destabilizing agent that resists our taming? How can we show up in our movements of justice if “the ways we respond to crisis is part of the crisis”? What happens when we unfurl into a space of slowness and relinquish human mastery to a wider cosmic net of relations?  Bayo Akomolafe (Ph.D.) considers his most sacred work to be learning how to be with his daughter and son, Alethea Aanya and Kyah Jayden—and their mother, his wife and "life-nectar,” Ijeoma. An author, speaker, renegade academic, and proud father, Bayo is Chief Curator and Director of The Emergence Network, a constellation of humans and nonhumans working together trans-locally to curate projects, rituals, conversations and events that nurture senses of the otherwise via practices that trouble the traditional boundaries of agency and possibility. Bayo is also a visiting professor at Middlebury College, Vermont, and has taught in universities around the world. He is a consultant with UNESCO, leading efforts for the Imagining Africa's Future (IAF) project. Bayo has authored two books, We Will Tell Our Own Story! and These Wilds Beyond our Fences: Letters to My Daughter on Humanity's Search for Home, and has penned forewords for many others. Music by Daniel Higgs Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Africalink | Deutsche Welle
AfricaLink on Air — 04 May 2022

Africalink | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 30:00


UN Boss Antonio Guterres winds up Sahel tour with visit in Maiduguri+++Burundi says 10 troops killed in attack on AU base in Somalia+++Kenyan Midwives decry workload+++Sexual harassment of Anglophone IDPs by landlords of host+++DR Congo to suspend around 20 Forests' logging Deals

Talk Is Sheep
EP 72: A Life’s Passion with Doctor Helen Schwantje

Talk Is Sheep

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 74:59


Kyle and Steve sit down and talk wild sheep with Dr. Helen Schwantje.  Helen has had her pulse on wild sheep in British Columbia for the past three decades as British Columbia's Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Provincial Wildlife Veterinary. She also serves on the Wild Sheep Foundation's Professional Reliance Advisory Board.  An award winning Veterinarian you will struggle to find someone more experienced on wild sheep than Helen. Helen is a consumate professional and well versed in the challenges facing wild sheep on the landscape.  She talks about the changes in wild sheep over the decades she has been involved and where she derives her passion for wild sheep. We guarantee you will learn a thing or two on this cast and without doubt will enjoy Helen's charismatic and straight talk about wild sheep, conservation and wildlife in general.

MPR News with Kerri Miller
From the archives: Ecologist Suzanne Simard on understanding the wisdom of forests

MPR News with Kerri Miller

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 48:46


The roots of ecologist Suzanne Simard's love of forests are multiple generations deep. Her family relied on forestry for their livelihood, and she was one of the early groups of women to carve out space within the logging industry. But her experience didn't mirror her family's. As the scale of the industry's business grew, Simard's concern about the implications for the ecosystem around it eventually evolved into a new career path.  Simard is now a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia and is working to reframe conversations about conservation. In her book “Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest” she writes, “This is not a book about how we can save the trees. This is a book about how the trees might save us.” In June 2021, Simard talked with MPR News host Kerri Miller about what humans can learn from the way trees cooperate and communicate with other plants. Let this conversation whet your appetite for more science-based conversation coming this Friday. Guest: Suzanne Simard is a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia. Her book is called “Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest.” To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or RSS. Subscribe to the Thread newsletter for the latest book and author news and must-read recommendations.

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast
50 Grad: Was unser Körper aushält / Tiny Forests: Klima retten?

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 18:58


50 Grad: Was unser Körper aushält (00:48) / Tiny Forests: Mit Mini-Wäldern Klima retten? (09:44) // Mehr spannende Themen wissenschaftlich eingeordnet findet ihr hier: www.quarks.de // Kritik, Fragen? Schreibt uns! --> quarksdaily@wdr.de Von Yvonne Strüwing.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Trees help Tasmania go 'carbon negative'

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 8:33


Under the canopies of Australia's native forests, carbon pollution is quietly being removed from the atmosphere. It's a natural process that could play a major role in reducing Australia's contribution to climate change according to new research.

The Climate Daily
Democratic Republic of Congo Co. Makes Paving Tiles from Plastic Bottles, Growing Heat Tolerant Potatoes, Strengthening US Forests, an Ocean-Based Climate Solution

The Climate Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 7:01


Democratic Republic of Congo Company makes paving tiles from plastic bottles, plus an ocean-based Climate Solution. Growing heat tolerant potatoes, and President Biden's executive order strengthening US forests.

Sharon Kleyne Hour
Encore What Everyone Should Know about Melanoma

Sharon Kleyne Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 56:00


Richard G. Glogau, MD (San Francisco, CA), dermatologist, cutting-edge dermatology, especially in cosmetic surgery and the treatment of skin cancer. Jerry Barnes (Cottage Grove, OR), global forest genetics expert. “Tree Propagation and the World's Forests – the New Zealand Model.” (DVD – Yes; Printable summary – Yes; Categories: 1,5,9,16,32,35) (Glogau, R, MD, “Collegiality and Dermatology,” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2005; 54(4): 701-2)

Planthropology
Let's Talk Plants: A Student Podcast- Ivan Rodriguez

Planthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 17:01


The final project for the introductory horticulture class I teach is to create a science communication piece about something we discussed in the class. They can choose to make a short podcast episode, a YouTube video, a TikTok, or write a paper. One of my students asked if he could be a guest on Planthropology as his project. I thought about it a while and decided it would be a fun idea! Ivan Rodriguez is a Freshman Landscape Architecture major at Texas Tech. In this short episode, he discusses what he learned in the class and how he hopes to use his newfound knowledge of native plants and landscape techniques in his future career. ****************************************************I'm super excited to announce our partnership with Forest Proud! Forest Proud is a non-profit organization supporting forest-based climate solutions. Their mission is to build awareness and support for keeping forests as forests to fight climate change. Forest Proud believes:Forests provide powerful climate solutions.Forest management is how we deliver those solutions.Forest markets and products are how we sustain those solutions.I'm incredibly honored to get to work with them to highlight climate solutions coming out of the forest management and forestry industry! Head over to www.forestproud.com to learn more. If you want to snag some #ForestProud swag, use the promo code "planthropology" at checkout for 10% off for your order!#ForestProud Links:FacebookInstagramTwitterWebsiteAs always, thanks so much for listening! Subscribe, rate, and review Planthropology on your favorite podcast app. It really helps the show keep growing and reaching more people! Also, check out Planthropology on our website and various social media pages, all listed below. As an added bonus, if you review Planthropology on Apple Podcasts or Podchaser and send me a screenshot of it, I'll send you an awesome sticker pack!Listen in on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, or wherever else you like to get your podcasts.Website: www.planthropologypod.comPodchaser: www.podchaser.com/PlanthropologyFacebook: PlanthropologyFacebook group: Planthropology's Cool Plant PeopleInstagram: @PlanthropologyPodTwitter: @Planthropology_e-mail: Planthropologypod@gmail.comSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/planthropology) Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/planthropology)

Prabhuji
Twelve Forests of Vraja, Aksaya Vat - Prabhuji, 29 Apr 2022

Prabhuji

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 66:23


Download: https://d3ctxlq1ktw2nl.cloudfront.net/staging/2022-3-29/262576684-44100-2-eaae6f40bc647.m4a

Prabhuji
Twelve Forests of Vraja - Prabhuji, 28 Apr 2022

Prabhuji

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 60:59


Download: https://d3ctxlq1ktw2nl.cloudfront.net/staging/2022-3-28/262346754-44100-2-0e71794938d48.m4a

Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast
Episode 68: Tinakrit Sireerat, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University

Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 44:24


In this latest episode, Michael and Tinakrit Sireerat, a PhD Candidate in the Department of Asian Studies at Cornell University, discuss his dissertation on the history of livestock farming in Hokkaido and forestry in Lanna as a backdrop for the interconnections between colonial administration and environmental governance.  Research and lecture summary: 01:40 Advice for researchers and recommendations: 28:23 Tinakrit Sireerat's Top Recommendation: Colonizing Animals by Jonathan Saha (link) Petch Pra Uma by Phanom Thian (link)

Planthropology
80. Seedless Bananas, Growing Pumpkins, and Dustin the Plant Murderer- April 2022 Q&A

Planthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 31:41


You've got questions, I have answers and a rant about bananas and cucumbers! Let's jump into the April 2022 Q&A!****************************************************I'm super excited to announce our partnership with Forest Proud! Forest Proud is a non-profit organization supporting forest-based climate solutions. Their mission is to build awareness and support for keeping forests as forests to fight climate change. Forest Proud believes:Forests provide powerful climate solutions.Forest management is how we deliver those solutions.Forest markets and products are how we sustain those solutions.I'm incredibly honored to get to work with them to highlight climate solutions coming out of the forest management and forestry industry! Head over to www.forestproud.com to learn more. If you want to snag some #ForestProud swag, use the promo code "planthropology" at checkout for 10% off for your order!#ForestProud Links:FacebookInstagramTwitterWebsiteAs always, thanks so much for listening! Subscribe, rate, and review Planthropology on your favorite podcast app. It really helps the show keep growing and reaching more people! Also, check out Planthropology on our website and various social media pages, all listed below. As an added bonus, if you review Planthropology on Apple Podcasts or Podchaser and send me a screenshot of it, I'll send you an awesome sticker pack!Listen in on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, or wherever else you like to get your podcasts.Website: www.planthropologypod.comPodchaser: www.podchaser.com/PlanthropologyFacebook: PlanthropologyFacebook group: Planthropology's Cool Plant PeopleInstagram: @PlanthropologyPodTwitter: @Planthropology_e-mail: Planthropologypod@gmail.com Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/planthropology)

Prabhuji
Twelve Forests of Vraja, Tapavan - Prabhuji, 27 Apr 2022

Prabhuji

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 55:53


Download: https://d3ctxlq1ktw2nl.cloudfront.net/staging/2022-3-27/262110015-44100-2-72d8606461f83.m4a

For The Wild
Dr. KIM TALLBEAR on Reviving Kinship and Sexual Abundance [ENCORE] /284

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with Dr. Kim TallBear originally aired in February of 2020. Intimacy and sexuality is the soil that gives rise to creativity, pleasure and regeneration of new life. As mainstream understandings of sex, marriage, and family shift, Dr. Kim TallBear highlights how the colonial project of nation-building disrupted the vitality of Indigenous kinship by imposing heteronormative monogamous marriage and the nuclear family structure. How have these constraints bred hyper-sexualized, paradoxical and fetishized beliefs that degrade relationships, wellbeing of communities and the land? Dr. Kim TallBear is Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta, and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment. By unraveling the doctrines of scarcity and separation, we are challenged to shatter pervasive beliefs of boundaries, binaries, and scarcity within our relations. Music by M83, Frazey Ford & FRASE. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Maria's Mutts & Stuff
Did You Know Trees Talk To Each Other??

Maria's Mutts & Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 15:33


Maria chats with author Susan Tyler Hitchcock about the language of trees and how they influence our lives in her book "INTO THE FOREST: The Secret Language of Trees". The 150th Anniversary of Arbor Day is Fri April 29th so pick up this book and read!

Prabhuji
Twelve Forests of Vraja, Kamyavan, Footprints of God - Prabhuji, 26 Apr 2022

Prabhuji

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 54:20


Download: https://d3ctxlq1ktw2nl.cloudfront.net/staging/2022-3-27/262055892-44100-2-e05647a3f0462.m4a

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 626 (4-25-22): A Sampler of Trees Inhabiting Soggy Virginia Sites

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-22-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of April 25 and May 2, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Baldcypress Swamp,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., sets the stage for exploring some of Virginia's tree species found in or near water, along with some of the water places those trees inhabit.  We start with a series of guest voices calling out 16 native Virginia tree species that can be found around watery habitats.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds. VOICES and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC - ~27 sec - “American Sycamore.  Atlantic White-cedar.  Baldcypress.  Black Gum.  Black Willow.  Boxelder.  Eastern Hemlock.  Hackberry.  Overcup Oak.  Red Maple.  Red Spruce.  River Birch.  Silver Maple.  Swamp Tupelo.  Water Hickory.  Water Tupelo.” Those 16 and other tree species can be found in a wide variety of water-related habitats in Virginia.  The Virginia Department of Conservation's 2021 report, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” lists over 30 community types associated with aquatic habitats.  Tree species are a characteristic of the vegetation in over 15 of those community types, ranging from Piedmont/Mountain Small-stream Alluvial Forests, to Coastal Plain/Piedmont Bottomland Forests, to Coastal Plain Depression Swamps and Ponds, to Maritime Swamps.  More generally speaking, you can find native Virginia trees beside small streams in uplands, for example, Eastern Hemlock; beside large rivers in the mountains or Piedmont, for example, American Sycamore and Silver Maple; beside large Coastal Plain rivers, for example, Overcup Oak and Water Hickory; and in a variety of swamps and other wetlands, for example, Baldcypress, Atlantic White-cedar, and Swamp Tupelo. Here's to Virginia's many tree species, its many water habitats, and the many combinations of those two groups of natural resources.  Thanks to seven Virginia Tech colleagues for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Baldcypress Swamp.” MUSIC – ~15 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Baldcypress Swamp,” from the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright 2004 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  The “Virginia Wildlife” album was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources).  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 479, 7-1-19, on the Dismal Swamp.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/. Virginia Water Radio thanks the seven Virginia Tech colleagues who recorded tree names on April 21, 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) River Birch photographed at Fredericksburg, Va., April 13, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user pfirth, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111309642(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Swamp Tupelo photographed at First Landing State Park in Virginia Beach, Va., July 9, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user karliemarina, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/86317064(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Black Willow trees along Toms Creek in Montgomery County, Va., August 18, 2011. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TREE SPECIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Following are the scientific names (in parentheses) of the tree species mentioned in this episode, in alphabetical order according to the species' common names. Atlantic White-cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides)Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)Black Gum (Nyssa syvatica)Black Willow (Salix nigra)Boxelder (Acer negundo)Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)Live Oak (Quercus virginiana)Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata)Red Maple (Acer rubrum)Red Spruce (Picearubens)River Birch (Betula nigra)Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)Swamp Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora) – a variety of Black GumWater Hickory (Carya aquatica)Water Tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Common Native Trees of Virginia,” Charlottesville, Va., 2016.  (The 2020 edition is available online [as a PDF] at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf.) A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” October 22, 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. Anita K. Rose and James S. Meadows, “Status and Trends of Bottomland Hardwood Forests in the Mid‑Atlantic Region,” USDA/Forest Service Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., November 2016; available online at https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53238. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject categoryFollowing are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.