Podcasts about Navajo Nation

American Indian territory in the Southwestern United States

  • 795PODCASTS
  • 1,275EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 1, 2022LATEST
Navajo Nation

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Navajo Nation

Show all podcasts related to navajo nation

Latest podcast episodes about Navajo Nation

The Path of IX - Walking With our Shadow
Compassion of Divine Simplicity

The Path of IX - Walking With our Shadow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 32:25


What does compassion look like and how does it differ from empathy? How can you show up with divine compassion for others, not assuming their stories, but simply asking and witnessing who they are? We all have the right to be. Today, I come to you from Navajo Nation, reflecting on the history of this land and its people, and it is heavy. Join me as we consider divine compassion and how we can grow and learn from simply accepting and witnessing. It's not our job to fix others. It's not our job to change them. None of us know the true story of how we've arrived here, so let us learn together.    I'm exploring:  How you can have and show compassion without fully understanding Letting go of the need to know it all and letting in the possibility of learning  Showing up as an individual and as part of a collective being because both have value  My experience with the Four Corners Monument: who I met and what I felt there   The necessary pieces missing from the Golden Rule A mantra of divine compassion: moving away from consumption and assumption, allowing others to be, and accepting what we do not know   Connect with me: Website: www.thepathofix.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepathofix/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/thepathofix Courses and Monthly Circles: https://thepathofix.thinkific.com/   Learn more about Cuatro Manos y Cinco Volcanes Farms & our cacao here: https://www.cuatromanosycincovolcanesfarms.com/4manos

Indianz.Com
'It's time to turn the page': Roselyn Tso promises new era at Indian Health Service

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 7:42


Roselyn Tso delivers remarks after being sworn in as the new director of the Indian Health Service. Tso, a citizen of the Navajo Nation, is the first permanent director of the IHS in nearly two years. Her swearing-in ceremony took place at the Department of the Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C., on September 27, 2022. "I am very excited," Tso said. "I've already had two meetings with my staff and laid out the expectations that I have moving forward with the Indian Health Service . Not because I can do that -- because it's the right thing to do." "It's time to turn the page and set and do a new page for IHS," said Tso, who has worked for the agency for more than 30 years. "I welcome the challenges and opportunities yet to come," said Tso. INDIANZ.COM: Native American news, information and entertainment. Owned by Ho-Chunk Inc., an economic development corporation owned by the Winnebago Tribe, an Indian nation with homelands in Nebraska and Iowa. Website: https://www.indianz.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/indianz Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/indianz SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/indianz Tumblr: https://indianzcom.tumblr.com

Access and Opportunity with Carla Harris
Empowering Tribes in the Fight Against Climate Change

Access and Opportunity with Carla Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 23:50


Indigenous voices have been left out of the conversation around climate change, even though they are among the first to face the direct consequences of global warming due to their interconnectedness with the environment and its resources. On this episode, we hear from Indigenous leaders working to uplift Native voices and bring generations of environmental wisdom into the fight against climate change. First we hear from Nikki Cooley of the Navajo Nation. As the co-manager of the Climate Change Program at the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, Nikki combines Native teachings with Western science to advise fellow tribes on how to adapt to climate change. Then, host Carla Harris speaks with Red Lake Nation member Robert Blake, founder and CEO of Solar Bear, a full service solar installation company. Through education, workforce training and demonstration, Robert is on a mission to realize the economic and environmental benefits of including Indigenous perspectives within the transition to clean energy.https://www.morganstanley.com/what-we-do/inclusive-innovation-and-opportunityDisclaimer textThe guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2022 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Wine & Crime
Ep288 Navajo Nation Crimes

Wine & Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 109:05 Very Popular


This week, the gals head back to the Reservation to take a look at just a few f*cked up local cases. Topics include an exhaustive desert search, a regrettable pickup, and a very, very, very long walk. Stock up on wines from Nk'Mip Cellars, learn your history, and tune in for Navajo Nation Crimes.  For a full list of show sponsors, visit https://wineandcrimepodcast.com/sponsors/

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
441: Creative Startups with Alice Loy

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 40:47


Alice Loy is a Founding Partner at DaVinci Ventures and the Co-Founder and CEO of Creative Startups, the leading global startup accelerator and company builder for design, food, immersive, and creative companies. Victoria and Chad talk with Alice about what she means by creative companies, how much judgment she must pass as an investor with a love for the "weird and wonderful," and some of the challenges faced in bringing diversity to the rest of the accelerator world. DaVinci Ventures (https://www.davinciventures.co/) Creative Startups (https://www.creativestartups.org/) Follow Creative Startups on Twitter (https://twitter.com/createstartups), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/createstartups/), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/createstartups/), Substack (https://creativestartups.substack.com/), YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1SCTGPWdes6ArrYJU0YJ-g), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/global-center-for-cultural-entrepreneurship/). Follow Alice on Twitter (https://twitter.com/aliceloy) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/aliceloy/). Alice's Blog (http://www.aliceloy.com/) Etkie (https://etkie.com/) Embodied Labs (https://www.embodiedlabs.com/) Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. VICTORIA: And I'm your other host, Victoria Guido. And with us today is Alice Loy, Founding Partner at DaVinci Ventures and the Co-Founder and CEO of Creative Startups, the leading global startup accelerator and company builder for design, food, immersive, and creative companies. CHAD: Alice, thank you so much for joining us. ALICE: Thanks for having me. CHAD: Can you tell us a little bit more about Creative Startups in general but also what you mean by creative companies specifically? Like, isn't every company creative? [laughs] ALICE: Yeah, it's so funny. That's often the first question. And sometimes people I can feel their sense of indignation in thinking maybe I think they're not creative. CHAD: [laughs] ALICE: First of all, the creative industries are pretty well defined globally by the World Bank and entities like that. I'll come back to that. Yes, all human beings are creative. I like to joke that that's what got us out of caves in the first place. But more importantly, all entrepreneurs are very creative regardless of what sector you're operating in. So when we're talking about creative, we're just referencing the set of industries that are measured as the quote, "creative industries." They include film, our museums, design certainly is a core element of that. Increasingly, we're seeing more and more people move toward the creative industries as mechanized labor takes over things like building cars or even running data analysis. CHAD: Has getting support and funding and that kind of thing traditionally been easy in the creative space or hard? ALICE: No. I know you know the answer to that question because you're a designer. [laughs] CHAD: I usually don't ask questions that I don't know the answers to, so... [laughs] ALICE: But it's a great question because actually what it uncovers, you guys, is that it has changed dramatically for people who I call creatives or creators in the last two or three years. It's a little tough to measure with the pandemic, but we know at least $2 billion have gone into platforms that support creators, businesses led by creators. The creative industry has really turned a corner. So when we started this work 15-16 years ago, I co-founded the organization with a gentleman named Tom, who is now in his 80s. But he had come out of what's called the cultural economy, which was the precursor to the creative economy. And, of course, now we're all living in the creator economy. So like every other industry, it evolves. And one turn in this evolution is that creatives are now understood as economic drivers, not just people who add nice flourishes to things at the end. When you're building new products, people think about engineers, but it's really a creative process. And people increasingly bring in creatives from the outset to think about how the design process can be more humanized, can be more effective to solve people's problems so that your products really delight customers instead of just get the job done. CHAD: Is there something you can point to that triggered or pushed along that turning point? ALICE: Well, not to be overly philosophical, but I would say the general sense in the U.S. and increasingly in other countries where we work is that human beings don't want to be cogs in a wheel. They don't want to just be bit parts in a system. When you talk to Gen Zers, they understand that they are complete human beings. And somehow, I think older generations bought into the idea that you have the same job for 40 years. You go to work at 8:00; you come home at 5:00. You repeat the next day. I think the sense in the economy is that people want to be fulfilled. If they're going to give that much time to a job, they want it to be meaningful and valuable. And they want it to solve some of the big problems. Frankly, big tech is not approaching the world in that way these days. And so I think younger people are looking for values-aligned opportunities. And the creative economy is a space where values tend to align with really reaching the full potential of each human being instead of just extracting their physical and occasionally mental labor toward building a capitalist system. And so I think that zeitgeist has helped open the door. I also then think when you look at the kinds of technologies that are being utilized, they're still fundamentally about communicating ideas, and art, and inspiration. That's what Facebook is. That's what TikTok is. That's what even news channels are. And as more people come into the world of saying, "Oh, I can share my ideas, my art, my jokes, my music, my whatever," they see themselves as creatives, and they go, "I wonder how I could get paid for that?" I mean, there are a multitude of factors weaving together to shift. I also think, quite frankly, the SaaS investment area has become so saturated. I mean, if you walk down the street in San Francisco, if you don't bump into three venture capitalists who are SaaS investors, it's like, what are you doing? And so I think other types of investors with a different background maybe are saying, hmm, what about this area over here? How could we make money? So that would be another thread I would say is helping drive. CHAD: It strikes me that what you've shared sort of creates a self-fulfilling cycle too. ALICE: Yes. CHAD: Because once creatives have examples of other creatives that have done this, it becomes an aspirational thing that they understand that they, too, could do themselves. ALICE: Yeah, 100%. So our goal when we started the startup accelerator...we launched the first accelerator for creative founders in 2013 in the world. And we said to ourselves, if we get one company that becomes the poster child for this creative movement and demonstrating that you can be, as we like to say, weird and wonderful and build a company, then we will unleash a flood of people who now see themselves in that light. We were very fortunate in that we got that one poster child, and that has really helped us paint a picture that's clear for a lot of people where they see themselves as entrepreneurs, even though they're a tattoo artist or they're a hard rock Navajo metal band from the reservation or whatever their background is. Now they look and go, "Oh yeah, I could do that," and they certainly could. Being an entrepreneur is really hard but not intellectually challenging; it's more heart-challenging. CHAD: Oh, that's really interesting, more heart challenging. ALICE: Yeah. I mean, you're an entrepreneur. You guys have built a business, so you know that being an entrepreneur is more about being able to just sort of stay calm in the waves than it is about building the world's best boat and being able to steer toward that destination no matter how the winds blow. CHAD: Yeah, I've often referred to it almost as grit, like the ability to, no matter what happened yesterday, get up and do it again. ALICE: Get up, yeah. And unfortunately, I think there's a myth, maybe at least in the U.S., that what drives most people to get up and go, again, is money. And I don't think that's true at all. I think what drives people to get up and go again is their love of customers or end users. And their feeling they're just irrefutable despite there being no evidence feeling that this is going to work. This is going to make a difference in people's lives. And that's why the sort of slog. And there are days when...one of the things we always start a Creative Startup's program with is find your tribe. Cling to the people who believe in you. Ignore the naysayers. The naysayers are ten to one. Blow them off and cling to the people who say, "Wow, dude, that sounds cool. I bet you could do that." Yes, do another coffee meeting with that person. [laughs] Because sometimes you just need people who can say, "You got this. You got this. Just do another day, man." What do you guys do? Let me ask, what do you guys do when things get really rocky for you? How do you guys collect that internal okay, I'm going to get back in the saddle. CHAD: I've talked about this with people before, and I actually think that this is going to be a non-answer, but I'll do my best. I actually don't know exactly what does this for me. But I do know a side effect is I also don't celebrate the wins as much as other people wish that I did. And I think it's because I just move on very quickly from things. I don't dwell on the downs as much. I also don't dwell on the highs as much. And so I don't know if it's just something about me that does it or I just trained myself to do that. But it does have some downsides to it. ALICE: That was a real answer. That wasn't a non-answer at all. CHAD: [laughs] ALICE: Victoria, what about you? VICTORIA: I think to add on to what Chad said is kind of that thoughtbot mentality of viewing things as an experiment. And so if you come in with that mentality, like, this is the experiment. We'll see if it works or it doesn't. And if it doesn't work, there are some lessons to be learned, and we can grow from that and do better next time. And if it does work, great; [chuckles] this is cool. And I actually like to celebrate the wins a lot. I like to really dwell in those moments and feel like we did something right. We should remember this and learn from that as well and then try to repeat it, right? ALICE: Yeah. Oh, I love that. CHAD: You mentioned that when you were first starting Creative Startups, you hoped to get one win, and you did. Which one was it? ALICE: To be clear, as a mom, we don't have favorite children, okay? [laughter] And there are different companies that have had enormous impact in different ways, so let me tick some off. Let me name first Etkie. It's a design company built by a woman named Sydney, who grew up in rural New Mexico with a passion for working with indigenous communities. Her design company makes spectacular handmade bracelets, average price point around 250 bucks. And she sells in about 100 different high-end galleries around the world. She creates 40 jobs for Navajo women on the reservation at twice the annual pay that they would receive if they worked any other job there. Pretty astounding, pretty astounding. Those women have gone on to reinvest their money in things like rebuilding the school, putting in wells for family. The Navajo Nation lacks drinking water all over the place. So really fundamentally shifting the economic and social trajectory of that community. She designs every single bracelet with a woman, and you'll see they're named after the women. And they just do a recollection process where the woman recalls something from her childhood, and they weave a story around that. And then, they create the bracelet design. They're beautiful, Etkie, E-T-K-I-E. The next one I would say that has really inspired me is founded by another woman who does...now she's doing more XR AR, But they started as a virtual reality company doing films for medical providers who needed to better understand the disease experience of their patients in order to come up with not just solutions to their lived experience but actual medical procedures, and technologies, and pharmaceuticals that could shape the outcomes of that patient. So that company is called Embodied Labs, founded by a woman named Carrie and her team out of LA. And they're now selling to hospital systems across California and increasingly in the Midwest, et cetera, changing thousands of lives. And then the one that most people do point to us and say, "Hey, good job," is a company called Meow Wolf. We were their first investor back in 2014. They've gone on to raise upwards of $250 million. They're kind of a competitor now to Disney. So they're in the immersive art and experience realm. They had a million visitors in their Denver spot. So far this year, they've had about a million visitors in their Las Vegas spot. They were founded here in Santa Fe, our hometown. And we didn't even know they existed. They didn't know we existed. [chuckles] The night before our application was to close, somebody wandered into a meeting they were having where they were talking about dissolving the art collective. And somebody said, "Oh before you guys make a decision, you should check out this thing." [laughs] So in some ways, it was angels on our shoulders in that it's a homegrown company, and Santa Fe is a small city. We needed a shift here around our creative economy. And they needed somebody to believe in them. They had gone to every business support organization they could find and had been told, "Well, you're probably trying to start an arts nonprofit." And they thought, "That's not really our vision. That's not...we want to build a company. We think art is something people will pay for if it's put forward in a way that blows your mind," and Meow certainly blows your mind. CHAD: That's really interesting. I mean, I totally get why people would say that just because...but that's like saying...when Disney was getting started [chuckles] people saying "It sounds like you're trying to create an arts nonprofit." ALICE: Yes. And I'm guessing a lot of people did. The future happens when we're all looking backwards, and very few people are looking forwards. And so I think it's important for entrepreneurs to keep in mind you're probably just statistically talking to somebody who's looking backwards because human beings tend to do that more than they look forward. And so better to find people early on who say, "You know, I'm not exactly sure what you're talking about because you're the expert in your startup, and I'm not. But let me ask you this, how could I be helpful?" That's the right question. If they give you an answer and they don't even know what you're talking about, you probably don't need their help. And that's hard for entrepreneurs because there are so many doubters out there that you have to kind of keep plucking through to find the one or two people who say, "That's really interesting. That seems like it might work. How could I help?" Did you guys have somebody at thoughtbot early on who you can remember sort of said, "Huh, that's interesting. How could I help?" CHAD: I think it was our early clients who most did that. ALICE: Oooh, yeah. CHAD: Because we're a consulting company, because we're an agency, finding clients who believed in us and wanted to work with us in part because they liked us was an important aspect to that. If it wasn't for those early clients, no amount of passion would have kept us going because we needed to support ourselves. ALICE: What a great insight, honestly. I think the sort of rhetoric around passion is really abused. Because there's now this sense that, well, if you have passion, you can build a business, and that's just not true. That's not true. I hate to say it, and people are always stunned when I say it because they think that I lead Creative Startups; I must be the core passion champion. But here's what I would say is if you have a passion for solving your client or your customers' problems, then you might have a business. [laughs] There's a huge difference there. There's a difference between well; this is what I want to make. This is what I love doing. That is not necessarily going to answer the question is anybody paying you to do that? And I like to encourage people to think about if you have passion for doing something, you probably have a hobby. If you do stuff that people want to pay you to do, you might have a business. And crossing that bridge is an analytical and a heart-wrenching process. Because usually, what you end up with is I mostly get to do what I love to do. But I do a lot of stuff I don't want to do because that's what building a business is, just like being a parent or any other really amazing, wonderful thing in life. Running a business is not just about doing what you love doing all day; it's mostly about doing what people want to pay you to do. And if you're doing what people want to pay you to do and you love it, that is beautiful. That is a blessed position to be in. It's rare. And you have to ask yourself very real questions and be brutally honest with yourself, or you could waste your retirement savings. You could spend a year or two away from your family before you figure that out, not to be depressing. [laughs] But we always say from our programs we look...not from our more advanced accelerator programs, but we also provide programs that are more; how do you figure out this idea? You have this idea, or you have what we call lucky revenue. A lot of creatives get lucky revenue where their friend sees them doing something, and they go, "Man, would you do one for me?" And then somebody else wants one, and now they have lucky revenue. And they're ready to say, "I think this might be a business." And those people we say you have three outcomes from our programs. One, you realize this is not a business. It's just not going to make any money. The business model does not pan out. Two, this might be a business if I do it differently, and now I need to figure out if I want to do it differently. And three is, yeah, I'm on track. Now I got to go grow it. And all three are valid outcomes. Because we've worked with people who came to us late, took out a loan. And we said, "Well, what's your plan for paying it back?" "Well, we don't know." That's bad. That's really dangerous. That can ruin families' economic futures. And so we're much happier to catch people before that happens so they can ask those critical questions about is this really a market opportunity? Is this a business I want to build? Is this, therefore, a business opportunity for me? And those questions are deceptively simple. In our more advanced programs, we focus on, okay, you've got revenue, you've got traction. You're ready to start maybe thinking about what's the next three years? Where are your cash flow gaps? Where's your, as people like to call it, the valley of death that you have to cross as you grow? What kind of financing can you go raise to help cross that valley? How do you get to 10 million in revenue, 50 million in revenue? People are at different stages of growing a business. MID-ROLL AD: Are you an entrepreneur or start-up founder looking to gain confidence in the way forward for your idea? At thoughtbot, we know you're tight on time and investment, which is why we've created targeted 1-hour remote workshops to help you develop a concrete plan for your product's next steps. Over four interactive sessions, we work with you on research, product design sprint, critical path, and presentation prep so that you and your team are better equipped with the skills and knowledge for success. Find out how we can help you move the needle at: tbot.io/entrepreneurs. CHAD: How much judgment do you pass as an investor as people who are reading applications about who gets into the accelerator program? How much judgment do you pass, and how do you strike that balance? ALICE: That's kind of a peek behind the curtain; how do people really pick companies? Different people do it differently. For us, we really hue toward weird and wonderful. We actually prefer...and this goes against what people say you should do, [laughs] but we kind of go against the grain in general. And it's worked out. We prefer to look at things that we don't totally understand partly because often creatives don't speak business speak. So I'm pretty turned off by (I'm going to make something up.) the Harvard Business School grad who has a music-sharing platform and doesn't play music. I'm like, how would you know about a music-sharing platform? Whereas a musician who comes with their garage band and they happen to have a computer science degree from the college down the road and they've invented this thing and all of a sudden, it's taking off, and they're not even sure why. I'm listening, and I'm like, oh, that's really interesting. A lot of creatives tend to pick up on opportunities in the market, and they don't frame it so much as a business opportunity because that's just not the language that they've learned to speak yet. But they have an insight into a particular sector or a need that people who are not really in that space... It feels like a lot of the startup world has been overtaken by people who want to be startup founders but don't necessarily have their hands dirty in a particular sector where they know how to really solve a problem that either a lot of people have, or that very few people have but that a lot of people have in the future if you build the market. And that's where you make a lot of money is if you build a market. So we look for things like that. So what does that mean when we're reading applications? We don't ask for financial statements. We ask, how much money did you make last year, and where do you think most of that money came from? We're more interested in are they interested in analyzing their business so they understand where growth could come from next? Instead of, what is your financial statements? Most of the entrepreneurs who come through our programs don't have financial statements. They might not even have a cash flow projection, which is really exciting. We have entrepreneurs who come to us who...I'll tell you a story. We had an entrepreneur come to us who ran underground music clubs in old houses in Denver. And he was like, "I think this is a business, but I don't know anything about business. I just started hosting these a few years ago." And I said, "Well, how many people...like, if you took an average year..." and I said, "You don't charge anything?" And he said, "No, people just hear about it." And I'm thinking, okay, so you get a couple thousand. "How many people in an average year come to your basement music club thing?" "50,000." [laughs] Yeah, I think you might have a business. I mean, those are the kinds of things that you think, wow, why did that take off? What is going on there? That's really interesting. Let's talk. And he had a mohawk. He played in a metal band. Business was not his deal. And so that wasn't the lens he was applying. I think a lot of designers and a lot of people who invent products and solutions start with; I'm doing this for myself, wouldn't this be rad? Without even knowing that, they touched a nerve in the market that now is kind of catching on fire. Those are really exciting entrepreneurs for us to work with. They do have to turn a corner on I'm building a business now. I'm not just doing something that's cool with my friends. And that can be a difficult place because it means you have to cross a bridge into the world of finance, and you're probably going to have to hire product managers. And now you go hire that Harvard Business School grad and they work for you. And a lot of people frankly don't want to turn that corner. And I get it because when you come back to that topic of, is this values-aligned? A lot of that world is not yet totally values-aligned. That's shifting, more impact investors, more investors who want to see more different types of people starting companies, but we're not there yet. And so there's this cultural clash. When creatives walk toward that space, they go, ew, I've been fighting against the man my whole life. And now you want me to get in the car and go on a long road trip with them? No thanks. [laughs] And I'm sitting there with the Doritos going, yeah, man, but I got all the good munchies, let's go. It often does work out. But I also understand why people say, "You know, that's just not my deal now." VICTORIA: Yeah. And you have a tremendous amount of diversity in your alumni. ALICE: We do, yeah. VICTORIA: And so do you find that there are some challenges in bringing in that group to the rest of the accelerator world? ALICE: Yeah, you know, funny, I was thinking about that yesterday. So about 70% of our alumni, and this has been true across the board from day one, are people of color or women. At one point, it was around 30% were women of color. I haven't looked at that number in a while. We've worked with about 550 companies worldwide. In the Middle East, half of our alumni are women-led companies. In the U.S., we are fortunate to be able to work with a lot of indigenous communities. New Mexico is home to a large indigenous population. And it's a lot of the reason our culture is so dynamic and beautiful. So for us, that was always a no-brainer that that was where a lot of the interesting creativity would come from and that that was where the rising markets were. We, for example, accelerated and were the first investor in a company called Native Realities, which is a comic book. And they founded the first indigenous Comic Con, which is now called Indigenous Pop X worldwide. And they saw obviously before even Black Panther, and it became kind of like people said, "Oh yeah, superheroes come from all communities." They saw that that market was rising. There are 300 million indigenous people worldwide. There are two comic book companies. Let that sink in. [laughs] It's like, oh my God, what is the possibility then not just around comic books, but gaming, animation, all kinds of creative tools, film, music? That's a huge market that has not been served at all. And we understood early on that that was an area where people want to tell their own stories. People want to understand the stories of other people. And then people want to build new stories together across those cultural or geographic boundaries. And the technology had shifted such that that was possible. In 1980, that wasn't really possible. The distribution channels of film were such that you had to raise money in Hollywood and have Tom Hanks and whatever. That's just not true anymore. So we saw that early on, and that has helped attract a lot of entrepreneurs who share our passion for really telling those stories. However, I would say for people who want to support rising entrepreneurs out of what I'm going to call distressed communities or communities that have been literally discouraged from becoming their own economic leaders is that the burden that most of the people bear who are building businesses, for example, from Black communities, or native communities, or women in the Middle East, those people tend to bear a larger burden than someone from a more privileged background like myself. They're often the person in their family and for their community who is helping to ensure that people get the health care they need, that that kid was able to visit the college that they wanted to apply to. They become that sort of anchor of support for more people than in situations where we have more support and more what I call margin. They have really little margin. And so to ask them to, for example, join an accelerator full-time for 12 weeks that just doesn't work. Because the decision that they're making, you know, from a very privileged position, we can say, "Well, either you're dedicated to your business, or you're not." But really, what we're saying to them is, well, either you do your business, or you love your family and your culture. That's the question we're asking them, and that's a totally unfair question. That's a ridiculous question. Every single one of us would say, "I love my family. Thanks, see ya." CHAD: So how do you balance that? ALICE: Well, it's tough. I mean, first of all, we have adopted in the programs where it's more for early-stage entrepreneurs, and we're opening doors to entrepreneurship. And we are being first and foremost patient, patient with they're crossing that threshold. We understand that our core outcome is that people come always saying, "I'm an entrepreneur. I'm ready for the journey." That means we do things like, first of all, we do all online. If possible, we do a meeting upfront, so everybody meets each other in person because that kind of sets a tone of just it's a lot of fun. We have food and drink, and we have a good time. And then we do 6 to 12 weeks online, and then we do a gathering at the end. And we build a community first and foremost of people who are understanding how they can help one another. So Creative Startups is a little different in how we do accelerators. We do not ever have people stand at the front of the room and tell people what they should do with their business partly because we're educators first and foremost, and we understand...I have a Ph.D. in entrepreneurship. I understand that entrepreneurs tend to be experiential learners, not all but many. And we're not going to be there in a year building their business. They're going to be building their business. We have to build their self-confidence. We have to build their ability to say, "I know how to row the boat. You're along for the ride." I'm just along for the ride. [laughs] That requires us to do things like, okay, so let's work on your business model and really carefully chunk out here's one piece of that. Let's go deeply into understanding that. Let's tackle the vocabulary. Let's look at how people talk about it online. Let's open that door culturally so that you can take that into your experiences and say, "Oh, I already kind of do that. I just use a different language," which is what a lot of designers do. A lot of designers, whatever your background, already do entrepreneurial processes. They use different language, and it's just a translation. It's literally just vocabulary. So we help people understand that the best way to figure out your client's needs are by listening; all people know that. If you want to understand someone else, listen, and unpacking that into then business speak a little bit, and then giving them opportunities to go do that in the real world. And being patient with how they might do that or why they couldn't get it done this week. Or maybe they want to come back with a different way of describing it than maybe a White person like me might describe what they experienced. And just giving a lot of latitude to people to have that own experience themselves. That honestly...I know that sounds very philosophical. But it breaks down into tactical things that we do in an accelerator that opens the door to a lot more entrepreneurs. And our Net Promoter Score is 9. Over 90% of people would recommend our program. People love our programs. And 70% of our alumni are still in business. So I think it's working. We have a lot of learning to do. We're doing an indigenous accelerator right now, and it's a lot of learning for me. It's very eye-opening. CHAD: As an accelerator specific to indigenous peoples, what made you decide to do that? Some people I know, thoughtbot included, sometimes hesitate to do things like that because we don't want...there's some hesitation around doing something like that. ALICE: So we share all of those hesitations, and we think they're spot on. We are doing this in partnership with a group called Creative Nations out of Colorado. They are all indigenous people. They're a new group. And we envision Creative Startups moving more toward a place of being kind of like the intel, you know, the old intel inside. We are inside, and we're an engine within another organization. So here in Santa Fe, we partnered with Vital Spaces, which serves Black and Brown creative entrepreneurs and artists. And our goal is to help build their capacity to be able to keep doing programs as they see fit for entrepreneurs. And we're standing by as they would like us to help. So we took that same approach with working with Creative Nations. It's been a fantastic partnership. The lead working with us is a woman named Kelly Holmes. She is Lakota Sioux. She's from the Cheyenne River Reservation. And she founded Native Max Media, which publishes Native Max Magazine, the world's first fashion magazine for indigenous entrepreneurs. She is a brilliant, creative entrepreneur. She is self-taught. She eked it out. She has been around ten years now. It's astounding. And you see the magazine, and it's spectacular. It is high glamour, beautiful. And it is reshaping the way not only indigenous people see themselves but how White people see indigenous people. And those reframed stories are so important to building a more equitable society. So I was over the moon to partner with her. Then I learned her mom is one of the few Lakota language teachers. So Lakota is her first language. Her mother teaches Lakota and teaches teachers how to teach Lakota. So she grew up with an educator. So she has taken to building this, again, patient, very exploratory online environment for indigenous entrepreneurs. And then I bring sometimes the more technical like, oh, you're asking a specific question about how to do structured interviews with customers. Sure, let me talk a little bit about that. But as we started out this conversation, you guys, entrepreneurship is not an intellectual challenge usually; it's a heart challenge. I don't mean that in a way to disparage how important it is to be really strategic and smart about your business. But I think at the outset especially, you just have to be able to hang in there and keep doing it. And then, as you grow into that opportunity, you start to see that the intellectual challenges unfold because your opportunities become more complex. But at this outset with Kelly, it's been a conversation with people who are frankly reframing themselves as business leaders, people who own businesses and have employees based on their creative output. And that's a really exciting space to work in. We wouldn't work in this space if we didn't have a partner who shared our vision and who wanted to be that native leader of a program like this. It just wouldn't really feel exciting. CHAD: I think that that's great advice and a framing that helps me think about the things that we've tried to do in the past and the things that we hope to do in the future and realizing that really genuinely partnering with someone in the actual community that we're trying to serve or to have an impact with is sometimes an important missing component that we need to incorporate. That'll help solve a lot of the hesitations that we might have around doing something. ALICE: Yeah, yeah. VICTORIA: Right. And we've all heard before that culture eats strategy for breakfast, which I think -- [laughs] ALICE: That's my favorite line, Victoria. You nailed it. VICTORIA: It makes sense that the more connected you are to your culture and to your community, that's where you'll be the most successful when your heart is in it. ALICE: Yeah. And I want to give sort of a plug for stepping outside of the zone of the way...I went to business school. I have an MBA. I'm really well-versed in that whole world. I'm married to a venture capitalist. He teaches how to do venture capital at Stanford. That whole world is very familiar to me. And it seems to not be helping us solve the problems that we have now as a society. And so one of the reasons I encourage people to go to those partners, go to those places where you're like, I don't fit in here; I don't understand what's going on here; these people speak a different cultural language, form, way of doing things, I encourage that because I think that for people who want to build a different world, we have to stop looking to the world that we already have. And we have to say, "Well, who does things differently? What could we learn?" One of the most beautiful things about working with the entrepreneurs in the cohort right now, the indigenous cohort, is they first talk about taking care of their people, that's first. And it's like, wow, if that's your entire frame, you start to make really different decisions in business. If you're talking about well, I want to take care of the people in my community; I want people to be healthy and happy and be able to pursue their own dreams; that's a really different frame of mind for a baseline for decision making. The other thing that Kelly talks about that I love (I'm stealing it from her.) is she talks about fighting for her business, fighting for her business. And that, to me, is such a great way to feel like, okay, if I'm fighting for my business, I know how much Creative Startups has achieved. I'm not fighting for myself. It's not my ego. It's none of that. It's fighting for my business so my business can keep having the impact. Everything that I think about now in terms of working with indigenous entrepreneurs is this has nothing to do with me. Their frame is very much my community, my people, my business, which is over there. And it's a humble way of understanding one's place. And that is a really exciting reframe for me to think about how we can solve problems like the climate crisis, like the disparity between rich and poor, like the disintegration of our democracy. What if we had a different frame? How could we solve problems differently, maybe better? So for us, these partnerships unlock a whole vast area of new thinking, new ways of doing business, new ways of taking care of other people. And at the end of the day, that's what gets me back in the rowboat [laughs] is this idea of, wow, we are having an impact on other people. And doing it with people who have a different starting point has really shaped a lot of the work that we do. CHAD: Well, I'm sorry that we have to wrap up. Otherwise, we could keep on going and solve the climate crisis and unraveling of our democracy, but -- [laughs] ALICE: Yeah, I have an appointment at 2:00 where I'm doing climate crisis. So I'll let you know how it goes. CHAD: Okay, wonderful. ALICE: [laughs] CHAD: Alice, thank you so much for joining the show and sharing everything with us. We really appreciate it. ALICE: Yeah, I was delighted to be with you guys and hope to continue the conversation. CHAD: You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. VICTORIA: And if you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. CHAD: You can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. VICTORIA: And you can find me on Twitter @victori_ousg This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHAD: Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Alice Loy.

America Out Loud PULSE
Navajo Nation COVID Suspicions

America Out Loud PULSE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 57:42 Very Popular


America Out Loud PULSE with Jodi O'Malley MSN, RN – Poor public health policy and a one-size-fits-all approach aimed at keeping them safe proved to be detrimental for the Navajo Nation, where many live in multigenerational households with no running water or electricity. Karen Bedonie, a full-blooded Navajo woman, details her...

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Navajo Nation COVID Suspicions

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 57:42


America Out Loud PULSE with Jodi O'Malley MSN, RN – Poor public health policy and a one-size-fits-all approach aimed at keeping them safe proved to be detrimental for the Navajo Nation, where many live in multigenerational households with no running water or electricity. Karen Bedonie, a full-blooded Navajo woman, details her...

DREAM. THINK. DO.
368. Driven by Curiosity - An Interview with DigDeep.org's Founder and CEO, George McGraw

DREAM. THINK. DO.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 45:24


George McGraw is joining us. He's a leading expert on water and sanitation in the United States and around the world. He's the Founder & CEO of DigDeep which is the only WaSH (water, sanitation and hygiene) organization solely focused on the USA.   Now… that might seem weird… but did you realize that over 2.2 million Americans live without clean tap water or without a toilet in their homes? Amazing… right?   George McGraw is hoping to dramatically change that stat… within his lifetime!   Under George's leadership… DigDeep has grown to serve remote areas in the US… such as the Navajo Nation, which spans New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah), in other areas in Appalachia and Texas.  In addition to his work with DigDeep… George is an avid speaker and writer. He's guest lectured at universities around the world and spoken at events hosted by WeDay, the Atlantic and Ford Motor Company and he's been published by the New York Times, the Nation and several law reviews.   RELATED DREAM THINK DO EPISODES: Lindsay Wrege - Founder and CEO of 321Coffee: mitchmatthews.com/337/ Shawn Askinoise - Founder and CEO of Askinosie Chocolate: mitchmatthews.com/195  Jamie Kern Lima - Bestselling Author and former CEO to IT Cosmetics: mitchmatthews.com/315    CONNECT WITH GEORGE: DigDeep: www.digdeep.org  George's Website: https://georgemcgraw.com  LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/george-mcgraw-195ab527/    WATCH SOME OF GEORGE'S STORY: Head to https://mitchmatthews.com/368   I WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU: How about YOU!?  What stood out to you from this interview? Was it the thought of 2.2 million Americans not having clean… running… water?  Did that stir something in you?  Did you want to DO something about it? Or… maybe it was George's personal story of seeing a need… and doing something about it?  Or… maybe it was one of the stories along the way.  Comment and let me know your thoughts!   And hey… know I'm rooting for you! Mitch

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – The lingering rental housing crisis

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 55:52


A new survey finds Native American renters faced evictions at a far higher rate than other ethnic groups over the past year. The report comes as the U.S. Census Bureau estimates there could be as many as 3.8 million evictions by October. At the same time, there is some glimmer of hope for renters. Realtor.com shows average rent prices were mostly flat compared to a year ago and employment data shows the labor market is rebounding following the pandemic. Today on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce talks about the status of the rental market and evictions with Earl Tulley (Navajo), Emergency Rent Assistance Program manager for the Navajo Nation; Tony Walters (citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), executive director of the Native American Indian Housing Council; Coya Delfina Crespin (Acjachemen Nation), senior metro community organizer for the Community Alliance of Tenants; and Elizabeth Elliott (they/them), executive director for the Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority.

Native America Calling
Wednesday, September 14, 2022 – The lingering rental housing crisis

Native America Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 55:52


A new survey finds Native American renters faced evictions at a far higher rate than other ethnic groups over the past year. The report comes as the U.S. Census Bureau estimates there could be as many as 3.8 million evictions by October. At the same time, there is some glimmer of hope for renters. Realtor.com shows average rent prices were mostly flat compared to a year ago and employment data shows the labor market is rebounding following the pandemic. Today on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce talks about the status of the rental market and evictions with Earl Tulley (Navajo), Emergency Rent Assistance Program manager for the Navajo Nation; Tony Walters (citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma), executive director of the Native American Indian Housing Council; Coya Delfina Crespin (Acjachemen Nation), senior metro community organizer for the Community Alliance of Tenants; and Elizabeth Elliott (they/them), executive director for the Northern Circle Indian Housing Authority.

ABQ Connect
Chuck Harper and Jenna Martinez

ABQ Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 23:58


Chuck Harper (General Director) and Jenna Martinez (Administrative Assistant/Radio Operations) of Across Nations (www.acrossnations.cc) bring us up to speed on recent events on the Navajo Nation and upcoming opportunities for ministry. Chuck and Jenna also share some stories of the rich history found by looking... The post Chuck Harper and Jenna Martinez appeared first on ABQ Connect.

KNPR's State of Nevada
'Connect, educate, advocate': Partnership works to curb Navajo veteran suicide

KNPR's State of Nevada

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 12:14


The suicide rate for veterans is generally known to be about 50% higher than the rate of the general public. But a study released in May by U.S. Medicine, which serves the Department of Veterans Affairs, said the suicide rates for Native Americans are the highest of any ethnic minority.

KJZZ's The Show
One idea to prevent heat deaths: Naming heat waves like hurricanes

KJZZ's The Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 51:01


Too many people in Arizona and elsewhere die each year because of extreme heat. Would it help bring the numbers down if we named heat waves the way we name hurricanes and other significant weather events? Plus, how the Navajo Nation achieved high COVID-19 vaccination rates among kids. That and more on The Show.

The Urban Auntie Show
Episode 42: Filmmaking and Indigenous Culture

The Urban Auntie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 52:41


In this episode, guest Shondiin Mayo discusses her cultural identity and how it weaves with her bachelor's degree and her future goals. We also chat about other fun topics like native games, boat racing, and beaded earrings (of course). Shondiin Mayo is Diné (Navajo) and Denaa and is of the Bitterwater Clan and born to the Koyukon Athabascan people. Her name means “Sunshine” in the Navajo language as she is originally from Stevens Village, Alaska, and grew up in both Fairbanks, Alaska, and the Navajo Nation. Shondiin's childhood was influenced by the subsistence lifestyle of fishing and living in a rural Alaska village as well as spending time on the reservation with her family. There, she learned values such as an appreciation for the land, preservation of traditional knowledge, and the responsibility to continue her heritage. Shondiin recently graduated from Northern Arizona University with a bachelor's degree in Creative Media and Film with an emphasis in Documentary and a minor in Ethnic Studies. Shondiin enjoys traveling and learning about other Indigenous communities. She also enjoys learning about her heritage and participating, in community events or taking part with her family, in subsistence activities such as boat racing, berry picking, and harvesting sheep in the Navajo Nation. Follow @urbanauntieshow on Instagram and Twitter, and like us on Facebook!

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast
HOST JACKIE TANTILLO - "My Mom Wanted More For Her Children" With Guest Educator Tammy Haddad

Should Have Listened to My Mother Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 28:43


Tammy Haddad  most recently finished teaching 5th and 6th grade and she likes to think that she knows what kids are into these days.  My guest is also the host of the "Cozy Rainbow" podcast which is geared for kids 10 years and up. As the  oldest of four siblings, Tammy says "I definitely get my drive from my mother. My father says "all my good qualities are from my mom."Though Tammy grew up in Las Vega, NV, she still has family that live on the reservation in Monument Valley, UT where her mother was raised. And it was through her tribe that both Shirlene and Tammy were able to get funds for their education.  Tammy's family was able to receive funding for college through various organizations, including the 'Native American Scholarship' (NAS) and 'Indian Health Services' (IHS) programs, just to name a few. Tammy explained "if you receive funding from IHS for college as Tammy's mother did, your first job in the healthcare field, you must work for two years on a reservation-part of a give back program." "My mother insisted that I apply for scholarships. I know lots of kids who didn't apply. I even worked at the scholarship office in college. I was dedicated to getting funding because of my mother. "Mom said, just get up and do it."  In turn, Tammy then was there to heIp her younger siblings apply as well.  And today, Tammy does not have tremendous outstanding loans.Tammy also shared her experience of coming out to her parents when she was then 16. She says "it was no big deal." She told her dad first, then her mom and her mom basically said "ok , cool no big deal." Tammy was very happy that her parents where understanding and that it wasn't a big to do.  She also doesn't understand why her sexual preference is anyone else's  business.  Tammy's advice to parents is, "tell your kids you love them no matter what, you'll never kick them out, and you'll always have a place to live here. Coming out doesn't have to be such a big deal," according to Tammy."Mom did all that she did-moved away, moved off the reservation and got her degree because she wanted me to have all the opportunities that she didn't have. My mom calls me her reincarnation" giggles Tammy. Not only do mother and daughter have similar personality traits, they do look very much alike.SOCIAL MEDIATWITTER: Tammy Haddad (@Had2Tammy) / TwitterFacebook: Cozy Rainbow Learning Co. - Home | FacebookInstagram: http://instagram.com/cozyrainbownvYoutube:  Cozy Rainbow - YouTube 

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
Analyzing Polling in State Races, Wildfire Impacts Linger & Navajo Novelist Releases Acclaimed Thriller

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 46:42


Host Lou DiVizio previews the week ahead at New Mexico in Focus, and runs through the top state headlines impacting New Mexicans. Gene Grant hosts a discussion with our Line Opinion Panel about new polling in statewide races that shows Democrats with big leads. Gene and the Panel also assess the dire situation in Las Vegas where ash and wildfire debris have contaminated the city's drinking water source. New Mexico in Focus Correspondent Antonia Gonzales sits down with a Navajo novelist to talk about her new book ‘Shutter,' which follows a young woman from the Navajo Nation who becomes a forensic photographer. Author Ramona Emerson also explains why she thinks it's so important for indigenous people to tell indigenous stories. Host: Lou DiVizio Line Host: Gene Grant The Line Opinion Panel: Algernon D'Ammassa, investigative & enterprise reporter, Las Cruces Sun-News Rebecca Latham, CEO, Girl Scouts of New Mexico Dede Feldman, fmr. New Mexico State Senator Guests: Ramona Emerson, author, filmmaker, Diné For More Information: Poll: Lujan Grisham maintains small lead over Ronchetti-NM Political Report Democrats lead big in races for 4 state offices, poll results say- Albuquerque Journal Poll: Lujan Grisham leads Ronchetti by 7 points, Dems lead other statewide races- NM Political Report ‘This has turned itno hell'- Santa Fe New Mexican Las Vegas struggles with post-fire water pollution- Santa Fe New Mexican The Age of Consequence: Wildfires in New Mexico- NM Political Report Forest Service to reseed McBride Fire burn scar- Albuquerque Journal Las Vegas Now Faces Water Shortage After State's Largest Wildfire- The Paper --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe
Bringing Water to the Waterless Right Here in the U.S.

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 23:16


Devin: What is your superpower?George: Ever since I found out that you were having me on, which I was really excited about, I've been thinking about this question. I'm a young queer man who grew up in a pretty conservative, pretty religious household. I think my superpower is my ability to really see someone and intuit what they need from me. I mean that on an emotional level, a level of service provision. I also think there's a level of like drive, drive for achievement that comes with that. I see people, and I see what they need, and I'm driven to achieve that thing for them and for myself.DigDeep didn't start its work in the United States. Founder and CEO George McGraw shares the story of a $50 donor who changed its focus with a single phone call:Well, this story is a little embarrassing, but I had no idea that this was a problem in my own country. I think I've always had a passion for water and studied international human rights law, and wanted to work on this issue abroad. I mean, I truly thought if you wanted to make a difference in water, you had to work abroad. So, like many good millennials, I got on a plane and went over to help. Our first focus at Dig Deep was on water access projects in Cameroon and in South Sudan—great work that was focused on the human rights aspect of this kind of slow development, community-led, very participatory approaches that were really successful over time.And then one day I got a call on our office number from a donor named Karen. I kid you not. She said, “I want to give you 50 bucks, but my only requirement is that you spend it on the Navajo Nation.” I was like, “Karen, people in the US don't need your money. We have water. Why don't you let me spend it where it's really needed?”And there was some silence on the phone, and you could tell she was kind of like controlling her temper a little bit. But she explained to me that she had been working on Navajo on a Habitat for Humanity-style project, building houses, and her Navajo colleagues explained to her that like, we don't put kitchens or bathrooms in these houses that we're building because there's no running water here. She was so floored, as I was, to find that that was happening in her own country. That's how we really got started on the Navajo Water Project.Eventually, George would learn that 2.2 million people lack taps or toilets in their homes right here in the United States. That doesn't count the folks in Flint, Michigan or Jackson, Mississippi, where there is water, but that's not safe to drink.Without running water in the home, residents must shower with family or friends or at fee-for-use places like truck stops. Of course, it also means buying bottled water—if they can afford it—or spending hours daily retrieving water from a stream or trough.One of the most extreme examples is on the Navajo Nation. “Almost a third of families don't have running water at home,” George says.Indigenous people lead DigDeep's Navajo Water Project.The COVID pandemic made a long-critical problem into a full-blown crisis. Without running water, two fundamental strategies for preventing the spread of the virus were challenging. You can't wash your hands or stay home if you don't have water there.DigDeep's model is to install a tank to hold water underground and a sink and shower inside the home. The people doing the work are Navajo. “All of a sudden, that was scary, unsafe, dangerous.”Initially, DigDeep shifted to emergency water distribution, serving the needs of at least 30,000 families.Then one of the team members had some inspiration. George shared the story:One of our staff members on Navajo, he got in a fight with his wife. All of us in relationships understand. She was like, “Go out to go out to our Hogan, go out to our other house and stay there for the night.”So, he packed his clothes and some water bottles in the suitcase and he went out there to spend the night. He woke up in the morning and realized, “Oh, no, I left my water in the car. Now, I'm going to get it out and it's going to be frozen.”But when he opened up his suitcase, it had been insulated by all his clothes. Even though it was subzero temperatures overnight, it hadn't frozen. So, that's where the idea for the suitcase came in. And he went on and became a finalist for the Innovation by Design Award from Fast Company for it.Building on this idea, DigDeep put its system largely inside an insulated box the size of a suitcase. The system includes a pump, a filter and a spout. The staff installs the solar-powered system without entering the home, making the process safer for the team and those who get the new water system.DigDeep plans to return to the homes to move the systems inside once there is an all-clear sign from public health authorities.George says DigDeep is growing. “Now we have the Appalachia Water Project, which serves folks in rural West Virginia and Eastern Kentucky. And we have the Colonias Water Project, which serves people in these irregular communities along the US-Mexico border called colonias.”For building DigDeep, George has leveraged skills he developed as a child, reading people to understand their needs and pairing that with a desire to serve and care for them. Could we call that empathetic passion for service?How to Develop Empathetic Passion for Service As a Superpower“I see people, and I see what they need, and I'm driven to achieve that thing for them and for myself,” George says of his superpower. Though it conjures difficult memories, he's grateful for the abilities he developed in his youth. He shared the story. I think for me, growing up as a queer kid in the closet, I got really good from a place of fear at analyzing other people's emotions and needs and sort of interior lives to try to understand, like, “How are they perceiving me? Is my sort of ruse working? And am I safe?” Kind of like a tool of manipulation, right? It combined so often for me with this other phenomenon that a lot of queer people will talk about; we call it "best little boy in the world syndrome.”We start from this place where we feel this deficit, that there's something wrong with us. So, we have this drive to achieve and to produce and to produce and to prove that we are worthy and that we are good, and that even if you guess our secret and don't like that thing about us, you'll still find something of value there.In like the unevolved beginning of my life, those were some of my biggest struggles and honestly, were often weaponized against me and against other people as manipulation, as fear, as hiding, as lying. But now I think if you can heal those and kind of use the momentum of them and redirect them toward good, there's a lot of beauty and a lot of utility there. I'm really glad for them.George acknowledges that others had it worse. “First of all, I feel like I should say that as sort of like a cis white man, I had it pretty easy.”“I have trans friends of color, and in other folks in the community who don't have that luxury and had to be a lot braver and muster a lot more power a lot earlier and were horribly abused by society and sometimes by their families or friends as a result,” he says.He points to a personal experience as evidence that times are better today for kids coming out now. “I was in a relationship for a long time with someone who has a teenage son. And I remember early on that boy had come to him and said, like, papa, when I kiss someone, is it okay if I kiss girls?”Meditation and mindfulness may unlock some of the ability to develop an empathetic passion for service, George says. “I spent a lot of time in my formative years essentially meditating, essentially practicing mindfulness.”“I see a lot of similarities between those two things, between that active pursuit of mindfulness now as an adult and what I was experiencing as a young person who was struggling so much internally and who spent a lot of time focused inward,” he says. “I think that helped develop that muscle.”Still, he says, that won't likely get you all the way. “I have yet to meet a person whose true superpower wasn't developed almost accidentally.”He offers a hypothetical example to make his point, “I had a conversation at a bar one night that led to another conversation somewhere else. And, you know, now I'm a roller coaster designer living in Tustin, Florida.”Developing a superpower results from countless influences, including those determined by genes.“Life is weird and circuitous and wonderful,” George says.By following his example and advice, you may find that life's wonder helps you develop a superpower like an empathetic passion for service. Get full access to Superpowers for Good at devinthorpe.substack.com/subscribe

Skiptown All-Stars
007 - I See Your Sedona and Raise You a Santa Fe

Skiptown All-Stars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 92:56


In this episode, our young explorers depart Zion with a surly dog and are met with a storm. And then a sandstorm. Despite the whiteout, they find their way through Navajo markets into the red-soiled, "new age" Utopia you all know as Sedona, AZ. Denise is super excited because she uses phrases like "Mercury is in retrograde" all the time. At any rate, after she drops a few crystal bombs on James and has him doing things he wouldn't normally do... like mountain freaking yoga... and fat-farm hypnosis... they have a few good meals, check out a few good hikes and find a few good shops. But overall, meh. On to Santa Fe, then, where the real enchantment begins. Between the Southwestern grub and the downtown plaza, James is stunned to find something around every corner that he loves, while Denise and her friends say, "Told ya." From the atomic flavor of Los Alamos National Laboratory to the rolling meadows of Eldorado, your two favorite middle-aged children leave no stone unturned (thanks to some really helpful tips from Jenny Parks at LANL Foundation) and actually EXTEND A DAY in Santa Fe. ***From James: PLEASE check out my new friend Chris Hoski's profile @sfsilver925 on IG and show him some love. Denise bought me (with my own card) a very cool ring you can find on @skiptownjames on IG, too. Chris is an artisan and is on that grind making one-of-a-kind jewelry and all of his Navajo love is poured into each piece. He creates, he ships and he scores. One of our best finds at the Palace of the Governors in Downtown Santa Fe... and not just because he invited us to his house for a tour and margaritas! We're coming back to take you up on that offer, Chris! You can find out where we went here on our brand spanking new Google Map made just for YOU! Sedona, AZ: https://goo.gl/maps/NxzGrCxpTtYPAV9E8 Santa Fe (and a spoiler for Roswell which is in next week's episode): https://goo.gl/maps/iF9XkTu6T1JRUZn28 Spotify
 https://open.spotify.com/show/0LY5k3G0n03N0pDtO8Zx72 Apple
 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/skiptown-all-stars/id1636817938  Amazon 
https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/c27fdc73-d7ad-495d-8931-3df036c4a8b5/skiptown-all-stars Google 
https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5saWJzeW4uY29tLzQyODYxNi9yc3M%3D Stitcher
 https://www.stitcher.com/show/skiptown-all-stars YouTube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYY1gCsalt6kItqF6yG2cqKJVLyGvW-OO
 
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skiptownallstars/ 
TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@skiptowndenise 
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skiptownallstars 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/skiptownallstar 
Web: http://skiptownallstars.com    

5 Plain Questions
Kathleen Ash-Milby

5 Plain Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 37:49


Kathleen Ash-Milby is Curator of Native American Art at the Portland Art Museum. She has organized numerous exhibitions of Native American art, including Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe). She was previously an associate curator at the National Museum of the American Indian and curator and co-director of the American Indian Community House Gallery in New York City. Publications include essays in Art in America, Art Journal, and Joseph Yoakum: What I Saw (2021). A member of the Navajo Nation, she earned her master of arts from the University of New Mexico. She is a proud mom and loves her new life in the Pacific Northwest where she lives with her husband, Edward. NMAI: https://americanindian.si.edu/explore/exhibitions/item?id=985 Dakota Modern: The Art of Oscar Howe book: https://americanindian.si.edu/shop/publications/books-and-products#6363 Portland Art Museum https://portlandartmuseum.org/exhibitions/dakota-modern/ Find Kathleen's publications here: https://www.amazon.com/Books-Kathleen-Ash-Milby/s?rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3AKathleen+Ash-Milby

EntheoRadio
DMT Dr Rick Strassman and The Psychedelic Handbook P2

EntheoRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 48:29


Hugh T Alkemi, host of EntheoRadio, is honored for a second time with Psychedelic Research Renaissance Founding Father Rick Strassman, MD who has been on The Joe Rogan Experience just this month and on Entheoradio about two years ago. It's always a fun time discussing the impact of psychedelics from both a research and a cultural standpoint with Dr Rick. This part 2 of 2 of the interview becomes particularly intense and includes both powerful wisdom and cautionary speculation about the future of Psychedelics in the USA.Bio for Rick Strassman, MD:Rick Strassman was born in Los Angeles, California in 1952. He attended public schools in southern California's San Fernando Valley and graduated from Ulysses S. Grant High School in Van Nuys in 1969. As an undergraduate, he majored in zoology at Pomona College in Claremont California for two years before transferring to Stanford University, where he graduated with departmental honors in biological sciences in 1973. During summers in college, he worked for RedKen Laboratories, developing cosmetics and a line of hair dyes. In addition, he performed laboratory research at Stanford, on the development of the chicken embryo's nervous system. He attended the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in the Bronx, New York, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1977.Dr. Strassman took his internship and general psychiatry residency at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center in Sacramento, and received the Sandoz Award for outstanding graduating resident in 1981. After graduating, he worked for a year in Fairbanks, Alaska in community mental health and private psychiatric practice. From 1982-1983, he obtained fellowship training in clinical psychopharmacology research at the University of California, San Diego's Veteran's Administration Medical Center. He then served on the clinical faculty in the department of psychiatry at UC Davis Medical Center, before taking a full-time academic position in the department of psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in Albuquerque in 1984.At UNM, Dr. Strassman performed clinical research investigating the function of the pineal hormone melatonin in which his research group documented the first known role of melatonin in humans. He also began the first new US government approved clinical research with psychedelic drugs in over twenty years, focusing on DMT and to a lesser extent, psilocybin. He received grant support from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse, as well as from the Scottish Rite Foundation for Schizophrenia Research. Before leaving the University in 1995, he attained the rank of tenured Associate Professor of Psychiatry and was awarded the UNM General Clinical Research Center's Research Scientist Award.In 1984, he received lay ordination in a Western Buddhist order, and co-founded, and for several years administered, a lay Buddhist meditation group associated with the same order. Dr. Strassman underwent a four-year personal psychoanalysis in New Mexico between 1986 and 1990.From 1996 to 2000, while living in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Dr. Strassman worked in community mental health centers in Washington State in Bellingham and Port Townsend. For the next four years, he had a solo private practice in Taos, New Mexico. After two years working near the Navajo Nation in Gallup NM, he returned to northern New Mexico in 2006, where he provided psychiatric services at a mental health center in Espanola. Since mid-2008, he has been writing full-time.Dr. Strassman's “DMT: The Spirit Molecule,” an account of his DMT and psilocybin studies, has sold a quarter-million copies as of mid-2021, and been translated into over a dozen languages, including Mandarin. He co-produced an independent documentary by the same name, which was the most-streamed independent drug documentary on Netflix. He also is the author of “DMT and the Soul of Prophecy,” “Joseph Levy Escapes Death,” and a co-author of “Inner Paths to Outer Space.”He has published over 40 peer-reviewed scientific papers and has served as a reviewer for 20 psychiatric research journals. He has been a consultant to the US Food and Drug Administration, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Veteran's Administration Hospitals, Social Security Administration, and other state and local agencies. He has provided consultation to many of the psychedelic startups that began appearing in 2020, including Atai, MindMed, and The Noetic Fund. He is on the Scientific Advisory Boards for Alexander Shulgin Research Institute and Ninnion Therapeutics.He currently is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and lives in Gallup, New Mexico.ENTHEORADIO IS SPONSORED BY:Mushroom Shaman Brand Supplements and ServicesHttps://linktr.ee/mushroomshaman/Alkemi Ormus Products and ExtractsAlkemi.gold Buy his book through his site to get a personal inscription: https://www.rickstrassman.com/publications/the-psychedelic-handbook/The Psychedelic Handbook:Entering the world of psychedelic drugs can be challenging, and many aren't sure where to start. As research continues to expand and legalization looms on the horizon for psychedelics like psilocybin, you may need a guide to navigate what psychedelics are, how they work, and their potential benefits and risks.The Psychedelic Handbook is a complete manual that is accessible to anyone with an interest in these “mind-manifesting” substances. Packed with information on psilocybin, LSD, DMT/ayahuasca, mescaline/peyote, ketamine, MDMA, ibogaine, 5-methoxy-DMT (“the toad”), and Salvia divinorum/salvinorin A, this book is your ultimate reference for understanding the science and history of psychedelics; discovering their potential to treat depression, PTSD, substance abuse, and other disorders, as well as to increase wellness, creativity, and meditation; learning how to safely trip and explaining what we know about microdosing; and recognizing and caring for negative reactions to psychedelics.Clinical research psychiatrist, father of the American psychedelic research renaissance, and best-selling author of DMT: The Spirit Molecule, Dr. Rick Strassman shares his experience and perspectives as neither advocate nor foe of psychedelics in order to help readers understand the effects of these remarkable drugs.

EntheoRadio
DMT-Dr Rick Strassman and the Psychedelic Handbook P1

EntheoRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 39:00


Hugh T Alkemi, host of EntheoRadio, is honored for a second time with Psychedelic Research Renaissance Founding Father Rick Strassman, MD who has been on The Joe Rogan Experience just this month and on Entheoradio about two years ago. It's always a fun time discussing the impact of psychedelics from both a research and a cultural standpoint with Dr Rick. This show includes suggestions and speculations about consciousness and the ongoing hype filled, psychedelic trend in the United States and gets especially intense in the part two of this episode. This is part 1 of 2.Bio for Rick Strassman, MD:Rick Strassman was born in Los Angeles, California in 1952. He attended public schools in southern California's San Fernando Valley and graduated from Ulysses S. Grant High School in Van Nuys in 1969. As an undergraduate, he majored in zoology at Pomona College in Claremont California for two years before transferring to Stanford University, where he graduated with departmental honors in biological sciences in 1973. During summers in college, he worked for RedKen Laboratories, developing cosmetics and a line of hair dyes. In addition, he performed laboratory research at Stanford, on the development of the chicken embryo's nervous system. He attended the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in the Bronx, New York, where he obtained his medical degree with honors in 1977.Dr. Strassman took his internship and general psychiatry residency at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center in Sacramento, and received the Sandoz Award for outstanding graduating resident in 1981. After graduating, he worked for a year in Fairbanks, Alaska in community mental health and private psychiatric practice. From 1982-1983, he obtained fellowship training in clinical psychopharmacology research at the University of California, San Diego's Veteran's Administration Medical Center. He then served on the clinical faculty in the department of psychiatry at UC Davis Medical Center, before taking a full-time academic position in the department of psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in Albuquerque in 1984.At UNM, Dr. Strassman performed clinical research investigating the function of the pineal hormone melatonin in which his research group documented the first known role of melatonin in humans. He also began the first new US government approved clinical research with psychedelic drugs in over twenty years, focusing on DMT and to a lesser extent, psilocybin. He received grant support from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse, as well as from the Scottish Rite Foundation for Schizophrenia Research. Before leaving the University in 1995, he attained the rank of tenured Associate Professor of Psychiatry and was awarded the UNM General Clinical Research Center's Research Scientist Award.In 1984, he received lay ordination in a Western Buddhist order, and co-founded, and for several years administered, a lay Buddhist meditation group associated with the same order. Dr. Strassman underwent a four-year personal psychoanalysis in New Mexico between 1986 and 1990.From 1996 to 2000, while living in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Dr. Strassman worked in community mental health centers in Washington State in Bellingham and Port Townsend. For the next four years, he had a solo private practice in Taos, New Mexico. After two years working near the Navajo Nation in Gallup NM, he returned to northern New Mexico in 2006, where he provided psychiatric services at a mental health center in Espanola. Since mid-2008, he has been writing full-time.Dr. Strassman's “DMT: The Spirit Molecule,” an account of his DMT and psilocybin studies, has sold a quarter-million copies as of mid-2021, and been translated into over a dozen languages, including Mandarin. He co-produced an independent documentary by the same name, which was the most-streamed independent drug documentary on Netflix. He also is the author of “DMT and the Soul of Prophecy,” “Joseph Levy Escapes Death,” and a co-author of “Inner Paths to Outer Space.”He has published over 40 peer-reviewed scientific papers and has served as a reviewer for 20 psychiatric research journals. He has been a consultant to the US Food and Drug Administration, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Veteran's Administration Hospitals, Social Security Administration, and other state and local agencies. He has provided consultation to many of the psychedelic startups that began appearing in 2020, including Atai, MindMed, and The Noetic Fund. He is on the Scientific Advisory Boards for Alexander Shulgin Research Institute and Ninnion Therapeutics.He currently is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and lives in Gallup, New Mexico.ENTHEORADIO IS SPONSORED BY:Mushroom Shaman Brand Supplements and ServicesHttps://linktr.ee/mushroomshaman/Alkemi Ormus Products and ExtractsAlkemi.gold Buy his book through his site to get a personal inscription: https://www.rickstrassman.com/publications/the-psychedelic-handbook/The Psychedelic Handbook:Entering the world of psychedelic drugs can be challenging, and many aren't sure where to start. As research continues to expand and legalization looms on the horizon for psychedelics like psilocybin, you may need a guide to navigate what psychedelics are, how they work, and their potential benefits and risks.The Psychedelic Handbook is a complete manual that is accessible to anyone with an interest in these “mind-manifesting” substances. Packed with information on psilocybin, LSD, DMT/ayahuasca, mescaline/peyote, ketamine, MDMA, ibogaine, 5-methoxy-DMT (“the toad”), and Salvia divinorum/salvinorin A, this book is your ultimate reference for understanding the science and history of psychedelics; discovering their potential to treat depression, PTSD, substance abuse, and other disorders, as well as to increase wellness, creativity, and meditation; learning how to safely trip and explaining what we know about microdosing; and recognizing and caring for negative reactions to psychedelics.Clinical research psychiatrist, father of the American psychedelic research renaissance, and best-selling author of DMT: The Spirit Molecule, Dr. Rick Strassman shares his experience and perspectives as neither advocate nor foe of psychedelics in order to help readers understand the effects of these remarkable drugs.

Running New Mexico Podcast
Episode 120 - Lan Yazzen; Dine Runner and Ute 100 Finisher

Running New Mexico Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 71:46


This week I had the pleasure to speak with Lan Yazzen. He is a recent finisher of the Ute 100. We talk about his start in running, beginning with growing up on the Navajo Nation and the traditions his mother taught him. We then talk about how he got back into running later in life. Lan talks about jumping up in distances and finding new ways to challenge himself. He also talks about training while making time for his family. He talks about his kids being out at the races as well. I really enjoyed talking with Lan. There is so much that he talks about that is relatable. I found myself laughing a lot, but he's so positive and just keeps going. I'm excited for what he does next. Cross country season is in full swing. Most APS schools opened their seasons at the Macen Holderman Memorial Cleveland Invite. It was a muddy and fantastic event. I hope you take some time to find a way to support your local team. It is also marathon training season. The fall schedule is packed full of goodness. Good luck to all in their goals. Listen to your bodies, hydrate, and keep running, New Mexico.

Antonia Gonzales
Friday, August 26, 2022

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 4:58


Navajo Nation confirms 1st case of monkeypox Ryan Zinke accused of lying when Trump Interior Dept blocked 2 tribal casinos Fed appeals court hands big victory to Wisconsin tribes over property tax

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 3, Ep. 14: Returning Home: Diné Poetry, Essays, Art & Journalism from Utah's Intermountain Indian School (1950-1983, Brigham City, UT)

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 103:27


Date: November 29, 2021 (Season 3, Episode 14: 102 minutes long). Click Here to see the SYP webpage page which includes art from the book, photos of the co-authors, recommended readings and a site plan for Intermountain Indian School, circa 1980s. Are you interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click here.Podcast Content: This episode is about literary and creative expressions--works of poetry, essays, art and journalism--produced by Diné or Navajo junior high and high school students, and older students ages 18 to 24, who returned to complete their high school years at IIS. For nine months of each year, most of the school's student body boarded chartered buses that took them to and from Brigham City's Intermountain Indian School (IIS: 1950-1983). Living hundreds of miles from their families and communities, these children, some as young as five years of age, lived in dormitories and attended school on a sprawling and somewhat isolated north Utah campus. Our guests for this episode: Farina King (Diné, historian, Univ. of Oklahoma), Mike Taylor (English and Native American Studies, BYU) and James Swensen (photographic/art historian, BYU). Each read their favorite poems and excerpts, shared personal insights and discoveries, and expressed their awe and wonder, at the youthful creative output covering relationships, youthful love, protest, homelands and family, and above all else, their affirmations of Indiginous knowledge and identity.The IIS campus, which was managed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, remains partially standing, located just below the incline to Sardine Canyon on US Route 89. Tens of thousands of Navajo students attended what was for its time, the largest Indian boarding school in the USA. During the school's last ten years the school became Inter-tribal facility, inviting both Navajo and students from other tribal nations.      This richly illustrated book describes, interpretes, and amassing hundreds of Diné student works into one volume. This book expands the known canon of mid 20th century Indigious art, literature and journalism. King, Taylor and Swensen's analysis, and their gathering of youthful Diné creative works, are both nationally and regionally significant, for Indigious Studies, American history, and our nation's interest in seeking out, and making publically available, more inclusive works in the Humanities and in the arts. Bios : Dr. Farina King--a citizen of the Navajo Nation--is the Horizon Chair of Native American Ecology & Culture, and an Associate Professor of Native American Studies at the Univ. of Oklahoma. King specializes in twentieth-century Native American Studies.  Besides this book she is the author of The Earth Memory Compass: Diné Landscapes and Education in the Twentieth Century.  Dr. Michael P. Taylor is Assistant Professor of English and Associate Director of American Indian Studies at BYU. He is a coauthor of Returning Home (the book in discussion). His research engages Indigenous archives to expand Indigenous literary histories and support community-centered initiatives of Indigenous resurgence. Dr. James R. Swensen is an associate professor of art history and the history of photography at BYU. He is the author of Picturing Migrants: The Grapes of Wrath and New Deal Documentary Photography (Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 2015), In a Rugged Land: Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, and the Three Mormon Towns Collaboration, 1953-1954  (Univ. of Utah Press, 2018) and co-author of Returning Home  (the book in discussion).

In Site
“Wisdom In Patience” - The Re-Emergence Of Glen Canyon

In Site

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 123:16


We've podcasted about the Lake Powell Pipeline, so we thought, as the drought continues and water levels continue to drop, let's go have a look. We told our board about the idea and it turns out that board member Catherine Smith rafted the Colorado River through Glen Canyon as a teenager in 1955. We were so pleased that she insisted on coming along. We included David Petitt, a well-known photographer now painter, and of course, our producer and host Logan, his wife Angie, and our assistant producer Ben.The level when we took our trip in May was only 1/4 full at 3523 feet – just 33 feet above the minimum power pool of 3,490 feet, or where there's not enough water to run the power generators. Dead pool is 120 feet lower, at 3,370 feet. Because the lake dropped about 40 feet in 2021 they have been releasing 500,000 acre-feet from Flaming Gorge to delay that moment of truth.But the big picture is that Lake Powell is really only of value to generate power, tourist economy aside. So if it drops below minimum power pool, then evaporation and rock-saturation coefficients start to play in. If preserving water is the sole priority, why expose all this surface area and let it seep into the sandstone? It starts to look like better water sense to send as much water as possible to Lake Mead. It's an immense, critical set of decisions the water lords have to make in the face of the harshest drought in 1200 years, and due to climate change, looking like the new normal.Now suddenly the Glen Canyon Institute — premised on draining the lake and revitalizing the river and deemed “looney” by Utah Senator Orrin Hatch — is gaining prominence, with Director Eric Balken finding himself in interviews in the New Yorker. At the end of the episode, we interview him too so he can help us make sense of our observations of both beauty and tragedy inherent in Glen Canyon's re-emergence.As we explored the re-emerging canyon, we also looked for Ancestral Puebloan evidence. Having found little, we reached out to Erik Stanfield, an archaeologist with Navajo Nation. You'll his voice about halfway through the episode. Our trip begins with a long walk down temporary ramps as Bullfrog Marina continues to have to move deeper and deeper into the canyon as water vanishes.

Truth Be Told
Self Reflection Through Navajo Wisdom and Beyond

Truth Be Told

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 40:04


Granddaughter Crow will discuss her books Belief, Being, and Beyond and Wisdom of the Natural World. Granddaughter Crow (Dr. Joy Gray) holds a doctorate in leadership. Internationally recognized as a medicine person, she comes from a long line of spiritual leaders as a member of the Navajo Nation.She is an award-winning author. Her books include The Journey of the Soul, Wisdom of the Natural World, and Belief, Being, and Beyond. She dedicates her life to inspiring, encouraging, and empowering individuals to be in their authenticity. Inducted into Delta Mu Delta, International Honors Society in 2012 and served on their Board of Directors for the Lambda Sigma Chapter in 2013-2015. Voted in as Women of the Year 2015, by the NAPW (National Association of Professional Women). She has been named among the best in mind, body, spirit books by the 2022 COVR Visionary Awards. www.granddaughtercrow.com Host Bonnie Burkert melds the worlds of media and higher consciousness, sharing tools for transformation for wellbeing and spiritual awakening . www.instagram.com/yogi_bon

Catch my Killer
Episode 148: Asia Graham

Catch my Killer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 46:55


Although, Private Asia Graham wasn't murdered, her death would stem from being raped and then feeling hopeless because she felt like her superiors were more concerned about her attacker and less about the rape she endured. Before Asia died, she confided in her mother that when she reported the rape to her company commander, he told her to just get over it and move on. Asia told her mother she didn't feel like anyone cared that she was raped. Unfortunately, Nicole Graham wouldn't be the only grieving parent. Not long after Asia's December 31, 2020 death, her closest friend and fellow soldier Pvt. Marriah Pouncy of Chinle, Ariz. would take her own life months later on June 21, 2021. She would also die at Fort Bliss as did Asia. Mariah was a proud member of the. Navajo Nation.Asia Graham's life began to unravel after only being at Fort Bliss, Texas for a month. It took two months for Asia to get enough courage to report that she was raped while unconscious on December 31, 2019. Her attacker was fellow soldier PFC Christian Alvarado. Asia reported the rape in February 2020. However, her superiors didn't file the complaint until June. One year later, she was found dead in her barracks where she overdosed while battling depression from the assault, her mother said. When I asked Nicole about details surrounding Asia's death, she told me that Asia and two of her friends received a Percoset from an unidentified person. According to Nicole, two of the pills were fine, but unknown to Nicole, her Percoset was laced with Fentanyl which killed her. Nicole believes the person who gave her daughter the Percoset should be held responsible for killing her daughter. Soldier Christian Alvarado was convicted of raping Pfc. Asia Graham Alvarado. He received a sentence of 18 years and three months. Please also visit my website for more information about my true crime and paranormal newspaper columns at www.themarcabe.com. You can also help support my podcast by purchasing a cup of $5 coffee every month. To help support the podcast, please visit https://www.buymeacoffee.com/catchmykiller. If you would like to contact me about this podcast, please visit my websites www.catchmykiller.com or www.themarcabe.com where you can submit a case.

The Well Woman Show
295: The Problem with Fake Pregnancy Clinics with Terrelene Massey

The Well Woman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 21:05


Welcome back to the well Woman show, I'm your host Giovanna Rossi. on this week's show I talk to Terrelene Massey, the Executive Director for the Southwest Women's Law Center in Albuquerque. Terrelene holds a Juris Doctor from the University of New Mexico School of Law, and a Master of Public Affairs from the University of Texas at Austin. She is a citizen of the Navajo Nation, from Pinon, AZ and has been living in NM since 2003. Terrelene also previously served as the Executive Director of the Navajo Nation Division of Social Services. Terrelene practiced law as an attorney with Johnson Barnhouse & Keegan, LLP, and the New Mexico Legal Aid, Inc. She also worked for the NM Human Services Department and the NM Indian Website - http://www.100womenabq.org/ (www.100womenabq.org) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/100WomenAlbuquerque (https://www.facebook.com/100WomenAlbuquerque) Crisis Pregnancy Centers report https://alliancestateadvocates.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/107/Alliance_CPC_Report_FINAL2-1-22.pdf (https://alliancestateadvocates.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/107/Alliance_CPC_Report_FINAL2-1-22.pdf) You can find notes from today's show at http://wellwomanlife.com/295show (wellwomanlife.com/295show). The Well Woman Show is thankful for the support from The Well Woman Academy™ at http://wellwomanlife.com/academy (wellwomanlife.com/academy). Join us in the Academy for community, mindfulness practices and practical support to live your Well Woman Life.

Strange Paradigms
SKINWALKER CSI - LAW ENFORCEMENT and the PARANORMAL - Jonathan Dover

Strange Paradigms

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 82:31 Very Popular


( To see the video of this show, click here: https://youtu.be/OuweWp3_Y7s ) NEW WEBSITE with Blogs, Videos, and Podcast direct links: https://strangeparadigms.com/ Cristina's Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and More > https://beacons.ai/cristinagomez Patreon Club for Extras & Behind the Scenes: https://www.patreon.com/paradigm_shifts Jonathan 'Redbird' Dover appeared in Season 3 of 'The Secret of Skinwalker Ranch'. In this interview with Cristina Gomez, he shares his experiences, knowledge, and insights from over 30 years in Law Enforcement, investigating reports on Tribal Reservations of UFOs, Bigfoot, Skinwalkers, Witchcraft, and various other paranormal phenomena. Once he retired from his service, he continued with investigations into these mysteries in and around Utah and Arizona, as well as Skinwalker Ranch and the Uintah Basin area.Jon has worked with the City of WInslow Arizona Police Department, The National Park Service, Navajo Historic Preservation Dept. and the Navajo Nation Rangers. He retired from active duty as a Lieutenant in 2011 after 31 years as law enforcement. He was trained in Criminal Investigations and was an Archaeological Resource Crimes Investigator. John was also trained as an EMT, in SWAT operations, Hazordous materials, Search & Rescue and was an instructor in Police Firearms training and High Angle Technical Rescue. During his work on Navajo Nation lands, he along with Stanley Milford Jr. were assigned over a period of 10 years to officially investigate and document significant cases involving Bgfoot, the Paranormal, Navajo Witchcraft and UFO's.

SoulWhat
Granddaughter Crow

SoulWhat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 67:50


Join Roger and Michelle with special guest Granddaughter Crow (Dr. Joy Gray). She is an award-winning author, and her books include “The Journey of the Soul,” “Wisdom of the Natural World,” and “Belief, Being, and Beyond.” She dedicates her life to inspiring, encouraging, and empowering individuals to be their authenticity. Internationally recognized as a medicine person, Granddaughter Crow comes from a long line of spiritual leaders as a member of the Navajo Nation.Learn more at GranddaughterCrow.comIf you have questions, feel free to ask. Roger & Michelle will also give a prize if there are a certain number of active listeners...so invite your friends. They will also offer live readings.Watch live on our SoulWhat page for giveaways and readings!You can also listen to SoulWhat on @MichelleSoulTopia YouTube, iHeart Radio, iTunes, Spotify and Google Podcast.

The Planet Today
Massive flooding in Kentucky, saving the mangroves in India, & more!

The Planet Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 24:27


Matt and Nick talk about a woman-led mission to save India's mangroves (How nine women are helping save India's mangroves – with foraging and eco-tours | Global development | The Guardian),Sea animals helping algae reproduce (Like Bees of the Seas, These Crustaceans Pollinate Seaweed - The New York Times (nytimes.com)),Kentucky's flooding amid a changing climate (White House warns of ‘intensifying impacts of climate change' as Biden tours flood-hit Kentucky – as it happened (theguardian.com)),The Navajo Nation's Baca/Prewitt community combatting a lack of running water (Two million people lack running water in the US. This Navajo Nation team is turning on the taps on tribal land | The Independent),And the birds predicted to be the first to go extinct as global biodiversity decreases (The Most Fascinating Birds Will Be the First to Go Extinct - The New York Times (nytimes.com))!

We Are Resilient: An MMIW True Crime Podcast

When Jamie Yazzie went missing in June 2019, she was last seen in Pinon, Arizona within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation.  It was announced earlier this year that her remains were discovered back in November 2021. Now an arrest has been made.When the original mini dropped we posed the question “Who killed Jamie Yazzie and why?” The answers are disturbing.Links to information found for this episode can be found here:https://people.com/crime/jamie-yazzie-navajo-woman-killed-boyfriend-charged/https://lawandcrime.com/crime/man-charged-with-murder-after-girlfriends-remains-turned-up-on-arizona-reservation-with-gunshot-wound-to-the-head-two-years-after-she-vanished/amp/

Wósdéé Podcast
Episode 38: A Cooperative Future (Ft. Bijiibah Ruth)

Wósdéé Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 38:14


In this episode I talk to Bijiibah Ruth about the potential of cooperatives within the Navajo Nation. We briefly cover the cooperative history, social solidarity characteristic of cooperatives, and how they can exist in the Navajo Nation. We discuss the limits to cooperatives which are the same obstacles that small businesses have regarding bureaucracy.

WGRT's LIMElight with Jessie Wiegand
Blending a Love of Language and Music wsg. Eli Lev

WGRT's LIMElight with Jessie Wiegand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 8:32


Eli Lev is and educator turned singer-songwriter whose music speaks volumes. Learn how his experience teaching on the Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona inspired his music and taught him about life. Learn more about Eli Lev here: https://eli-lev.com/ (https://eli-lev.com/) LIMElight with Jessie is part of the WGRT 102.3 FM Podcast Network. For the latest episodes of all of our featured podcasts, visit our website here: https://wgrt-1023-fm-podcast-network.captivate.fm/ (https://wgrt-1023-fm-podcast-network.captivate.fm) WGRT's LIMElight with Jessie is produced by the following team members: Executive Producer: Jessie Wiegand Audio Engineer: George James Administrator: Jessie Wiegand Marketing: Jessie Wiegand Follow Jessie on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/wgrt_jessie/ (https://www.instagram.com/wgrt_jessie/)

1A
Water Week: Access To Clean Drinking Water

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 30:20


Human beings start their days with water. A warm shower. Brushing teeth. Washing faces. The more than two million Americans who live without running water, however, aren't afforded this luxury. More than 25 million Americans don't drink water that meets federal health standards according to a study conducted by The Guardian. Native American households are 19 times more likely to lack indoor plumbing than white households. We hear from one of the people trying to address the problem. We start the conversation in Navajo Nation where one in three homes don't have running water.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
11:11 Talk Radio with Simran Singh

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:23


Belief, being and BEYOND: Granddaughter Crow A radical new cognitive framework for under- standing the mysteries of the complex Universe in which we live. Encompass the views and perspectives of seemingly disparate belief systems to create a foundational new paradigm for understanding cultural perspectives. What does Christianity have in common with the tarot? What does Paganism have in common with Navajo creation stories? What does Jesus have in common with the Hindu deity Manu? Granddaughter Crow will enlighten you to the fact that there is far more that unites our varied human systems of belief than we may have ever considered. Granddaughter Crow (Dr. Joy Gray) holds a doctorate in leadership. Internationally recognized as a medicine person, she comes from a long line of spiritual leaders as a member of the Navajo Nation. She is an award-winning author. Her three titles are The Journey of the Soul, Wisdom of the Natural World (Llewellyn 2021), and Belief, Being, and Beyond (Llewellyn, June 2022.) Founding CEO of The Eagle Heart Foundation, a non-profit organization. She dedicates her life to inspiring, encouraging, and empowering individuals to be their authenticity. Learn more about Simran here: www.iamsimran.com www.1111mag.com/

Antonia Gonzales
Wednesday, August 3, 2022

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 4:58


MI tribes host Sec Haaland's 2nd stop on Road To Healing Tour Nez, Nygren top Navajo Nation primary election KS voters choose to protect abortion rights Historic Pine Ridge station seeks new building

KZMU News
Monday August 1, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 10:58


Utah Governor Spencer Cox released another chapter of Utah's water plan last week. It aims to balance water conservation, agriculture and state growth. Plus, the FBI published a ‘first of its kind' list of almost 180 missing Indigenous people throughout the Navajo Nation. And later, the climate crisis has been the cause of lower stream flows in rivers and creeks throughout the West. Our radio partners report on how this changing ecosystem is affecting boreal toads in Colorado wilderness. // Show Notes: // Photo: Samantha Alford weighs a boreal toad in a plastic bag as it attempts to escape. Toads are indicator species, which means they can tell researchers a lot about the health of the environment. Caroline Llanes / Aspen Public Radio // UPR: Utah releases third chapter of state water action plan https://www.upr.org/utah-news/2022-07-27/utah-releases-third-chapter-of-state-water-action-plan // FBI: List of Native Americans Verified as Missing Throughout New Mexico and the Navajo Nation https://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field-offices/albuquerque/news/press-releases/fbi-releases-list-of-native-americans-verified-as-missing-throughout-new-mexico-and-the-navajo-nation // Aspen Public Radio: Small boreal toads in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness face big challenges https://www.aspenpublicradio.org/2022-07-13/boreal-toads-in-the-maroon-bells-snowmass-wilderness-face-big-challenges

Indianz.Com
Jonathan Nez / Navajo Nation, National Indian Health Board

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 8:38


House Subcommittee on Indigenous Peoples of the United States Legislative Hearing – July 28, 2022 Date: Thursday, July 28, 2022 Time: 01:00 PM Location: Longworth House Office Building 1324 Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. ET, in Room 1324 Longworth House Office Building and via Cisco WebEx, the House Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) holds a hybrid legislative hearing on the following bill: • H.R.5549, the Indian Health Service Advance Appropriations Act. The bill amends the Indian Health Care Improvement Act to authorize appropriations for the Indian Health Service for two years in advance. Witness List Panel I Ms. Elizabeth Fowler Acting Director Indian Health Service U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Rockville, Maryland Panel II The Honorable Jonathan Nez President, Navajo Nation Navajo Area Representative, National Indian Health Board Window Rock, Arizona The Honorable Kirk Francis President United South and Eastern Tribes Sovereignty Protection Fund Nashville, Tennessee The Honorable Fawn Sharp President National Congress of American Indians Washington, DC The Honorable Jarred-Michael Erickson Chairman Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation Nespelem, Washington Ms. Maureen Rosette Board Member National Council of Urban Indian Health Washington, DC Ms. Alberta Unok President and CEO Alaska Native Health Board Anchorage, Alaska Committee Notice: https://naturalresources.house.gov/hearings/hybrid-scip-legislative-hearing_july-28-2022

Public News Service
PNS Daily Newscast - July 26, 2022

Public News Service

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 6:01


Advocates say electrifying USPS vehicles will benefit workers, unemployment reform in Ohio would make benefits more inclusive, and environmental concerns slow proposed helium mining in the Navajo Nation.

Public News Service
PNS Daily Newscast - July 26, 2022

Public News Service

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 6:00


Advocates say electrifying USPS vehicles will benefit workers, unemployment reform in Ohio would make benefits more inclusive, and environmental concerns slow proposed helium mining in the Navajo Nation.

Hozho Speaks
Navajo Language and Preservance with Aaron Yazzie

Hozho Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 37:59


In this week's episode, Clayton interviews Aaron Yazzie, a Mechanical Engineer with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, where he designs mechanical systems for robotic space missions. He recently helped NASA work in collaboration with the Navajo Nation, to help designate some rocks and samples on Mars, based on the Navajo Language. Aaron tells us a little more about himself and what motivated him to make a career in one of the most prestigious  research and development centers.Support the show

1A
Best Of: Native Americans Are The Highlight Of This Summer's TV Slate

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 31:11


It took 30 years for "Dark Winds" to be adapted for television. The Tony Hillerman series revolves around the Navajo Nation and two tribal policemen trying to solve the murder of a Navajo woman.The show has already made history for its predominant Native cast and crew, already cinching up a second season. All episodes of the first season are available for streaming on AMC+.But this series isn't alone this summer in presenting Native Americans in a more authentic way. "Rutherford Falls" and "Reservation Dogs" are both returning for second seasons.Last year, UCLA's Hollywood Diversity Report found that indigenous people made up less than one percent of acting roles. They were virtually nonexistent in creative roles behind the camera.We talk about the evolution of the representation of Native people in movies and TV. We also discuss what the future of Native stories on screen looks like.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Living The Next Chapter: Authors Share Their Journey
E35 - Nancy Candea - Author of PRESENT - The Art of Living Boldly in the Second Half of Life

Living The Next Chapter: Authors Share Their Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 29:02


EPISODE 35 - From midlife on, women have been caught up in the myths of getting older—pain, anxiety, depression, memory loss, and becoming a lesser member of society.PRESENT compassionately guides the reader toDispel ageism myths that affect womenCherish her body & avoid chronic painExercise, eat well, and relax for a healthy brainReduce anxiety and depressionFind the power in both anger and forgivenessReconcile with regretFind deep connection in communicationDeclare a bold path forwardBy sharing stories, imparting knowledge, and cultivating self awareness, Nancy empowers the reader to reevaluate her beliefs, regain her physical health, process anger and regret, learn how to connect deeply, and declare a bold path for all the years ahead.More than just a mindfulness book or self care journal, PRESENT is a motivational book for women in the second half of life. It is filled with questions that challenge our thoughts on aging, self-acceptance, and life purpose for women over 40.About Nancy CandeaNancy Candea is a yoga therapist and life coach who helps women make peace with their past, find self-acceptance, and step wholeheartedly into their purpose. She has brought healing to women in shelters, to elite athletes, and to seven-figure households. Her work and impact with women is evident in the response that she has been getting in prominent online journals and the engagement in her social media. Her writing on health and healing in the second half of life has appeared in Elephant Journal, Tiny Buddha, Purpose Fairy, and other online journals.She is the founder of Yoga Impact, a non-profit that brings yoga into communities that lack wellness resources. Nancy, who specializes in yoga therapy for trauma, addiction, and chronic pain, has led trainings and retreats in Greece, Uganda, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, upcountry Hawaii, Detroit, and Newark, NJ. She created 2017's social justice summit on the Navajo Nation in Arizona. With her knowledge of ancient practices of mindfulness and movement, tempered by her study of modern physiology, she has brought new life to wounded veterans in New Jersey Veterans Administration hospitals, to elite athletes in Boulder, Colorado—and everyone in between. Nancy helps all her clients value their life experiences, organize their self-care, and reframe what getting older looks like.A retired dancer, Nancy's service-based dance business won her numerous grants. She was awarded an NEA grant for Life of a Star, her aerial dance, live-music production at the Kahilu Theater in Waimea, Hawaii (2006). To create this show, she worked with the Keck Observatory and interviewed some of the top specialists in star behavior.Nancy makes wellness accessible through her WildKind Health podcast, her free bi-monthly healthy lifestyle webinars, and her low-cost wellness platform, Underhill Life.Nancy's call is for women to live the second half of their lives confidently, utilizing the gifts and powerful knowledge they have gained.Nancy is a mother of two daughters and lives in Rockaway, New Jersey with her husband, the actor James Michael Reilly. When she is not working, she is writing, building, landscaping, drawing, basket-making, and sitting on the stone steps of Underhill looking at the sunrise.https://nancycandea.com/https://livingthenextchapter.com/podcast presented by https://truemediasolutions.ca/

The Poetry Magazine Podcast
Esther Belin in Conversation with Manny Loley

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 35:11


This week, Esther Belin speaks with Manny Loley, a Diné poet and storyteller who writes in both the Navajo and English languages. Belin and Loley talk about stories as medicine, the unique poetics of the Navajo language and the meanings and musicality that don't translate into English, and the importance and industriousness of queer people in Diné creation stories and in the Navajo Nation today. Loley also shares why his most important readers and listeners are his grandma, his mom, and the land. Loley is ‘Áshįįhi born for Tó Baazhní'ázhí; his maternal grandparents are the Tódích'íi'nii, and his paternal grandparents are the Kinyaa'áanii. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in English and Literary Arts at the University of Denver, and he serves as the director of the Emerging Diné Writers' Institute. You can read two of Loley's poems in Navajo and English in the July/August 2022 issue of Poetry, in print and online.

Let's Talk About Water
Engineering a New Water World

Let's Talk About Water

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 16:25 Very Popular


In our third bonus episode of the summer season, we look back at the innovative ways people are sourcing their freshwater, from building home water systems on the Navajo Nation to engineering a state of the art wastewater treatment facility in Orange County. We hear what improvements need to be made to America's aging water infrastructure. And we look at the damage that over-engineering has done through dams and diversions, turning our attention to nature-based solutions to help restore the broken water cycle.   This mini-episode features the voices of Emma Robbins, Peter Gleick, Mike Markus and Sandra Postel. You can find their full episodes from our previous seasons here:   S2E1 (COVID-19 & our Water Supply) featuring Emma Robbins: https://www.whataboutwater.org/s02e01/ S2E6 (Bide(n) Time for America's Water Resources) featuring Peter Gleick: https://www.whataboutwater.org/s02e06/ S3E4 (Replenishing a Broken Water Cycle) featuring Sandra Postel: https://www.whataboutwater.org/s03e04/ S3E7 (Debunking ‘Toilet to Tap') featuring Mike Markus: https://www.whataboutwater.org/s03e07/ We'd love to hear your thoughts about our show in our What About Water Listener Survey. As a thank you, we will plant a tree through One Tree Planted for each survey our podcast listeners complete.

The Takeaway
Deep Dive: Water (Rebroadcast)

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 45:56


In this week's Deep Dive with Dorian Warren, Melissa and Dorian take an in-depth look at water insecurity, access and cleanliness. They start off with Sera Young, associate professor anthropology and global health at northwestern University. Then Josina Morita, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District in Cook County about how the infrastructure bill will aid in improving water systems.  Jonathan Nez, president of the Navajo Nation and Bidtah Becker, Associate attorney with the Navajo tribal utility authority join for a discussion of water issues in Indian Country, with a specific focus on Navajo Nation. Reverend Roslyn Bouier, executive director of the Brightmoor Connection Client Choice Food Pantry explains how water shut offs affect the citizens of Brightmoor in Detroit, Michigan.  And finally Tom Mueller, research assistant professor of geography and environmental sustainability at the University of Oklahoma will discuss how water insecurity and plumbing poverty affects rural area.  Some music from this episode by: I Think Like Midnight (http://www.ithinklikemidnight.com/) & The Sometime Boys (https://www.thesometimeboys.com/)

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast
279: Who Are the Kids Being Trafficked, with Kendra Tankersley-Davis

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 32:45 Very Popular


Sandie is joined by Kendra Tankersley-Davis to discuss the characteristics and signs of youth who are identified as being commercially sexually exploited. Sandie and Kendra provide statistics on what CSEC looks like in Orange County, risk factors for caregivers to look out for, and tips for individuals interested in becoming a foster/resource parent. Kendra Tankersley-Davis Kendra has worked with at-risk children and families, who are involved in the child welfare, probation, or mental health systems due to complex trauma, for over sixteen years. She has worked in Human Trafficking supporting survivors in transitioning out of the life, educating communities, teaching preventative methods, and providing advocacy for over fifteen years. Kendra has a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice and a Master's Degree in Family and Human Development; she is currently The Vice President of External Affairs at Crittenton Services for Children and Families. Key Points For youth who experience trauma, often their development can stop or be hindered at that age of experience. 80% of the CSEC (commercially sexually exploited children) who were identified in Orange County were from Orange County The biggest risk factor for exploitation is prior abuse and neglect. Training to recognize the signs of possible exploitation and/or abuse for anyone interacting with youth is important to take action and prevent further harm. Resources Crittenton Services for Family and Children Smart Mamas, Safe Kids - OC Parent Anti-Human Trafficking Training EP. 278 - Identifying and Interacting with Minor Victims of Human Trafficking, with Dr. Jodi Quas Love the show? Consider supporting us on Patreon! Become a Patron Transcript Dave [00:00:00] You're listening to the Ending Human Trafficking podcast. This is episode number 279, Who Are the Kids Being Trafficked, with Kendra Tankersley-Davis. Production Credits [00:00:11] Produced by Innovate Learning, maximizing human potential. Dave [00:00:31] Welcome to the Ending Human Trafficking podcast. My name is Dave Stachowiak. Sandie [00:00:37] And my name is Sandie Morgan. Dave [00:00:39] And this is the show where we empower you to study the issues, be a voice, and make a difference in ending human trafficking. Sandie, today we are turning our attention of our conversation towards kids. The most important people, perhaps in this conversation. One of the reasons we continue to come back to the topic of children in our conversation about ending human trafficking. Today, an expert with us who's going to help us to really understand this population better and some of the implications that we can all learn from. I'm so pleased to welcome Kendra Tankersley-Davis. She is an adjunct professor for the Global Center for Women and Justice here at Vanguard University. Kendra has worked with at-risk children and families who are involved in the child welfare probation or mental health systems due to complex trauma. And she's been doing the work for over 16 years. She has worked in human trafficking, supporting survivors and transitioning out of the life, educating communities, teaching preventative methods, and providing advocacy for over 15 years. Kendra has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice and a master's degree in Family and Human Development. She's currently the Vice President of External Affairs at Crittenton Services for Children and Families. Kendra, what a pleasure to have you with us. Kendra [00:01:53] Thank you so much. I'm very excited to be here. I listen to the podcast pretty much weekly, so I'm excited to be a guest. Thank you so much. Sandie [00:02:02] I'm really happy to have you, Kendra. And we just got to have a whole week together last month with our faculty student trip to Navajo Nation,