Podcasts about developer advocate

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Latest podcast episodes about developer advocate

The Happy Engineer
067: How Data Science and Machine Learning Lead to Optimizing Your Life with Kristen Kehrer

The Happy Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 51:36


What does the future of data science and machine learning have to teach you about life?   How can you take the best parts of your work life and use them to optimize your home life?   In this episode, we follow the data and learn as we go with Developer Advocate at CometML, Kristen Kehrer. She has been awarded “LinkedIn Top Voice” in data science and continues to share remarkable content with her audience of over 88,000 technical leaders.   Her passion for machine learning is mirrored by passion for optimizing her life, and we explore both together today.   Kristen is a former Data Science instructor at UC Berkeley Ext, Faculty/SME at Emeritus Institute of Management and Founder of Data Moves Me, LLC. Kristen holds an MS in Applied Statistics from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and a BS in Mathematics.   So press play and let's chat… it's time to take a look at the data of our lives and iterate to the next level!   >> Then join The Happy Engineer Community online and get access to bonus content and live coaching in our free group >>   https://www.facebook.com/groups/thehappyengineer    ==========================   SHOW NOTES: Find all the links from this episode and more >>   www.theHappyEngineerPodcast.com   ==========================   COACHING: Ready for promotion, more money, and more FUN in your career? Then let's chat!   Book your FREE session for podcast listeners at www.CareerClarityCall.com   ==========================   Rate, Review, and Follow   “I love Zach and The Happy Engineer Podcast.” If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing the show! This helps me support more engineers -- just like you -- take the next step toward the career and life that they desire. On Apple Podcasts, click our show, scroll to the bottom, tap to rate with five stars, and select “Write a Review.” Then be sure to let me know what you loved most about the episode!   Remember, we only spread our message when you share this episode with others that need it. So if you enjoy this podcast, please SHARE it on your social media and tag @TheHappyEngineerPodcast so I can say hi and thank you.    Also, if you haven't done so already, subscribe to the podcast. I'll be releasing a lot of new content including bonus episodes to the feed and, if you're not subscribed, there's a good chance you'll miss out. Subscribe now!   For all the extras related to this episode, remember to visit >>   www.theHappyEngineerPodcast.com

Scaling DevTools
Developer User Research extends your runway, with Ana Hevesi

Scaling DevTools

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 17:34


Ana Hevesi is a Developer Experience Researcher and Ecosystem Consultant. She has experience marshalling technical products and communities at companies including Stack Overflow, Nodejitsu and MongoDB.Scaling DevTools is the podcast that investigates how DevTools go from zero to one. Created by Jack Bridger, founder of BitReach. BitReach helps DevTool companies reach more developers. In this series, Jack will explore how startups sell to developers, build tools and become successful.What we cover An introduction to developer user research Research at DevTools startups How to use findings and insights How user research can help extend runway at a startup Where to hear from Ana Twitter: @anthrocypher https://www.anahevesi.com/ Tools Anna lovesDovetailWhere to hear from us Twitter: @JackSBridger https://blog.bitreach.io Newsletter: https://www.bitreach.io/

Breaking Changes
The Opsification of the Enterprise with Viktor Farcic, Developer Advocate, Upbound

Breaking Changes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 42:06


In this episode of Breaking Changes, Viktor Farcic of Upbound joins Kin to talk about the opsification of the enterprise and how we need to provide Heroku-like guardrails for all of the infrastructures that our teams need access to, helping abstract away the increasing complexity of operations and allow developers to focus on what truly matters to the business.

Scaling DevTools
What is good developer marketing? With Nimrod Kramer from Daily.dev

Scaling DevTools

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 16:43


Nimrod Kramer is the CEO at Daily.dev. Daily.dev is a community of developers getting together and exploring Dev news.Scaling DevTools is the podcast that investigates how DevTools go from zero to one. Created by Jack Bridger, founder of BitReach. BitReach helps DevTool companies reach more developers. In this series, Jack will explore how startups sell to developers, build tools and become successful.What we cover(00:39): Why has Daily.dev been such a sensation from your perspective?(02:13): Could you share your thoughts on good developer marketing and what it is?(04:52): Could you talk about how you work with Francesco and how that's been working?(07:28) Could you talk a little bit about examples?(09:19) What is a developer?(13:12) Have you got any examples of companies that have created really successful marketing campaigns with Daily.dev?Where to hear from Nimrod Twitter: @NimrodKramer https://daily.dev/ Where to hear from us Twitter: @JackSBridger https://blog.bitreach.io Newsletter: https://www.bitreach.io/

Jon Myer Podcast
Ep#89 The Inside Look at Empowering Developers with Cobus Bernard

Jon Myer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 52:56


What does it take to become a Sr. Developer Advocate and how is #aws Empowering developers to "think big"? Join us as we sit down with Cobus Bernard from AWS and how he shares his experience moving from Africa to Seattle! AWS has CloudFormation, right? Yes. How are you? Uh, Sr DA talking about Terraform and why not CloudFormation? Um, it's what I use the most. It's one of those things where use the tool that works for you. And we're not gonna tell you, listen, a lot of people use Terraform." ~Cobus

Jon Myer Podcast
Ep#89 The Inside Look at Empowering Developers with Cobus Bernard

Jon Myer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 52:56


What does it take to become a Sr. Developer Advocate and how is #aws Empowering developers to "think big"? Join us as we sit down with Cobus Bernard from AWS and how he shares his experience moving from Africa to Seattle! AWS has CloudFormation, right? Yes. How are you? Uh, Sr DA talking about Terraform and why not CloudFormation? Um, it's what I use the most. It's one of those things where use the tool that works for you. And we're not gonna tell you, listen, a lot of people use Terraform." ~Cobus

COMPRESSEDfm
82 | Leveraging Blockchain Infrastructure for Decentralized, Web3 Applications

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 49:42


Anthony Campolo (AJC) joins us to talk about leveraging blockchain infrastructure for decentralized Web3 applications and his experience working as a Developer Advocate at QuickNode.SponsorsDaily.devdaily.dev is where developers grow together. It provides a community-based feed of the best developer news, helping you stay up-to-date. daily.dev aggregates hundreds of sources every few minutes and creates a personal feed for you according to your interests, whether it's web dev, data science, or Elixir. Anything you might be interested in, it has the content for you.Check out daily.devHashnodeCreating a developer blog is crucial in creating an online presence for yourself. It's proof of work for your future employer. Hashnode makes it easy to start a blog in seconds on your custom domain for free. It's fully optimized for developers and supports writing in Markdown, rich embeds, publishing from GitHub repository, syntax highlighting, and edge caching with Next.js blogs deployed on Vercel. On top of these, Hashnode is free from paywall, ads, and sign-up prompts.Hashnode is a community of developers, engineers, and people in tech. Your article gets instant readership from their growing community.Check out Hashnode, and join the community.Show Notes00:00:00 - Intro00:04:06 - Bootcamp Experiences00:09:59  - Sponsor Shoutout: Hashnode00:10:45 - Experience Working on the Core Team of Redwood.js00:18:09 - Sponsor Shoutout: Daily.dev00:19:10 - Defining Web3, Blockchain, and Cryptocurrencies00:27:24 - What is QuickNode? - Blockchain API and Node Infrastructure00:28:54  - The Future of Web3?00:35:48 - Building a Hello World Smart Contract00:43:04 - Closing Thoughts on Web3 and the BlockchainLinksAnthony on Twitter - https://twitter.com/ajcwebdevQuickNode - https://www.quicknode.com/How to Create a dApp on Avalanche's Fuji Testnet with QuickNode: https://www.quicknode.com/guides/web3-sdks/how-to-create-a-dapp-on-avalanches-fuji-testnet-with-quicknodeA First Look at Deploying Smart Contracts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvvMWGPJVUIA Crash Course in Web3 for Web2 Developers: https://youtube.com/watch?v=kl5nNRKemkY

In the Loop: A WordPress Podcast by Blackbird Digital
19: All-In on Gutenberg with Ryan Welcher

In the Loop: A WordPress Podcast by Blackbird Digital

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 69:04


Cory interviews Ryan Welcher, a Developer Advocate at Automattic focusing on the Gutenberg Project, as a special follow-up to our last episode, titled “We Like Gutenberg, We Swear!”. We talk about his WCUS talk, being a Developer Advocate, how to write to post meta with custom blocks, scaffolding with the @wordpress/create-block package, the convenience of ACF fields, and more. ## Links Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/ryanwelchercodes YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/RyanWelcherCodes Twitter: https://twitter.com/ryanwelcher Website: https://ryanwelcher.com Discord: https://discord.gg/RYtFaYbMRM (03:34) WCUS 2022 Extending WordPress with SlotFill: https://youtu.be/ql4hhXWcdik?t=27235 (08:34) Twitch repo: https://github.com/ryanwelcher/twitch (30:28) HTML Walker proposal: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2022/08/19/a-new-system-for-simply-and-reliably-updating-html-attributes/ (33:34) @wordpress/create-block package: https://developer.wordpress.org/block-editor/reference-guides/packages/packages-create-block/ (1:03:50) Query Block variations PR: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/pull/43632 (1:04:55) Twitch Code Repo for custom field block: https://github.com/ryanwelcher/twitch/tree/trunk/plugins/custom-field-block/src (1:05:09) Integrating a custom post type into Gutenberg and Full Site Editing: https://youtu.be/vr3wgD9IZRA ## Upcoming WP Events WordPress Accessibility Day, Nov 2-3: https://wpaccessibility.day/ WordFest Live, Nov 18: https://www.wordfest.live/

Scaling DevTools
Critical path infra for developers with Megan Reynolds from Crane

Scaling DevTools

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 15:12


Megan Reynolds is an investor at Crane Venture Partners. Crane are an early stage VC who have invested in developer tools such as Gitpod, Encore and Novu. Scaling DevTools is the podcast that investigates how DevTools go from zero to one. Created by Jack Bridger, founder of BitReach. BitReach helps DevTool companies reach more developers. In this series, Jack will explore how startups sell to developers, build tools and become successful.What we cover What is happening in the market right now? Critical path for developers What can devtools do to make themselves more critical? Understanding your landscape What are the good founders doing? Gitpod example Why Megan invested in Novu What Megan is looking for in devtools Where to hear from Megan Twitter: @meganreyno https://crane.vc/ Dev Tools mentioned Gitpod - open source remote developer collaboration Gitpod // Factorial case study Novu - open source notification infrastructure Encore - backend development engine Firebase - backend as a service Supabase (open source alternative to firebase) Posthog (open source alternative to mixpanel) Where to hear from us Twitter: @JackSBridger https://blog.bitreach.io Newsletter: https://www.bitreach.io/

Papo Sobremesa
T04EP14 | Que diabos é um DevRel?

Papo Sobremesa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 44:30


O tema do episódio de hoje é bastante comentado, porém, nem sempre compreendido. Estamos falando do Developer Relations! Também conhecido como DevRel. Para falar sobre o DevRel, nosso host Rafael Ireno conversará com William Grasel, Staff Engineer do iFood, Ana Cunha, Developer Advocate da AWS e, uma celebridade do mundo de tecnologia, criador de conteúdo-extraordinaire, Gabs […]

DevOps Speakeasy Podcast
S03E30: #DevOpsSpeakeasy at #swampUP San Diego 2022 with Tony Loehr

DevOps Speakeasy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 9:35


Tony Loehr, Developer Advocate at CyCode, discusses the strengths of the CyCode platform in the software development life cycle to secure software delivery.

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Reddit Sentiment Analysis with Apache Kafka-Based Microservices

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 35:23 Transcription Available


How do you analyze Reddit sentiment with Apache Kafka® and microservices? Bringing the fresh perspective of someone who is both new to Kafka and the industry, Shufan Liu, nascent Developer Advocate at Confluent, discusses projects he has worked on during his summer internship—a Cluster Linking extension to a conceptual data pipeline project, and a microservice-based Reddit sentiment-analysis project. Shufan demonstrates that it's possible to quickly get up to speed with the tools in the Kafka ecosystem and to start building something productive early on in your journey.Shufan's Cluster Linking project extends a demo by Danica Fine (Senior Developer Advocate, Confluent) that uses a Kafka-based data pipeline to address the challenge of automatic houseplant watering. He discusses his contribution to the project and shares details in his blog—Data Enrichment in Existing Data Pipelines Using Confluent Cloud.The second project Shufan presents is a sentiment analysis system that gathers data from a given subreddit, then assigns the data a sentiment score. He points out that its results would be hard to duplicate manually by simply reading through a subreddit—you really need the assistance of AI. The project consists of four microservices:A user input service that collects requests in a Kafka topic, which consist of the desired subreddit, along with the dates between which data should be collectedAn API polling service that fetches the requests from the user input service, collects the relevant data from the Reddit API, then appends it to a new topicA sentiment analysis service that analyzes the appended topic from the API polling service using the Python library NLTK; it calculates averages with ksqlDBA results-displaying service that consumes from a topic with the calculationsInteresting subreddits that Shufan has analyzed for sentiment include gaming forums before and after key releases; crypto and stock trading forums at various meaningful points in time; and sports-related forums both before the season and several games into it. EPISODE LINKSData Enrichment in Existing Data Pipelines Using Confluent CloudWatch the video version of this podcastKris Jenkins' TwitterStreaming Audio Playlist Join the Confluent CommunityLearn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent DeveloperLive demo: Intro to Event-Driven Microservices with ConfluentUse PODCAST100 to get an additional $100 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details) 

Scaling DevTools
Developer video for startups with Richard Moot from Square

Scaling DevTools

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 14:43


Richard Moot is the Head of Developer Advocacy at Square. Square helps millions of sellers run their business-from secure credit card processing to point of sale solutions. Scaling DevTools is the podcast that investigates how DevTools go from zero to one. Created by Jack Bridger, founder of BitReach. BitReach helps DevTool companies reach more developers. In this series, Jack will explore how startups sell to developers, build tools and become successful.What we cover(00:32): Could you tell us about the work that you're doing on YouTube with Square?(01:00): If a startup is thinking of getting started with YouTube, how would you suggest they get started?(03:39): Could you talk us through the types of tasks that you or other members of the team do?(07:28) Could you talk a little bit about examples?(09:16) How do you approach them quality vs quantity when it comes to good examples?(11:52) Where and how does fun come into it all?Where to hear from Richard Twitter: @wootmoot https://squareup.com https://developer.squareup.com/us/en https://www.youtube.com/c/SquareDev Where to hear from us Twitter: @JackSBridger https://blog.bitreach.io Newsletter: https://www.bitreach.io/

The MongoDB Podcast
Ep. 126 C# Saved My Life with Luce Carter

The MongoDB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 31:31


Luce Carter shares details of her journey to becoming a highly successful Conference Speaker, and Developer Advocate. You may find it surprising to learn that someone on the Autistic Spectrum and who was diagnosed with ADHD has managed to become so successful in this role. She attributes the kindness of friends in the tech community who introduced her to programming and specifically C#. Conversation Highlights[1:50] Luce Introduction[2:54] Luce talks about her specialization on the Developer Relations Team[4:14] Luce previously worked as a Developer and in QA[7:24] Luce credits learning C# as saving her life[12:09] What Luce wishes others knew about Autism[16:27] Luce explains the "spoons" theory[18:00] Luce talks about AD/HD and Imposter Syndrome[21:37] Luce talks about the book she's writing[25:17] Luce gives advice

Screaming in the Cloud
Trivy and Open Source Communities with Anaïs Urlichs

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 36:15


About AnaïsAnaïs is a Developer Advocate at Aqua Security, where she contributes to Aqua's cloud native open source projects. When she is not advocating DevOps best practices, she runs her own YouTube Channel centered around cloud native technologies. Before joining Aqua, Anais worked as SRE at Civo, a cloud native service provider, where she helped enhance the infrastructure for hundreds of tenant clusters. As CNCF ambassador of the year 2021, her passion lies in making tools and platforms more accessible to developers and community members.Links Referenced: Aqua Security: https://www.aquasec.com/ Aqua Open Source YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AquaSecurityOpenSource Personal blog: https://anaisurl.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while, when I start trying to find guests to chat with me and basically suffer my various slings and arrows on this show, I encounter something that I've never really had the opportunity to explore further. And today's guest leads me in just such a direction. Anaïs is an open-source developer advocate at Aqua Security, and when I was asking her whether or not she wanted to talk about various topics, one of the first thing she said was, “Don't ask me much about AWS because I've never used it,” which, oh my God. Anaïs, thank you for joining me. You must be so very happy never to have dealt with the morass of AWS.Anaïs: [laugh]. Yes, I'm trying my best to stay away from it. [laugh].Corey: Back when I got into the cloud space, for lack of a better term, AWS was sort of really the only game in town unless you wanted to start really squinting hard at what you define cloud as. I mean yes, I could have gone into Salesforce or something, but I was already sad and angry all the time. These days, you can very much go all in-on cloud. In fact, you were a CNCF ambassador, if I'm not mistaken. So, you absolutely are in the infrastructure cloud space, but you haven't dealt with AWS. That is just an interesting path. Have you found others who have gone down that same road, or are you sort of the first of a new breed?Anaïs: I think to find others who are in a similar position or have a similar experience, as you do, you first have to talk about your experience, and this is the first time, or maybe the second, that I'm openly [laugh] saying it on something that will be posted live, like, to the internet. Before I, like, I tried to stay away from mentioning it at all, do the best that I can because I'm at this point where I'm so far into my cloud-native Kubernetes journey that I feel like I should have had to deal with AWS by now, and I just didn't. And I'm doing my best and I'm very successful in avoiding it. [laugh]. So, that's where I am. Yeah.Corey: We're sort of on opposite sides of a particular fence because I spend entirely too much time being angry at AWS, but I've never really touched Kubernetes and anger. I mean, I see it in a lot of my customer accounts and I get annoyed at its data transfer bills and other things that it causes in an economic sense, but as far as the care and feeding of a production cluster, back in my SRE days, I had very old-school architectures. It's, “Oh, this is an ancient system, just like grandma used to make,” where we had the entire web tier, then a job applic—or application server tier, and then a database at the end, and everyone knew where everything was. And then containers came out of nowhere, and it seemed like okay, this solves a bunch of problems and introduces a whole bunch more. How do I orchestrate them? How do I ensure that they're healthy?And then ah, Kubernetes was the answer. And for a while, it seemed like no matter what the problem was, Kubernetes was going to be the answer because people were evangelizing it pretty hard. And now I see it almost everywhere that I turn. What's your journey been like? How did you get into the weeds of, “You know what I want to do when I grow up? That's right. I want to work on container orchestration systems.” I have a five-year-old. She has never once said that because I don't abuse my children by making them learn how clouds work. How did you wind up doing what you do?Anaïs: It's funny that you mention that. So, I'm actually of the generation of engineers who doesn't know anything else but Kubernetes. So, when you mentioned that you used to use something before, I don't really know what that looks like. I know that you can still deploy systems without Kubernetes, but I have no idea how. My journey into the cloud-native space started out of frustration from the previous industry that I was working at.So, I was working for several years as developer advocate in the open-source blockchain cryptocurrency space and it's highly similar to all of the cliches that you hear online and across the news. And out of this frustration, [laugh] I was looking at alternatives. One of them was either going into game development, into the gaming industry, or the cloud-native space and infrastructure development and deployment. And yeah, that's where I ended up. So, at the end of 2020, I joined a startup in the cloud-native space and started my social media journey.Corey: One of the things that I found that Kubernetes solved for—and to be clear, Kubernetes really came into its own after I was doing a lot more advisory work and a lot more consulting style activity rather than running my own environments, but there's an entire universe of problems that the modern day engineer never has to think about due to, partially cloud and also Kubernetes as well, which is the idea of hardware or node failure. I've had middle of the night driving across Los Angeles in a panic getting to the data center because the disk array on the primary database had degraded because the drive failed. That doesn't happen anymore. And clouds have mostly solved that. It's okay, drives fail, but yeah, that's the problem for some people who live in Virginia or Oregon. I don't have to think about it myself.But you do have to worry about instances failing; what if the primary database instance dies? Well, when everything lives in a container then that container gets moved around in the stateless way between things, well great, you really only have to care instead about okay, what if all of my instances die? Or, what if my code is really crappy? To which my question is generally, what do you mean, ‘if?' All of us write crappy code.That's the nature of the universe. We open-source only the small subset that we are not actively humiliated by, which is, in a lot of ways, what you're focusing on now, over at Aqua Sec, you are an advocate for open-source. One of the most notable projects that come out of that is Trivy, if I'm pronouncing that correctly.Anaïs: Yeah, that's correct. Yeah. So, Trivy is our main open-source project. It's an all-in-one cloud-native security scanner. And it's actually—it's focused on misconfiguration issues, so it can help you to build more robust infrastructure definitions and configurations.So ideally, a lot of the things that you just mentioned won't happen, but it obviously, highly depends on so many different factors in the cloud-native space. But definitely misconfigurations of one of those areas that can easily go wrong. And also, not just that you have data might cease to exist, but the worst thing or, like, as bad might be that it's completely exposed online. And they are databases of different exposures where you can see all the kinds of data of information from just health data to dating apps, just being online available because the IP address is not protected, right? Things like that. [laugh].Corey: We all get those emails that start with, “Your security is very important to us,” and I know just based on that opening to an email, that the rest of that email is going to explain how security was not very important to you folks. And it's the apology, “Oops, we have messed up,” email. Now, the whole world of automated security scanners is… well, it's crowded. There are a number of different services out there that the cloud providers themselves offer a bunch of these, a whole bunch of scareware vendors at the security conferences do as well. Taking a quick glance at Trivy, one of the problems I see with it, from a cloud provider perspective, is that I see nothing that it does that winds up costing extra money on your cloud bill that you then have to pay to the cloud provider, so maybe they'll put a pull request in for that one of these days. But my sarcasm aside, what is it that differentiates Trivy from a bunch of other offerings in various spaces?Anaïs: So, there are multiple factors. If we're looking from an enterprise perspective, you could be using one of the in-house scanners from any of the cloud providers available, depending which you're using. The thing is, they are not generally going to be the ones who have a dedicated research team that provides the updates based on the vulnerabilities they find across the space. So, with an open-source security scanner or from a dedicated company, you will likely have more up-to-date information in your scans. Also, lots of different companies, they're using Trivy under the hood ultimately, or for their own scans.I can link a few where you can also find them in a Trivy repository. But ultimately, a lot of companies rely on Trivy and other open-source security scanners under the hood because they are from dedicated companies. Now, the other part to Trivy and why you might want to consider using Trivy is that in larger teams, you will have different people dealing with different components of your infrastructure, of your deployments, and you could end up having to use multiple different security scanners for all your different components from your container images that you're using, whether or not they are secure, whether or not they're following best practices that you defined to your infrastructure-as-code configurations, to you're running deployments inside of your cluster, for instance. So, each of those different stages across your lifecycle, from development to runtime, will maybe either need different security scanners, or you could use one security scanner that does it all. So, you could have in a team more knowledge sharing, you could have dedicated people who know how to use the tool and who can help out across a team across the lifecycle, and similar. So, that's one of the components that you might want to consider.Another thing is how mature is a tool, right? A lot of cloud providers, what they end up doing is they provide you with a solution, but it's nice to decoupled from anything else that you're using. And especially in the cloud-native space, you're heavily reliant on open-source tools, such as for your observability stack, right? Coming from Site Reliability Engineering also myself, I love using metrics and Grafana. And for me, if anything open-source from Loki to accessing my logs, to Grafana to dashboards, and all their integrations.I love that and I want to use the same tools that I'm using for everything else, also for my security tools. I don't want to have the metrics for my security tools visualized in a different solution to my reliability metrics for my application, right? Because that ultimately makes it more difficult to correlate metrics. So, those are, like, some of the factors that you might want to consider when you're choosing a security scanner.Corey: When you talk about thinking about this, from the perspective of an SRE is—I mean, this is definitely an artifact of where you come from and how you approach this space. Because in my world, when you have ten web servers, five application servers, and two database servers and you wind up with a problem in production, how do you fix this? Oh, it's easy. You log into one of those nodes and poke around and start doing diagnostics in production. In a containerized world, you generally can't do that, or there's a problem on a container, and by the time you're aware of that, that container hasn't existed for 20 minutes.So, how do you wind up figuring out what happens? And instrumenting for telemetry and metrics and observability, particularly at scale becomes way more important than it ever was, for me. I mean, my version of monitoring was always Nagios, which was the original Call of Duty that wakes you up at two in the morning when the hard drive fails. The world has thankfully moved beyond that and a bunch of ways. But it's not first nature for me. It's always, “Oh, yeah, that's right. We have a whole telemetry solution where I can go digging into.” My first attempt is always, oh, how do I get into this thing and poke it with a stick? Sometimes that's helpful, but for modern applications, it really feels like it's not.Anaïs: Totally. When we're moving to an infrastructure to an environment where we can deploy multiple times a day, right, and update our application multiple times a day, multiple times a day, we can introduce new security issues or other things can go wrong, right? So, I want to see—as much as I want to see all of the other failures, I want to see any security-related issues that might be deployed alongside those updates at the same frequency, right?Corey: The problem that I see across all this stuff, though, is there are a bunch of tools out there that people install, but then don't configure because, “Oh, well, I bought the tool. The end.” I mean, I think it was reported almost ten years ago or so on the big Target breach that they wound up installing some tool—I want to say FireEye, but please don't quote me on that—and it wound up firing off a whole bunch of alerts, and they figured was just noise, so they turned it all off. And it turned out no, no, this was an actual breach in progress. But people are so used to all the alarms screaming at them, that they don't dig into this.I mean, one of the original security scanners was Nessus. And I seen a lot of Nessus reports because for a long time, what a lot of crappy consultancies would do is they would white-label the output of whatever it was that Nessus said and deliver that in as the report. So, you'd wind up with 700 pages of quote-unquote, “Security issues.” And you'd have to flip through to figure out that, ah, this supports a somewhat old SSL negotiation protocol, and you're focusing on that instead of the oh, and by the way, the primary database doesn't have a password set. Like, it winds up just obscuring it because there is so much. How does Trivy approach avoiding the information overload problem?Anaïs: That's a great question because everybody's complaining about vulnerability fatigue, of them, for the first time, scanning their container images and workloads and seeing maybe even hundreds of vulnerabilities. And one of the things that can be done to counteract that right from the beginning is investing your time into looking at the different flags and configurations that you can do before actually deploying Trivy to, for example, your cluster. That's one part of it. The other part is I mentioned earlier, you would use a security scan at different parts of your deployment. So, it's really about integrating scanning not just once you—like, in your production environment, once you've deployed everything, but using it already before and empowering engineers to actually use it on their machines.Now, they can either decide to do it or not; it's not part of most people's job to do security scanning, but as you move along, the more you do, the more you can reduce the noise and then ultimately, when you deploy Trivy, for example, inside of your cluster, you can do a lot of configuration such as scanning just for critical vulnerabilities, only scanning for vulnerabilities that already have a fix available, and everything else should be ignored. Those are all factors and flags that you can place into Trivy, for instance, and make it easier. Now, with Trivy, you won't have automated PRs and everything out of the box; you would have to set up the actions or, like, the ways to mitigate those vulnerabilities manually by yourself with tools, as well as integrating Trivy with your existing stack, and similar. But then obviously, if you want to have something more automated, if you want to have something that does more for you in the background, that's when you want to use to an enterprise solution and shift to something like Aqua Security Enterprise Platform that actually provides you with the automated way of mitigating vulnerabilities where you don't have to know much about it and it just gives you the solution and provides you with a PR with the updates that you need in your infrastructure-as-code configurations to mitigate the vulnerability [unintelligible 00:15:52]?Corey: I think that's probably a very fair answer because let's be serious when you're running a bank or someone for whom security matters—and yes, yes, I know, security should matter for everyone, but let's be serious, I care a little bit less about the security impact of, for example, I don't know, my Twitter for Pets nonsense, than I do a dating site where people are not out about their orientation or whatnot. Like, there is a world of difference between the security concerns there. “Oh, no, you might be able to shitpost as me if you compromise my lasttweetinaws.com Twitter client that I put out there for folks to use.” Okay, great. That is not the end of the world compared to other stuff.By the time you're talking about things that are critically important, yeah, you want to spend money on this, and you want to have an actual full-on security team. But open-source tools like this are terrific for folks who are just getting started or they're building something for fun themselves and as it turns out, don't have a full security budget for their weird late-night project. I think that there's a beautiful, I guess, spectrum, as far as what level of investment you can make into security. And it's nice to see the innovation continued happening in the space.Anaïs: And you just mentioned that dedicated security companies, they likely have a research team that's deploying honeypots and seeing what happens to them, right? Like, how are attackers using different vulnerabilities and misconfigurations and what can be done to mitigate them. And that ultimately translates into the configurations of the open-source tool as well. So, if you're using, for instance, a security scanner that doesn't have an enterprise company with a research team behind it, then you might have different input into the data of that security scanner than if you do, right? So, these are, like, additional considerations that you might want to take when choosing a scanner. And also that obviously depends on what scanning you want to do, on the size of your company, and similar, right?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: Something that I do find fairly interesting is that you started off, as you say, doing DevRel in the open-source blockchain world, then you went to work as an SRE, and then went back to doing DevRel-style work. What got you into SRE and what got you out of SRE, other than the obvious having worked in SRE myself and being unhappy all the time? I kid, but what was it that got you into that space and then out of it?Anaïs: Yeah. Yeah, but no, it's a great question. And it's, I guess, also was shaped my perspective on different tools and, like, the user experience of different tools. But ultimately, I first worked in the cloud-native space for an enterprise tool as developer advocate. And I did not like the experience of working for a paid solution. Doing developer advocacy for it, it felt wrong in a lot of ways. A lot of times you were required to do marketing work in those situations.And that kind of got me out of developer advocacy into SRE work. And now I was working partially or mainly as SRE, and then on the side, I was doing some presentations in developer advocacy. However, that split didn't quite work, either. And I realized that the value that I add to a project is really the way I convey information, which I can't do if I'm busy fixing the infrastructure, right? I can't convey the information of as much of how the infrastructure has been fixed as I can if I'm working with an engineering team and then doing developer advocacy, solely developer advocacy within the engineering team.So, how I ultimately got back into developer advocacy was just simply by being reached out to by my manager at Aqua Security, and Itay telling me, him telling me that he has a role available and if I want to join his team. And it was open-source-focused. Given that I started my career for several years working in the open-source space and working with engineers, contributing to open-source tools, it was kind of what I wanted to go back to, what I really enjoy doing. And yeah, that's how that came about [laugh].Corey: For me, I found that I enjoy aspects of the technology part, but I find I enjoy talking to people way more. And for me, the gratifying moment that keeps me going, believe it or not, is not necessarily helping giant companies spend slightly less money on another giant company. It's watching people suddenly understand something they didn't before, it's watching the light go on in their eyes. And that's been addictive to me for a long time. I've also found that the best way for me to learn something is to teach someone else.I mean, the way I learned Git was that I foolishly wound up proposing a talk, “Terrible Ideas in Git”—we'll teach it by counterexample—four months before the talk. And they accepted it, and crap, I'd better learn enough get to give this talk effectively. I don't recommend this because if you miss the deadline, I checked, they will not move the conference for you. But there really is something to be said for watching someone learn something by way of teaching it to them.Anaïs: It's actually a common strategy for a lot of developer advocates of making up a talk and then waiting whether or not it will get accepted. [laugh] and once it gets accepted, that's when you start learning the tool and trying to figure it out. Now, it's not a good strategy, obviously, to do that because people can easily tell that you just did that for a conference. And—Corey: Sounds to me, like, you need to get better at bluffing. I kid.Anaïs: [laugh].Corey: I kid. Don't bluff your way through conference talks as a general rule. It tends not to go well. [laugh].Anaïs: No. It's a bad idea. It's a really bad idea. And so, I ultimately started learning the technologies or, like, the different tools and projects in the cloud-native space. And there are lots, if you look at the CNCF landscape, right? But just trying to talk myself through them on my YouTube channel. So, my early videos on my channel, it's just very much on the go of me looking for the first time at somebody's documentation and not making any sense out of them.Corey: It's surprising to me how far that gets you. I mean, I guess I'm always reminded of that Tom Hanks movie from my childhood Big where he wakes up—the kid wakes up as an adult one day, goes to work, and bluffs his way into working at a toy company. He's in a management meeting and just they're showing their new toy they're going to put out there and he's, “I don't get it.” Everyone looks at him like how dare you say it? And, “I don't get it. What's fun about this?” Because he's a kid.And he wants to getting promoted to vice president because wow, someone pointed out the obvious thing. And so often, it feels like using a tool or a product, be it open-source or enterprise, it is clearly something different in my experience of it when I try to use this thing than the person who developed it. And very often it's that I don't see the same things or think of the problem space the same way that the developers did, but also very often—and I don't mean to call anyone in particular out here—it's a symptom of a terrible user interface or user experience.Anaïs: What you've just said, a lot of times, it's just about saying the thing that nobody that dares to say or nobody has thought of before, and that gets you obviously, easier, further [laugh] then repeating what other people have already mentioned, right? And a lot of what you see a lot of times in these—also an open-source projects, but I think more even in closed-source enterprise organizations is that people just repeat whatever everybody else is saying in the room, right? You don't have that as much in the open-source world because you have more input or easier input in public than you do otherwise, but it still happens that I mean, people are highly similar to each other. If you're contributing to the same project, you probably have a similar background, similar expertise, similar interests, and that will get you to think in a similar way. So, if there's somebody like, like a high school student maybe, somebody just graduated, somebody from a completely different industry who's looking at those tools for the first time, it's like, “Okay, I know what I'm supposed to do, but I don't understand why I should use this tool for that.” And just pointing that out, gets you a response, most of the time. [laugh].Corey: I use Twitter and use YouTube. And obviously, I bias more for short, pithy comments that are dripping in sarcasm, whereas in a long-form video, you can talk a lot more about what you're seeing. But the problem I have with bad user experience, particularly bad developer experience, is that when it happens to me—and I know at a baseline level, that I am reasonably competent in technical spaces, but when I encounter a bad interface, my immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, I'm dumb. And this thing is for smart people.” And that is never, ever true, except maybe with quantum computing. Great, awesome. The Hello World tutorial for that stuff is a PhD from Berkeley. Good luck if you can get into that. But here in the real world where the rest of us play, it's just a bad developer experience, but my instinctive reaction is that there's stuff I don't know, and I'm not good enough to use this thing. And I get very upset about that.Anaïs: That's one of the things that you want to do with any technical documentation is that the first experience that anybody has, no matter the background, with your tool should be a success experience, right? Like people should look at it, use maybe one command, do one thing, one simple thing, and be like, “Yeah, this makes sense,” or, like, this was fun to do, right? Like, this first positive interaction. And it doesn't have to be complex. And that's what many people I think get wrong, that they try to show off how powerful a tool is, of like, oh, “My God, you can do all those things. It's so exciting, right?” But [laugh] ultimately, if nobody can use it or if most of the people, 99% of the people who try it for the first time have a bad experience, it makes them feel uncomfortable or any negative emotion, then it's really you're approaching it from the wrong perspective, right?Corey: That's very apt. I think it's so much of whether people stick with something long enough to learn it and find the sharp edges has to do with what their experience looks like. I mean, back when I was more or less useless when it comes to anything that looked like programming—because I was a sysadmin type—I started contributing to SaltStack. And what was amazing about that was Tom Hatch, the creator of the project had this pattern that he kept up for way too long, where whenever anyone submitted an issue, he said, “Great, well, how about you fix it?” And because we had a patch, like, “Well, I'm not good at programming.” He's like, “That's okay. No one is. Try it and we'll see.”And he accepted every patch and then immediately, you'd see another patch come in ten minutes later that fixed the problems in your patch. But it was the most welcoming and encouraging experience, and I'm not saying that's a good workflow for an open-source maintainer, but he still remains one of the best humans I know, just from that perspective alone.Anaïs: That's amazing. I think it's really about pointing out that there are different ways of doing open-source [laugh] and there is no one way to go about it. So, it's really about—I mean, it's about the community, ultimately. That's what it boils down to, of you are dependent, as an open-source project, on the community, so what is the best experience that you can give them? If that's something that you want to and can invest in, then yeah [laugh] that's probably the best outcome for everybody.Corey: I do have one more question, specifically around things that are more timely. Now, taking a quick look at Trivy and recent features, it seems like you've just now—now-ish—started supporting cloud scanning as well. Previously, it was effectively, “Oh, this scans configuration and containers. Okay, great.” Now, you're targeting actually scanning cloud providers themselves. What does this change and what brought you to this place, as someone who very happily does not deal with AWS?Anaïs: Yeah, totally. So, I just started using AWS, specifically to showcase this feature. So, if you look at the Aqua Open Source YouTube channel, you will find several tutorials that show you how to use that feature, among others.Now, what I mentioned earlier in the podcast already is that Trivy is really versatile, it allows you to scan different aspects of your stack at different stages of your development lifecycle. And that's made possible because Trivy is ultimately using different open-source projects under the hood. For example, if you want to scan your infrastructure-as-code misconfigurations, it's using a tool called tfsec, specifically for Terraform. And then other tools for other scanning, for other security scanning. Now, we have—or had; it's going to be probably deprecated—a tool called CloudSploit in the Aqua open-source project suite.Now, that's going to, kind of like, the functionality that CloudSploit was providing is going to get converted to become part of Trivy, so everything scanning-related is going to become part of Trivy that really, like, once you understand how Trivy works and all of the CLI commands in Trivy have exactly the same structure, it's really easy to scan from container images to infrastructure-as-code, to generating s-bombs to scanning also now, your cloud infrastructure and Trivy can scan any of your AWS services for misconfigurations, and it's using basically the AWS client under the hood to connect with the services of everything you have set up there, and then give you the list of misconfigurations. And once it has done the scan, you can then drill down further into the different aspects of your misconfigurations without performing the entire scan again, since you likely have lots and lots of resources, so you wouldn't want to scan them every time again, right, when you perform the scan. So, once something has been scanned, Trivy will know whether the resource changed or not, it won't scan it again. That's the same way that in-classes scanning works right now. Once a container image has been scanned for vulnerabilities, it won't scan the same container image again because that would just waste time. [laugh]. So yeah, do check it out. It's our most recent feature, and it's going to come out also to the other cloud providers out there. But we're starting with AWS and this kind of forced me to finally [laugh] look at it for the sake of it. But I'm not going to be happy. [laugh].Corey: No, I don't think anyone is. It's every time I see on a resume that someone says, “Oh, I'm an expert in AWS,” it's, “No you're not.” They have 400-some-odd services now. We have crossed the point long ago, where I can very convincingly talk about AWS services that do not exist to Amazonians and not get called out for it because who in the world knows what they run? And half of their services sound like something I made up to be funny, but they're very real. It's wild to me that it is a sprawling as it is and apparently continues to work as a viable business.But no one knows all of it and everyone feels confused, lost, and overwhelmed every time they look at the AWS console. This has been my entire career in life for the last six years, and I still feel that way. So, I'm sure everyone else does, too.Anaïs: And this is how misconfigurations happen, right? You're confused about what you're actually supposed to do and how you're supposed to do it. And that's, for example, with all the access rights in Google Cloud, something that I'm very familiar with, that completely overwhelms you and you get super frustrated by, and you don't even know what you give access to. It's like, if you've ever had to configure Discord user roles, it's a similar disaster. You will not know which user has access to which. They kind of changed it and try to improve it over the past year, but it's a similar issue that you face in cloud providers, just on a much larger-scale, not just on one chat channel. [laugh]. So.Corey: I think that is probably a fair place to leave it. I really want to thank you for spending as much time with me as you have talking about the trials and travails of, well, this industry, for lack of a better term. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Anaïs: So, I have a weekly DevOps newsletter on my blog, which is anaisurl—like, how you spell U-R-L—and then dot com. anaisurl.com. That's where I have all the links to my different channels, to all of the resources that are published where you can find out more as well. So, that's probably the best place. Yeah.Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the show notes. I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you have been. Thank you.Anaïs: Thank you for having me. It was great.Corey: Anaïs, open-source developer advocate at Aqua Security. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry, insulting comment that I will never see because it's buried under a whole bunch of minor or false-positive vulnerability reports.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing
[Ep124] - Google Shares Insights On Factors That Determine Which Content Is Indexed

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 15:30


1. Quick Updates - Meta Provides New Insights Into How its Video Distribution Algorithms Work Meta Invites Applications for the Third Phase of its ‘Community Accelerator' Program Instagram Best Practices For Recommended Content Twitter Shares New Insight into the Value of Utilizing Ad Format Combinations in Your Tweet Marketing Google Updates Privacy Threshold For Analytics Search Queries Report Danny Sullivan at Google Tweets That “Helpful Content” Is WIP 2. Twitter ‘Circles' Option Is Available To All Users - Because sometimes your Tweets aren't for everyone add up to 150 people to yours and use it. “Before you post on Twitter, you'll now see an option to share your Tweet with either your circle or your full followers list. Circles can contain up to 150 people, and you can adjust who's in and who's out at any time. Don't worry, no one will be notified of any changes you make to your circle.” Members of Circle will be alerted that their tweets are only viewable by those in the group via a green indicator attached to each Circle tweet.3. Microsoft Ads Re-extends RSA Migration To Feb. 2023 - In April,2022 Microsoft extended the original June 30 deadline to August 29. Now Microsoft has announced that they are extending that deadline to February 1, 2023. Microsoft says the extension is in response to advertisers need for more time. Expanded Text Ads (ETAs) will continue to serve with RSAs but advertisers will no longer be able to create new or edit existing ETAs.You can read the announcement here.4. Google Wants You To Add Product Information To Your Business Profiles! - Google has added a new section for products to the Google Business Profile guidelines. The section says "If you run a retail business, you can show nearby shoppers what you sell by adding your in-store products to your Business Profile at no charge." You can either add products to your Business Profile manually through the Product Editor or with Pointy - a hardware device that is free from Google and sits in the middle of  your barcode scanner and point of sale system so that it can add your products to Google.Products submitted via Product Editor or Pointy must adhere to the Shopping Ads Policy. Google does not allow content related to regulated products and services, including alcohol, tobacco products, gambling, financial services, pharmaceuticals and unapproved supplements, or health/medical devices. Submitting products that violate Google's policy may result in removal of the entire product catalog, including products that aren't in violation.You can read the guidelines over here.5. 4 New Features In Google Shopping Campaign - Google just announced four new features for advertisers to implement in their ad campaigns and merchant feeds.  Conversion value rules for store sales and store visits - Advertisers can now set store visits or sales default values at the campaign level. Before this update, Google Ads applied conversion value rules equally to all conversion actions. In addition to setting specific conversion values for store visits and sales, you can select the values at the campaign level. If you're running multiple campaigns promoting store visits, you can assign a higher value to one than the other. Additionally, you can set rules for store visits or sales on the conditions of geographic location, audiences, or devices. The ability to adjust values by location or device means you can increase the value of store visits for customers in New York versus customers in other areas, for example. You can set conversion value rules by logging in to your Google Ads account and navigating to Measurement > Conversions > Value rules. Then, click create conversion value rule and fill in the required information. Product-specific insights - Product-specific insights are available at the account level and help advertisers spot underperforming offers, identify products with missing feed attributes, and compare bidding with your top competitors. Product insights work on shopping and Performance Max campaigns and are intended to leverage ads performance data to optimize products and provide visibility on what actions to take to fix issues. Deals Content API - The Deals Content API is intended to make uploading and managing deals easier at scale. Merchants and advertisers can now add their sales and promotions to their listings via the Content API, which makes it even easier for merchants to upload and manage their deals at scale. Shipping & Returns Annotations - Merchants will now be able to list the expected delivery date (dynamic) (“Delivery by XX/YY”) and free returns right on their ads. Advertisers can also easily add their return policies. 6. Google Publishes 6 SEO Tips For E-commerce Websites - Alan Kent, a Developer Advocate at Google, shared six SEO tips that combine structured data and Merchant Center to get the most out of your website's presence in search results. Ensure Products Are Indexed - Googlebot can miss pages when crawling a site if they're not linked to other pages. On ecommerce sites, for example, some product pages are only reachable from on-site search results. You can ensure Google crawls all your product pages by utilizing tools such as an XML sitemap and Google Merchant Center. Creating a Merchant Center product feed will help Google discover all the products on your website. The product page URLs are shared with the Googlebot crawler to use as starting points for crawls of additional pages potentially. Check Accuracy Of Product Prices Search Results - If Google incorrectly extracts pricing data from your product pages, it may list your original price in search results, not the discounted price. To accurately provide product information such as list price, discounts, and net price, it's recommended to add structured data to your product pages and provide Google Merchant Center with structured feeds of your product data. This will help Google extract the correct price from product pages. Minimize Price & Availability Lag - Google crawls webpages on your site according to its own schedule. That means Googlebot may not notice changes on your site until the next crawl. These delays can lead to search results lagging behind site changes, such as a product going out of stock. It would be best if you aimed to minimize inconsistencies in pricing and availability data between your website and Google's understanding of your site due to timing lags. Google recommends utilizing Merchant Center product feeds to keep pages updated on a more consistent schedule. Ensure Products Are Eligible For Rich Product Results - Eligibility for rich product results requires the use of product structured data. To get the special rich product presentation format, Google recommends providing structured data on your product pages and a product feed in Merchant Center. This will help ensure that Google understands how to extract product data to display rich results. However, even with the correct structured data in place, rich results are displayed at Google's discretion. Share Local Product Inventory Data - Ensure your in-store products are found by people entering queries with the phrase “near me.” First, register your physical store location in your Google Business Profile, then provide a local inventory feed to Merchant Center. The local inventory feed includes product identifiers and store codes, so Google knows where your inventory is physically located. As an additional step, Google recommends using a tool called Pointy. Pointy is a device from Google that connects to your in-store point-of-sale system and automatically informs Google of inventory data from your physical store. The data is used to keep search results updated. Sign Up For Google Shopping Tab - You may find your products are available in search results but do not appear in the Shopping tab. If you're unsure whether your products are surfacing in the Shopping tab, the easiest way to find out is to search for them. Structured data and product feeds alone aren't sufficient to be included in the Shopping tab. To be eligible for the Shopping tab, provide product data feeds via Merchant Center and opt-in to ‘surfaces across Google.' For more on any of the above tips, see the full video from Google.7. Google Shares Insights On Factors That Determine Which Content Is Indexed - Gary Illyes and Martin Splitt from Google recently published a podcast discussing what's known as a crawl budget and what influences Google to index content. Gary Illyes said that the concept of a crawl budget was something created outside of Google by the search community and most sites don't need to worry about the crawl budget. According to Gary, part of the calculation for a crawl budget is based on practical considerations like how many URLs does the server allow Googlebot to crawl without overloading the server. Another interesting point that was made was how, in relation to crawling, there are different considerations involved. There are limits to what can be stored so, according to Google, that means utilizing Google's resources “where it matters.” It all boils down to the  issue of “spending our resources where it matters.”Because Google can't index everything, it tries to index only the content that matters and how frequently it is updated. "Google can infer from a site overall which areas they might need to crawl more frequently. E.g. if there's a blog subdirectory & there are signals that it's popular/important, then Google might want to crawl there more." " And it's not just update frequency, it's also about quality. E.g. if G sees a certain pattern is popular (folder), & people are talking about it & linking to it, then it's a signal that ppl like that directory,"Listen to the podcast here.

Oracle Groundbreakers
Emily Jiang Rethinks Microservices and Builds Cloud Native Apps

Oracle Groundbreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 21:43


JavaOne 2022 Speaker Preview In this conversation Oracle's Jim Grisanzio talks with Java developer and JavaOne 2022 speaker Emily Jiang from the UK. Emily is a Java Champion and Developer Advocate. She's doing three sessions at JavaOne in October on microservices and cloud native development and she previews them in this discussion. She also talks about her experiences with the Java community and JavaOne.  JavaOne 2022 from October 17-20 in Las Vegas JavaOne 2022: Registration and Sessions JavaOne 2022 Updates at Inside Java Emily Jiang, Developer Advocate, IBM  @emilyfhjiang Java Development and Community OpenJDK Inside Java Dev.Java @java on Twitter Java on YouTube Duke's Corner Podcast Host Jim Grisanzio, Oracle Java Developer Relations, @jimgris

COMPRESSEDfm
Content Creation and Cloudinary With Colby Fayock

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 43:03


Colby Fayock joins the show to talk about his developer background, experience as a Content Creator, and his role as a Developer Advocate at Cloudinary.SponsorsDaily.devdaily.dev is where developers grow together. It provides a community-based feed of the best developer news, helping you stay up-to-date. daily.dev aggregates hundreds of sources every few minutes and creates a personal feed for you according to your interests, whether it's web dev, data science, or Elixir. Anything you might be interested in, it has the content for you.Check out daily.devHashnodeCreating a developer blog is crucial in creating an online presence for yourself. It's proof of work for your future employer. Hashnode makes it easy to start a blog in seconds on your custom domain for free. It's fully optimized for developers and supports writing in Markdown, rich embeds, publishing from GitHub repository, syntax highlighting, and edge caching with Next.js blogs deployed on Vercel. On top of these, Hashnode is free from paywall, ads, and sign-up prompts.Hashnode is a community of developers, engineers, and people in tech. Your article gets instant readership from their growing community.Check out Hashnode, and join the community.Show Notes00:00:00 - Intro00:00:58 - Colby's Intro and Background00:03:01 - Colby Background and Content Creation00:06:16 - Wordpress Development and Why It's Still Relevant00:09:23 - Favorite Wordpress Hosts00:11:50 - Security Concerns with Wordpress as a Headless CMS00:12:57 - Headless eCommerce00:16:26 - Thought Leadership and Being an "Influencer"00:18:05 - Creating Accessible Content00:21:48 - How We Plan Content00:22:35 - Updating Outdated Content00:25:45 - Colby's Role as Developer Advocate at Cloudinary00:28:17 - Cloudinary Features00:32:24 - Cloudinary and Wordpress Integration00:39:50 - Colby's Astro Brand Explained00:40:57 - Community Shoutouts00:41:42 - Colby Rant on Moving Past Your Initial Barrier to Entry

Google Cloud Platform Podcast
GKE Turns 7 with Tim Hockin

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 38:04


Tim Hockin joins Kaslin Fields and Anthony Bushong to celebrate GKE's seventh birthday! Tim starts with a brief background on GKE from its beginnings in 2015 and its relationship to Borg to the visions Google developers had for the software. GKE is meant to help companies focus on what they're good at and leave the rest to Google's managed Kubernetes service. Tim talks about his acting gig in a Kubernetes documentary, including some fun facts about Kubernetes' early days and the significance of the number seven. Over time, the teams working on open source Kubernetes and GKE have worked together, with advances in the open source software influencing updates in GKE. Kubernetes 1.25 was released the day this episode was recorded, and Tim describes how much work and thought goes into building these updates. GKE offers GCP users unique ways to leverage Kubernetes tools like scaling, and Tim shares stories about the evolution of some of these tools and his experiences with networking. Talking with the Kubernetes community has helped refine GKE mult-icluster tools to help companies solve real problems, and Tim tells us more about other features and updates coming with future iterations of GKE. KubeCon is in October, so come by and learn more! Tim Hockin Tim Hockin is Principal Software Engineer working with Kubernetes at Google Cloud. Cool things of the week What's new with Google Cloud blog Power Your Business with Modern Cloud Apps: Strategies and Best Practices site Securing apps for Googlers using Anthos Service Mesh blog Interview GKE site Kubernetes site Anthos site Borg: The Predecessor to Kubernetes blog Enabling multi-cluster Gateways docs Cloud Load Balancing site Multi-cluster Services docs Keynote: From One to Many, the Road to Multicluster- Kaslin Fields, Developer Advocate, Google Cloud video GCP Podcast Episode 272: GKE Turns Six with Anthony Bushong, Gari Singh, and Kaslin Fields podcast What's something cool you're working on? Kaslin is working on NEXT and KubeCon stuff. Anthony is working on GKE Essentials and getting ready to go on leave. Hosts Kaslin Fields and Anthony Bushong

AWS Developers Podcast
Episode 049 – Starting a Career in Cloud Computing with Linda Haviv

AWS Developers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 40:26


In this episode, Dave and Emily chat with Linda Haviv, a Developer Advocate at Amazon Web Services. Linda has a large social media following on both TikTok and Instagram, where she covers numerous AWS and cloud concepts, offers advice to people looking to start a cloud career, and highlights many other members of the developer community. Linda shares her journey from being a full-time journalist, how she found a love a tech, and the decision she made to start a developer career. She offers plenty of advice to new developers ramping up, the importance of meetups and community, as well as tips for passing AWS certifications. Linda on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lindavivah Linda on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lindavivah Linda on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lindavivah/ Linda's Medium: https://medium.com/@LindaVivah Linda's Website: https://lindavivah.com/ Emily on Twitter: https://twitter.com/editingemily Dave on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thedavedev [BLOG] What is AWS in 60 secs: https://medium.com/@LindaVivah/what-is-aws-in-60-seconds-ec88edaa750c [BLOG] Linda's Working from Home Setup: https://lindavivah.com/my%20wfh%20setup [BLOG] Six Years Later: Was Flatiron School Worth It for Linda https://www.coursereport.com/blog/six-years-later-was-flatiron-school-worth-it-for-linda Credits - Frozen 2 - Into the Unknown Clip – Performed by Peter Hollens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpC9r3TspCI Subscribe: Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/f8bf7630-2521-4b40-be90-c46a9222c159/aws-developers-podcast Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/aws-developers-podcast/id1574162669 Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zb3VuZGNsb3VkLmNvbS91c2Vycy9zb3VuZGNsb3VkOnVzZXJzOjk5NDM2MzU0OS9zb3VuZHMucnNz Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7rQjgnBvuyr18K03tnEHBI TuneIn: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Technology-Podcasts/AWS-Developers-Podcast-p1461814/ RSS Feed: https://feeds.soundcloud

A Bootiful Podcast
Fellow Java Champion and TimescaleDB developer advocate Christoph Engelbert

A Bootiful Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 81:07


Hi, Spring fans! In this installment, Josh Long (@starbuxman) talks to fellow Java Champion and TimescaleDB developer advocate Christoph Engelbert (@noctarius2k) about PostgreSQL, Java, time series databases, observability, and so much more.

COMPRESSEDfm
74 | So you want to be a Developer Advocate?

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 63:49


In this episode, James shares all the juicy details about Developer Relations / Developer Advocacy / Technical Evangelism and all the things that happen behind the scenes.SponsorsZEALZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit codingzeal.comVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes0:00 Introduction2:50 "Not" Parenting Rant3:56 Spending Time with Remix5:14 Remix vs Next.js7:09 Remix vs Next.js Article9:01 How James Got His First Developer Advocacy Role12:10 Sponsor: Vercel13:18 Working at Microsoft as a Technical Evangelist18:17 Why Content Creation is Important19:54 Difference Between Technical Evangelism and Developer Advocacy22:05 Tech Is More Than Just Software Development23:00 Sponsor: DatoCMS23:54 Moving to New York City24:50 The Impact of Student Hackathons27:22 James Meets Tom Holland31:04 Learn Build Teach31:28 Speaking in Public34:20 Sponsor: ZEAL35:05 Technical Experience at FedEx40:10 Transitioning Back to Developer Advocacy42:23 Downside of Developer Advocacy47:34 Grab Bag Questions47:46 What are two challenges faced by developer advocates?42:10 What has been the hardest challenge when building a community and how did you address it? What do you like the most and the least about Developer Advocacy?55:44 What advice would you give to become a Developer Advocate?56:36 How much time do you spend building stuff versus marketing versus documentation?58:14 Picks and Plugs52:24 James's Pick: Ryobi Battery Powered Weed-Eater1:00:10 James's Pick: James Q Quick on YouTube 01:00:21 Amy's Pick - Book: Story Worthy01:01:15 Amy's Plug: SelfTeach.me on Twitch

The Unicorn Finders
TUF w/Polygon - Allowing Web3 to be Accessible

The Unicorn Finders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 31:12


We caught up with Rahat Chowdhury, Developer Advocate at Polygon. If you want to learn more about Polygon check them out at https://polygon.technology/ If you enjoy the episode...review the pod for us and like and share! Connect with us on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/theunicornfinders/

Do the Woo - A WooCommerce Podcast
Taking On a WooCommerce Integration with David Henriquez

Do the Woo - A WooCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 48:48


David Henriquez from Klaviyo shares his story with WooCommerce and WordPress and insights on building an integration for WooCommerce.

Azure DevOps Podcast
Damian Brady: GitHub Actions - Episode 206

Azure DevOps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 37:14


Damian Brady is a Developer Advocate at GitHub. He's a developer, speaker, and author specializing in DevOps, MLOps, developer process, and software architecture. Formerly a Cloud Advocate at Microsoft for four years, and before that, a dev at Octopus Deploy and a Microsoft MVP, he has a 20-plus year background in software development and consulting in a broad range of industries. In Australia, he co-organized the Brisbane .Net User Group and launched the annual DDD Brisbane conference.   Topics of Discussion: [2:45] How does Damian describe the landscape between Microsoft and GitHub? [4:12] What is it about automated development that jazzes Damian up? [5:57] Damian describes the lay of the land with GitHub Actions. [10:39] Does GitHub have a package repository? [14:19] For your build, you can keep them as just artifacts that are for that particular workflow, or you can create a package and put it into one of those package repositories for later retrieval. [14:25] Damian talks about the transition to deploying to the first pre-production environment in your chain. [19:12] What do the non-secret variables look like? [22:09] To what extent is there still overlap from Azure, and how does it deviate? [26:22] There are two options: there are actions that are in the marketplace, and then you can also run your own scripts. [30:10] Damian and his team are building around a pretty core experience where you have a project that you're deploying to multiple environments. [34:24] How is Octopus Deploy similar? How is it different?   Mentioned in this Episode: Architect Tips — New video podcast! Azure DevOps Clear Measure (Sponsor) .NET DevOps for Azure: A Developer's Guide to DevOps Architecture the Right Way, by Jeffrey Palermo — Available on Amazon! Jeffrey Palermo's YouTube Jeffrey Palermo's Twitter — Follow to stay informed about future events! Damian Brady On DevOps for Data Science and Machine Learning Chris Patterson on Github Actions   Want to Learn More? Visit AzureDevOps.Show for show notes and additional episodes.

The MongoDB Podcast
Ep. 122 The Intern Episode, Part 2

The MongoDB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 20:58


In this special episode, Developer Advocate intern Cedric Clyburn speaks with other interns at MongoDB about their experience and focus areas. Conversation highlights: [01:18] Natalie Chwalk, Campus Recruiting Program Manager[05:43] Rohan Chhaya, Developer intern[09:03] Sahi Muthyala, Atlas Growth Team intern[13:43] Paul Romo, Marketing intern

Roaring Elephant
Episode 309 – Infra as Code: People and Learnings with Rosemary Wang

Roaring Elephant

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 23:59


Today we are joined by our special guest Rosemary Wang, Developer Advocate at HashiCorp and author of the book "Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and practices" and the topic is, quite obviously: Infrastructure as Code. In this last episode with Rosemary, we end with the required people skills and some lessons learned! Head over to the Manning Publications website for more information about Rosemary's book: "Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices" Please use the Contact Form on this blog or our twitter feed to send us your questions, or to suggest future episode topics you would like us to cover.

Scaling Developer Success by Peritus.ai
Scaling Developer Success with Joe Karlsson, Developer Advocate at Viam

Scaling Developer Success by Peritus.ai

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 24:55


DevRel has evolved over the past few years and in this podcast we are talking to the groundbreaking thought leaders who are paving the way for people and organizations who want to follow DevRel best practices. To many people, Developer Relations is the community management for technical audiences, but for others it's a lot more. It's building relationships and fostering trust, it's collecting and relaying feedback to other teams or it's inspiring people to build tools to empower.This week's guest is Joe Karlsson, Developer Advocate at Viam.LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joekarlsson/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/JoeKarlsson1 

Remote Ruby
Gem Mining & Advice on Mentoring Developers

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 62:04


[00:02:46] Andrew tells us about being on the Rubber Duck Dev Show livestream with Collin Jilbert. [00:05:14] Have you ever used Alfred? Andrew fills us in on the app and Raycast. [00:12:15] Chris explains the “gem mining” he's been doing.[00:16:38] Andrew and Chris chat about using SQLite.[00:20:41] Andrew asks Chris if he ever thinks how much extra code it is to have to support all these different things. Chris explains why he doesn't think it be a whole lot. [00:23:20] We find out when Chris is evaluating these types of decisions, if he ever tries to write performance tests, benchmarks, or something to evaluate those assumptions and he explains how he thinks about performance in a gem. [00:27:04] Andrew mentions since RBS is becoming better with more integrations and more tools, he asks Chris if he's ever considered adding some typing support.[00:31:30] We hear about an issue Andrew had when rewriting their checkout at Podia and Chris tells us about an issue he ran into with Stripe. They also talk about issues they were having with the new element on Google Pay, Apple Pay, and Afterpay.[00:37:39] Andrew does a shoutout to CJ, Developer Advocate at Stripe, who helped him with some things that weren't working for Andrew and his team, and Chris tells us why he likes Stripe so much. [00:39:12] Chris tells us about his first job as a Rails developer, Andrew shares one more thing about Stripe that they do that's cool, and Chris shares something related to bank accounts on Stripe and the demos they have.[00:43:50] Find out the story about Bruce Wayne. [00:46:15] If you're using RBS, want to talk about it and what's happening in the RBS world, Chris and Andrew would love to talk with you. [00:47:28] Chris does a shout out to firstrubyfriend.org, and if you're a Junior or want to be a Ruby Developer, go to this website.[00:48:25] Andrew and Chris go in depth about mentors and mentees, they explain how there's a lot more aspects to being a developer than coding, and why it's so important to take initiative if you are a mentee. [00:59:57] Andrew highlights something Chris said about promoting the community as a mentor.Panelists:Chris OliverAndrew MasonSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Chris Oliver TwitterAndrew Mason TwitterJason Charnes TwitterRubber Duck Dev Show Episode 51 with Andrew Mason and Collin JilbertAlfred RaycastSQLiteStripeCJ Avilla TwitterFirst Ruby FriendRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar Twitter

API Intersection
DevRel Deep Dive: Measuring impact & where your devs should be feat. Rizel Scarlett, Developer Advocate at GitHub

API Intersection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 22:35


Developer relations (DevRel) is an increasingly rising industry, growing as a reflection of software's ubiquity in the business world — and the growing power of the developer to influence what products and platforms their employers use.But, what makes a good Developer Advocate and strong DevRel program? This week on the API Intersection podcast, we chatted with Rizel Scarlett, Developer Relations Engineer at Github, to get her opinion on how to measure a DevRel program's success and different platforms Developer Advocates can utilize to reach the developer community.Do you have a question you'd like answered, or a topic you want to see in a future episode? Let us know here: stoplight.io/question/

Roaring Elephant
Episode 308 – Infra as Code: Building Blocks with Rosemary Wang

Roaring Elephant

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 25:59


Today we are joined by our special guest Rosemary Wang, Developer Advocate at HashiCorp and author of the book "Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and practices" and the topic is, quite obviously: Infrastructure as Code. In this second episode with Rosemary, we continue with move information on the components you'll likely need. Head over to the Manning Publications website for more information about Rosemary's book: "Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices" Please use the Contact Form on this blog or our twitter feed to send us your questions, or to suggest future episode topics you would like us to cover.

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #22158: MacVoices Live! - Apple At The Top of the Brand Value Heap (Again) (3)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 30:31


This MacVoices Live! discussion concludes with more on the Kantar designation of Apple as the world's most valuable brand. The panel of Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Jay Miller, Jim Rea, Jeff Gamet, Mark Fuccio, and Andrew Orr debate the methodology, but not the result, of that designation and how such designations are used in business. (Part 3)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by The MacVoices Slack. Available to silver, gold, and platinum Patrons of MacVoices. Sign up at Patreon.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Links: Kantar Brandz 2022 report finds Apple the world's most valuable brand on 9to5Mac What are the most valuable global brands in 2022? on Kantar   Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com.Andrew Orr is a freelance writer and amateur photographer and Contributing Editor at AppleInsider. He loves Apple products and enjoys writing and sharing all things tech. When he's not writing about Apple, you can often find him snapping photos with his iPhone. Follow him on Twitter or sample his musical tastes on Apple Music…if you dare. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter.   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22158: MacVoices Live! - Apple At The Top of the Brand Value Heap (Again) (3)

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 30:32


This MacVoices Live! discussion concludes with more on the Kantar designation of Apple as the world's most valuable brand. The panel of Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Jay Miller, Jim Rea, Jeff Gamet, Mark Fuccio, and Andrew Orr debate the methodology, but not the result, of that designation and how such designations are used in business. (Part 3)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by The MacVoices Slack. Available to silver, gold, and platinum Patrons of MacVoices. Sign up at Patreon.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Links: Kantar Brandz 2022 report finds Apple the world's most valuable brand on 9to5Mac What are the most valuable global brands in 2022? on Kantar   Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com.Andrew Orr is a freelance writer and amateur photographer and Contributing Editor at AppleInsider. He loves Apple products and enjoys writing and sharing all things tech. When he's not writing about Apple, you can often find him snapping photos with his iPhone. Follow him on Twitter or sample his musical tastes on Apple Music…if you dare. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter.   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

Sustain
Episode 131: Bolaji Ayodeji on Open Source Community Africa (OSCA)

Sustain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 38:49


Guest Bolaji Ayodeji Panelists Richard Littauer | Justin Dorfman | Ben Nickolls Show Notes Hello and welcome to Sustain! The podcast where we talk about sustaining open source for the long haul. Today, our guest is Bolaji Ayodeji, who's a Software Engineer, Content Creator, Community Engineer, and currently works as a Developer Advocate at Commerce Layer. Bolaji is a member of the Sustain community and has done so much with Open Source Community Africa (OSCA). Our conversations take us through learning how Bolaji got into open source, being a part of the OSCA community and the Sustain Africa session, and what OSCA is all about. We'll also hear about the communities and companies that are part of OSCA, things we can do to help the next generation of open source contributors and developers from African nations, and Bolaji highlights two Sustain sessions that he thought were really cool and what he enjoyed most about them. Go ahead and download this episode now! [00:01:39] Bolaji tells us how he got into open source. [00:03:05] We learn how Bolaji ended up being a part of the OSCA community and how his experience was joining them. [00:04:20] At the OSCA event there was a giant Sustain track, so Bolaji talks about how that happened and what happened there. [00:09:04] Now that there's been a few events that happened, Bolaji fills us in on how the conversation has been evolving, and he tells us about DataFest in Africa. [00:12:47] Justin talks about Bolaji's blog and his tutorials around data science and he wonders if he's giving any talks about data visualization and if there's any organizations he's working with that he can take their data and visualize it to the community. [00:15:30] We hear about the communities and companies that are part of OSCA. [00:18:21] Find out how many people came to OSCA this year, and how many people that attended are working on open source as part of their jobs or in addition to their jobs. [00:20:02] Bolaji shares his views on what we should be doing to ensure the next generation of open source contributors and developers from African nations are incentivized and able to join in that community and contribute. [00:23:16] Richard asks Bolaji if there has been a lot of buy-in about open source from other countries in Africa who've come to OSCA, is there a particular reason open source blossoming in Nigeria, and how is it being spread out to places like Ghana or other countries. [00:25:25] Bolaji explains if there's anything large companies can do in developed nations to help the open source community in Africa. [00:27:22] What sessions was Bolaji most excited about at the Sustain meeting. [00:29:36] When we talk about documentation in OSCA, Richard asks if as a community, Bolaji talks in English or if there's small subgroups which speak in languages also spoken by participants in open source. [00:34:51] Find out where you can follow Bolaji and OSCA on the internet. Quotes [00:26:37] “The same things that people in the western world have access to, Africans also working in open source should also be able to have access too without bias.” Spotlight [00:35:49] Justin's spotlight is his Non-Code Contributor Newsletter. [00:36:21] Ben's spotlights are a blog post by Abdulsamod Azeez on Contributing to Open Source as a Data Scientist, and a list of Open Source Data Science Projects you can contribute to by Aden Haussmann. [00:36:54] Richard's spotlight is Heather Piwowar. [00:37:24] Bolaji's spotlight is TypeScript Error Translator by Matt Pocock. Links SustainOSS (https://sustainoss.org/) SustainOSS Twitter (https://twitter.com/SustainOSS?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) SustainOSS Discourse (https://discourse.sustainoss.org/) podcast@sustainoss.org (mailto:podcast@sustainoss.org) Richard Littauer Twitter (https://twitter.com/richlitt?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) Justin Dorfman Twitter (https://twitter.com/jdorfman?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) Ben Nickolls Twitter (https://twitter.com/benjam?lang=en) Bolaji Ayodeji Twitter (https://twitter.com/iambolajiayo) Bolaji Ayodeji LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/iambolajiayo) Bolaji Ayodeji website (https://www.bolajiayodeji.com/) Commerce Layer (https://commercelayer.io/) Open Source Community Africa (https://oscafrica.org/) Sustain Africa 2022 Community Report (https://blog.oscafrica.org/sustain-africa-2022-community-report) DataFest Africa 2022 (https://datafest.africa/) Sustain Podcast-Episode 122: A conversation with Stefano Maffulli of the OSI (https://podcast.sustainoss.org/guests/maffulli) The Non-Code Contributor- Issue #35 (https://www.getrevue.co/profile/tncc/issues/the-non-code-contributor-issue-35-1192373) Contributing to Open Source as a Data Scientist by Abdulsamond Azeez (https://abdulsamodazeez.com/contributing-to-open-source-as-a-data-scientist) Open-Source Data Science Projects You Can Contribute to Today by Aden Haussmann (https://towardsdatascience.com/open-source-data-science-projects-you-can-contribute-to-today-ee766f4b8494) Heather Piwowar Twitter (https://twitter.com/researchremix?lang=en) TypeScript Error Translator-Git Hub (https://github.com/mattpocock/ts-error-translator) Credits Produced by Richard Littauer (https://www.burntfen.com/) Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Show notes by DeAnn Bahr Peachtree Sound (https://www.peachtreesound.com/) Special Guest: Bolaji Ayodeji.

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #22157: MacVoices Live! - iPhone Repairs, iPhone at 15, Apple Brand Recognition (2)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 34:37


The discussion over Apple's customer repair options for the iPhone was intense as Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Jay Miller, Jim Rea, Jeff Gamet, and Mark Fuccio debated the pros and cons, and how it is being covered by the media in general, and one article in particular. Then, the group turned their attention to the 15th anniversary of the iPhone before starting an examination of Kantar naming Apple the world's most valuable brand (again). (Part 2)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by Zocdoc. Find local doctors who take your insurance at Zocdoc.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Links: I Tried Apple's Self-Repair Program With My iPhone. Disaster Ensued by Brian X. Chen on The New York Times Kantar Brandz 2022 report finds Apple the world's most valuable brand on 9to5Mac What are the most valuable global brands in 2022? on Kantar   Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter.   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

JAMstack Radio
Ep. #106, Blockchain Infrastructure with Anthony Campolo of QuickNode

JAMstack Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 34:23


In episode 106 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Anthony Campolo, a Developer Advocate at QuickNode. This conversation explores blockchain infrastructure and tooling, including built-in governance mechanisms, NFTs, dApps, and cryptography.

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed
Ep. #106, Blockchain Infrastructure with Anthony Campolo of QuickNode

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 34:23


In episode 106 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Anthony Campolo, a Developer Advocate at QuickNode. This conversation explores blockchain infrastructure and tooling, including built-in governance mechanisms, NFTs, dApps, and cryptography.

JAMstack Radio
Ep. #106, Blockchain Infrastructure with Anthony Campolo of QuickNode

JAMstack Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 34:23


In episode 106 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Anthony Campolo, a Developer Advocate at QuickNode. This conversation explores blockchain infrastructure and tooling, including built-in governance mechanisms, NFTs, dApps, and cryptography.

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed
Ep. #106, Blockchain Infrastructure with Anthony Campolo of QuickNode

Heavybit Podcast Network: Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 34:23


In episode 106 of JAMstack Radio, Brian speaks with Anthony Campolo, a Developer Advocate at QuickNode. This conversation explores blockchain infrastructure and tooling, including built-in governance mechanisms, NFTs, dApps, and cryptography.

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22157: MacVoices Live! - iPhone Repairs, iPhone at 15, Apple Brand Recognition (2)

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 34:38


The discussion over Apple's customer repair options for the iPhone was intense as Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Jay Miller, Jim Rea, Jeff Gamet, and Mark Fuccio debated the pros and cons, and how it is being covered by the media in general, and one article in particular. Then, the group turned their attention to the 15th anniversary of the iPhone before starting an examination of Kantar naming Apple the world's most valuable brand (again). (Part 2)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by Zocdoc. Find local doctors who take your insurance at Zocdoc.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Links: I Tried Apple's Self-Repair Program With My iPhone. Disaster Ensued by Brian X. Chen on The New York Times Kantar Brandz 2022 report finds Apple the world's most valuable brand on 9to5Mac What are the most valuable global brands in 2022? on Kantar   Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter.   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

Guidance Counselor 2.0
Episode 160 - The Power of Community w/ Will Johnson

Guidance Counselor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 29:53


On today's episode I'm joined by Will Johnson, Developer Advocate at Auth0, Instructor at Egghead.io and Speaker/Technical Writer. Will and I got connected through Twitter, and he has been such a connector of people. You won't want to miss this episode as we dive into how he got his first job in tech! Like what you hear? Connect with me- Website: www.taylordesseyn.com LinkedIn: Taylor Desseyn Tweet me: @tdesseyn Tik Tok: @tdesseyn Pics of the life, wife, daughter & dog: @tdesseyn

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #22156: MacVoices Live! - Apple Store Unionization, iPhone Customer Repairs (1)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 32:12


The MacVoices Live! panel of Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Jay Miller, Jim Rea, Jeff Gamet, and Mark Fuccio start off discussing the recent vote by an Apple Store's employees to unionize, Apple's response, and what it means for all parties. Then, an article in the New York Times about the do-it-yourself iPhone repair option offered by Apple raised some blood pressures. (Part 1) This edition of MacVoices is supported by Zocdoc. Find local doctors who take your insurance at Zocdoc.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Links: Apple ready to bargain with its first U.S. store to unionize: source on Reuters I Tried Apple's Self-Repair Program With My iPhone. Disaster Ensued by Brian X. Chen on The New York Times Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter.   Support: Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon      http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect: Web:      http://macvoices.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner      http://www.twitter.com/macvoices Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner MacVoices Page on Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/ MacVoices Group on Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice LinkedIn:      https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/ Instagram:      https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes      Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher: Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22156: MacVoices Live! - Apple Store Unionization, iPhone Customer Repairs (1)

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 32:13


The MacVoices Live! panel of Chuck Joiner, David Ginsburg, Jay Miller, Jim Rea, Jeff Gamet, and Mark Fuccio start off discussing the recent vote by an Apple Store's employees to unionize, Apple's response, and what it means for all parties. Then, an article in the New York Times about the do-it-yourself iPhone repair option offered by Apple raised some blood pressures. (Part 1) This edition of MacVoices is supported by Zocdoc. Find local doctors who take your insurance at Zocdoc.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Links: Apple ready to bargain with its first U.S. store to unionize: source on Reuters I Tried Apple's Self-Repair Program With My iPhone. Disaster Ensued by Brian X. Chen on The New York Times Guests: Mark Fuccio is actively involved in high tech startup companies, both as a principle at piqsure.com, or as a marketing advisor through his consulting practice Tactics Sells High Tech, Inc. Mark was a proud investor in Microsoft from the mid-1990's selling in mid 2000, and hopes one day that MSFT will be again an attractive investment. You can contact Mark through Twitter on LinkedIn. Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter.   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

Roaring Elephant
Episode 307 – Infra as Code: Introduction with Rosemary Wang

Roaring Elephant

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 25:17


Today we are joined by our special guest Rosemary Wang, Developer Advocate at HashiCorp and author of the book "Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and practices" and the topic is, quite obviously: Infrastructure as Code. In this first episode with Rosemary, we start with an introduction on the topic. Head over to the Manning Publications website for more information about Rosemary's book: "Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices" Please use the Contact Form on this blog or our twitter feed to send us your questions, or to suggest future episode topics you would like us to cover.

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #22151: Road to Macstock - Jay Miller

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 20:50


“The Road to Macstock” wraps up in a conversation with Jay Miller, who will present something completely new: the importance of developer relations. Jay explains how this will fit into the Macstock agenda, from both the philosophical as well as the “nuts and bolts” perspectives. This edition of MacVoices is supported by MacVoices After Dark, our newest benefit for all Patreon supporters. Uncensored, off-topic, and always off the wall. Show Notes: Links: Macstock Conference & Expo Guests: Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com. Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #22151: Road to Macstock - Jay Miller

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 20:51


“The Road to Macstock” wraps up in a conversation with Jay Miller, who will present something completely new: the importance of developer relations. Jay explains how this will fit into the Macstock agenda, from both the philosophical as well as the “nuts and bolts” perspectives. This edition of MacVoices is supported by MacVoices After Dark, our newest benefit for all Patreon supporters. Uncensored, off-topic, and always off the wall. Show Notes: Links: Macstock Conference & Expo Guests: Jay Miller is a Developer Advocate and Podcaster based in San Diego, Ca. A multipotentialite, Jay enjoys finding unique ways to merge his fascination with productivity, automation, and development to create tools and content to serve the tech community.Hear him on his podcast, Conduit and Youtube.com/kjaymiller or checkout his web site at kjaymiller.com. Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

WPwatercooler - Weekly WordPress Talk Show
EP423 – Converting your site to FSE

WPwatercooler - Weekly WordPress Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 32:00


This week on WPwatercooler we're continuing our series on the Full Site Editor and are joined by Nick Diego who is a Developer Advocate at WP Engine and developer of Block Visibility. We'll be talking with Nick on his journey through using FSE and how people should approach converting their sites to FSE after making the decision to do it. Nick Diego: Builder Basics – Let's Build a Custom Theme (No Coding Required) The Chemical Brothers – Block Rockin' Beats (Official Music Video) Beck – Loser (Official Music Video) Panel Jason Tucker – jasontucker.blog Steve Zehngut – zeek.com Sé Reed – sereedmedia.com Jason Cosper – jasoncosper.com Nick Diego – nickdiego.com

PurePerformance
The State of Cloud Native Security with Anais Urlichs

PurePerformance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 44:26


Security is everyone's business. And as everyone seems to be moving to Cloud Native it's important to understand what the security landscape in k8s, containerized apps, serverless, … looks like.To learn more about this we invited Anais Urlichs (@urlichsanais), Developer Advocate at Aqua Security and CNCF Ambassador of the year 2021. Over the past years Anais has educated thousands of people on cloud native, devops and security on her YouTube Channel.Tune in and learn more about the different approaches to security in cloud native, which open source projects are out there and how her advise on embedding security in your day2day work.Some additional links we discussed can be found here:Anais on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/urlichsanais/Anais on Twitter: https://twitter.com/urlichsanaisTrivy: https://github.com/aquasecurity/trivyWeekly DevOps Newsletter: https://anaisurl.com/WTFisSRE Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zL61AiOaK0Anais's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AnaisUrlichsAqua Open Source YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCb4mfRT5UWpjoUQRcIE2qOQ

CityDAO Podcast | A Community-Governed Crypto City of the Future
27: Women in Crypto, Top Female Leaders, & SurgeWomen.io // Denise Schaefer & Juliette Chevalier

CityDAO Podcast | A Community-Governed Crypto City of the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 45:00


Our CityDAO Podcast episode today focuses on women in crypto. We welcome our guests Juliette Chevalier and Denise Schaefer, Co-Founders of Surge. Concerned by the lack of participation from women within the crypto space, Juliette and Denise decided to build a community with one goal in common: to help each other grow. Software Engineer and programming teacher, Juliette works as a Developer Advocate at Aragon, helping engineers build the future of work through DAOs. She and Denise met online through a Web3 online course, and have been building Surge remotely ever since. Marketing, branding, NFT-enthusiast, Denise came up with the idea for this project after diving into a self-educating crypto journey. She realized the capabilities of Web3 and became passionate about making it more accessible to women everywhere. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/city-dao-podcast/message

Screaming in the Cloud
TikTok and Short Form Content for Developers with Linda Vivah

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:01


Full Description / Show Notes Corey and Linda talk about Tiktok and the online developer community (1:18) Linda talks about what prompted her to want to work at AWS (5:29) Linda discusses navigating the change from just being part of the developer community to being an employee of AWS (10:37) Linda talks about moving AWS more in the direction of short form content, and Corey and Linda talk about the Tiktok algorithm (15:56) Linda talks about the potential struggle of going from short form to long form content (25:21) About LindaLinda Vivah is a Site Reliability Engineer for a major media organization in NYC, a tech content creator, an AWS community builder member, a part-time wedding singer, and the founder of a STEM jewelry shop called Coding Crystals. At the time of this recording she was about to join AWS in her current position as a Developer Advocate.Linda had an untraditional journey into tech. She was a Philosophy major in college and began her career in journalism. In 2015, she quit her tv job to attend The Flatiron School, a full stack web development immersive program in NYC. She worked as a full-stack developer building web applications for 5 years before shifting into SRE to work on the cloud end internally.Throughout the years, she's created tech content on platforms like TikTok & Instagram and believes that sometimes the best way to learn is to teach.Links Referenced:lindavivah.com: https://lindavivah.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We talk a lot about how people go about getting into this ridiculous industry of ours, and I've talked a little bit about how I go about finding interesting and varied guests to show up and help me indulge my ongoing love affair on this show with the sound of my own voice. Today, we're going to be able to address both of those because today I'm speaking to Linda Haviv, who, as of this recording, has accepted a job as a Developer Advocate at AWS, but has not started. Linda, welcome to the show.Linda: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while and there's been a lot of interesting things I learned along the way. You were one of the first people I encountered when I joined the TikToks, as all the kids do these days, and was trying to figure out is there a community of folks who use AWS. Which really boils down to, “So, where are these people that are sad all the time?” Well, it turns out, they're on TikTok, so there we go. We found my people.And that was great. And we started talking, and it turns out that we were both in the AWS community builder program. And we've developed a bit of a rapport. We talk about different things. And then, I guess, weird stuff started happening, in the context of you were—you're doing very well at building an audience for yourself on TikTok.I tried it, and it was—my sense of humor sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. I've had challenges in finding any reasonable way to monetize it because a 30-second video doesn't really give nuance for a full ad read, for example. And you've been looking at it from the perspective of a content creator looking to build the audience slash platform is step one, and then, eh, step two, you'll sort of figure out aspects of monetization later. Which, honestly, is a way easier way to do it in hindsight, but, yeah, the things that we learn. Now, that you're going to AWS, first, you planning to still be on the TikToks and whatnot?Linda: Absolutely. So, I really look at TikTok as a funnel. I don't think it's the main place, you're going to get that deep-dive content but I think it's a great way, especially for things that excite you or get you into understanding it, especially beginner-type audience, I think there's a lot of untapped market of people looking to into tech, or technologists that aren't in the cloud. I mean, even when I worked—I worked as a web developer and then kind of learned more about the cloud, and I started out as a front-end developer and shifted into, like, SRE and infrastructure, so even for people within tech, you can have a huge tech community which there is on TikTok, with a younger community—but not all of them really understand the cloud necessarily, depending on their job function. So, I think it's a great way to kind of expose people to that.For me, my exposure came from community. I met somebody at a meetup who was working in cloud, and it wasn't even on the job that I really started getting into cloud because many times in corporations, you might be working on a specific team and you're not really encountering other ends, and it seems kind of like a mystery. Although it shouldn't seem like magic, many times when you're doing certain job functions—especially the DevOps—could end up feeling like magic. So, [laugh] for the good and the bad. So sometimes, if you're not working on that end, you really sometimes take it for granted.And so, for me, I actually—meetups were the way I got exposed to that end. And then I brought it back into my work and shifted internally and did certifications and started, even, lunch-and-learns where I work to get more people in their learning journey together within the company, and you know, help us as we're migrating to the cloud, as we're building on the cloud. Which, of course, we have many more roles down the road. I did it for a few years and saw the shift. But I worked at a media company for many years and now shifting to AWS, and so I've seen that happen on different ends.Not—oh, I wasn't the one doing the migration because I was on the other end of that time, but now for the last two years, I was working on [laugh] the infrastructure end, and so it's really fascinating. And many people actually—until now I feel like—that will work on maybe the web and mobile and don't always know as much about the cloud. I think it's a great way to funnel things in a quick manner. I think also society is getting used to short videos, and our attention span is very low, and I think for—Corey: No argument here.Linda: —[crosstalk 00:04:39] spending so mu—yeah, and we're spending so much time on these platforms, we might as well, you know, learn something. And I think it depends what content. Some things work well, some things doesn't. As with anything content creation, you kind of have to do trial and error, but I do find the audience to be a bit different on TikTok versus Twitter versus Instagram versus YouTube. Which is interesting how it's going to play out on YouTube, too, which is a whole ‘nother topic conversation.Corey: Well, it's odd to me watching your path. It's almost the exact opposite of mine where I started off on the back-end, grumpy sysadmin world and, “Oh, why would I ever need to learn JavaScript?” “Well, genius, because as the world progresses, guess what? That's right. The entire world becomes JavaScript. Welcome.”And it took me a long time to come around to that. You started with the front-end world and then basically approached from the exact opposite end. Let's be clear, back in my day, mine was the common path. These days, yours is very much the common path.Linda: Yeah.Corey: I also want to highlight that all of those transitions and careers that you spoke about, you were at the same company for nine years, which in tech is closer to 30. So, I have to ask, what was it that inspired you, after nine years, to decide, “I'm going to go work somewhere else. But not just anywhere; I'm going to AWS.” Because normally people don't almost institutionalized lifers past a certain point.Linda: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Oh, you'll be there till you retire or die.” Whereas seeing significant career change after that long in one place, even if you've moved around internally and experienced a lot of different roles, is not common at all what sparked that?Linda: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's such a good question. I always think about that, too, especially as I was reflecting because I'm, you know, in the midst of this transition, and I've gotten a lot of reflecting over the last two weeks [laugh], or more. But I think the main thing for me is, I always, wherever I was—and this kind of something that—I'm very proactive when it comes to trying to transition. I think, even when I was—right, I held many roles in the same company; I used to work in TV production and actually left for three months to go to a coding boot camp and then came back on the other end, but I understood the product in a different way.So, for that time period, it was really interesting to work on the other end. But, you know, as I kind of—every time I wanted to progress further, I always made a move that was actually new and put me in an uncomfortable place, even within the same company. And I'm at the point now that I'm in my career, I felt like this next step really needs to be, you know, at AWS. It's not, like, the natural progression for me. I worked alongside—on the client end—with AWS and have seen so many projects come through and how much our own workloads have changed.And it's just been an incredible journey, also dealing with accounts team. On that end, I've worked alongside them, so for me, it was kind of a natural progression. I was very passionate about cloud computing at AWS and I kind of wanted to take it to that next place, and I felt like—also, dealing with the community as part of my job is a dream part to me because I was always doing that on the side on social media. So, it wasn't part of my day-to-day job. I was working as an SRE and an infrastructure engineer, so I didn't get to do that as part of my day-to-day.I was making videos at 2 a.m. and, you know, kind of trying to, like, do—you know, interact with the community like that. And I think—I come from a performing background, the people background, I was singing since I was four years old. I always go to—I was a wedding singer, so I go into a room and I love making people happy or giving value. And I think, like, education has a huge part of that. And in a way, like making that content and—Corey: You got to get people's attention—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —you can't teach them a damn thing.Linda: Right. Exactly. So, it's kind of a mix of everything. It's like that performance, the love of learning. You know, between you and I, like, I wanted to be a lawyer before I thought I was going to—before I went to tech.I thought I was going to be a lawyer purely because I loved the concept of going to law school. I never took time to think about the law part, like, being the lawyer part. I always thought, “Oh, school.” I'm a student at heart. I always call myself a professional student. I really think that's part of what you need to be in this world, in this tech industry, and I think for me, that's what keeps my fire going.I love to experiment, to learn, to build. And there's something very fulfilling about building products. If you take a step back, like, you're kind of—you know, for me that part, every time I look back at that, that always is what kind of keeps me going. When I was doing front-end, it felt a lot more like I was doing smaller things than when I was doing infrastructure, so I felt like that was another reason why I shifted. I love doing the front-end, but I felt like I was spending two days on an Internet Explorer bug and it just drove me—[laugh] it just made it feel unfulfilling versus spending two days on, you know, trying to understand why, you know, something doesn't run the infrastructure or, like, there's—you know, it's failing blindly, you know? Stuff like that. Like, I don't know, for me that felt more fulfilling because the problem was more macro. But I think I needed both. I have a love for both, but I definitely prefer being back-end. So. [laugh]. Well, I'm saying that now but—[laugh].Corey: This might be a weakness on my part where I'm basically projecting onto others, and this is—I might be completely wrong on this, but I tend to take a bit of a bifurcated view of community. I mean, community is part of the reason that I know the things I know and how I got to this place that I am, so use that as a cautionary tale if you want. But when I talk to someone like you at this moment, where you're in the community, I'm in the community, and I'm talking to you about a problem I'm having and we're working on ways to potentially solve that or how to think about that. I view us as basically commiserating on these things, whereas as soon as you start on day one—and yes, it's always day one—at AWS and this becomes your day job and you work there, on some level, for me, there's a bit shift that happens and a switch gets flipped in my head where, oh, you actually work at this company. That means you're the problem.And I'm not saying that in a way of being antagonistic. Please, if you're watching or listening to this, do not antagonize the developer advocates. They have a very hard job understanding all this so they can explain that to the rest of us. But how do you wind up planning to navigate, or I guess your views on, I guess, handling the shift between, “One of the customers like the rest of us,” to, as I say, “Part of the problem,” for lack of a better term.Linda: Or, like, work because you kind of get the—you know. I love this question and it's something I've been pondering a lot on because I think the messaging will need to be a little different [coming from me 00:10:44] in the sense of, there needs to be—just in anything, you have to kind of create trust. And to create trust, you have to be vulnerable and authentic. And I think I, for example, utilize a lot of things outside of just the AWS cloud topic to do that now, even, when I—you know, kind of building it without saying where I work or anything like that, going into this role and it being my job, it's going to be different kind of challenge as far as the messaging, but I think it still holds true that part, that just developing trust and authenticity, I might have to do more of that, you know? I might have to really share more of that part, share other things to really—because it's more like people come, it doesn't matter how much somet—how many times you explain it, many times, they will see your title and they will judge you for it, and they don't know what happened before. Every TikTok, for example, you have to act like it's a new person watching. There is no series, you know? Like, yes, there's a series but, like, sometimes you can make that but it's not really the way TikTok functions or a short-form video functions. So, you kind of have to think this is my first time—Corey: It works really terribly when you're trying to break it out that way on TikTok.Linda: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Right. Here's part 17 of my 80-TikTok-video saga. And it's, “Could you just turn this into a blog post or put this on YouTube or something? I don't have four hours to spend learning how all this stuff works in your world.”Linda: Yeah. And you know, I think repeating certain things, too, is really important. So, they say you have to repeat something eight times for people to see it or [laugh] something like that. I learned that in media [crosstalk 00:12:13]—Corey: In a row, or—yeah. [laugh].Linda: I mean, the truth is that when you, kind of like, do a TikTok maybe, like, there's something you could also say or clarify because I think there's going to be—and I'm going to have to—there's going to be a lot of trial and error for me; I don't know if I have answers—but my plan is going into it very much testing that kind of introduction, or, like, clarifying what that role is. Because the truth is, the role is advocating on behalf of the community and really helping that community, so making sure that—you don't have to say it as far as a definition maybe, but, like, making sure that comes across when you create a video. And I think that's going to be really important for me, and more important than the prior even creating content going forward. So, I think that's one thing that I definitely feel like is key.As well as creating more raw interaction. So, it depends on the platform, too. Instagram, for example, is much more community—how do I put this? Instagram is much more easy to navigate as far as reaching the same community because you have something, like, called Instagram Stories, right? So, on Instagram Stories, you're bringing those stories, mostly the same people that follow you. You're able to build that trust through those stories.On TikTok, they just released Stories. I haven't really tried them much and I don't play with it a lot, but I think that's something I will utilize because those are the people that are already follow you, meaning they have seen a piece of content. So, I think addressing it differently and knowing who's watching what and trying to kind of put yourself in their shoes when you're trying to, you know, teach something, it's important for you to have that trust with them. And I think—key to everything—being raw and authentic. I think people see through that. I would hope they do.And I think, uh, [laugh] that's what I'm going to be trying to do. I'm just going to be really myself and real, and try to help people and I hope that comes through because that's—I'm passionate about getting more people into the cloud and getting them educated. And I feel like it's something that could also allow you to build anything, just from anywhere on your computer, brings people together, the world is getting smaller, really. And just being able to meet people through that and there's just a way to also change your life. And people really could change their life.I changed my life, I think, going into tech and I'm in the United States and I, you know—I'm in New York, you know, but I feel like so many people in the States and outside of the States, you know, all over the world, you know, have access to this, and it's powerful to be able to build something and contribute and be a part of the future of technology, which AWS is.Corey: I feel like, in three years or whatever it is that you leave AWS in the far future, we're going to basically pull this video up and MST3k came together. It's like, “Remember how naive you were talking about these things?” And I'm mostly kidding, but let's be serious. You are presumably going to be focusing on the idea of short-form content. That is—Linda: Yeah.Corey: What your bread-and-butter of audience-building has been around, and that is something that is new for AWS.Linda: Yeah.Corey: And I'm always curious as to how companies and their cultures continue to evolve. I can only imagine there's a lot of support structure in place for that. I personally remember giving a talk at an AWS event and I had my slides reviewed by their legal team, as they always do, and I had a slide that they were looking at very closely where I was listing out the top five AWS services that are bullshit. And they don't really have a framework for that, so instead, they did their typical thing of, “Okay, we need to make sure that each of those services starts with the appropriate AWS or Amazon naming convention and are they capitalized properly?” Because they have a framework for working on those things.I'm really curious as to how the AWS culture and way of bringing messaging to where people are is going to be forced to evolve now that they, like it or not, are going to be having significantly increased presence on TikTok and other short-form platforms.Linda: I mean, it's really going to be interesting to see how this plays out. There's so much content that's put out, but sometimes it's just not reaching the right audience, so making sure that funnel exists to the right people is important and reaching those audiences. So, I think even YouTube Shorts, for example. Many people in tech use YouTube to search a question.They do not care about the intro, sometimes. It depends what kind of following, it depends if [in gaming 00:16:30], but if you're coming and you're building something, it's like a Stack Overflow sometimes. You want to know the answer to your question. Now, YouTube Shorts is a great solution to that because many times people want the shortest possible answer. Now, of course, if it's a tutorial on how to build something, and it warrants ten minutes, that's great.Even ten minutes is considered, now, Shorts because TikTok now has ten-minute videos, but I think TikTok is now searchable in the way YouTube is, and I think let's say YouTube Shorts is short-form, but very different type of short-form than TikTok is. TikTok, hooks matter. YouTube answers to your questions, especially in chat. I wouldn't say everything in YouTube is like that; depends on the niche. But I think even within short-form, there's going to be a different strategy regarding that.So, kind of like having that mix. I guess, depending on platform and audience, that's there. Again, trial and error, but we'll see how this plays out and how this will evolve. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. 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My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: I feel like there are two possible outcomes here. One is that AWS—Linda: Yeah.Corey: Nails this pivot into short-form content, and the other is that all your TikTok videos start becoming ten minutes long, which they now support, welcome to my TED Talk. It's awful, and then you wind up basically being video equivalent for all of your content, of recipes when you search them on the internet where first they circle the point to death 18 times with, “Back when I was a small child growing up in the hinterlands, we wound—my grandmother would always make the following stew after she killed the bison with here bare hands. Why did grandma kill a bison? We don't know.” And it just leads down this path so they can get, like, long enough content or they can have longer and longer articles to display more ads.And then finally at the end, it's like ingredient one: butter. Ingredient two, there is no ingredient two. Okay. That explains why it's delicious. Awesome. But I don't like having people prolong it. It's just, give me the answer I'm looking for.Linda: Yeah.Corey: Get to the point. Tell me the story. And—Linda: And this is—Corey: —I'm really hoping that is not the direction your content goes in. Which I don't think it would, but that is the horrifying thing and if for some chance I'm right, I will look like Nostradamus when we do that MST3k episode.Linda: No, no. I mean, I really am—I always personally—even when I was creating content these last few years and testing different things, I'm really a fan of the shortest way possible because I don't have the patience to watch long videos. And maybe it's because I'm a New Yorker that can't sit down from the life of me—apart from when I code of course—but, you know, I don't like wasting time, I'm always on the go, I'm with my coffee, I'm like—that's the kind of style I prefer to bring in videos in the sense of, like, people have no time. [laugh]. You know?The amount of content we're consuming is just, uh, bonkers. So, I don't think our mind is really a built for consuming [laugh] this much content every time you open your phone, or every time you look, you know, online. It's definitely something that is challenging in a whole different way. But I think where my content—if it's ten minutes, it better be because I can't shorten it. That's my thing. So, you can hold me accountable to that because—Corey: Yeah, I want ten minutes of—Linda: I'm not a—Corey: Content, not three minutes of content in a ten-minute bag.Linda: Exactly. Exactly. So, if it's a ten-minute video, it would have been in one hour that I cut down, like, meaning a tutorial, a very much technical types of content. I think things that are that long, especially in tech, would be something like, on that end—unless, of course, you know, I'm not talking about, like, longer videos on YouTube which are panels or that kind of thing. I'm talking more like if I'm doing something on TikTok specifically.TikTok also cares about your watch time, so if people aren't interested in it, it's not going to do well, it doesn't matter how many followers you have. Which is what I do like about the way TikTok functions as opposed to, let's say, Instagram. Instagram is more like it gives it to your following—and this is the current state, I don't know if it always evolves—but the current state is, Instagram Reels kind of functions in a way where it goes first to the people that follow you, but, like, in a way that's more amplified than TikTok. TikTox tests people that follows you, but if it's not a good video, it won't do well. And honestly, they're many good videos videos that don't go viral. I'm not talking about that.Sometimes it's also the topic and the niche and the sound and the title. I mean, there's so many people who take a topic and do it in three different ways and one of them goes viral. I mean, there's so many factors that play into it and it's hard to really, like, always, you know, kind of reverse engineer but I do think that with TikTok, things won't do well, more likely if it's not a good piece of content as opposed to—or, like, too long, right? Not—I shouldn't say not good a good piece of content—it's too long.Corey: The TikTok algorithm is inscrutable to me. TikTok is firmly convinced, based upon what it shows me, that I am apparently a lesbian. Which okay, fine. Awesome. Whatever. I'm also—it keeps showing me ads for ADHD stuff, and it was like, “Wow, like, how did it know that?” Followed by, “Oh, right. I'm on TikTok. Nevermind.”And I will say at one point, it recommended someone to me who, looking at the profile picture, she's my nanny. And it's, I have a strong policy of not, you know, stalking my household employees on social media. We are not Facebook friends, we are not—in a bunch of different areas. Like, how on earth would they have figured this out? I'm filling the corkboard with conspiracy and twine followed by, “Wait a minute. We probably both connect from the same WiFi network, which looks like the same IP address and it probably doesn't require a giant data science team to put two and two together on those things.” So, it was great. I was all set to do the tinfoil hat conspiracy, but no, no, that's just very basic correlation 101.Linda: And also, this is why I don't enable contacts on TikTok. You know, how it says, “Oh, connect your contacts?”Corey: Oh, I never do that. Like, “Can we look at your contacts?”Linda: Never.Corey: “No.” “Can we look at all of your photos?” “Absolutely not.” “Can we track you across apps?” “Why would anyone say yes to this? You're going to do it anyway, but I'll say no.” Yeah.Linda: Got to give the least privilege. [laugh]. Definitely not—Corey: Oh absolutely.Linda: Yeah. I think they also help [crosstalk 00:22:40]—Corey: But when I'm looking at—the monetization problem is always a challenge on things like this, too, because when I'm—my guilty TikTok scrolling pleasures hit, it's basically late at night, I just want to see—I want something to want to wind down and decompress. And I'm not about ready to watch, “Hey, would you like to migrate your enterprise database to this other thing?” It's, I… no. There's a reason that the ads that seem to be everywhere and doing well are aimed at the mass market, they're generally impulse buys, like, “Hey, do you want to set that thing over there on fire, but you're not close enough to get the job done? But this flame thrower today. Done.”And great, like, that is something everyone can enjoy, but these nuanced database products and anything else is B2B SaaS style stuff, it feels like it's a very tough sell and no one has quite cracked that nut, yet.Linda: Yeah, and I think the key there—this is, I'm guessing based on, like, what I want to try out a lot—is the hook and the way you're presenting it has to be very product-focused in the sense that it needs to be very relatable. Even if you don't know anything about tech, you need to be—like, for example, in the architecture page on AWS, there's a video about the Emirates going to Mars mission. Space is a very interesting topic, right? I think, a hook, like, “Do want to see how, like, how this is bu—” like, it's all, like, freely available to see exactly [laugh] how this was built. Like, it might—in the right wording, of course—it might be interesting to someone who's looking for fun-fact-style content.Now, is it really addressing the people that are building everyday? Not really always, depends who's on there and the mass market there. But I feel like going on the product and the things that are mass-market, and then working backwards to the tech part of it, even if they learn something and then want to learn more, that's really where I see TikTok. I don't think every platform would be, maybe, like this, but that's where I see getting people: kind of inviting them in to learn more, but making it cool and fun. It's very important, but it feels cool and fun. [laugh]. So.Because you're right, you're scrolling at 2 a.m. who wants to start seeing that. Like, it's all about how you teach. The content is there, the content has—you know, that's my thing. It's like, the content is there. You don't need to—it's yes, there's the part where things are always evolving and you need to keep track of that; that's whole ‘nother type thing which you do very well, right?And then there's a part where, like, the content that already exists, which part is evergreen? Meaning, which part is, like, something that could be re—also is not timely as far as update, for example, well-architected framework. Yes, it evolves all the time, you always have new pillars, but the guide, the story, that is an evergreen in some sense because that guide doesn't, you know, that whole concept isn't going anywhere. So, you know, why should someone care about that?Corey: Right. How to turn on two-factor authentication for your AWS account.Linda: Right.Corey: That's evergreen. That's the sort of thing that—and this is the problem, I think, AWS has had for a long time where they're talking about new features, new enhancements, new releases. But you look what people are actually doing and so much of it is just the same stuff again and again because yeah, that is how most of the cloud works. It turns out that three-quarters of company's production infrastructures tends to run on EC2 more frequently than it tends to run on IoT Greengrass. Imagine that.So, there's this idea of continuing to focus on these things. Now, one of my predictions is that you're going to have a lot of fun with this and on some level, it's going to really work for you. In others, it's going to be hilariously—well, its shortcomings might be predictable. I can just picture now you're at re:Invent; you have a breakout talk and terrific. And you've successfully gotten your talk down to one minute and then you're sitting there with—Linda: [laugh].Corey: —the remainder of maybe 59. Like, oh, right. Yeah. Turns out not everything is short-form. Are you predicting any—Linda: Yep.Corey: Problems going from short-form to long-form in those instances?Linda: I think it needs to go hand-in-hand, to be honest. I think when you're creating any short-form content, you have—you know, maybe something short is actually sometimes in some ways, right, harder because you really have to make sure, especially in a technical standpoint, leaving things out is sometimes—leaves, like, a blind spot. And so, making sure you're kind of—whatever you're educating, you kind of, to be clear, “Here's where you learn more. Here's how I'm going to answer this next question for you: go here.” Now, in a longer-form content, you would cover all that.So, there's always that longevity. I think even when I write a script, and there's many scripts I'm still [laugh] I've had many ideas until now I've been doing this still at 2 a.m. so of course, there's many that didn't, you know, get released, but those are the things that are more time consuming to create because you're taking something that's an hour-long, and trying to make sure you're pulling out the things that are most—that are hook-style, that invite people in, that are accurate, okay, that really give you—explain to you clearly where are the blind spots that I'm not explaining on this video are. So, “XYZ here is, like, the high level, but by the way, there's, like, this and this.” And in a long-form, you kind of have to know the long-form version of it to make the short-form, in some ways, depending on what—you're doing because you're funneling them to somewhere. That's my thing. Because I don't think there should be [crosstalk 00:27:36]—Corey: This is the curse of Twitter, on some level. It's, “Well, you forgot about this corner case.” “Yeah, I had 280 characters to get into.” Like, the whole point of short-form content—which I do consider Twitter to be—is a glimpse and a hook, and get people interested enough to go somewhere and learn more.For something like AWS, this makes a lot of sense. When you highlight a capability or something interesting, it's something relevant, whereas on the other side of it, where it's this, “Oh, great. Now, here's an 8000-word blog post on how I did this thing.” Yeah, I'm going to get relatively fewer amounts of traffic through that giant thing, but the people who are they're going to be frickin' invested because that's going to be a slog.Linda: Exactly.Corey: “And now my eight-hour video on how exactly I built this thing with TypeScript.” Badly—Linda: Exactly.Corey: —as it turns out because I'm a bad programmer.Linda: [laugh]. No, you're not. I love your shit-posting. It's great.Corey: Challenge accepted.Linda: [laugh]. I love what you just mentioned because I think you're hitting the nail on the head when it comes to the quality content that's niche focus, like, there needs to be a good healthy mix. I think always doing that, like, mass-market type video, it doesn't give you, also, the credibility you need. So, doing those more niche things that might not be relevant to everybody, but here and there, are part of that is really key for your own knowledge and for, like, the com—you know, as far as, like, helping someone specific. Because it's almost like—right, when you're selling a service and you're using social media, right, not everybody's going to buy your service. It doesn't matter what business you're in right? The deep-divers are going to be the people that pay up. It's just a numbers game, right? The more people you, kind of, address from there, you'll find—Corey: It's called a funnel for a reason.Linda: Right. Exactly.Corey: Free content, paid content. Almost anyone will follow me on Twitter; fewer than will sign up for a newsletter; fewer will listen to a podcast; fewer will watch a video, and almost none of them will buy a consulting engagement. But ‘almost' and ‘actually none of them,' it turns out is a very different world.Linda: Exactly. [laugh]. So FYI, I think there's—Corey: And that's fine. That's the way it works.Linda: That's the way it works. And I think there needs to be that niche content that might not be, like, the most viral thing, but viral doesn't mean quality, you know? It doesn't. There's many things that play into what viral is, but it's important to have the quality content for the people that need that content, and finding those people, you know, it's easier when you have that kind of mass engagement. Like, who knows? I'm a student. I told you; I'm a professional student. I'm still [laugh] learning every day.Corey: Working with AWS almost makes it a requirement. I wish you luck—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —in the new gig and I also want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me about how you got to this point. And we're all very eager to see where you go from here.Linda: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me. I'm a huge fan, I love your content, I'm an avid reader of your newsletter and I am looking forward to very much being in touch and on the Twitterverse and beyond. So. [laugh].Corey: If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and other assorted nonsense, where's the best place they can go to find you?Linda: So, the best place they could go is lindavivah.com. I have all my different social handles listed on there as well a little bit about me, and I hope to connect with you. So, definitely go to lindavivah.com.Corey: And that link will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:30:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Linda: Thank you, Corey. Have a wonderful rest of the day.Corey: Linda Haviv, AWS Developer Advocate, very soon now anyway. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the like and subscribe buttons, and of course, leave an angry comment that you have broken down into 40 serialized TikTok videos.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.